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Nelson Physics 12

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AUTHOR Team
Dan Bruni, B.Sc., M.Sc., B.Ed.
York Catholic District School Board
Greg Dick, B.Sc. (Hons), B.Ed., OCT
Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Jacob Speijer, B.Eng., M.Sc.Ed., P.Eng., OCT
Simcoe County District School Board
Charles Stewart, B.Sc., B.Ed.
Peel District School Board
Senior Program Consultant
Maurice DiGiuseppe, Ph.D.
University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)
Formerly Toronto Catholic District School Board
PROGRAM CONSULTANT
Charles Stewart, B.Sc., B.Ed.
Peel District School Board
8160_FM_pi-vii.indd 1
4/12/12 10:04 AM
Nelson Physics 12
Senior Program Consultant
Maurice DiGiuseppe
Authors
Dan Bruni
Greg Dick
Jacob Speijer
Charles Stewart
Contributing Authors
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Isha DeCoito
Christopher T. Howes
Ron Ricci
Rob Vucic
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Copyright © 2012 by
Nelson Education Ltd.
Student Text and PDF
ISBN-13: 978-0-17-652038-0
ISBN-10: 0-17-625038-4
Student Text
ISBN-13: 978-0-17-650453-3
ISBN-10: 0-17-650453-2
Printed and bound in Canada
2 3 4 15 14 13 12 Portions adapted from
College Physics: Reasoning
and Relationships, First Edition,
Published by Brooks/Cole,
Cengage Learning © 2010.
Nicholas J. Giordano.
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of Physics
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of Physics
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Ontario Institute for Studies in
Education (OISE),
University of Toronto
NEL
8160_FM_pi-vii.indd 3
Safety Consultants
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Association of Ontario (STAO)
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of Ontario (STAO) Safety
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Renfrew County District School Board
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Charles J. Cohen
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Dufferin–Peel Catholic DSB
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Tanenbaum Community Hebrew
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Niagara DSB
Patricia Jones
Ottawa–Carleton DSB
Roche Kelly
Durham DSB
Ron Macnaughton
Peel DSB
Christopher Meyer
Toronto DSB
Dermot O’Hara
Toronto Catholic DSB
Steve Pfisterer
Rockway Mennonite Collegiate
Robert Pickett
Catholic DSB of Eastern Ontario
Ron Ricci
Greater Essex County DSB
Henri van Bemmel
Toronto DSB
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Peel DSB
Glenn Wagner
Upper Grand DSB
Victoria Wraight
Kawartha Pine Ridge Board
of Education
Jim Young
Limestone DSB
Dave Fish
Waterloo Region DSB
Reviewers iii
4/12/12 10:04 AM
Contents
Unit 1 Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Focus on STSE: Applying the Dynamics
of Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Are You Ready?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Chapter 1: Kinematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.1 Motion and Motion Graphs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.2 Equations of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1.3 Displacement in Two Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
1.4 Velocity and Acceleration in Two Dimensions. . . 30
1.5 Projectile Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
1.6 Relative Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Investigation 1.5.1: Investigating Projectile
Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Chapter 1 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Chapter 1 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Chapter 1 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Chapter 2: Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
Forces and Free-Body Diagrams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Newton’s Laws of Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Applying Newton’s Laws of Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Forces of Friction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Explore an Application in Dynamics:
Linear Actuators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
2.6 Physics Journal: The Physics
of Downhill Skiing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Investigation 2.3.1: Static Equilibrium
of Forces. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Investigation 2.4.1: Inclined Plane
and Friction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Investigation 2.4.2: Motion and Pulleys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Chapter 2 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Chapter 2 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Chapter 2 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
iv Contents
8160_FM_pi-vii.indd 4
Chapter 3: Uniform Circular Motion. . . . . . . 106
3.1
Inertial and Non-inertial Frames
of Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Centripetal Acceleration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Centripetal Force. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Rotating Frames of Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Physics Journal: The Physics
of Roller Coasters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Explore an Issue in Dynamics:
Improvements in Athletic Technology. . . . . . . .
Investigation 3.3.1: Simulating Uniform
Circular Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 3.3.2: Analyzing Uniform
Circular Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 3 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
108
114
120
125
131
133
135
136
138
139
140
Unit 1 Task: A New Extreme Sport . . . . . . . . . . 146
Unit 1 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Unit 1 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Unit 2 Energy and Momentum. . . 158
Focus on STSE: Innovations
in Energy Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Are You Ready?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Chapter 4: Work and Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . 162
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Work Done by a Constant Force. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kinetic Energy and
the Work-Energy Theorem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gravitational Potential Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explore an Issue in Energy Generation:
Gravitational Potential Energy
and Hydroelectricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
164
171
177
182
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4.5
4.6
The Law of Conservation of Energy . . . . . . . . . .
Elastic Potential Energy
and Simple Harmonic Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.7 Springs and Conservation
of Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 4.2.1: The Work–Energy
Theorem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 4.5.1: Energy and Pulleys . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 4.7.1: Energy and Springs. . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 4 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
184
192
201
209
210
211
212
213
214
Chapter 5: Momentum and Collisions. . . . . 220
5.1
5.2
Momentum and Impulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conservation of Momentum
in One Dimension. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 Collisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 Head-on Elastic Collisions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 Collisions in Two Dimensions:
Glancing Collisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 Explore Applications of Momentum:
Staying Safe at Every Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 Physics Journal: Momentum
and the Neutrino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 5.2.1: Conservation
of Momentum in One Dimension. . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 5.4.1: Head-on Elastic Collisions. . . . . .
Investigation 5.5.1: Conservation
of Momentum in Two Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
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Focus on STSE: The International
Space Station. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
Are You Ready?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
Chapter 6: Gravitational Fields . . . . . . . . . . 286
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Newtonian Gravitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Orbits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explore Applications
of Gravitational Fields: Satellites. . . . . . . . . . .
Physics Journal: General Relativity. . . . . . . . . . .
288
297
304
306
Investigation 6.1.1: Universal Gravitation . . . . . . . . . . 308
Investigation 6.2.1: Design a Solar System. . . . . . . . . . 309
Chapter 6 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
228
233
240
249
Chapter 6 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Chapter 6 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
Chapter 7: Electric Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
7.1
Properties of Electric Charge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
7.2
Coulomb’s Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
7.3
Electric Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
256
7.4
Potential Difference
and Electric Potential. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
258
259
7.5
Electric Potential and Electric Potential
Energy Due to Point Charges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
7.6
The Millikan Oil Drop Experiment. . . . . . . . . . . 362
254
260
262
263
264
Unit 2 Task: Applications of Energy and
Momentum in Engineering Design. . . . . 270
Unit 2 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Unit 2 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
NEL
Unit 3 Gravitational, Electric,
and Magnetic Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Investigation 7.2.1: Coulomb’s Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Investigation 7.6.1: The Millikan Experiment. . . . . . . 367
Chapter 7 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
Chapter 7 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Chapter 7 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370
Contents v
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Chapter 8: Magnetic Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . 376
8.1
Magnets and Electromagnets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
8.2
Magnetic Force on Moving Charges. . . . . . . . . . 386
8.3
Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying
Conductor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392
8.4
Motion of Charged Particles in
Magnetic Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
8.5
Applications of Electric and
Magnetic Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405
8.6
Explore an Application
in Electromagnetic Fields:
Particle Accelerators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410
Investigation 8.2.1: Observing the Magnetic
Force on a Moving Charge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412
Chapter 8 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Chapter 8 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
Chapter 8 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416
Unit 3 Task: Field Technology in Use. . . . . . . . .422
Unit 3 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424
Unit 3 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426
Unit 4 The Wave Nature
of Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434
Focus on STSE: Light and Interference . . . . . . 435
Are You Ready?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
Chapter 9: Waves and Light. . . . . . . . . . . . 438
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
Properties of Waves and Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refraction and Total Internal Reflection . . . . . .
Diffraction and Interference
of Water Waves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Light: Wave or Particle?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interference of Light Waves:
Young’s Double-Slit Experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explore an Issue in Light-Based
Technology: Should Governments
Restrict Network Access? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vi Contents
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440
444
459
470
Investigation 9.3.1: Properties of Water Waves. . . . . . 487
Investigation 9.3.2: Interference of Waves
in Two Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 9.5.1: Young’s Double-Slit
Experiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 9 Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 9 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 9 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
488
490
492
493
494
Chapter 10: Applications of the Wave
Nature of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
Interference in Thin Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single-Slit Diffraction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Diffraction Grating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electromagnetic Radiation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Polarization of Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explore Applications of Light
Technology: Electromagnetic Waves. . . . . . . . .
10.7 Physics Journal: Light Nanotechnology and
Counterfeit Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.8 Explore an Issue in Light Technology:
Global Positioning Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 10.1.1: Investigating Interference
Using Air Wedges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 10.2.1: Diffraction of Light
Using a Single Slit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 10.3.1: CD and DVD
Storage Capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
502
512
520
526
532
538
540
542
544
545
547
548
549
550
Unit 4 Task: Optical Pattern Analysis . . . . . . . . 556
Unit 4 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 558
Unit 4 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560
477
485
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Unit 5 Revolutions in Modern
Physics: Quantum Mechanics
and Special Relativity. . . . . . . . . . . 568
Focus on STSE: Particle Acceleration
and the Large Hadron Collider. . . . . . . . 569
Are You Ready?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 570
Chapter 11: Relativity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572
11.1
11.2
11.3
The Special Theory of Relativity. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time Dilation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Length Contraction, Simultaneity,
and Relativistic Momentum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11.4 Mass–Energy Equivalence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 11.2.1: Analyzing Relativistic Data. . . .
Chapter 11 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 11 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 11 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
574
580
588
598
604
606
607
608
Chapter 12: Quantum Mechanics. . . . . . . . 614
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
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8160_FM_pi-vii.indd 7
Introducing Quantum Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Photons and the Quantum Theory of Light. . . .
Wave Properties of Classical Particles. . . . . . . . .
Explore an Application in Quantum
Mechanics: Medical Diagnostic Tools. . . . . . .
616
620
632
640
12.5
Physics Journal: Raymond Laflamme and
Quantum Information Theory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12.6 The Standard Model of Elementary Particles. . .
Investigation 12.2.1: The Photoelectric Effect. . . . . . .
Investigation 12.2.2: Determining Planck’s
Constant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigation 12.6.1: Laser Simulation. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 12 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 12 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 12 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
642
644
654
656
657
658
659
660
Unit 5 Task: The Large Hadron Collider:
The World’s Biggest Microscope. . . . . . 666
Unit 5 Self-Quiz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668
Unit 5 Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 670
Appendix A
Skills Handbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679
Appendix B
Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 708
Appendix C
Answers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 714
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 723
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 730
Credits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxx
Contents vii
4/12/12 10:04 AM
UNIT
1
dynamics
oVeRAll
eXpectAtions
• analyze technological devices that
apply the principles of the dynamics of
motion, and assess the technologies’
social and environmental impact
• investigate, in qualitative and
quantitative terms, forces involved in
uniform circular motion and motion in
a plane, and solve related problems
• demonstrate an understanding of the
forces involved in uniform circular
motion and motion in a plane
Big iDeAs
• Forces affect motion in predictable
and quantifiable ways.
• Forces acting on an object will
determine the motion of that object.
• Many technologies that utilize the
principles of dynamics have societal
and environmental implications.
UNiT TASK PrEvIEw
In the Unit Task, you will apply some of the principles of physics
that are used in sports and games. The Unit Task is described in
detail on page 146. As you work through the unit, look for Unit
Task Bookmarks to see how information in the section relates
to the Unit Task.
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Focus on STSE
Applying the Dynamics of Motion
One of the most exciting and dangerous winter sports is the one-person luge (sled),
where athletes race down icy tracks with high banked curves on top of a small luge, as
seen in the image on the facing page.
The thrill of the luge comes from the high levels of speed the athlete can reach. To
help reduce air resistance and reach high speeds, athletes try to be as aerodynamic as
possible by lying down and keeping their heads down and toes pointed. They also wear
specially designed aerodynamic racing helmets and suits and use lightweight luges. In
fact, many racers spend hours in wind tunnels designed to help them find the ideal body
position to minimize drag.
The terrain and the mass of the luge also affect the speed. The steeper the hill, the faster
the luge goes. However, if the luge crashes, the impact will be greater as well. The smoother
the track, the less friction between the ice and the sled, and the faster the luge will go. The
only brakes are the athlete’s feet. Their shoes are covered with treads, like tire treads, to
help protect them from the tremendous amount of friction created by braking.
The most dangerous points on a luge run are the turns and turn combinations, where
circular motion and high velocities buffet the athlete. To maintain speed, the athlete must
find just the right spot on the luge to perfectly balance the opposing forces.
Think about all the different kinds of motion and forces that occur as the luger speeds
down the track. Which forces, if any, do you think have no direct effect on the motion of
the luge? Which forces speed it up or slow it down? Gravity pulls the luger down the track,
but some of this force is balanced by the other forces acting on the luge. For example,
friction between the sled and the track works against gravity.
Questions
1. Which features of the luge and the athlete’s technique help decrease the time
of the run?
2. Why are the turns banked? Explain what you know about the forces acting on the
athlete in the turns.
3. What are the main forces that cause the luge to speed up? When do the largest
accelerations occur?
4. In what direction is the net force on the luge and the athlete when going around a
banked curve? Explain your reasoning.
5. The sport of luging is extremely dangerous. In your opinion, should more stringent
conditions or rules be implemented for luge courses? Explain your reasoning.
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unit
1
Are you ready?
Concepts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
kinematics
Newton’s laws of motion
vectors and scalars
friction
Pythagorean theorem
trigonometric ratios
sine law and cosine law
Concepts Review
1. Two students travel to school by different means. One
takes the bus, and his path includes many turns and stops.
The other student rides her bicycle and travels directly to
school without any stops and turns. Describe each
student’s displacement. K/U C
2. Which object has more acceleration, a jet cruising with a
constant speed of 600 km/h or a baseball player just after
he hits the ball and starts running from rest? K/U
3. Describe a specific case in which an object’s velocity and
acceleration vectors point in opposite directions. K/U C A
4. (a) Some people dry their hands by flicking the water
off (moving the hands rapidly and then stopping
them suddenly). Explain how this action illustrates
one of Newton’s laws of motion.
(b) Explain, using Newton’s laws, how this knowledge
can help you get ketchup out of a glass bottle in the
most efficient way.
(c) Explain, using Newton’s laws, why hitting the
bottom of a ketchup bottle is not the most effective
way to get the ketchup out. Then explain why it
works at all. K/U T/I C A
5. With some effort, a man can push his car to a nearby
service station, even though the car is much more massive
than he is (Figure 1). Describe the forces between the
man and the car. Discuss where friction helps him and
where friction hinders him in this situation. K/U A
Skills
•
•
•
•
•
•
solving for unknown lengths and angles using trigonometry
communicating scientific information clearly and accurately
analyzing graphs
solving motion problems using kinematics equations
drawing free-body diagrams and force diagrams
determining vector components and net force
6. A large football player collides with a smaller football
player during a game. They exert forces on each other
when they collide. K/U A
(a) How do the magnitude and direction of the
forces compare?
(b) Which player is more likely to experience a
greater acceleration? Explain your reasoning.
(c) Explain why football players wear protective
equipment even though it slows them down.
7. You push on a large heavy box with a horizontal and
gradually increasing force. At first, the box does not
move, but eventually it begins to accelerate. K/U T/I C
(a) Which force keeps the box at rest when you start
to push? Describe the magnitude and direction of
this force.
(b) Which forces act on the box when it is moving?
Draw a free-body diagram of the box when it
is moving.
(c) Sketch a simple graph of the force of friction acting
on the box (vertical axis) as a function of the
applied force on the box (horizontal axis). Explain
your reasoning.
8. You slide a dynamics cart up an incline. The cart
moves directly up the ramp and then back down to the
bottom, where you catch it. Sketch the three motion
graphs for the cart when it is moving freely on the
ramp without you exerting an applied force on it.
Justify your reasoning. K/U T/I C
Skills Review
9. A hockey puck slides across the ice, eventually
coming to rest a long distance from where it
was hit. K/U T/I C
(a) Draw a system diagram of the side view of the
puck as it is sliding to the right.
(b) Draw a free-body diagram of the puck.
Figure 1
4 Unit 1 • Dynamics
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Acceleration
Acceleration
10. For many centuries, people believed Aristotle’s
theory of free fall, which said two things: (a) objects
immediately reach a constant velocity after they are
released, and (b) the constant falling velocity depends
on the mass of the object. Describe an investigation
that you could conduct to test the validity of Aristotle’s
claims. K/U T/I C
11. A launcher applies a constant force to several different
masses. An observer measures the acceleration during
the launch for each mass. Which of the graphs in
Figure 2 shows the correct plot of acceleration versus
mass? K/U T/I
Mass
Mass
(c)
Acceleration
(a)
14. A 12 kg mass is pushed by two forces, A and B. Force A
is 55 N [W], and force B is 82 N [E]. K/U T/I
(a) Calculate the net force due to forces A and B on
the mass.
(b) Calculate the acceleration of the mass.
15. Calculate the magnitude of all the forces acting on each
mass below. K/U T/I
(a) A 14 kg mass sits at rest on top of a desk.
(b) A 3.2 kg mass is pulled horizontally across the
floor at a constant velocity with a force of 4.5 N.
(c) A 4.7 kg mass is pushed horizontally forward
by an 8.6 N force, and the mass accelerates at
1.1 m/s2 [forward].
16. A 15 kg mass sits on top of a scale calibrated in newtons.
You push straight down on the mass with a force of 22 N,
and the reading on the scale goes up. K/U T/I
(a) What was the reading on the scale before you
pushed down?
(b) What was the reading on the scale after you
pushed down?
(c) The reading on the scale provides the magnitude of
one of the forces acting on the mass. Which force
is it? Explain your reasoning.
17. Solve for the unknown lengths, a, b, c, and d, in the
right-angled triangles in Figure 3. T/I
a
17 m
52°
25 m
Mass
37°
(b)
K/U
T/I
(a) How far will the boat travel in 15 min?
(b) Determine the net force acting on the boat.
