Working in Poland - Europeans on the intercultural labour market

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Europeans on the Intercultural Labour Market
Lifelong Learning Programme Grundtvig Partnership Project
No: 2013-1-RO1-GRU06-29549 5
Working in Poland
Sławomir Rudziński
Roman Tarnowski
School of Polish for Foreign Students
University of Lodz
Presentation plan
1.
Employment documents (chapter 1)
2.
Looking for a job (chapter 3)
3.
Practices and work habits in Poland (chapter 4)
Employment documents:
CV/motivation letter
There is no one „correct” way to construct a CV/motivation letter!
However, there are general principles for a good CV/motivation letter:
1.
Adapt your to the post you are applying
2.
Concentrate on the essentials (reveal only job-related qualifications and skills)
3.
Be clear and concise (informative, logically ordered, easy to read)
4.
Pay attention to the presentation of your CV/motivation letter (clear layout, not
too long)
5.
Check your CV/motivation letter once you have filled it in (make sure your
spelling and grammar is perfect)
Employment documents:
CV
What information should a CV (résumé) contain?
1.
Personal information (name, address, date of birth, telephone number and
email, photo)
2.
Education and qualifications (education level, degrees, grades unless poor)
3.
Work experience (job/post, period of work, employer, responsabilites, skills
acquired)
4.
Interest and achievements (interest relevant to the job, evidences of
achivement, extraordinary hobbies)
5.
Skills (languages, computing, other job-related skills)
6.
References (employers’ statements)
Employment documents:
CV
Good CV:
Source: https://europass.cedefop.europa.eu/pl/documents/curriculum-vitae/examples
Employment documents:
CV
Poor CV:
Source: http://www.cv-masterclass.com/cv-demo2.html
Employment documents:
motivation (cover) letter
Good motivation letter:
Source: http://motivationalletter.com/category/motivational-letter-for-a-job/
Employment documents:
motivation (cover) letter
Poor motivation letter:
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/worst-cover-letters-2011-10?op=1
Looking for a job in Poland
Who can work in Poland?:
•
EU/EEA citizens and holders of the Card of the Poledo not need a work permit
•
non-EU/EEA citizens generally need to apply for a work permit (which is granted
only if no EU citizen can fill the position)
•
full-time students do not need a permit for some forms of work (summer jobs,
obligatory internship)
•
full-time study graduates do not need a permit
Looking for a job in Poland
Where to look for a job?:
-
public job centres in each major city and region, eg. www.wup.lodz.pl
-
university career centres, eg. www.biurokarier.uni.lodz.pl
-
non-public employment offices, eg.
www.randstad.pl
www.manpower.pl
www.grafton.pl
-
online job services, eg.
www.job-poland.com
www.pracuj.pl
www.gazetapraca.pl
Looking for a job in Poland
What jobs you can find in Poland:
-
generally no demand for foreign workforce (low immigration)
-
regions to look for a job: mostly Warsaw and major cities (high-skilled employees),
rural regions (low-skilled employees)
-
shortage of labour: mostly low-skilled workers (agriculture, construction, house
services)
Looking for a job in Poland
Necessary documents:
-
visa/settlement permit
-
work permit
-
sufficient means to cover the costs of living in Poland
-
certification/proof of pervious work experiecne or job qualifications (doctors,
teachers etc.) translated into Polish
Practices and work habits in Poland
Polish work specificities:
-
Polish langauge required
-
8 hour working day (40 hours a week)
-
no lunch breaks/siestas
-
work contracts (first 1-3-months, then 1-year and finally permanent), popular task
contracts (especially for young employees)
-
retirement when 67 years old
Thank you for your attention!
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