(c) How does the total of all the frictional forces acting
on the boat compare to the applied force of the
water on the boat?
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c
b
Figure 2
12. A storm front moving in approximately a straight
line reaches Toronto at 3:45 p.m. and Peterborough
at 4:30 p.m. the same day. If the storm continues
moving at the same rate, when will it reach Ottawa
(nearly in a line with the other cities)? Peterborough
is 90 km from Toronto, and Ottawa is 220 km from
Peterborough. K/U T/I A
13. A speed boat cruises with a velocity of 41.0 km/h [N].
d
Figure 3
18. Solve for the unknown length, c, and the unknown
angles, x and y, in the scalene triangle in Figure 4.
c
y
T/I
9 cm
x
21°
12 cm
Figure 4
CAREER PATHWAYS Preview
Throughout this unit, you will see Career Links. Go to the Nelson
Science website to find information about careers related to
Dynamics. On the Chapter Summary page at the end of each
chapter, you will find a Career Pathways feature that shows you
the educational requirements of the careers. There are also some
career-related questions for you to research.
Are You Ready? 5
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chApteR
1
Kinematics
How Can Two-dimensional Motion
Be Analyzed?
key concepts
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• solve one-dimensional and
two-dimensional motion
problems involving average
speed and average velocity
• calculate average acceleration
using vector subtraction in
two dimensions
• solve projectile motion problems
using components
• solve relative motion problems
in two dimensions
• conduct an inquiry to observe
projectile motion
An acrobat launched from a cannon at a target, such as the one on the facing
page, is a familiar sight at circuses and fairs around the world. How you see
an acrobat’s trajectory (path) depends on your point of view. Suppose you are
watching the launch outside on a sunny day. As the acrobat leaves the cannon,
passing across your field of view, you notice her shadow on the ground. How
does it appear to move across the ground when the Sun is directly overhead?
Now suppose you are watching from behind the cannon. How would the
motion of the acrobat appear from this point of view?
You may not see an acrobat launched from a cannon very often, but you
do encounter the same type of projectile motion in everyday life. Anything
hurled, pitched, tossed, or otherwise projected with force becomes a projectile. A football spiralling toward the receiver is a projectile, as are fireworks
shot into the air, water squirting from a fountain, and an athlete hurtling over
a high-jump bar.
Although it may seem simple, the study of projectile motion involves many
factors. The acrobat’s landing on the target requires several calculations before
launching from the cannon. She needs to be fired at a specific speed and at a
particular angle. Since gravity will pull her to the ground, she needs to know
how far the cannon will propel her forward and at what point she will begin
her descent so that the target is set up in the right place.
A strong understanding of the physics of motion is necessary in other
situations as well, such as designing ski equipment, hot-air balloons, and GPS
and weather satellites. The physics of motion also plays an integral role in the
everyday world of elevators and traffic, the fun areas of entertainment and
sports, and the serious endeavours of technological innovation and space
exploration. It is as necessary in implementing safety measures as it is in
achieving new horizons in exploration.
STARTiNG PoINTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later, applying
concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. In what direction is the acceleration of the human
cannonball when
(a) inside the cannon during firing?
(b) moving through the air?
3. Which motion values are constant, and which values
change, when the acrobat is moving through the air?
4. How do you think the motion of the shadow across the
ground would look when the Sun is directly overhead?
5. Describe what you think you would see if you watched
the acrobat fired out of the cannon when you were
directly behind the cannon.
2. What kind of trajectory will the acrobat follow after
leaving the cannon?
6
Chapter 1 • Kinematics
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Mini Investigation
Launching Projectiles
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
A2.1
In this activity, you will use a projectile launcher to model
and observe projectile motion.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; projectile launcher;
ball of modelling clay or other soft material
1. Set the projectile launcher to fire at an angle of 458
(Figure 1).
Figure 1
Direct the launcher away from observers into an
obstacle-free area. Obtain your teacher’s permission
before using the launcher.
2. Put on your eye protection, and launch the ball.
3. Watch the path of the ball from different points of view as
it goes up and then falls to the ground.
4. Observe the ball’s trajectory, maximum height, horizontal
distance, and time of flight.
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5. Repeat the activity by launching the ball at several
different angles, including 08, 308, 608, and 908.
A. What happens to the maximum height of the ball as the
launch angle increases? T/I A
B. How does the angle affect the horizontal distance and
the time of flight? T/I A
C. How would you describe the motion of the ball in
(a) the horizontal direction?
(b) the vertical direction? T/I A
introduction
7
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1.1
Figure 1 A highway is a good example
of the physics of motion in action.
kinematics the study of motion without
considering the forces that produce the
motion
dynamics the study of the causes of
motion
scalar a quantity that has magnitude
(size) but no direction
vector a quantity that has both magnitude
(size) and direction
>
position (d ) the straight-line distance
and direction of an object from a reference
point
>
displacement (Dd ) the change in
position of an object
Motion and Motion Graphs
Cars drive by on the street, people walk and cycle past us, and garbage cans blow in
a high wind. From quiet suburbs to busy highways, different kinds of motion happen
all the time during a normal day (Figure 1). We often take this motion for granted,
but we react to it instinctively: We dodge out of the way of objects flying or swerving
toward us. We change our own motion to avoid hitting objects in our way or to get
to school on time.
Kinematics is the study of motion without considering the forces that produce the
motion. Dynamics, which is the topic of study in Chapters 2 and 3, is the study of
the causes of motion. An understanding of kinematics and dynamics is essential in
understanding motion.
Kinematics Terminology
In physics, the terms we use to describe motion—displacement, distance, speed,
velocity, and acceleration—all have specific definitions and equations that connect
them. We can divide the mathematical quantities we use to describe the motion of
objects into two categories: scalars and vectors. Scalars are quantities that have only a
magnitude, or numerical value. Vectors have both a magnitude and a direction.
Position and Displacement
To start, consider motion along a straight line—one-dimensional motion—such as a
hockey puck sliding on a horizontal icy surface. Figure 2(a) shows what a multipleexposure image of a hockey puck in motion might look like. The dots represent
evenly spaced intervals of time. The puck is moving the same distance in each
interval, so the puck is moving at a constant speed. Here, we measure position—the
distance and direction of an object from a reference point—as the distance from the
origin on the horizontal axis to the centre of the hockey puck. For one-dimensional
motion, distance specifies the position of the object. We can use the information in
Figure 2(a) to construct a graph of the puck’s position as a function of time, as shown
in Figure 2(b).> Notice in Figure 2(b) that the distance axis is now vertical as we plot
the position, d , as a function of time, t. In such a position–time plot, it is conventional
to plot time along the horizontal axis. The change in the puck’s position, in one direction, is its displacement. Mathematically, for one-dimensional motion, displacement
is written as
>
>
>
Dd 5 d 2 2 d 1
>
>
where d 1 is the object’s initial position and d 2 is the object’s final position. While
displacement tells us how far an object moves, it does not tell us how fast it moved.
Vectors provide two pieces of information, so we need a specific way of presenting
this information clearly and unambiguously. For example, a displacement of 15 m [E]
clearly identifies a magnitude of 15 and a direction of east.
Velocity v. Time
d (m [right])
v
(a) 0
d
v (m/s [right])
Position v. Time
(b)
t (s)
(c)
0
t (s)
Figure 2 (a) If we took multiple exposures of a hockey puck travelling across an icy surface at a
constant speed, the photo might look like this. (b) Each dot in the graph corresponds to a position of
the puck in (a). (c) The velocity of the puck versus time is a straight line in this case.
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Speed and Velocity
Speed and velocity are related quantities, but they are not the same. Many people
use them interchangeably in everyday language, but strictly speaking this is incorrect in scientific terms. Speed tells how fast an object is moving, and speed is always
a positive quantity or zero. The distance between adjacent dots in Figure 2(a)
shows how far the puck has moved during each time interval. The average speed,
vav , of an object is the total distance travelled divided by the total time to travel
that distance. Speed is a scalar quantity; it does not have a direction. The SI unit
for speed is metres per second (m/s). You can calculate the average speed using
the equation
vav 5
average speed (v av) the total distance
travelled divided by the total time to travel
that distance
Dd
Dt
Velocity, the change in position divided by the time interval, is a vector quantity, so
>
>
it is written with the vector arrow, v . The direction of v indicates the direction of the
motion. In the puck example, the direction of the velocity is to the right. But it could
>
have been negative (motion to the left, toward smaller or more negative values of d )
or even zero. So, velocity can be positive, negative, or zero.
How does an object’s velocity relate to its position? For a particular time interval
that begins at time t1 and ends at time t2, the time interval is Dt 5 t2 2 t1. You can
then calculate the average velocity using the equation
>
velocity (v ) the change in position
divided by the time interval
>
Dd
>
vav 5
Dt
The hockey puck in Figure 2(a) is sliding at a constant speed, so its velocity also
has a constant value, as shown in the velocity–time graph in Figure 2(c). In this case,
the velocity> is positive, which means that the direction of motion is toward increasing
values of d (that is, toward the right).
>
When an object moves with a constant speed, the average velocity, vav—the displacement divided by the time interval for that change—is constant throughout
the motion, and the position–time graph has a constant slope, as in Figure 2(b).
For more general cases, the average velocity is the slope of the line segment that
connects the positions at the beginning and end of the time interval, called the
secant. This is illustrated in the hypothetical position–time graph in Figure 3.
In Tutorial 1, you will solve two simple problems related to average velocity and
average speed.
>
average velocity (vav) the displacement
divided by the time interval for that
change; the slope of a secant on a
position–time graph
secant a straight line connecting two
separate points on a curve
Position v. Time
d (m)
d2
∆d
d1
vav d 2 – d1
∆d
t2 – t1
∆t
∆t
t1
t (s)
t2
Figure 3 The average velocity during the time interval from t1 to t2 is the slope of the dashed line
connecting the two corresponding points on the curve.
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Tutorial 1 Distinguishing between Average Speed and Average Velocity
The following Sample Problem reviews how to calculate average speed and average velocity.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Average Velocity and Average Speed
A jogger takes 25.1 s to run a total distance of 165 m by running
140 m [E] and then 25 m [W]. The displacement is 115 m [E].
(a) Calculate the jogger’s average velocity.
(b) Calculate the jogger’s average speed.
Solution
>
(a) Given: Dd 5 115 m [E]; Dt 5 25.1 s
>
Required: vav
>
Dd
>
Analysis: vav 5
Dt
>
Dd
>
Solution: vav 5
Dt
115 m 3 E 4
5
25.1 s
>
vav 5 4.58 m/s 3 E 4
(b) Given: Dd 5 165 m; Dt 5 25.1 s
Required: vav
Analysis: vav 5
Dd
Dt
Dd
Dt
165 m
5
25.1 s
vav 5 6.57 m/s
Solution: vav 5
Statement: The jogger’s average speed is 6.57 m/s.
Statement: The jogger’s average velocity is 4.58 m/s [E].
Practice
1. A woman leaves her house to walk her dog. They stop a few times along a straight
path. They walk a distance of 1.2 km [E] from their house in 24 min. In another 24 min,
they turn around and take the same path home. Give your answers to the following
questions in kilometres per hour. T/I A
(a) Determine the average speed of the woman and her dog for the entire route.
[ans: 3.0 km/h]
(b) Calculate the average velocity from their house to the farthest position from
the house. [ans: 3.0 km/h [E]]
(c) Calculate the average velocity for the entire route. [ans: 0.0 km/h]
(d) Are your answers for (b) and (c) different? Explain why or why not.
2. A bus driver begins a descent down a steep hill and suddenly sees a deer about to cross
the road. He applies the brakes. During the bus driver’s 0.32 s reaction time, the bus
maintains a constant velocity of 27 m/s [forward]. Determine the displacement of the bus
during the time the driver takes to react. T/I [ans: 8.6 m [forward]]
3. Drivers at the Daytona 500 Speedway in Florida must complete 200 laps of a track that
is 4.02 km long. Calculate the average speed, in kilometres per hour, of a driver who
completes 200 laps in 6.69 h. T/I [ans: 1.20 3 102 km/h]
4. A student in a mall walks 140 m [E] in 55 s to go to his favourite store. The store is not
open yet, so he walks 45 m [W] in 21 s to go to another store. Calculate his
(a) average speed [ans: 2.4 m/s]
(b) average velocity T/I [ans: 1.2 m/s [E]]
5. A delivery truck heads directly south for 62 km, stopping for an insignificant amount
of time, and then travels 78 km directly north. The average speed for the entire trip
is 55 km/h. K/U T/I C
(a) Determine the average velocity for the entire trip in kilometres per hour. [ans: 6.3 km/h [N]]
(b) Why is the average velocity of the truck so much smaller than the average speed?
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Graphical Interpretation of Velocity
Consider another example of one-dimensional motion: a rocket-powered car travelling on a straight, flat road (Figure 4(a)). Assume the car is initially at rest; “initially”
means that the car is not moving when the clock reads zero. At t 5 0, the driver
turns on the rocket engine and the car begins to move forward in a straight-line path.
Figure 4(b) is a motion diagram showing the position of the car at evenly spaced
instants in time. Figure 4(c) shows the corresponding position–time graph for the
car, where again we use dots to mark the car’s position at evenly spaced time intervals. Notice that the dots are not equally spaced along the position axis. Instead, their
spacing increases as the car travels. This means that the car moves farther during
each successive and equal time interval, so the velocity of the car increases with time.
In this example, the car moves toward increasing values of position, so the velocity
is again positive and increases smoothly with time, as shown in Figure 4(d).
(a)
(b)
Velocity v. Time
v (m/s
[forward])
d
0
d (m
[forward])
Position v. Time
t (s)
t (s)
(c)
(d)
Figure 4 (a) In 1997, the rocket-powered Thrust SSC became the first car to break the sound barrier
by travelling at a speed of over 1200 km/h. (b) A time-lapse image of a rocket-propelled car travelling
along a horizontal road might look like this. (c) Position versus time for the rocket-powered car.
(d) The velocity–time graph indicates that the car’s velocity is not constant.
Instantaneous Velocity
Figure 5 is a position–time graph for an object moving a certain displacement over
a short time period. Again, we use dots to mark the position at the beginning and
end of a particular time interval, which starts at t 5 1.0 s and ends at t 5 2.0 s.
The average velocity during this time interval is just the displacement during the
interval divided by the length of the time interval. Figure 5(a) shows that this
average velocity is the slope of the secant connecting the two points on the curve.
Position v. Time
d (m [right])
d (m [right])
Position v. Time
slope 1.0
(a)
instantaneous
velocity at
t 1.5 s
average
vav
velocity
1.5
t (s)
t
1.0
2.0
1.5
t (s)
2.0
(b)
Figure 5 (a) The average velocity during a particular time interval is the slope of the line
connecting the start of the interval to the end of the interval. (b) The instantaneous velocity at a
particular time is the slope of the position–time curve at that time. The instantaneous velocity in
the middle of a time interval is not necessarily equal to the average velocity during the interval.
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tangent a straight line that intersects a
curve at a point and has the same slope
as the curve at the point of intersection
>
instantaneous velocity (v ) the velocity of
an object at a particular instant; the slope
of the tangent to a position–time graph
instantaneous speed (v) the speed
of an object at a particular instant; the
magnitude of the slope of the tangent to a
position–time graph
With this approach, though, we lose the details about what happens in the middle
of the interval. In Figure 5(a), the slope of the position–time curve varies considerably as we move through the interval from t 5 1.0 s to t 5 2.0 s. If we want to get
a more accurate description of the object’s motion at a particular instant within
this time interval, say at t 5 1.5 s, it is better to use a smaller interval. How small
an interval should we use? In Figure 5(b), we consider slopes over a succession of
smaller time intervals. Intuitively, we expect that using a smaller interval will give a
better measure of the motion at a particular instant in time.
From Figure 5(b), we see that as we take smaller and smaller time intervals, we are
actually approximating the slope of the position–time curve at the point of interest
(t 5 1.5 s) using a tangent. A tangent is a straight line that intersects a curve at a point
and has the same slope as the curve at the point of intersection. The slope of a tangent
>
to a position–time curve is called the instantaneous velocity, v , which is the velocity of
an object at a certain instant of time.
In some cases, a moving object changes its speed during its motion, so we need to
clarify the difference between average speed and instantaneous speed: As mentioned
earlier in this section, average speed is the total distance divided by the total time.
Instantaneous speed, v , refers to the speed of an object at any given instant in time and
is defined as the magnitude of the slope of the tangent to a position–time graph.
Moving objects do not always travel with changing speeds. Objects often move at
a steady rate with a constant speed. The difference between the average and instantaneous values can be understood using the analogy of a car’s speedometer. The
speedometer reading gives your instantaneous speed, which is the magnitude of your
instantaneous velocity at a particular moment in time. If you are taking a long drive,
your average speed will generally be different because the average value will include
periods when you are stopped in traffic, accelerating to pass other cars, and so on. In
many cases, such as in discussions with a police officer, the instantaneous value will
CAREER LINK
be of greater interest.
The instantaneous velocity gives a mathematically precise measure of how the
position is changing at a particular moment, making it much more useful than the
average velocity. For this reason, from now on in this textbook we refer to the instan>
taneous velocity as simply the “velocity,” and we denote it by v .
In Tutorial 2, you will analyze a position–time graph, use the graph to determine
average velocity, and then create a velocity–time graph.
Tutorial 2 Working with Motion Graphs
In the following Sample Problem, we will calculate average velocity from a position–time graph.
Then, we will analyze a position–time graph and use the data to make a velocity–time graph.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Average Velocity and Sketching a Velocity–Time Graph
The position–time graph in Figure 6 shows the details of how an
object moved.
(b) Analyze the position–time graph in Figure 6. Use your analysis to
sketch a qualitative velocity–time graph of the object’s motion.
Solution
(a) Given: t1 5 1.0 s; t2 5 2.5 s
>
Required: vav over the interval t1 5 1.0 s to t2 5 2.5 s
>
Analysis: To determine vav between t1 and t2, calculate the
slope of the line between t1 and t2.
12 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 12
t1
d (m [right])
(a) Calculate the average velocity during the time interval
t1 5 1.0 s to t2 5 2.5 s.
Position v. Time
t2
t3
t4
3
2
slope 1
0
0
1
2
3
d2 – d1
t 2 – t1
4
t (s)
Figure 6
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4/2/12 4:17 PM
Solution: Reading the values from the graph,
>
Dd
>
vav 5
Dt
>
>
d2 2 d1
5
t2 2 t1
3.0 m 3 right 4 2 1.0 m 3 right 4
5
2.5 s 2 1.0 s
>
vav 5 1.3 m/s 3 right 4
A t t2, the slope is approximately zero, so v is
near zero.
Between t2 and t3, the object is moving toward smaller
values of position, so the slope of the position–time
curve and, hence, the velocity, are negative. At t3, the
slope is zero, so the velocity is zero.
Finally, at t4, the object is again moving to the right
because d is increasing with time. So, v is again
positive.
Statement: The average velocity during the time interval
t1 5 1.0 s to t2 5 2.5 s is 1.3 m/s [right].
Step 2. A fter estimating the position–time slope at these places,
we can construct a qualitative velocity–time graph.
v (m/s [right])
(b) Step 1. To generate the data for the velocity–time graph,
analyze the motion of the object in Figure 6.
This object is initially moving to the right. The object
reverses direction near 2.5 s (t2) and 4.0 s (t3).
At t1, the slope is large and positive, so v is large and
positive at t1.
t1
t2
t3
t4
t (s)
Practice
t (s)
(a)
d (m)
d (m)
d (m)
1. Examine the position–time graphs in Figure 7. K/U A
(a)In which graph(s) does the velocity increase with time? [ans: (c)]
(b)In which graph(s) does the velocity decrease with time? [ans: (b)]
t (s)
(b)
t (s)
(c)
Figure 7
2. Analyze the graphs in Figure 8. Create a corresponding velocity–time graph for
each graph. T/I C
20
10
0
(a)
0
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8
t (s)
10
5
0
(b)
100
d (m [S])
15
d (m [W])
d (m [E])
30
0
0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0
t (h)
50
0
–50
2
4
6
8
t (h)
(c)
Figure 8
The average velocity is the slope of a secant on a position–time graph. To analyze
the velocity, we take approximate values by drawing lines tangent to the position–time
curve at several places and calculating their slopes. The instantaneous velocity at a
particular time is always equal to the slope of the position–time curve at that time.
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 13
1.1 Motion and Motion Graphs 13
4/2/12 4:17 PM
Acceleration
Acceleration is a measure of how velocity changes with time. The SI unit for acceleration is metres per second squared (m/s2). Sometimes objects move at constant
velocity, but usually the velocities we observe are changing. When an object’s velocity
is changing, that object is accelerating.
We can study acceleration using velocity–time graphs. These graphs display time
values on the horizontal axis and velocity on the vertical axis. Velocity–time graphs
can be useful when studying objects moving with uniform (constant) velocity (zero
acceleration) or uniform acceleration (velocity changing, but at a constant rate). The
velocity–time graphs for both uniform velocity and uniform acceleration are always
straight lines. By contrast, the position–time graph of an accelerated motion is curved.
>
>
When an object’s velocity changes by Dv over time Dt, the average acceleration, aav,
or the change in velocity divided by the time interval for that change, during this
interval is
>
average acceleration (aav) the change
in velocity divided by the time interval for
that change
>
Dv
>
aav 5
Dt
As with velocity, we often need to know
> the acceleration at a particular instant in
time, or the instantaneous acceleration, a . The instantaneous acceleration equals the
slope of the velocity–time graph at a particular instant in time. If the velocity–time
graph is straight during a time interval, then the acceleration is constant. This means
that the instantaneous acceleration is equal to the average acceleration, and we can
omit the subscript “av” in the equation above. You can now apply these concepts by
completing Tutorial 3.
>
instantaneous acceleration (a ) the
acceleration at a particular instant in time
Tutorial 3 Working with Motion Graphs
In the following Sample Problem, we will create an acceleration–time graph from a velocity–time
graph and analyze the graph to determine the maximum acceleration.
Sample Problem 1: Creating an Acceleration–Time Graph and Calculating the Maximum Acceleration
(a)
(b)
Velocity v. Time
end of race
10
start
0
0
10
t (s)
Figure 9
(a) Analyze the velocity–time graph in Figure 9(b). Use your
analysis to make a sketch of an acceleration–time graph of
the sprinter’s motion.
(b) From your acceleration–time graph, determine the maximum
acceleration and the time at which it occurs.
Solution
(a) Step 1. A cceleration is the slope of the velocity–time graph,
so first we must estimate this slope at several
different values of t to be able to graph the sprinter’s
acceleration as a function of time. Figure 9(b) shows
several lines tangent to the velocity–time curve at
various times. The slopes of these tangent lines give
the acceleration. Estimate the slopes.
Step 2. U
se the slope estimations to sketch the acceleration–
time graph. The resulting acceleration–time graph is
only qualitative (approximate). More accurate results
would be possible if we had started with a more
detailed graph of the velocity.
Acceleration v. Time
a (m/s2
[forward])
v (m/s [forward])
Suppose the sprinter in Figure 9(a) is running a 100 m dash.
The sprinter’s time and distance data have been recorded and
used to make the velocity–time graph in Figure 9(b).
10
0
–10
0
10
t (s)
14 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 14
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4/2/12 4:17 PM
(b) The largest value of the acceleration is approximately 11 m/s2.
This occurs near the start of the race, around t 5 1.5 s, when
the sprinter is gaining speed. Note that this is where the slope
of the velocity–time graph is largest. At the end of the race,
as the runner crosses the finish line, he slows down and
eventually comes to a stop with v 5 0.
Practice
C
v (m/s [N])
1. Figure 10 shows a graph of the motion of a car along a straight road. K/U T/I
Velocity v. Time
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
0
2.0
4.0
6.0
t (s)
Figure 10
(a) How can you tell from the graph that the car has a constant acceleration?
(b) Describe the motion of the car.
(c) Determine the acceleration of the car. [ans: 2.0 m/s2 [N]]
v (m/s [forward])
2. Examine the velocity–time graph in Figure 11.
40
30
20
10
0
K/U
C
A
Velocity v. Time
0
2
4
6
t (s)
Figure 11
(a)Determine the average acceleration for the entire trip. [ans: 6 m/s2 [forward]]
(b)Determine the instantaneous acceleration at 3 s and at 5 s. [ans: 6 m/s2 [forward]; 10 m/s2 [forward]]
(c) Draw a reasonable acceleration–time graph of the motion.
v (m/s [forward])
3. Examine the velocity–time graph in Figure 12.
50
40
30
20
10
0
T/I
C
Velocity v. Time
0 1
3
5
t (s)
7
Figure 12
(a) Determine the average acceleration for the entire trip. [ans: 7 m/s2 [backward]]
(b) Determine the instantaneous acceleration at 2 s, 4 s, and 6 s. [ans: 4 m/s2 [backward];
8 m/s2 [backward]; 12 m/s2 [backward]]
(c) Draw a reasonable acceleration–time graph of the motion.
Acceleration is the slope of a velocity–time graph. Therefore, given a velocity–time
graph, we can describe the behaviour of an object’s acceleration. An interesting feature
of the graphs in Sample Problem 1, on page 14, is that the maximum velocity and
the maximum acceleration do not occur at the same time. It is tempting to think that if
the “motion” is large, both v and a will be large, but this notion is incorrect. Acceleration
is the slope—the rate of change—of the velocity versus time. The time at which the rate
of change in velocity is greatest may not be the time at which the velocity itself is greatest.
NEL
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 15
1.1 Motion and Motion Graphs 15
4/2/12 4:17 PM
1.1
Review
Summary
Dd
• The equation for average
speed is vav 5
, and the equation for average
>
Dt
Dd
>
velocity is vav 5
. The slope of an object’s position–time graph gives the
Dt
velocity of the object.
• Acceleration describes how quickly an object’s velocity
changes over time.
>
Dv
>
. The slope of an object’s
The equation for average acceleration is aav 5
Dt
velocity–time graph gives the object’s acceleration.
Questions
16 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 16
8. The position–time graph in Figure 13 represents
the motion of a race car moving along a straight
road. K/U T/I C
Position v. Time
d (m [E])
400
300
200
100
0
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
t (s)
Figure 13
(a) Determine the average velocity for the entire trip.
(b) Determine the average velocity for the last
10 s of the motion. Why are the two average
velocities different?
(c) Determine the instantaneous velocity at 4.0 s,
8.0 s, and 12.0 s.
(d) Sketch a qualitative velocity–time graph for the
motion of the car.
9. Study the graph in Figure 14. K/U T/I C
v (m/s [forward])
1. A cardinal flies east for 2.9 s in a horizontal plane
for a distance of 22 m from a fence post to a bush.
It then flies north another 11 m to a bird feeder
for 1.5 s. T/I
(a) Calculate the total distance travelled.
(b) Calculate the cardinal’s average speed.
(c) Calculate the cardinal’s average velocity.
2. At a sled race practice field in North Bay, Ontario,
a dogsled team covers a single-lap distance of
2.90 km at an average speed of 15.0 km/h. T/I
(a) Calculate the average speed in metres
per second.
(b) Calculate the time, in seconds, needed
to complete the lap.
3. A skater travels straight across a circular pond with
a diameter of 16 m. It takes her 2.1 s. T/I
(a) Determine the skater’s average speed.
(b) How long would it take the skater to skate
around the edge of the pond at the same
average speed?
4. An airplane flies 450 km at a compass heading of
858 for 45 min. T/I
(a) Calculate the airplane’s average speed.
(b) Calculate the airplane’s average velocity.
5. A model rocket accelerates from rest to 96 km/h [W]
in 4.1 s. Determine the average acceleration of
the rocket. T/I
6. A batter hits a baseball in a batting-practice cage.
The ball undergoes an average acceleration of
1.37 3 103 m/s2 [W] in 3.12 3 1022 s before it hits
the cage wall. Calculate the velocity of the baseball
when it hits the wall. T/I A
7. A track runner begins running at the starting whistle
and reaches a velocity of 9.3 m/s [forward] in 3.9 s.
Calculate the runner’s average acceleration. T/I
Velocity v. Time
50
40
start
30
20
10
end of race
0
0 2 4 6 8 10
t (s)
Figure 14
(a) Determine the average acceleration for the
entire trip.
(b) Determine the instantaneous acceleration at
3.0 s, 6.0 s, and 9.0 s.
(c) Sketch a qualitative acceleration–time graph of
the motion.
NEL
4/2/12 4:17 PM
1.2
Equations of Motion
You are driving a car along a road at a constant speed. Suddenly, you see a deer crossing
the road ahead of you (Figure 1). You apply your brakes, slowing the car down. If
you slow down at a constant rate, how far will you travel before you stop? Will you
hit the animal?
To solve this kind of problem, you can use motion graphs. Using these graphs, you
can calculate the distance you would travel while applying the brakes, which is the
braking distance. You can also determine your braking time. The braking time is how
long it takes to stop while applying the brakes.
There is another way to solve the problem, though: using motion equations. Motion
equations relate different variables such as velocity, acceleration, and displacement. In
most cases, it is easier and faster to solve problems using motion equations than by
drawing motion graphs.
For motion with constant acceleration, motion equations relate five variables: the
object’s initial velocity, its final velocity, its acceleration, its displacement, and the
time interval.
Figure 1 Understanding the physics of
motion can help you prevent accidents.
Velocity v. Time
One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration
v
The defining equation for average acceleration is
vf
>
>
vf 2 vi
>
aav 5
Dt
vi
In this section and for all our equations of motion, the acceleration is constant, so we
>
>
will use the symbol a for aav.
Figure 2 shows a velocity–time graph for an object with constant acceleration. The
>
>
object starts with initial velocity vi, accelerates for a time Dt with acceleration a , and
>
ends with final velocity vf . The displacement is equal to the area under the line. The
shape under the line is a trapezoid, and its area is
> 1 >
>
Dd 5 1 vf 1 vi 2 Dt
2
>
Notice that the above equation does not use the variable a . This means we can
combine it with the defining equation for> average acceleration to derive other useful
> >
>
equations. There are five variables (Dt, Dd , vi, vf , and a ), and we can derive equations
that link any four of them.
>
For example, to eliminate vf , we can combine our equations. We can rearrange the
>
defining equation for average acceleration to get vf :
>
>
> vf 2 vi
a5
Dt
>
>
>
vf 5 vi 1 aDt
>
Substituting the above equation for vf into the equation for displacement gives
> 1 >
>
Dd 5 1vf 1 vi 2 Dt
2
1 >
>
>
5 1 1vi 1 aDt2 1 vi 2 Dt
2
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 vi Dt 1 a Dt 2
2
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 17
0
t
∆t
Figure 2 The displacement of an object
is equal to the area under the line on
a velocity–time graph. For constant
acceleration, this shape is a trapezoid.
1.2 Equations of Motion 17
4/2/12 4:17 PM
>
We can use similar substitutions to derive two more equations that eliminate vi and
Dt. The equations of motion for constant acceleration are shown in Table 1. In the
following Tutorial, you will solve motion problems using these kinematics equations.
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
Table 1 The Five Key Equations for Uniformly Accelerated Motion
Variables found
in equation
Variable not
in equation
>
>
>
vf 1 vi
Dd 5 a
bDt
2
>
> >
Dd , Dt, vf, vi
>
a
>
>
>
vf 5 vi 1 a Dt
> > >
vf, vi, a, Dt
>
Dd
Equation 3
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 vi Dt 1 a Dt 2
2
> >
>
Dd , vi, Dt, a
>
vf
Equation 4
v 2f 5 v 2i 1 2aDd
vf, vi, a, Dd
Dt
Equation 5
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 vf Dt 2 a Dt 2
2
> >
>
Dd , vf, Dt, a
>
vi
You can use some of the equations in
Table 1 when you complete the Unit
Task on page 146.
Equation
Equation 1
Equation 2
Tutorial 1 Using the Equations of Motion to Solve for Accelerated Motion
In the following Sample Problems, we will use the kinematics equations to analyze motion.
Sample Problem 1: Solving for Time and Final Velocity
Two cars are at rest on a straight road. Car A starts 120 m
ahead of car B, and both begin moving in the same direction
at the same time. Car A moves at a constant velocity of
7.0 m/s [forward]. Car B moves at a constant acceleration of
2.0 m/s2 [forward]. Calculate how long it will take for car B
to catch up with car A, and calculate the velocities of the
two cars when they meet.
Given: We have two sets of variables, one for each car.
> > > >
We will label them with subscripts A and B: vA i; vB i; aA; aB;
>
>
>
vA i 5 7.0 m/s [forward]; aA 5 0 m/s2; vB i 5 0 m/s;
>
aB 5 2.0 m/s2 [forward]
> >
Required: Dt ; vA f ; vB f
>
1 >
>
Analysis: Using Dd 5 vi Dt 1 a Dt 2, express the displacement
2
of each car using forward as positive, and then relate the two
displacements.
Solution: The displacement of car A from its starting position is
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 viDt 1 aDt 2
2
>
1
Dd A 5 17.0 m/s 3 forward 42 Dt 1 a 102b Dt 2
2
>
Dd A 5 17.0 m/s 3 forward 42 Dt
The displacement of car B from its starting position is
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 viDt 1 a Dt 2
2
>
1
Dd B 5 102 Dt 1 12.0 m/s2 3 forward 42 Dt 2
2
>
Dd B 5 11.0 m/s2 3 forward 42 Dt 2
18 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 18
We want to solve for the time at which car B has caught up with
>
>
car A. That is when Dd B 5 Dd A 1 120 m 3 forward 4 because, for
car B to catch up, it has to cover the initial 120 m separation as
well as the displacement of car A.
>
>
Using our expressions for Dd A and Dd B, we get the following
quadratic equation:
>
>
Dd B 5 Dd A 1 120 m
Dt 2 5 7.0Dt 1 120
ote that we are omitting the units here to keep the equation
N
uncluttered. Rearranging gives the equation below.
Dt 2 2 7.0Dt 2 120 5 0
1Dt 2 152 1Dt 1 8.02 5 0
T here are two solutions: Dt 5 15 and Dt 5 28.0. We want the
positive time value, which is Dt 5 15 s.
S ince car A is not accelerating, the velocity of car A is
>
unchanged: vA i 5 7.0 m/s [forward].
We can determine the final velocity of car B:
>
>
>
vB f 5 vB i 1 aBDt
5 0 1 12.0 m/s2 3 forward 42 115 s2
>
vB f 5 3.0 3 101 m/s 3 forward 4
Statement: Car B catches up with car A after 15 s. When they
meet, the velocity of car A is 7.0 m/s [forward], and the velocity
of car B is 3.0 3 101 m/s [forward].
NEL
4/2/12 4:17 PM
Sample Problem 2: Solving for Time and Displacement
A motorcyclist drives along a straight road with a velocity of
30.0 m/s [forward]. The driver applies the brakes and slows
down at 5.0 m/s2 [backward].
(a) Calculate the braking time.
(b) Determine the braking distance (displacement).
Solution
>
>
(a) Given: vi 5 30.0 m/s [forward]; a 5 5.0 m/s2 [backward];
>
vf 5 0
Required: Dt
vf 2 vi
Analysis: a 5
; the motorcycle is slowing down, so
Dt
make the acceleration negative and the initial velocity positive.
vf 2 vi
Solution: a 5
Dt
vf 2 vi
Dt 5
a
0 m/s 2 30.0 m/s
5
25.0 m/s2
Dt 5 6.0 s
>
>
(b) G
iven: vi 5 30.0 m/s [forward]; a 5 25.0 m/s2 [forward];
Dt 5 6.0 s
>
Required: Dd
>
1 >
>
Analysis: Dd 5 vi Dt 1 aDt 2
2
Solution:
>
1 >
>
Dd 5 viDt 1 aDt 2
2
5 130.0 m/s 3 forward 42 16.0 s2 1
1
125.0 m/s2 3 forward 42 16.0 s2 2
2
5 180.0 m 3 forward 4 2 90.0 m 3 forward 4
>
Dd 5 90.0 m 3 forward 4
Statement: The braking distance is 90.0 m [forward].
Statement: The braking time is 6.0 s.
Practice
1. A motorcyclist is travelling at 15.0 m/s [forward] and applies the brakes. The motorcycle
slows down at 5.0 m/s2 [backward]. T/I A
(a) Determine the motorcycle’s braking distance. [ans: 22 m [forward]]
(b) Compare your answer to (a) to the answer for Sample Problem 2. What do these two
problems indicate about speeding and traffic safety?
2. A man starts at rest and then runs north with a constant acceleration. He travels 120 m in
15 s. Calculate his acceleration. T/I [ans: 1.1 m/s2 [N]]
3. A bus is moving at 22 m/s [E] for 12 s. Then the bus driver slows down at 1.2 m/s2 [W] until
the bus stops. Determine the total displacement of the bus. T/I [ans: 4.7 3 102 m]
4. In a 100.0 m sprint, a runner starts from rest and accelerates to 9.6 m/s [W] in 4.2 s. T/I
(a) Calculate the acceleration of the runner. [ans: 2.3 m/s2 [W]]
(b) Calculate the displacement of the runner. [ans: 2.0 3 101 m [W]]
(c) The runner runs at a constant velocity for the rest of the race. What is the total time? [ans: 13 s]
5. Two football players separated by 42 m run directly toward each other. Football player 1 starts
from rest and accelerates at 2.4 m/s2 [right], and football player 2 moves uniformly
at 5.4 m/s [left]. K/U T/I A
(a) How long does it take for the players to collide? [ans: 4.1 s]
(b) How far does each player move? [ans: player 1: 20 m; player 2: 22 m]
(c) How fast is football player 1 moving when the players collide? [ans: 9.8 m/s]
6. A jet lands on a runway at 110 m/s [forward]. When stopping, the jet can accelerate at
6.2 m/s2 [backward]. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the minimum time for the jet to stop. [ans: 18 s]
(b) What is the minimum safe length for this runway? [ans: 9.8 3 102 m]
(c) Explain why the runway should be much longer than the minimum safe length.
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 19
1.2 Equations of Motion 19
4/26/12 10:14 AM
Freely Falling Objects
free fall the motion of a falling object
where the only force acting on the object
is gravity
When you let go of a ball, it will fall down because Earth’s gravity pulls it down. When
you throw a ball upward, it will move upward for a time, stop, change direction, and
then move downward. In both cases, the ball is moving under the influence of gravity.
An object that is only moving under the influence of gravity is said to be in free fall.
The ball is in free fall when you drop it, and the ball is in free fall when you throw it
upward. Gravity moves objects downward with a constant acceleration of 9.8 m/s2.
This important value is called the acceleration due to gravity, g.
On Earth, other factors affect moving objects, such as air resistance. You will read
more about air resistance in Chapter 2.
Tutorial 2 Using the Equations of Motion for Accelerated Motion Due to Gravity
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Time and Velocity
A ball is thrown from a height of 52 m from the top of a building
with a velocity of 24 m/s straight up.
(a) Determine the velocity of the ball at ground level.
(b) How long does it take for the ball to reach the ground?
Solution
>
>
(a) Given: vi 5 24 m/s [up]; g 5 9.8 m/s2 [down];
>
Dd 5 52 m [down]
>
Required: vf
Analysis: Use v f2 5 v i2 1 2aDd to calculate the final
velocity. Use up as positive and down as negative.
Solution: v f2 5 v i2 1 2aDd
v f2 5 1124 m/s2 2 1 2 129.8 m/s22 1252 m2
vf 5 639.9 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
>
>
>
(b) Given: vi 5 124 m/s; vf 5 –39.9 m/s; g 5 29.8 m/s2
Required: Dt >
>
> vf 2 vi
Analysis: a 5
Dt
>
>
vf 2 vi
Dt 5
>
a
>
>
vf 2 vi
Solution: Dt 5
>
a
1239.9 m/s2 2 1124 m/s2
29.8 m/s2
Dt 5 6.5 s
5
Statement: It takes 6.5 s for the ball to reach the ground.
Since the ball is moving down, use the negative value.
Statement: The velocity of the ball at ground level is
24.0 3 101 m/s, or 4.0 3 101 m/s [down].
Practice
1. An apple is thrown upward from ground level at 22 m/s. Determine the maximum height of
the apple. T/I [ans: 25 m]
2. Calculate the length of time it would take an object to fall 10.0 m if g were one-sixth the
value of Earth’s g (the acceleration due to gravity on the Moon). T/I [ans: 3.5 s]
3. A ball is thrown straight down at 12 m/s toward the ground from a height of 45 m. T/I
(a) How long does it take to land? [ans: 2.0 s]
(b) How fast is the ball moving when it lands? [ans: 32 m/s]
(c) How does your answer to (b) change if the ball is initially thrown at 12 m/s [upward]?
4. In a physics experiment, a ball is released from rest, and it falls toward the ground. The timer
was not paying attention but estimates that it took 1.5 s for the ball to fall the last 32 m. T/I
(a) Calculate the velocity of the ball when it is 32 m above the ground. [ans: 14 m/s [downward]]
(b) Calculate the total displacement of the ball. [ans: 42 m [downward]]
5. Matt tosses a set of keys straight up to Sanjit, who catches them from a window 1.1 s later at
a height of 14 m above the point of release. T/I
(a) Determine the initial velocity of the keys. [ans: 18 m/s [up]]
(b) Determine the velocity of the keys when they were caught. [ans: 7.3 m/s [up]]
20 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
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1.2
Review
Summary
• The five key equations for uniformly accelerated motion, listed in Table 1
on page 18, use the following variables: displacement, initial velocity,
final velocity, acceleration, and time interval.
• Free fall is the motion of an object when it is moving only under the influence
of gravity.
• The acceleration due to gravity on Earth is 9.8 m/s2 [down].
Questions
1. Upon leaving the starting gate, a racehorse
accelerates at a constant 4.1 m/s2 [forward] for 5.2 s.
Determine the horse’s
(a) displacement
(b) final velocity T/I A
2. An electron travelling at 7.72 3 106 m/s [E] enters a
force field that reduces its velocity to 2.46 3 106 m/s [E].
The acceleration is constant. The displacement
during the acceleration is 0.478 m [E]. T/I A
(a) Determine the electron’s acceleration.
(b) Determine the time interval over which the
acceleration occurs.
3. A police officer at rest at the side of the highway
notices a speeder moving at 62 km/h along a
straight level road near an elementary school. When
the speeder passes, the officer accelerates at 3.0 m/s2
in pursuit. The speeder does not notice until the
police officer catches up. T/I A
(a) How long will it take for the officer to catch
the speeder?
(b) How far will they move from the position
where the officer was at rest?
(c) Calculate the speed of the police car
when the officer catches the speeder. Is
this reasonable?
(d) Now assume that the police officer accelerates
until the police car is moving 10.0 km/h faster
than the speeder and then moves at a constant
velocity until the police officer catches up. How
long will it take to catch the speeder? Is this
scenario more reasonable than the scenario
in (c)? Explain your answer.
4. A cliff rises straight up from the Mediterranean Sea.
Explain how you could calculate the height of
the cliff above the sea using a stopwatch and a
small stone. What assumption must you make?
K/U
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 21
T/I
C
A
5. A baseball player throws a ball straight up and then
catches it 2.4 s later at the same height from which
he threw it. Determine
(a) the initial velocity
(b) the maximum height of the ball T/I A
6. You throw a ball straight up into the air at 18 m/s
from a height of 32 m above the ground. T/I
(a) Calculate the time the ball takes to hit
the ground.
(b) Calculate the velocity of the ball when it hits
the ground.
(c) Calculate the maximum height of the ball.
(d) Explain why you cannot use half the time for
(a) to answer (c).
7. A toy rocket starts from rest on the ground and
then accelerates at 39.2 m/s2 [up] for 5.0 s. T/I
(a) Calculate the velocity of the rocket when the
engines stop firing after 5.0 s.
(b) Calculate the maximum height of the rocket.
(c) How long will it take the rocket to hit the ground
from rest at the maximum height and initial rest?
8. When a driver is forced to make a panic stop by
pressing down on the brake as hard as possible,
the car will undergo a large acceleration to stop.
K/U
T/I
A
(a) Copy Table 2 into your notebook. Calculate the
braking distances.
(b) Compare the reaction times, and discuss the
implications, to the driver and to speeding, of
using cellphones while driving.
Table 2
(i)
Acceleration
(m/s2)
Reaction
time (s)
Speed
(km/h)
9.5
0.80
60.0
(ii)
9.5
0.80
120.0
(iii)
9.5
2.0
60.0
Braking
distance (m)
1.2 Equations of Motion 21
4/2/12 4:17 PM
1.3
Displacement in Two Dimensions
So far, you have learned about motion in one dimension. This is adequate for learning
basic principles of kinematics, but it is not enough to describe the motions of objects
in real life. Cars and buses do not always move in a straight line because streets do
not always follow straight lines (Figure 1). Even train tracks change directions, and
airplanes have both vertical and horizontal displacements.
Figure 1 Streets typically change direction, as this image shows. The position of a vehicle on such
streets requires coordinates in more than one dimension.
In this section, you will learn how to combine vectors to describe the position of
an object in two dimensions. From this, you will be able to determine the object’s
two-dimensional displacement using different methods. This basic but important
skill will prepare you for describing two-dimensional velocity and acceleration using
CAREER LINK
vector addition.
Displacement Vectors and Their Properties
In Sections 1.1 and 1.2, you reviewed how some quantities, such as speed, are described
solely in terms of magnitude (scalars), and other quantities, such as displacement and
velocity, are described in terms of both magnitude and direction (vectors).
As with equations, in diagrams and figures an arrow represents a vector quantity.
The arrow’s length indicates the magnitude of the vector (for example, how fast a
car is moving), and the direction of the arrow indicates the direction of the vector
relative to a chosen coordinate system (for example, which way a car is moving). In
most cases, we use reference coordinates that are perpendicular to each other (such as
x and y, or north and east) and then describe the vector in two dimensions with
respect to the coordinate system.
In Sections 1.1 and 1.2, our vector notation described situations in one dimension.
Now that we are describing situations in two dimensions, we need to slightly modify
the notation. For example, suppose you walk 15 m toward the west. Your displacement
will be 15 m [W]. Now suppose you turn and walk 15 m in a direction that is west
358 north. You express this displacement as 15 m [W 358 N] (Figure 2). The direction
[W 358 N] can be read as “point west, and then turn 358 toward north.”
N
15 m
W
35°
E
S
scale
1 cm: 5 m
Figure 2 This scale diagram represents a displacement of 15 m [W 358 N].
22 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
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Determining Total Displacement
Often, we will want to determine the total displacement of an object that has changed
direction during its motion. In such cases, we will treat the object’s linear displacement in each direction as a separate
> vector. Below are three different methods to
determine the total displacement, Dd T: the scale diagram method, the cosine and sine
laws method, and the perpendicular components of a vector method.
The Scale Diagram Method
Representing vectors as arrows is a convenient way to add them together and determine the total displacement. Drawing a scale diagram is the most direct way of doing
this. Simply draw the vectors, making sure that you draw the magnitudes to scale
with respect to each other, and orient their directions correctly with respect to the
coordinate system using a protractor. This approach to solving the problem lacks
accuracy, but it makes it easier to visualize the
> vector addition.
>
Figure 3 shows two displacements, Dd 1 and Dd 2, drawn to scale and added
together. Each vector has a magnitude and a direction, and both the lengths and the
directions of the arrows are important. When you draw each vector, you can choose
where you want to locate the arrow, just as long as it has the same length and the same
direction. If the arrow keeps its properties of magnitude and direction, it is still the
same vector. You can write this addition of vectors as
>
>
>
Dd T 5 Dd 1 1 Dd 2
∆d T
∆d1
∆d2
∆d2
∆d1
>
>
Figure 3 Drawing the tail of Dd 2 at the tip of Dd 1 is a convenient way to add vectors. The total
>
>
>
displacement Dd T equals Dd 1 1 Dd 2.
>
>
>
Note that the > addition> of Dd 1 and Dd 2 and the total displacement Dd T form a
triangle, with Dd 1 and
> Dd 2 directed one way around the triangle (counterclockwise
in this case) and Dd T directed the other way. The triangle concept can be difficult to
understand: Think> of walking
> around a triangle on the ground. The two individual
displacements, Dd 1 and Dd 2, indicate
one way you could walk around the triangle.
>
The total displacement vector, Dd T, indicates the other way you could go. Also note
that the order in which you add the vectors does not matter; that is, the addition
is commutative. As long as you scale the arrows properly, orient them in the right
directions, and add the tail of one vector to the tip of the other, the total displacement
arrow will extend from the tail of the first displacement to the tip of the second displacement. This is true of all vectors, not just displacements. You must also remember
to convert the answer you obtain from the scale diagram back into the actual answer
using the scale.
The Cosine and Sine Laws Method
Another method to determine the sum of two vectors is to use the cosine and sine
laws. These trigonometric relations allow you to calculate the length of the total displacement vector and its angle of orientation with respect to the coordinate system.
This trigonometric method only works when adding two vectors at a time, but the
result is more accurate than that of a scale diagram. In Tutorial 1, you will practise
adding displacement vectors to determine total displacement by drawing scale diagrams and by using trigonometry.
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1.3 Displacement in Two Dimensions 23
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Tutorial 1 Adding Displacement Vectors
This tutorial models two methods of adding two displacement vectors to determine the total
displacement. In Sample Problem 1, you will use the scale diagram method. In Sample Problem 2,
you will use the cosine and sine laws method.
Sample Problem 1: Vector Addition by Scale Diagram
Suppose you walk to a friend’s house, taking a shortcut across
an open field. Your first displacement is 140 m [E 358 N] across
the field. Then you walk 200.0 m [E] along the sidewalk.
Determine your total displacement using a scale diagram.
>
>
Given: Dd 1 5 140 m [E 358 N]; Dd 2 5 200.0 m [E]
>
>
Required: Dd T; the angle for Dd T, u
>
>
>
Analysis: Dd T 5 Dd 1 1 Dd 2. Decide on a scale so that you can
draw each vector to scale with the correct direction with respect
to the coordinate axes.
Solution:
Step 1. Choose a suitable scale. In this case, set the scale so
that 1 cm : 40 m. Then, determine the lengths of the
>
>
arrows for Dd 1 and Dd 2.
N
> 140 m
> 200.0 m
Dd 1:
5 3.5 cm; Dd 2:
5 5.0 cm
40 m/cm
40 m/cm
Step 2. Using a ruler and a protractor, draw the two vectors, placing
>
>
the tail of Dd 2 at the tip of Dd 1, as shown in Figure 4.
N
∆d1 140.0 m
[E 35° N]
35°
∆d2 200.0 m [E]
∆d T 320.0 m [E 14° N]
14°
scale
1 cm: 40 m
E
>
Figure 5 Draw the total displacement vector, Dd T.
∆d2 200.0 m [E]
∆d1 140.0 m
[E 35° N]
>
Step 3. Draw the total displacement vector Dd T from the tail of
>
>
Dd 1 to the tip of Dd 2, measure the length of the vector,
and measure the angle the displacement vector makes
to the horizontal, as shown in Figure 5. The measured
length of the total displacement vector is 8.1 cm.
Convert to metres:
m
8.1 cm 3 40
5 324 m
cm
To two significant digits, the total displacement is 320 m.
The measured angle between east and the total
displacement vector is about 148.
>
Statement: The total displacement Dd T is approximately
320 m [E 148 N].
35°
scale
1 cm: 40 m
E
>
>
Figure 4 Set the scale, and draw vectors Dd 1 and Dd 2.
Sample Problem 2: Vector Addition Using the Cosine and Sine Laws
Using your solution diagram for Sample Problem 1 (Figure 5),
determine the total displacement using the cosine and sine laws.
>
>
Given: Dd 1 5 140 m 3 E 358 N 4 ; Dd 2 5 200.0 m 3 E 4
>
>
Required: Dd T; the angle for Dd T, u
24 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 24
>
>
>
Analysis: Dd T 5 Dd 1 1 Dd 2. To determine the magnitude
of the displacement, use the cosine law. To calculate the
>
angle of Dd T with respect to the horizontal axis E, use
the sine law.
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4/2/12 4:17 PM
Solution: The second displacement is parallel to the E axis,
and u2 1 358 5 1808, so the angle u2 is 1458 (Figure 6).
sin u 3
sin u 2
> 5
>
0 Dd 2 0
0 Dd T 0
>
0 Dd 2 0 sin u 2
sin u 3 5
>
0 Dd T 0
N
∆d2
35°
2 145°
∆d1
3
∆d T
35°
E
Figure 6
a2 5 b 2 1 c 2 2 2bc cos A
> 2
>
>
>
>
0 Dd T 0 5 0 Dd 1 0 2 1 0 Dd 2 0 2 2 2 0 Dd 1 0 0 Dd 2 0 cos u 2
1200.0 m2 1sin 14582
324.8 m
u 3 5 20.78 1one extra digit carried2
5
The angle u between east and the total displacement is therefore
358 2 20.78 5 14.38.
Statement: Using the cosine and sine laws, the displacement is
>
Dd T 5 320 m [E 148 N].
5 1140 m2 2 1 1200.0 m2 2 2 2 1140 m2 1200.0 m2 1 cos 14582
> 2
0 Dd T 0 5 105 473 m2
>
0 Dd T 0 5 324.8 m 1two extra digits carried2
Practice
1. A car starts from a parking lot and travels 1.2 km south and then 3.1 km in a direction
538 north of east. Relative to the parking lot, what is the car’s total displacement? Solve the
problem using the scale diagram method, and express your answer in terms of distance and
an angle. K/U T/I A [ans: 2.3 km [E 348 N]]
2. A boater travels across a river from one point on the western shore to a point 95.0 m south
on the eastern shore. The river is 77.0 m wide as measured directly from west to east.
Calculate the boater’s total displacement. K/U T/I A [ans: 122 m [E 51.08 S]]
3. A helicopter flies 65 km [N 328 E] and then 42 km [E 218 N]. Determine the total displacement
of the helicopter. K/U T/I A [ans: 1.0 3 102 km [E 448 N]]
The Perpendicular Components of a Vector Method
A more straightforward way of adding two or more displacement vectors is to resolve,
or separate, each vector into perpendicular components. For two dimensions, the
perpendicular components of a vector are the parts of the vector that lie along either the
x-axis or the y-axis. This makes it easy to add the components of several vectors that
are all parallel. We obtain the components of the total displacement vector by adding
the parallel displacement components.
To do this, we need to be familiar with obtaining the components of a vector, which
requires trigonometry. For example, suppose you walked a distance of 5.0 km in a
>
direction that is east 378 toward north, or Dd 5 5.0 km [E 378 N], as shown in
Figure 7. In this example, we will use the convention that east and north are positive. To
draw the x-component, you position the tail of the Ddx vector at the origin and make a
vector going east. You draw this one first because it is indicated as the first direction in
[E 378 N]. From the tip of the x-component
you draw the y-component, Ddy, directly
>
north and stop at the tip of Dd , as shown in Figure 7. You draw the y-component
second because it is the second direction listed in [E 378 N]. Then the components of
this vector can be determined using the sine and cosine trigonometric ratios:
opposite
adjacent
sin u 5
cos u 5
hypotenuse
hypotenuse
Ddx
>
0 Dd 0
>
Ddx 5 0 Dd 0 cos u
cos u 5
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 25
Ddy
>
0 Dd 0
>
Ddy 5 0 Dd 0 sin u
component of a vector in two
dimensions, either of the x-vector and
y-vector that are combined into an
overall vector
N
∆d 5.0 km [E 37° N]
∆d y ∆d sin 37°
∆d x ∆d cos E
Figure 7 The displacement vector can
be broken down into its perpendicular
x- and y-components.
sin u 5
1.3 Displacement in Two Dimensions 25
4/2/12 4:17 PM
For the situation described in Figure 7, the components are
>
>
Ddx 5 0 Dd 0 cos u
Ddy 5 0 Dd 0 sin u
5 15.0 km2 1sin 3782
5 15.0 km2 1cos 3782
5 4.0 km
Ddx 5 4.0 km 3 E 4
5 3.0 km
Ddy 5 3.0 km 3 N 4
When drawing these displacement components, be sure to place the tail of the
vertical displacement (Ddy) at the tip of the horizontal component (Ddx). Keep in
mind that θ will not always be the angle between the x-axis and the displacement.
Sometimes, θ will be situated between the y-axis and the displacement. For this
reason, always consider which component is opposite θ and which one is adjacent to
θ to determine the components. To add and subtract vectors using components, you
must first become adept at determining the components of vectors. Tutorial 2 models
how to do this.
Tutorial 2 Determining the Components of a Displacement Vector
This Tutorial shows how to use trigonometry to determine the components of a displacement vector.
Sample Problem 1: Determining Vector Components Using Trigonometry
A polar bear walks toward Churchill, Manitoba. The polar bear’s
displacement is 15.0 km [S 60.08 E]. Determine the components
of the displacement.
>
Given: Dd 5 15.0 km [S 60.08 E]
Required: Ddx ; Ddy
Analysis: Draw the displacement vector, and then use trigonometry
to determine the components. Use east and north as positive.
Solution:
E
∆d 15.0 km [S 60.0° E]
∆d y 60.0°
∆d x
S
>
Ddx 5 1 0 Dd 0 sin u 1positive because the component points east2
5 115.0 km2 1sin 60.082
To check these results, use the magnitudes of the components
to determine the magnitude of the total displacement,
>
0 Dd 0 5 " 1Ddx 2 2 1 1Ddy 2 2, and then calculate the angle using
0 Ddx 0
the equation u 5 tan21 a
b.
0 Ddy 0
>
0 Dd 0 5 " 1Ddx 2 2 1 1Ddy 2 2
5 " 112.99 km2 2 1 17.50 km2 2
>
0 Dd 0 5 15.0 km
0 Ddx 0
u 5 tan21 a
b
0 Ddy 0
5 tan21 a
12.99 km
b
7.50 km
u 5 60.08
The magnitude of the displacement and the angle are the same
as those given in the Sample Problem.
Statement: The components of the polar bear’s displacement are
Ddx 5 12.99 km 1one extra digit carried2
Ddx 5 13.0 km [E] and Ddy 5 7.50 km [S].
>
Ddy 5 2 0 Dd 0 cos u 1negative because the component points south2
5 2 115.0 km2 1cos 60.082
5 27.50 km
Ddy 5 7.50 km 3 S 4
Practice
1.
Determine the perpendicular vector components for each of the following displacements.
(a) 25.0 km [E 45.08 N] [ans: Ddx 5 17.7 km [E]; Ddy 5 17.7 km [N]]
(b) 355 km [N 42.08 W] [ans: Ddx 5 238 km [W]; Ddy 5 264 km [N]]
(c) 32.3 m [E 27.58 S] [ans: Ddx 5 28.7 m [E]; Ddy 5 14.9 m [S]]
(d) 125 km [S 31.28 W] [ans: Ddx 5 64.8 km [W]; Ddy 5 107 km [S]]
26 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 26
T/I
A
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Adding Vectors Algebraically
Now that you know how to separate a vector into its perpendicular components, you
can add two or more displacement vectors by separating each vector into its horizontal
and vertical components. Once you have these components, add all the horizontal
components as one-dimensional vectors (Dd1x 1 Dd2x 1 Dd3x 1 c). Then do the
same with the vertical displacement components (Dd1y 1 Dd2y 1 Dd3y 1 c). In both
cases, you obtain a total component, Ddx and Ddy, in each direction (Figure 8). These
>
components represent the horizontal and vertical components of the total vector Dd T.
y
∆d 2y
∆dy ∆d 1y ∆d 2y
∆d 1y
∆d T
∆d 2
∆d 1
∆d 1x
∆d 2x
∆dx ∆d 1x ∆d 2x
x
Figure 8 To calculate the sum of two vectors, add their components. Here, the x-components
>
>
of Dd 1 and Dd 2 are added to get the total x-component Ddx . The same procedure with the
y-components yields Ddy .
>
The magnitude of Dd T is given by the Pythagorean theorem,
>
0 Dd T 0 5 " 1Ddx2 2 1 1Ddy2 2
and the angle between the total vector and the positive horizontal axis is given by
0 Ddy 0
u 5 tan21 a
b
0 Ddx 0
In Tutorial 3, you will practise adding vectors algebraically.
Tutorial 3 Adding Vectors Algebraically
This Tutorial models how to add vectors algebraically to determine the total displacement.
Sample Problem 1: Determining Displacement by Adding Vectors Algebraically
An airplane flies 250 km [E 258 N], and then flies 280 km [S 138 W].
Using components, calculate the airplane’s total displacement.
>
>
Given: Dd 1 5 250 km [E 258 N]; Dd 2 5 280 km [S 138 W]
>
Required: Dd T
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 27
Analysis: Draw a simple scale vector diagram of each vector,
and determine the corresponding components. Add the
x-components and then the y-components to determine the
total displacement in these directions. Use north and east
as positive, and south and west as negative. Then use the
Pythagorean theorem and the tangent ratio to determine
the total displacement.
1.3 Displacement in Two Dimensions 27
4/2/12 4:17 PM
Solution: For the first vector:
Add the horizontal components:
Ddx 5 Dd1x 1 Dd2x
5 226.6 km 1 1262.99 km2
y
∆d1
∆d 1y ∆d 1 sin x
∆d 1x ∆d 1 cos 25°
Dd1x 5 0 Dd1 0 cos u
5 1250 km2 1cos 2582
Dd1x 5 226.6 km 1two extra digits carried2
>
Dd1y 5 0 Dd 1 0 sin u
5 1250 km2 1sin 2582
Dd1y 5 1105.7 km 1two extra digits carried2
For the second vector:
Ddx 5 163.6 km 3 E 4
Add the vertical components:
Ddy 5 Dd1y 1 Dd2y
5 105.7 km 1 12272.8 km2 3 N 4
5 2167.1 km 3 N 4
Ddy 5 167 km 3 S 4
Combine the total displacement components to determine the
total displacement.
∆d x
x
13°
∆d 2
∆d
∆d 2y ∆d 2 cos ∆d y
>
0 Dd 0 5 " 1Ddx 2 2 1 1Ddy 2 2
y
∆d 2x ∆d 2 sin >
Dd2x 5 2 0 Dd 2 0 sin u
5 2 1280 km2 1sin 1382
Dd2x 5 262.99 km 1two extra digits carried2
>
Dd2y 5 2 0 Dd 2 0 cos u
5 2 1280 km2 1cos 1382
Dd2y 5 2272.8 km 1two extra digits carried2
5 " 1163.6 km2 2 1 1167.1 km2 2
>
0 Dd 0 5 233.9 km
>
0 Dd y 0
u 5 tan21 a > b
0 Dd x 0
5 tan21 a
u 5 468
167.1 km
b
163.6 km
Statement: The airplane’s total displacement is 230 km [E 468 S].
Practice
1. An airplane flies 276.9 km [W 76.708 S] from Edmonton to Calgary and then continues
675.1 km [W 11.458 S] from Calgary to Vancouver. Using components, calculate the plane’s
total displacement. T/I A [ans: 830.0 km [W 29.098 S]]
2. A person drives 120 km [N 328 W] in a car to a friend’s place to visit and then drives 150 km
[W 248 N] to visit family. Determine the total displacement of the trip. T/I [ans: 260 km [W 398 N]]
3. In a helicopter ride, the pilot first flies 12 km [N], then 14 km [N 228 E], and then 11 km [E].
Determine the total displacement. [ans: 3.0 3 101 km [E 578 N]]
When adding displacement vectors, you can choose the method that you find
convenient. The scale diagram method (“tip-to-tail”) gives you a visual sense of how
the displacements relate, but it is not the most accurate way of determining the total
displacement. The trigonometric method using the sine and cosine laws is accurate,
but you can only combine two vectors at a time. The algebraic component method is
less familiar but is accurate, and you can use it for any number of displacement vectors.
In time, you will find it easier to use as well. For these reasons, it is the preferred
approach in physics for determining the total displacement or adding a number of
vectors of any type.
28 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
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1.3
Review
Summary
• To add displacement vectors using the scale diagram method, draw the
vectors tip to tail and to the proper scale on a graph. Then determine the
total displacement by measuring the length of the displacement vector and its
angle. Finally, rescale the answer to the appropriate units.
• To calculate the sum of two vectors using the cosine and sine laws, first draw
the two vectors tip to tail. Then apply the cosine and sine laws.
• Two-dimensional displacement vectors can be resolved into two perpendicular
component vectors, one parallel to the x-axis and one parallel to the y-axis.
• You can use the component method to determine two perpendicular components
using the sine and cosine ratios. The x-component of the total displacement
equals the sum of the individual x-displacements. The y-component of the total
displacement equals the sum of the individual y-displacements.
• Using the perpendicular vector component method, you can add two or
more displacement vectors by separating each vector into its components and
adding the components to obtain a total component in each direction. The >
total component represents a component of the total displacement vector Dd T.
Questions
>
1. Consider
> the displacements Dd 1 5 7.81 km [E 508 N]
and Dd 2 5 5.10 km [W 118 N]. T/I C
(a) Draw a scale diagram of these two vectors, and
determine the total displacement using the
scale diagram method.
(b) Determine the total displacement
mathematically using a different method.
(c) Compare the two answers by determining the
percent difference.
2. Consider
the following three vectors:
>
>
Dd 1 5 >5.0 cm [E 30.08 N], Dd 2 5 7.5 cm [E],
and Dd 3 5 15.0 cm [E 10.08 S]. Add these vectors
using the scale diagram method to determine the
total displacement. T/I C
3. Determine the components of the vector
2.50 m [N 38.08 W]. T/I
4. A student walks 25.0 m [E 30.08 N]. Determine the
components of the student’s displacement. T/I
5. A vector has the following components:
Ddx 5 54 m [E] and Ddy 5 24 m [N]. T/I
(a) Calculate the length of the total displacement
vector.
(b) Determine the vector’s direction.
6. A driver travels 15.0 km to the west and then turns
and drives 45.0 km to the south. Finally, she travels
32 km [N 258 W]. Determine the driver’s total
displacement. T/I A
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8160_CH01_p002-029.indd 29
7. Using components, determine the total
displacement from> the following individual
displacements: Dd 1 5 2.5 m [W 30.08 S],
>
>
Dd 2 5 3.6 m [S], and Dd 35 4.9 m [E 38.08 S]. K/U T/I
8. A boat travelling on the St. Lawrence River moves
2.70 km [E 25.08 N] and then changes direction
and moves 4.80 km [E 45.08 S]. Determine
(a) the components of the total displacement
and (b) the total displacement of the boat. T/I
9. An airplane flies 1512.0 km [W 19.308 N] from
Toronto to Winnipeg, continues 571.0 km [W 4.358 N]
from Winnipeg to Regina, and then changes
direction again and flies 253.1 km [W 39.398 N]
from Regina to Saskatoon. Determine the total
displacement of the plane. T/I A
10. A car takes a trip consisting of two displacements.
The first displacement is 25 km [N], and the total
displacement is 62 km [N 388 W]. Determine the
second displacement. T/I A
11. A plane flies 450 km [W] and then another 220 km
in an unknown direction. Determine the maximum
and minimum displacement of the plane. Explain
your reasoning. K/U T/I A
12. Figure 3 on page 23 shows, among other things, that
vector addition is commutative. What does this mean?
Make a similar diagram (or two separate diagrams)
that shows that vector addition is commutative
when using vector components. K/U T/I C
1.3 Displacement in Two Dimensions 29
4/2/12 4:17 PM
1.4
Figure 1 An object’s velocity changes
whenever there is a change in the
velocity’s magnitude (speed) or
direction, such as when these cars
turn with the track.
Velocity and Acceleration
in Two Dimensions
Suppose you are driving south along a straight side road that has a speed limit of
60 km/h. You stay on this road for 1 h and then reach a highway that has a speed limit
of 100 km/h. You turn and travel southwest on the highway for 2 h.
This simple example gives you an idea of why you must carefully consider how
to determine average velocity in a two-dimensional situation. Velocity is a vector,
and like displacement, can be described in more than one dimension. A change in
velocity occurs when there is a change in the velocity’s magnitude (speed) or direction, such as the race cars taking a curve in Figure 1. Acceleration depends on the
change in velocity, so acceleration in two dimensions also depends on a change in the
velocity’s magnitude, direction, or both.
Now that you are familiar with the component method for adding vectors, you
can use this method to calculate two-dimensional average velocity and average
acceleration. First, we look at velocity and speed in two dimensions and then
subtracting vectors.
Velocity and Speed in Two Dimensions
In general, average velocity is the change in total displacement over time and is
described by the equation
>
Dd
>
vav 5
Dt
If displacement is in two dimensions, then you must first determine the total
displacement using components (or a similar method) before determining the
average velocity.
The notation for describing a velocity vector is the same as that for displacement,
except that average velocity has units of length divided by time (for example, metres
per second). Suppose a car has a displacement of 200 m [E 308 N], and travels this
distance and in this direction in 10 s. The average velocity is therefore
200 m 3 E 308 N 4
>
vav 5
10 s
>
vav 5 20 m/s 3 E 308 N 4
What happens when there are several displacements, each with a different direction?
The average velocity for the entire trip is based on the total displacement. Therefore,
this average velocity will always have the same direction as the total displacement.
In the equation
>
Dd
>
vav 5
,
Dt
>
>
>
>
Dd 5 Dd 1 1 Dd 2 1 Dd 3 1 c. To calculate total displacement, add the horizontal
and vertical components of the individual displacements, and combine them to obtain
the magnitude and direction of the total displacement as in Section 1.3.
Average speed, on the other hand, is a scalar property based on the length of
time travelled and the total distance travelled, regardless of the direction. Therefore,
when an object returns to its starting point, the distance it has travelled is the sum
of all displacement magnitudes, and is thus not zero. Average speed is simply this
total distance divided by the time of travel and is greater than zero. In the following
Tutorial, you will review how to calculate average velocity and average speed in
two dimensions.
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Tutorial 1 Calculating Average Velocity and Average Speed in Two Dimensions
This Tutorial reviews how to calculate average velocity and average speed in two dimensions.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Average Velocity and Average Speed
A family drives from Saint John, New Brunswick, to Moncton.
Assuming a straight highway, this part of the drive has a
displacement of 135.7 km [E 32.18 N]. From Moncton, they
drive to Amherst, Nova Scotia. The second displacement is
51.9 km [E 25.98 S]. The total drive takes 2.5 h to complete.
(a) Calculate the average velocity of the family’s vehicle.
(b) Calculate the average speed of the family’s vehicle.
>
(a) Given:
Dd
1 5 135.7 km [E 32.18 N];
>
Dd 2 5 51.9 km [E 25.98 S]; Dt 5 2.5 h
>
Required: vav
u T 5 178
Analysis: Make a scale diagram to show the situation.
Determine the components of the two vectors. Then determine
the total horizontal displacement, DdTx 5 Dd1x 1 Dd2x ,
and the total vertical displacement, DdTy 5 Dd1y 1 Dd2y .
Calculate the magnitude of the total displacement using the
Pythagorean theorem, and use the inverse tangent equation
to calculate the angle of orientation for the total displacement.
The average velocity is then the total displacement divided by
the time of travel.
Solution:
25.9° ∆d
2y
dT
∆d 1y
d Ty
32.1°
∆d 1x
d Tx
Dd Tx 5 Dd1x 1 Dd2x
>
>
5 11Dd 1 cos u 1 2 1 11Dd 2 cos u 22
5 1135.7 km2 1cos 32.182 1 151.9 km2 1cos 25.982
5 161.6 km
Dd Tx 5 161.6 km 3 E 4 1two extra digits carried2
Dd Ty 5 Dd1y 1 Dd2 y
>
>
5 11Dd 1 sin u 12 1 12Dd 2 sin u 22
5 1135.7 km2 1sin 32.182 2 151.9 km2 1sin 25.982
5 49.44 km
Dd Ty 5 49.44 km 3 N 4 1two extra digits carried2
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 31
49.44 km
b
161.6 km
The total displacement is 170 km [E 178 N]. The average
velocity is therefore
>
Dd T
>
vav 5
Dt
169.0 km 3 E 178 N 4
5
2.5 h
>
vav 5 68 km/h 3 E 178 N 4
Statement: The average velocity of the vehicle is
68 km/h [E 178 N].
>
(b) Given: Dd 1 5 135.7 km [E 32.18 N];
>
Dd 2 5 51.9 km [E 25.98 S]; Dt 5 2.5 h
Required: vav
∆d 2 51.9 km [E 25.9° S] ∆d 2x
∆d 1 135.7 km [E 32.1° N]
5 " 1161.6 km2 2 1 149.44 km2 2
>
0 Dd T 0 5 169.0 km 1two extra digits carried2
0 DdTy 0
u T 5 tan21 a
b
0 DdTx 0
5 tan21 a
Solution
N
>
0 Dd T 0 5 " 1Dd Tx 2 2 1 1Dd Ty 2 2
E
Analysis: To calculate the average speed of the vehicle,
determine the total distance travelled. Distance is not
a vector sum, but a scalar addition of the separate
displacement magnitudes. Therefore,
>
>
Dd T 5 0 Dd 1 0 1 0 Dd 2 0
and vav 5
DdT
.
Dt
>
>
Solution: d T 5 0 Dd 1 0 1 0 Dd 2 0
5 135.7 km 1 51.9 km
d T 5 187.6 km
Dd T
Dt
187.6 km
5
2.5 h
vav 5 75 km/h
vav 5
Statement: The average speed of the vehicle is 75 km/h.
1.4 Velocity and Acceleration in Two Dimensions 31
4/2/12 4:15 PM
Practice
>
>
1. A plane makes the following displacements: Dd 1 5 72.0 km [W 30.08 S], Dd 2 5 48.0 km [S],
>
and Dd 3 5 150.0 km [W]. The entire flight takes 2.5 h. T/I
(a) Calculate the total displacement of the plane. [ans: 230 km [W 228 S]]
(b) Calculate the average velocity of the plane. [ans: 91 km/h [W 228 S]]
(c) Calculate the average speed of the plane. [ans: 110 km/h]
2. An elk walks 25.0 km [E 53.138 N], then walks 20.0 km [S], and then runs 15.0 km [W].
The journey takes 12 h. T/I
(a) Calculate the elk’s average velocity. [ans: 0 km/h]
(b) Calculate the elk’s average speed. [ans: 5.0 km/h]
(c) Explain the difference in the two answers for the elk’s average velocity and average speed.
Subtracting Vectors in Two Dimensions
B
A
B
A B
Figure 2 Vector subtraction is
equivalent to adding a positive vector
and a negative vector.
Up to now, you have been working with vector addition. In some cases, though,
you need to multiply vectors by scalars and subtract vectors. Before dealing with
vector subtraction, first consider the multiplication of a vector by a scalar. Scalars are
simply numbers, such as 2 and 5.7. Multiplication of a vector by a scalar changes the
vector’s length, or magnitude. If a scalar k is greater than 1 (k . 1), then the product
>
>
of k and vector A is longer than A . Similarly, if 0 , k , 1, then the product of k and
>
>
vector A is shorter than A .
>
>
Now suppose the scalar k is negative (k , 0). If you multiply vector B by k, then B
>
and kB point in opposite directions. Now you can see how vector subtraction arises
>
>
from scalar multiplication and vector addition. Subtracting vector B from vector A
>
>
is equivalent to adding the vectors A and 2B , for k 5 21. See Figure 2. Expressing
this as a vector equation yields
>
>
>
>
A 1 1212 1 B 2 5 A 1 12B 2
>
>
5A2B
You can use this same approach with the components of vectors. By multiplying
one component by an appropriate negative scalar, you can subtract two vector components in one dimension by adding the positive component of one vector and the
negative component of the other vector.
What does subtracting vectors mean physically? When a vector changes over an
interval of time, the physical quantity of interest is the measure of the change, or the
difference between the vectors in that time interval. For example, consider a car following a curve on a level road (Figure 3). Even if the driver keeps the speed of the car
constant, the direction of the car changes. This change equals the difference between
the velocity at one point in time and the velocity at any earlier point in time. In other
words, the change in velocity is the subtraction of the final and initial velocities:
>
>
>
Dv 5 vf 2 vi
vf
vf
vi
vi
vf vi
>
>
>
>
Figure 3 A change in a vector from vi to vf can be determined by vector subtraction, vf 2 vi.
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Acceleration in Two Dimensions
We can now apply the principle of vector subtraction in two dimensions to determine
the average acceleration in two dimensions. Recall that acceleration in one dimension
is the change in velocity with time:
>
Dv
>
aav 5
Dt
>
>
vf 2 vi
>
aav 5
Dt
Average acceleration occurs when the velocity vector of an object changes in magnitude, direction, or both.
As with two-dimensional displacement vectors, you can break down the two
velocity vectors into horizontal and vertical components. By subtracting each dimension’s components, you obtain the net horizontal and vertical components:
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
Calculate the acceleration during your
extreme sport for the Unit Task on
page 146.
Dvx 5 vf x 2 vix
Dvy 5 vf y 2 viy
From these, you can calculate the magnitude and direction of the net velocity
using the Pythagorean theorem and the inverse tangent equation, respectively:
>
0 Dv 0 5 "Dv 2x 1 Dv 2y
u 5 tan21 a
0 Dvy 0
0 Dvx 0
b
Finally, the change in velocity divided by the time interval yields the average
acceleration.
In Tutorial 2, you will learn how to calculate acceleration in two dimensions by
vector subtraction of velocity components.
Tutorial 2 Calculating Acceleration in Two Dimensions
The following Sample Problem models how to determine acceleration in two dimensions by vector
subtraction of velocity components.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Acceleration in Two Dimensions
A car turns from a road into a parking lot and into an available
parking space. The car’s initial velocity is 4.0 m/s [E 45.08 N].
The car’s velocity just before the driver decreases speed is
4.0 m/s [E 10.08 N]. The turn takes 3.0 s. Calculate the average
acceleration of the car during the turn.
>
>
Given: vi 5 4.0 m/s [E 45.08 N]; vf 5 4.0 m/s [E 10.08 N];
Dt 5 3.0 s
>
Required: aav
Analysis: Draw a vector diagram of the situation. Determine
the components for each velocity vector, and then subtract the
initial vector components from the final vector components,
Dvx 5 Dvfx 2 Dvix and Dvy 5 Dvfy 2 Dviy . Calculate the
magnitude of the change in velocity using the Pythagorean
theorem, and use the inverse tangent equation to calculate the
angle of orientation for the net velocity. The average acceleration
is then the change in velocity divided by the time interval.
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 33
Solution:
Components for the initial velocity vector:
N
viy vi sin i
45.0°
vix vi cos i
E
Components for the final velocity vector:
N
10.0°
vfx vf cos i
E
vfy vf sin i
1.4 Velocity and Acceleration in Two Dimensions 33
4/2/12 4:15 PM
For the initial vector:
>
vix 5 vi cos u i
5 14.0 m/s 3 E 42 1cos 45.082
vix 5 2.83 m/s 3 E 4
>
viy 5 vi sin u i
5 14.0 m/s 3 N 42 1sin 45.082
viy 5 2.83 m/s 3 N 4
For the final vector:
>
vfx 5 vf cos u f
5 14.0 m/s 3 E 42 1cos 10.082
vfx 5 3.94 m/s 3 E 4
>
vfy 5 vf sin u f
5 14.0 m/s 3 N 42 1sin 10.082
vfy 5 0.695 m/s 3 N 4
Subtract the horizontal components:
Dvx 5 vfx 2 vix
5 3.94 m/s 3 E 4 2 2.83 m/s 3 E 4
Dvx 5 1.11 m/s 3 E 4
Subtract the vertical components:
Dvy 5 vfy 2 viy
5 0.695 m/s 3 N 4 2 2.83 m/s 3 N 4
5 22.14 m/s 3 N 4
Dvy 5 2.14 m/s 3 S 4
Combine the net velocity components to determine the change
in velocity:
>
0 Dv 0 5 "Dv 2x 1 Dv 2y
5 " 11.11 m/s2 2 1 122.14 m/s2 2
>
0 Dv 0 5 2.4 m/s
0 Dvy 0
u 5 tan 21 a
b
0 Dvx 0
5 tan 21 a
2.14 m/s
b
1.11 m/s
u 5 638
The change in velocity is 2.4 m/s [E 638 S]. The average
acceleration is therefore
>
Dv
>
aav 5
Dt
2.4 m/s 3 E 638 S 4
5
3.0 s
>
aav 5 0.80 m/s2 3 E 638 S 4
Statement: The car’s average acceleration is
0.80 m/s2 [E 638 S].
Practice
1. A car heading east turns right at a corner. The car turns at a constant speed of 20.0 m/s.
After 12 s, the car completes the turn, so that it is heading due south at 20.0 m/s.
Calculate the car’s average acceleration. T/I A [ans: 2.4 m/s2 [W 458 S]]
2. Over a 15.0 min period, a truck travels on a road with many turns. The truck’s initial velocity
is 50.0 km/h [W 60.08 N]. The truck’s final velocity is 80.0 km/h [E 60.08 N]. Calculate the truck’s
average acceleration, in kilometres per hour squared. T/I [ans: 2.80 3 102 km/h2 [E 21.88 N]]
3. A bird flies from Lesser Slave Lake in northern Alberta to Dore Lake in northern
Saskatchewan. The bird’s displacement is 800.0 km [E 7.58 S]. The bird then flies from
Dore Lake to Big Quill Lake, Saskatchewan. This displacement is 400.0 km [E 518 S].
The total time of flight is 18.0 h. Determine the bird’s
(a) total distance travelled [ans: 1.2 3 103 km]
(b) total displacement [ans: 1.1 3 103 km [E 228 S]]
(c) average speed [ans: 62 km/h]
(d) average velocity T/I [ans: 62 km/h [E 228 S]]
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1.4
Review
Summary
• Average velocity, in two dimensions, is the total displacement in two dimensions
>
Dd
>
.
divided by the time interval during which the displacement occurs: vav 5
Dt
• You can determine the change in velocity in two dimensions by separating
the velocity vectors into components and subtracting them using the vector
>
>
>
>
property vf 2 vi 5 vf 1 12vi 2 .
• Average acceleration in two dimensions is the change in velocity divided by
>
>
>
vf 2 vi
Dv
>
5
.
the time interval between the two velocities: aav 5
Dt
Dt
Questions
1. Explain why the average speed is always greater
than or equal to the magnitude of the average
velocity for an object moving in two dimensions.
Give an example in your answer. K/U T/I C
2. During 4.0 min on a lake, a loon moves
25.0 m [E 30.08 N] and then 75.0 m [E 45.08 S].
Determine the loon’s
(a) total distance travelled
(b) total displacement
(c) average speed
(d) average velocity T/I
3. A car driver in northern Ontario makes the following
displacements:
>
Dd 1 5 15.0 km [W 30.08 N],
>
Dd 2 5 10.0 km [W 75.08 N],
>
and Dd 3 5 10.0 km [E 70.08 N].
The trip takes 0.50 h. Calculate the average velocity
of the car and driver. T/I
4. Explain how there can be average acceleration when
there is no change in speed. K/U T/I C
5. In your own words, explain how to subtract vectors
in two dimensions. K/U C
6. A pilot in a seaplane flies for a total of 3.0 h
with an average velocity of 130 km/h [N 328 E].
In the first part of the trip, the pilot flies for 1.0 h
through a displacement of 150 km [E 128 N].
She then flies directly to her final destination.
Determine the displacement for the second part
of the flight. T/I A
7. A student goes for a jog at an average speed of
3.5 m/s. Starting from home, he first runs 1.8 km [E]
and then runs 2.6 km [N 358 E]. Then he heads
directly home. How long will the entire trip take?
T/I
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 35
8. In Figure 4, a bird changes direction in 3.8 s while
flying from point 1 to point 2. Determine the bird’s
average acceleration. T/I
2
1
v2 8.5 m/s [E 30.0° N]
v1 6.4 m/s [E 30.0° S]
Figure 4
9. A helicopter travelling horizontally at 50.0 m/s [W]
turns steadily, so that after 45.0 s, its velocity is
35.0 m/s [S]. Calculate the average acceleration of
the helicopter. T/I A
10. A ball on a pool table bounces off the rail (side),
as shown in Figure 5. The ball is in contact with the
rail for 3.2 ms. Determine the average acceleration
of the ball. T/I A
N
8.2 m/s
25°
8.2 m/s
25°
Figure 5
11. A speed boat is moving at 6.4 m/s [W 358 N]
when it starts accelerating at 2.2 m/s2 [S] for 4.0 s.
Calculate the final velocity of the boat. T/I A
12. An airplane turns slowly for 9.2 s horizontally.
The final velocity of the plane is 3.6 3 102 km/h [N];
the average acceleration during the turn is 5.0 m/s2 [W].
What was the initial velocity of the plane? T/I A
A
1.4 Velocity and Acceleration in Two Dimensions 35
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1.5
projectile an object that is launched
through the air along a parabolic trajectory
and accelerates due to gravity
Projectile Motion
In sports in which a player kicks, throws, or hits a ball across a field or court, the
player’s initial contact with the ball propels the ball upward at an angle. The ball rises
to a certain point, and gravity eventually curves the path of the ball downward. If you
ignore the effects of air resistance and Earth’s rotation, the curved path, or trajectory, of the ball under the influence of Earth’s gravity follows the curve of a parabola,
as Figure 1 shows. The ball acts like a projectile, which is an object that is moving
through the air and accelerating due to gravity. The x-direction is horizontal and
positive to the right, and the y-direction is vertical and positive upward.
Figure 1 The path of a projectile follows the curve of a parabola.
The ball in Figure 1 was hit with a tennis racquet. If you draw an imaginary line
through the ball images, you can trace the parabola from where the ball made contact
with the racquet to the other end. Another imaginary line shows the uppermost point
of the trajectory (at the top of the highest ball). After the ball leaves the racquet, its
path curves upward to this highest point and then curves downward. You can see the
symmetry of the ball’s path because the shape of the upward-bound curve exactly
matches the shape of the downward-bound curve. Anyone who has tossed any kind
of object into the air has observed this parabolic trajectory called projectile motion.
Before we formally define projectile motion, we will look at its properties.
Properties of Projectile Motion
range (Ddx ) the horizontal displacement
of a projectile
projectile motion the motion of a
projectile such that the horizontal
component of the velocity is constant,
and the vertical motion has a constant
acceleration due to gravity
36 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 36
Suppose you drop a soccer ball from the roof of a one-storey building while your
friend stands next to you and kicks another soccer ball horizontally at the same
instant. Will they both land at the same time? Some people are surprised to learn
that the answer is yes.
Figure 2, on the next page, shows a strobe image of two balls released simultaneously,
one with a horizontal projection, as your friend’s soccer ball had. The horizontal lines
represent equal time intervals—the time interval between the camera’s strobe flashes is
constant. The vertical components of the displacement increase by the same amount for
each ball. The horizontal displacement of the projectile—in this instance, the ball—is
called the horizontal range, Ddx. The horizontal motion is also constant. The trajectory
forms from the combination of the independent horizontal and vertical motions.
We observe the following properties about the motion of a projectile:
• The horizontal motion of a projectile is constant.
• The horizontal component of acceleration of a projectile is zero.
• The vertical acceleration of a projectile is constant because of gravity.
• The horizontal and vertical motions of a projectile are independent,
but they share the same time.
Combining these properties helps us define projectile motion: projectile motion is
the motion of an object such that the horizontal component of the velocity is constant
and the vertical motion has a constant acceleration due to gravity.
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Figure 2 The two balls reach the lowest position at the same instant, even though one ball was
dropped and the other was given an initial horizontal velocity.
The most important property of projectile motion in two dimensions is that the
horizontal and vertical motions are completely independent of each other. This
means that motion in one direction has no effect on motion in the other direction.
This allows us to separate a complex two-dimensional projectile motion problem into
two separate simple problems: one that involves horizontal, uniform motion and one
that involves vertical, uniform acceleration down. Figure 3 shows a baseball player
hitting a fly ball and the path it follows. You can see that the horizontal velocity vx is
independent of the vertical velocity vy.
y vy
Investigation
1.5.1
Investigating Projectile Motion
(page 50)
In this investigation, you will
use an air table to investigate
projectile motion.
v
vx
x
Figure 3 The horizontal and vertical components of velocity are independent of each other.
You can also see this result in the strobe images in Figure 2. The ball on the left
simply drops, but the ball on the right has an initial horizontal velocity. The ball
on the left falls straight down, while the ball on the right follows a parabolic path
typical of projectile motion. The balls have quite different horizontal velocities at
each “flashpoint” in the image. Nonetheless, they are at identical heights at each
point. This shows that their displacements and velocities along the y-direction are
the same. The image confirms that the motion along the vertical direction does not
WEB LINK
depend on the motion along the horizontal direction.
Analyzing Projectile Motion
In Section 1.2, you reviewed the equations that describe motion in one dimension.
You can use these same equations to analyze the motion of a projectile in two dimensions. You simply have to apply the equations to the x- and y-motions separately.
Assume that at t 5 0 the projectile leaves the origin with an initial velocity vi. If the
velocity vector makes an angle u with the horizontal, where u is the projection angle,
then from the definitions of the cosine and sine functions,
vi
vix 5 vi cos u
viy 5 vi sin u
viy vi sin vix vi cos where vix is the initial velocity (at t 5 0) in the x-direction, and viy is the initial
velocity in the y-direction.
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1.5 Projectile Motion 37
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Table 1 summarizes the kinematics equations you can use with both horizontal
and vertical components.
Table 1 Kinematics Equations with Horizontal and Vertical Components
Direction of motion
Description
Equations of motion
horizontal motion (x)
constant-velocity equation
for the x-component only
vix
vix
Ddx
Ddx
vertical motion (y)
constant-acceleration
equations for the y-component;
constant acceleration
has a magnitude of
>
l g l 5 g 5 9.8 m/s2
vfy 5 vi sin u 2 gDt
5 v i cos u
5 constant
5 vix Dt
5 1vi cos u 2 Dt
1
gDt 2
2
5 1vi sin u 2 2 2 2gDdy
Ddy 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2
v 2fy
Mini Investigation
Analyzing
the Range of a Projectile
Mini
Investigation
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Skills: Performing, Analyzing, Communicating
You can calculate the horizontal range of a projectile by applying
the kinematics equations step by step. In this activity, you will
complete a table showing launch angle, time of flight, maximum
height, and range.
Equipment and Materials: paper and pencil; calculator
1. Set up a table like the one in Table 2, either on paper or
electronically.
Table 2
Launch angle Time of flight
(u)
(s)
5
15
25
85
Maximum height
(m)
Range
(m)
A2.2
2. List several launch angles in increments of 108, from
58 to 858.
3. Complete the table for a projectile that has an initial velocity
of magnitude 25 m/s and lands at the same level from which
it was launched. Use two significant digits in your calculations.
A. What conclusion can you draw from the data about the
relationship between the horizontal component of velocity
and maximum height? K/U T/I
B. What conclusion can you draw from the data about how
you can maximize the height of an object in projectile
motion? K/U T/I
C. What conclusion can you draw from the data about how
you can maximize the range of an object in projectile
motion? K/U T/I
D. The sum of complementary angles is 908. Identify pairs
of complementary angles. Look at the range for each pair of
complementary angles in your data. Write a statement that
summarizes the relationship between complementary initial
angles for projectile motion. K/U T/I C
In the following Tutorial, you will apply the projectile motion equations to Sample
Problems in which an object launches horizontally and an object launches at an angle
above the horizontal.
38
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Tutorial 1 Solving Simple Projectile Motion Problems
This Tutorial demonstrates how to solve two-dimensional projectile motion problems. In Sample
Problem 1, an object launches horizontally so that it has an initial horizontal velocity but no initial
vertical velocity. In Sample Problem 2, an object launches at an upward angle so that it has both
initial horizontal and vertical velocity components.
Sample Problem 1: Solving Projectile Motion Problems with No Initial Vertical Velocity
1
Solution: Ddy 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
An airplane carries relief supplies to a motorist stranded in a
snowstorm. The pilot cannot safely land, so he has to drop the
package of supplies as he flies horizontally at a height of 350 m
over the highway. The speed of the airplane is a constant 52 m/s.
Figure 4 shows the package (a) as it leaves the airplane, (b) in
mid-drop, and (c) when it lands on the highway.
(a) Calculate how long it takes for the package to reach
the highway.
1
5 152 m/s2 1sin 082 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
1
2
5 102 Dt 2 gDt
2
1
Ddy 5 2 gDt 2
2
(b) Determine the range of the package.
Dt 5
y
y
y
Δddy
x
(a)
Figure 4
(b)
Å
g
22 12350 m2
Å 9.8 m/s2
Dt 5 8.45 s 1one extra digit carried2
5
x
22Ddy
x
Statement: The package takes 8.5 s to reach the highway.
(c)
(b) Given: Ddy 5 2350 m; vi 5 52 m/s; Dt 5 8.45 s
Solution
Required: Ddx
(a) Given: Ddy 5 2350 m; vi 5 52 m/s
Analysis: Calculate Ddx using the definition of cosine:
Ddx 5 1vi cos u 2 Dt
Required: Dt
Solution: Ddx 5 1vi cos u 2 Dt
5 152 m/s2 1cos 082 18.45 s2
Analysis: Set di 5 0 as the altitude at which the
plane is flying. Therefore, Ddy 5 2350 m. Calculate
Dt from the formula for the displacement along y :
1
Ddy 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
Ddx 5 4.4 3 102 m
Statement: The range of the package is 4.4 3 102 m.
Sample Problem 2: Solving Projectile Motion Problems with an Initial Vertical Velocity
A golfer hits a golf ball with an initial velocity of 25 m/s at an
angle of 30.08 above the horizontal. The golfer is at an initial
height of 14 m above the point where the ball lands (Figure 5).
y
vy
(a) Calculate the maximum height of the ball.
vi
(b) Determine the ball’s velocity on landing.
Solution
(a) Given: vi 5 25 m/s; u 5 30.08
Required: Ddy max
Analysis: When the golf ball reaches its maximum height,
the y-component of the ball’s velocity is zero. So vfy 5 0.
Set the formula for vertical velocity, vfy 5 vi sin u 2 gDt ,
equal to zero, and then determine the time at which the
ball reaches this point. Then, determine the maximum
height using the formula for vertical displacement,
1
Ddy 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2.
2
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 39
viy
30.0°
vix
vfy 0
v
v
vx
vx
vy
v
vx
Figure 5
vy
x
v
1.5 Projectile Motion
39
4/2/12 4:15 PM
Solution:
Solution:
vfy 5 vi sin u 2 gDt
0 5 vi sin u 2 gDt
vi sin u
Dt 5
g
125 m/s2 1sin 30.082
5
9.8 m/s2
Dt 5 1.28 s 1one extra digit carried2
1
Ddy max 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
v 2fy 5 v 2iy 2 2gDdy
5 1vi sin u 2 2 2 2gDdy
1
5 125 m/s2 1sin 30.082 11.28 s2 2 19.8 m/s22 11.28 s2 2
2
Ddy max 5 8.0 m
Statement: The maximum height of the ball is 8.0 m.
(b) Given: vi 5 25 m/s; Ddy 5 14 m; u 5 30.08
Required: vf
Analysis: Set di 5 0 as the point at which the golfer strikes
the golf ball. Therefore, Ddy 5 214 m. Use the equation
v 2fy 5 v 2iy 2 2gDdy to calculate the final vertical velocity of
the ball before it hits the ground. Then, calculate the velocity
when the ball lands using vf 5 "v 2fx 1 v 2fy and the inverse
tangent ratio.
vfy 5 6" 1 125 m/s2 1sin 30.082 2 2 2 2 19.8 m/s22 1214 m2
5 620.8 m/s
vfy 5 220.8 m/s 1negative because the object is moving down2
vx 5 vi cos u
5 25 1cos 30.082
vx 5 21.7 m/s
vf 5 "v 2x 1 v 2y
5 " 121.7 m/s2 2 1 1220.8 m/s2 2
vf 5 30.1 m/s
u 5 tan21 a
5 tan21 a
u 5 448
0 vy 0
0 vx 0
b
20.8
b
21.7
Statement: The velocity of the ball when it lands is
30.1 m/s [448 below the horizontal].
Practice
1. A marble rolls off a table with a horizontal velocity of 1.93 m/s and onto the floor. The tabletop
is 76.5 cm above the floor. Air resistance is negligible. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine how long the marble is in the air. [ans: 0.40 s]
(b) Calculate the range of the marble. [ans: 76 cm]
(c) Calculate the velocity of the marble when it hits the floor.
[ans: 4.3 m/s [648 below the horizontal]]
2. A baseball pitcher throws a ball horizontally. The ball falls 83 cm while travelling 18.4 m to
home plate. Calculate the initial horizontal speed of the baseball. Air resistance is negligible.
K/U
T/I
A
[ans: 45 m/s]
3. In a children’s story, a princess trapped in a castle wraps a message around a rock and
throws it from the top of the castle. Right next to the castle is a moat. The initial velocity of
the rock is 12 m/s [428 above the horizontal]. The rock lands on the other side of the moat,
at a level 9.5 m below the initial level. Air resistance is negligible. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the rock’s time of flight. [ans: 2.4 s]
(b) Calculate the width of the moat. [ans: 22 m]
(c) Determine the rock’s velocity on impact with the ground. [ans: 18 m/s [618 below the horizontal]]
4. A friend tosses a baseball out of his second-floor window with an initial velocity of
4.3 m/s [428 below the horizontal]. The ball starts from a height of 3.9 m, and you catch
the ball 1.4 m above the ground. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the time the ball is in the air. [ans: 0.48 s]
(b) Determine your horizontal distance from the window. [ans: 1.5 m]
(c) Calculate the speed of the ball as you catch it. [ans: 8.2 m/s]
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The Range Equation
When you know the initial velocity and the launch angle of a projectile, you can calculate
the projectile’s range (Ddx). Now suppose we launch a projectile that lands at the same
height it started from, as shown in Figure 6. In this case, Ddy 5 0, and we can use this
fact to significantly simplify the equations of motion. We can calculate the range using
the equation Ddx 5 vixDt if we know the initial velocity and launch angle.
y
x
vi
viy
vix
∆ dx
Figure 6 The projectile lands at the same height from which it was launched.
To determine the value of Δt, use the equation for vertical motion and viy 5 vi sin u:
1
Ddy 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
The final level is the same as the initial level, so Ddy 5 0. Substituting values in the
vertical motion equation gives
1
0 5 1vi sin u 2 Dt 2 gDt 2
2
1
0 5 Dt avi sin u 2 gDtb
2
1
Therefore, either Dt 5 0 on takeoff or vi sin u 2 gDt 5 0 on landing. Solving the
2
latter equation for Dt gives the following equation:
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
If your extreme sport uses projectile
motion, you can use the ideas in this
section to complete the Unit Task
on page 146.
2vi sin u
g
Now, we return to the equation for range, Ddx 5 viDt. Substituting Dt and the initial
velocity in the x-direction, vix 5 vi cos u, gives
Dt 5
Ddx 5 vixDt
5 vi cos u a
2vi sin u
b
g
v 2i
2 sin u cos u
g
Substituting the trigonometry identity 2 sin u cos u 5 sin 2u into the above equation,
we get the following for the range of a projectile:
Ddx 5
Ddx 5
v 2i
sin 2u
g
where vi is the magnitude of the initial velocity of a projectile launched at an angle
u to the horizontal. Note that this equation applies only when Ddy 5 0, that is, only
when the projectile lands at the same height from which it was launched. The largest
value of the range is when sin 2u 5 1 because the sine function has a maximum value
of 1. This maximum value occurs when the angle is 908. Since 2u 5 908, then u 5 458,
so the largest value the range can have occurs when u 5 458.
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1.5 Projectile Motion 41
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All the previous discussion and examples of projectile motion have assumed
that air resistance is negligible. This is close to the true situation in cases involving
relatively dense objects moving at low speeds, such as a shot used in a shot put competition. However, for many situations you cannot ignore air resistance. When you
consider air resistance, the analysis of projectile motion becomes more complex and
is beyond the scope of this text.
In Tutorial 2, you will use the kinematics equations to calculate the maximum
height and the range for a projectile that lands at the launching height.
Tutorial 2 Solving Projectile Motion Problems
Some projectile motion problems involve an object that starts and ends at the same height and
is propelled at an angle above the horizontal. This Tutorial models how to solve projectile motion
problems of this type.
Sample Problem 1: Solving Projectile Motion Problems in Which the Object Lands
at the Same Height as the Launching Height
Suppose you kick a soccer ball at 28 m/s toward the goal at a
launch angle of 218.
(a) How long does the soccer ball stay in the air?
(b) Determine the distance the soccer ball would need to cover to
score a goal (the range).
Solution
(a) Given: vi 5 28 m/s; u 5 218
Required: Dt
2vi sin u
g
2vi sin u
Solution: Dt 5
g
2 128 m/s2 sin 218
5
9.8 m/s2
Dt 5 2.0 s
Analysis: Dt 5
Statement: The soccer ball stays in the air for 2.0 s.
(b) Given: vi 5 28 m/s; u 5 218
Required: Ddx
v 2i
sin 2u
g
v 2i
Solution: Ddx 5 sin 2u
g
128 m/s2 2
5
sin 12 12182 2
9.8 m/s2
Ddx 5 54 m
Statement: The range of the soccer ball is 54 m.
Analysis: Ddx 5
Practice
1. A projectile launcher is set at an angle of 458 above the horizontal and fires an object with a
speed of 2.2 3 102 m/s. The object lands at the same height from which it was launched.
Air resistance is negligible. Calculate the object’s
(a) time of flight [ans: 32 s]
(b) horizontal range [ans: 4.9 3 103 m]
(c) maximum height [ans: 1.2 3 103 m]
(d) velocity at impact with the ground K/U T/I A [ans: 2.2 3 102 m/s [458 below the horizontal]]
2. A projectile is launched with an initial speed of 14.5 m/s at an angle of 35.08 above the
horizontal. The object lands at the same height from which it was launched. Air resistance
is negligible. Determine
(a) the projectile’s maximum height [ans: 3.5 m]
(b) the projectile’s horizontal displacement when it hits the ground [ans: 2.0 3 101 m]
(c) how long the projectile takes to reach its maximum height K/U T/I A [ans: 0.85 s]
3. What happens to each of the following when the initial velocity of a projectile is doubled?
Assume the projectile lands at the same height from which it was launched. K/U T/I A
(a) the time of flight
(b) the range
(c) the maximum height
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1.5
Review
Summary
• A projectile is an object that moves along a trajectory through the air, with
only the force of gravity acting on it.
• An object moving with projectile motion has a constant horizontal velocity
and a constant vertical acceleration.
• The time that a projectile moves in the horizontal direction is the same as the
time that it moves in the vertical direction.
• When an object lands at the same height from which it was launched, use the
v 2i
range equation to determine the horizontal range: Ddx 5
sin 2u.
g
Questions
1. A rock kicked horizontally off a cliff moves 8.3 m
horizontally while falling 1.5 m vertically. Calculate
the rock’s initial speed. K/U T/I A
2. A projectile launcher sends an object with an initial
velocity of 1.1 3 103 m/s [458 above the horizontal]
into the air. The launch level is at the same level as
the landing level. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate how long the object is airborne.
(b) Determine its maximum range.
(c) Determine the maximum height of the object.
3. In a physics demonstration, a volleyball is
tossed from a window at 6.0 m/s [328 below the
horizontal], and it lands 3.4 s later. Calculate
(a) the height of the window and (b) the velocity
of the volleyball at ground level. K/U T/I A
4. A person kicks a soccer ball with an initial velocity
directed 538 above the horizontal. The ball lands on
a roof 7.2 m high. The wall of the building is 25 m
away, and it takes the ball 2.1 s to pass directly over
the wall. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the initial velocity of the ball.
(b) Determine the horizontal range of the ball.
(c) By what vertical distance does the ball clear the
wall of the building?
5. A small asteroid strikes the surface of Mars and
causes a rock to fly upward with a velocity of 26 m/s
[528 above the horizontal]. The rock rises to a
maximum height and then lands on the side of a hill
12 m above its initial position. The acceleration due to
gravity on the surface of Mars is 3.7 m/s2. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the maximum height of the rock.
(b) Determine the time that the rock is in flight.
(c) What is the range of the rock?
6. A rock is thrown at an angle of 658 above the
horizontal at 16 m/s up a hill that makes an angle
of 308 with the horizontal. How far up the hill will
the rock go before hitting the ground? K/U T/I A
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 43
7. A projectile launcher launches a snowball at 45 m/s
from the top of building 1 in Figure 7. Does the
snowball land on top of building 2? Support your
answer with calculations. T/I
35 m
25 m
35°
150 m
12 m
building 1
building 2
Figure 7
8. In a physics demonstration, a projectile launcher on
the floor is aimed directly at a target hanging from
the ceiling on the other side of the room (Figure 8).
When the projectile is launched, the target is
released at exactly the same time and the projectile
hits the target. Explain why the projectile will
always hit the target as long as it reaches the target
before they strike the floor. K/U T/I C A
target
vi
point of
impact
Figure 8
9. A football is thrown from the edge of a cliff from
a height of 22 m at a velocity of 18 m/s [398 above
the horizontal]. A player at the bottom of the cliff
is 12 m away from the base of the cliff and runs at
a maximum speed of 6.0 m/s to catch the ball.
Is it possible for the player to catch the ball?
Support your answer with calculations. K/U T/I A
1.5 Projectile Motion 43
4/2/12 4:15 PM
1.6
Relative Motion
Suppose that you are flying in an airplane at a constant velocity south. Your view from
the window might be similar to the view in Figure 1(a). How would you describe
the view? At first, the answer might seem simple and you would describe the clouds
and the ground. After a little thought, you would realize that you can see much more.
From the point of view of the plane, the ground and the clouds appear to be moving
north and the plane appears to be stationary. However, from the point of view of an
observer on the ground (Figure 1(b)), the plane is moving south, the ground is staCAREER LINK
tionary, and the clouds are moving with the wind.
(a)
(b)
Figure 1 An airplane in flight is an excellent example of relative motion. (a) The view from an
airplane window provides one perspective of an airplane’s motion. (b) The view from the ground
provides a completely different perspective of an airplane’s motion.
Relative Velocity
frame of reference a coordinate system
relative to which motion is described or
observed
relative velocity the velocity of an object
relative to a specific frame of reference
The airplane scenario above is an example of relative motion. The pilot and passengers in the plane are in one frame of reference (or have one point of view), and
the observer on the ground is in another frame of reference. A frame of reference is a
coordinate system relative to which motion is described or observed. The velocity of
an object relative to a specific frame of reference is called the relative velocity.
>
When analyzing relative velocity problems, we will use the vector symbol, v , with
two subscripts in capital letters. The first subscript represents the moving object, and
the second subscript represents the frame of reference. For example, suppose an airplane (P) is travelling at 450 km/h [N] relative to the frame of reference from Earth (E).
>
Then vPE is the velocity of the airplane relative to Earth, and we write the relative
>
velocity like this: vPE 5 450 km/h [N].
Now suppose we analyze the scenario further to be more realistic: At the altitudes
at which airplanes fly, the air (A) often moves very fast relative to the ground. So, we
>
must also consider the velocity of the plane relative to the air, vPA, and the velocity of
>
the air relative to the ground, vAE, in addition to the velocity of the plane relative to
>
Earth, vPE. The relationship that connects these three relative velocities is
>
>
>
vPE 5 vPA 1 vAE
This equation applies whether the motion is in one, two, or three dimensions. In
one dimension, solving the equation is straightforward. For example, if the plane is
>
moving relative to the air at vPA 5 450 km/h [N], but the air velocity relative to Earth
>
is vAE 5 40 km/h [N] (a tailwind), then the velocity of the plane relative to Earth is
>
>
>
vPE 5 vPA 1 vAE
5 450 km/h 3 N 4 1 40 km/h 3 N 4
>
vPE 5 490 km/h 3 N 4
44 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
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So, the ground speed increases with a tailwind, which makes sense. What would
happen if the wind were a headwind? The airplane’s ground speed would decrease to
410 km/h [N] if the magnitude of the wind’s velocity were the same. This also makes
sense because airplanes slow down relative to Earth because of headwinds.
In two dimensions, for example, when there is a crosswind, then the solution is
also straightforward but requires more steps. You will work through relative velocity
problems in one and two dimensions in Tutorial 1. But before you start the Tutorial,
make sure you understand the patterns of the subscripts in the equation for relative
velocity. In general, the equation takes the form
>
>
>
vAC 5 vAB 1 vBC
In the above equation, note that the outside subscripts on the right side of the
equation (A and C) are in the same order as the subscripts on the left side of the
equation, and the inside subscripts on the right side of the equation are the same (B).
If we add another frame of reference, the equation becomes
>
>
>
>
vAD 5 vAB 1 vBC 1 vCD
Tutorial 1 Solving Relative Motion Problems
A variety of situations involve relative motion. This Tutorial models a few examples in both one and
two dimensions.
Sample Problem 1: Relative Motion in One Dimension
Passengers on a cruise ship are playing shuffleboard (Figure 2).
The shuffleboard disc’s velocity relative to the ship is
4.2 m/s [forward], and the ship is travelling in the same
direction as the disc at 4.6 km/h relative to Earth when the
water is stationary.
Solution:
km
1 min 1000 m
1h
>
3 forward 4 b a
vSE 5 a4.6
ba
ba
b
h
60 min
60 s
1 km
4.6 3 1000 m 3 forward 4
60 3 60 s
>
vSE 5 1.278 m/s 3 forward 4 1two extra digits carried2
>
>
>
vDE 5 vDS 1 vSE
5
5 4.2 m/s 3 forward 4 1 1.278 m/s 3 forward 4
>
vDE 5 5.5 m/s 3 forward 4
Statement: The velocity of the disc relative to Earth is
5.5 m/s [forward].
Figure 2
(a) Determine the disc’s velocity relative to Earth.
(b) Determine the disc’s velocity relative to Earth when the disc is
moving in a direction opposite to that of the ship.
(c) Determine the disc’s velocity relative to Earth when the water
is moving at 1.1 m/s [forward].
Solution
(a) G
iven: Use the subscripts D for the disc, S for the ship, and E
>
>
for Earth. vDS 5 4.2 m/s [forward]; vSE 5 4.6 km/h [forward]
>
Required: vDE
>
>
>
Analysis: Use the equation for relative velocity, vDE 5 vDS 1 vSE,
but first convert the ship’s velocity to metres per second.
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8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 45
(b) G
iven: Use the subscripts D for the disc, S for the ship,
>
>
and E for Earth. vDS 5 4.2 m/s [backward]; vSE 5 4.6 km/h
[forward] 5 1.278 m/s [forward]
>
Required: vDE
Analysis: Use the equation for relative velocity,
>
>
>
vDE 5 vDS 1 vSE. For the ship’s velocity, use the value from
part (a) after converting to metres per second.
Solution:
>
>
>
vDE 5 vDS 1 vSE
5 4.2 m/s 3 backward 4 1 1.278 m/s 3 forward 4
5 4.2 m/s 3 backward 4 2 1.278 m/s 3 backward 4
>
vDE 5 2.9 m/s 3 backward 4
Statement: The velocity of the disc relative to Earth is
2.9 m/s [backward].
1.6 Relative Motion 45
4/2/12 4:15 PM
(c) Given: Use the subscripts D for the disc, S for the ship,
>
W for water, and E for Earth. vDS 5 4.2 m/s [forward];
>
vSE 5 4.6 km/h [forward] 5 1.278 m/s [forward];
>
vWE 5 1.1 m/s [forward]
>
Required: vDE
Analysis: Use the equation for relative velocity,
>
>
>
>
vDE 5 vDS 1 vSW 1 vWE. For the ship’s velocity, use the value
from part (a) after converting to metres per second.
Solution:
>
>
>
>
vDE 5 vDS 1 vSW 1 vWE
5 4.2 m/s 3 forward 4 1 1.278 m/s 3 forward 4
1 1.1 m/s 3 forward 4
>
vDE 5 6.6 m/s 3 forward 4
Statement: The velocity of the disc relative to Earth is
6.6 m/s [forward].
Sample Problem 2: Relative Motion in Two Dimensions at Right Angles
The boat in Figure 3 is heading due north as it crosses a wide
river. The velocity of the boat is 10.0 km/h relative to the water.
The river has a uniform velocity of 5.00 km/h due east. Determine
the boat’s velocity relative to an observer on the riverbank.
vWE
vBW
river
vBE
N
>
Required: vBE
>
>
>
Analysis: vBE 5 vBW 1 vWE. This problem involves vectors in two
dimensions, so we will use components to solve it. The vectors
form a right-angled triangle, so the solution is straightforward.
To determine the magnitude of the velocity of the boat relative to
the ground, we can use the Pythagorean theorem. Then we can
use the inverse tangent ratio to determine the direction.
>
>
>
Solution: 0 vBE 0 5 " 0 vBW 0 2 1 0 vWE 0 2
5 " 110.0 km/h2 2 1 15.00 km/h2 2
>
0 vBE 0 5 11.2 km/h
>
0 vWE 0
tan u 5 >
0 vBW 0
5
Figure 3
Given: Use the subscripts B for boat, W for water, and E for Earth.
>
>
vBW 5 10.0 km/h [N]; vWE 5 5.00 km/h [E]
5.00 km/h
10.0 km/h
u 5 26.68
Statement: The velocity of the boat relative to an observer on the
riverbank is 11.2 km/h [N 26.68 E].
Sample Problem 3: Relative Motion in Two Dimensions
The driver of the boat in Sample Problem 2 moves with the
same speed of 10.0 km/h relative to the water but now wants
to arrive across the water at a location that is due north of his
present location. The river is flowing east at 5.00 km/h.
In which direction should he head? What is the speed of the
boat, according to an observer on the shore?
Given: Use the subscripts B for boat, W for water, and E for Earth.
>
>
>
vBW 5 10.0 km/h [?]; vWE 5 5.00 km/h [E]; vBE 5 ? [N]
>
Required: 0 vBE 0 ; the heading of the boat, u
>
>
>
Analysis: vBE 5 vBW 1 vWE. This problem involves vectors in two
dimensions, but we do not know two complete vectors. So, first
we will draw the vector triangle and then resolve the triangle:
>
draw vBW in a northwest direction as shown in Figure 4, and
>
>
then add vWE head to tail. The sum of these two vectors, vBE,
must be directed north as shown. Determine the heading of the
boat using the definition of sine. To calculate the magnitude of
the velocity of the boat relative to an observer on shore, use the
Pythagorean theorem.
46
Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 46
Solution:
v WE
vBE
vBW
N
Figure 4
Determine the heading of the boat:
>
0 vWE 0
sin u 5 >
0 vBW 0
5
5.00 km/h
10.0 km/h
u 5 30.08
NEL
4/2/12 4:15 PM
>
>
>
0 vBE 0 5 " 0 vBW 0 2 2 0 vWE 0 2
Statement: The heading of the boat is N 30.08 W, and the speed
of the boat relative to the shore is 8.66 km/h.
5 " 110.0 km/h2 2 2 15.00 km/h2 2
>
0 vBE 0 5 8.66 km/h
Sample Problem 4: Using Trigonometry with Relative Motion
The air velocity of a small plane is 230 km/h [N 358 E] when the
wind is blowing at 75 km/h [W 258 S]. Determine the velocity of
the plane relative to the ground.
Given: Use the subscripts P for plane, A for air, and E for Earth.
>
>
vPA 5 230 km/h [N 358 E]; vAE 5 75 km/h [W 258 S]
>
Required: vPE
>
>
>
Analysis: vPE 5 vPA 1 vAE. This problem involves vectors in two
dimensions, so we will use components to solve it.
First, determine the components of each vector—the vector for
the airplane and the vector for the wind—using the 1y-direction
as north and the 1x-direction as east. Then use the Pythagorean
theorem to calculate the speed of the plane and the inverse
tangent ratio to calculate the direction of the plane.
Solution:
Airplane components:
230 sin 35°
131.9 km/h
N
Determine the vertical components, where the 1y-direction
is north:
>
>
>
1vPE 2 y 5 1vPA 2 y 1 1vAE 2 y
5 188.4 km/h 1 1231.7 km/h2
>
1vPE 2 y 5 156.7 km/h
Determine the horizontal components, where the 1x-direction
is east:
>
>
>
1vPE 2 x 5 1vPA 2 x 1 1vAE 2 x
5 131.9 km/h 1 1268.0 km/h2
>
1vPE 2 x 5 63.9 km/h
Calculate the magnitude of the velocity of the plane relative to
Earth and then the direction of the plane:
>
>
>
0 vPE 0 5 " 0 1vPE 2 y 0 2 1 0 1vPE 2 x 0 2
5 " 1156.7 km/h2 2 1 163.9 km/h2 2
>
0 vPE 0 5 170 km/h
(vvPE )x 63.9 km/h
230 cos 35°
188.4 km/h
35°
v PA
230 km/h [N 35° E]
(vvPE )y 156.7 km/h
22° vPE
Wind components:
75 cos 25° 68.0 km/h
25°
75 sin 25° 31.7 km/h
v AE 75 km/h [W 25° S]
tan u 5
5
>
0 1vPE 2 x 0
>
0 1vPE 2 y 0
63.9 km/h
156.7 km/h
u 5 228
Statement: The velocity of the plane relative to the ground is
170 km/h [N 228 E].
Practice
1. A group of teenagers on a ferry boat walk on the deck with a velocity of 1.1 m/s relative
to the deck. The ship is moving forward with a velocity of 2.8 m/s relative to the water.
K/U
T/I
A
(a) Determine the velocity of the teenagers relative to the water when they are walking to
the bow (front). [ans: 3.9 m/s [forward]]
(b) Determine the velocity of the teenagers relative to the water when they are walking to
the stern (rear). [ans: 1.7 m/s [forward]]
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1.6 Relative Motion
47
4/26/12 10:21 AM
2. An airplane flies due north over Sudbury with a velocity relative to the air of 235 km/h and
with a wind velocity of 65 km/h [NE]. Calculate the speed and direction of the airplane.
K/U
T/I
A
[ans: 280 km/h [E 818 N]]
3. A helicopter flies with an air speed of 175 km/h, heading south. The wind is blowing at
85 km/h to the east relative to the ground. Calculate the speed and direction of the helicopter.
K/U
T/I
A
[ans: 190 km/h [E 648 S]]
4. Suppose you are the pilot of a small plane flying due south between northern Ontario and
Barrie. You want to reach the airport in Barrie in 3.0 h. The airport is 450 km away, and the
wind is blowing from the west at 50.0 km/h. Determine the heading and air speed you should
use to reach your destination on time. K/U T/I A [ans: 160 km/h [S 188 W]]
5. A large ferry boat is moving north at 4.0 m/s [N] with respect to the shore, while a child is
running on the deck at a speed of 3.0 m/s. Determine the velocity of the child relative to Earth
when the child is running in the following directions with respect to the deck of the boat:
(a) north [ans: 7.0 m/s [N]]
(b) south [ans: 1.0 m/s [N]]
(c) east K/U T/I A [ans: 5.0 m/s [N 378 E]]
6. A plane is travelling with a velocity relative to the air of 3.5 3 102 km/h [N 358 W] as it
passes over Hamilton. The wind velocity is 62 km/h [S]. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the velocity of the plane relative to the ground. [ans: 3.0 3 102 km/h [N 428 W]]
(b) Determine the displacement of the plane after 1.2 h. [ans: 3.6 3 102 km [N 428 W]]
7. A person decides to swim across a river 84 m wide that has a current moving with a velocity of
0.40 m/s [E]. The person swims at 0.70 m/s [N] relative to the water. K/U T/I A
(a) What is the velocity of the person with respect to Earth? [ans: 0.81 m/s [N 308 E]]
(b) How long will it take to cross? [ans: 1.2 3 102 s]
(c) How far downstream will the person land? [ans: 48 m]
(d) In what direction should she swim if she lands at a point directly north of her starting
position? [ans: [N 358 W]]
8. Two canoeists paddle with the same speed relative to the water, but one moves upstream at
21.2 m/s and the other moves downstream at 12.9 m/s, both relative to Earth. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the speed of the water relative to Earth. [ans: 0.85 m/s]
(b) Determine the speed of each canoe relative to the water. [ans: 2.0 m/s]
9. An airplane maintains a velocity of 630 km/h [N] relative to the air as it makes a trip to a city
750 km away to the north. K/U T/I A
(a) How long will the trip take when the wind velocity is 35 km/h [S]? [ans: 1.3 h]
(b)How long will the same trip take when there is a tailwind of 35 km/h [N] instead?
Why does the answer change? [ans: 1.1 h]
(c)What will the pilot do if the wind velocity is 35 km/h [E] instead? How long will the trip
take in this case? [ans: 1.2 h]
48 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 48
NEL
4/2/12 4:15 PM
1.6
Review
Summary
• Relative motion is motion observed from a specific perspective or frame of
reference. Each frame of reference has its own coordinate system. Relative
velocity is the velocity of an object observed from a specific frame of reference.
>
>
>
• The relative velocity equation is vAC 5 vAB 1 vBC, where A is the object
moving relative to the frame of reference C, which is moving relative to the
frame of reference B.
Questions
1. A river has a steady current of 0.50 m/s [E]. A person
can swim at 1.2 m/s in still water. The person swims
upstream 1.0 km and then back to the starting point.
K/U
2.
3.
4.
5.
T/I
A
(a) How long does the trip take?
(b) Will the time change if he swims downstream
1.0 km and then back instead? Explain your
reasoning.
(c) How much time is required to complete the
same trip in still water? Why does the trip take
longer when there is a current?
An airplane has an air velocity of 200 m/s [W].
The wind velocity relative to the ground is
60 m/s [N]. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the velocity of the airplane relative
to the ground.
(b) The airplane now faces a headwind of 60 m/s [E].
Calculate how long it takes the airplane to fly
between two cities 300 km apart.
A helicopter travels at a velocity of 62 m/s [N]
with respect to the air. Calculate the velocity of the
helicopter with respect to Earth when the wind
velocity is as follows: K/U T/I A
(a) 18 m/s [N]
(c) 18 m/s [W]
(b) 18 m/s [S]
(d) 18 m/s [N 428 W]
A person can swim 0.65 m/s in still water. She
heads directly south across a river 130 m wide and
lands at a point 88 m [W] downstream. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the velocity of the water relative to
the ground.
(b) Determine the swimmer’s velocity relative to Earth.
(c) Determine the direction she should swim to land
at a point directly south of the starting point.
A pilot is required to fly directly from London,
United Kingdom, to Rome, Italy, in 3.4 h. The
displacement is 1.4 3 103 km [S 438 E]. The wind
velocity reported from the ground is 55 km/h [S].
Determine the required velocity of the plane relative
to the air. K/U T/I A
NEL
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 49
6. A pilot is flying to a destination 220 km [N] of her
present position. An air traffic controller on the
ground tells her the wind velocity is 42 km/h [N 368 E].
She knows her plane cruises at a speed of 230 km/h
relative to the air. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the heading of the plane.
(b) How long will the trip take?
7. An airplane flies 5.0 3 103 km from Boston to
San Francisco at an air speed of 250 m/s. On the
way to San Francisco, the airplane faces a headwind
of 50.0 m/s blowing from west to east, and a tailwind
of the same speed on the way back. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the average speed of the airplane
relative to the ground on the way west.
(b) Calculate the average speed of the airplane
relative to the ground on the way east.
8. A group of people on vacation on a cruise ship
decide to go up to the top floor. Some decide to take
an elevator, which moves at 2.0 m/s, while others
climb the stairs at 2.0 m/s. The stairs are at an angle
of elevation of 388 up from the east direction. The
boat is cruising at a velocity of 3.2 m/s [E] relative
to the water. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the velocity of the people in the
elevator relative to the water.
(b) Calculate the velocity of the people taking the
stairs relative to the water.
9. A car travels due east with a speed of 60.0 km/h
relative to the ground. Raindrops are falling at a
constant speed vertically relative to Earth. The
traces of the rain on the side windows of the car
make an angle of 70.08 with the vertical. Calculate
the velocity of the rain relative to (a) the car and
(b) Earth. K/U T/I A
10. A plane must reach a destination N 30.08 W of its
present position. The wind velocity is 48 km/h [W],
and the plane moves at 260 km/h relative to the air.
Determine (a) the heading of the plane and (b) the
speed of the plane relative to the ground. K/U T/I A
1.6 Relative Motion 49
4/2/12 4:15 PM
CHAPTER
1
Investigation
investigation 1.5.1
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Investigating Projectile Motion
A straightforward way to observe and analyze twodimensional projectile motion is to use an air table to
launch a puck (Figure 1). The air table reduces the friction
between the puck and the surface. If you change the angle
of the air table and launch a puck with a velocity parallel
to the inclined surface, the puck accelerates, undergoing
projectile motion.
SKIllS MENU
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Do not touch the surface of the air table when the spark
generator is on—you will get a shock. Keep both pucks in
contact with the carbon paper on the air table when the
generator is on. Keep the angle of elevation small.
Procedure
1. Raise one end of the air table, and use trigonometry
or a protractor to determine the angle of incline as
accurately as possible. Keep the angle low.
2. Turn the air table on but not the sparker. Have one
person be ready to catch the puck before it hits the
edge of the table.
3. Starting with the puck close to the top corner of the
table, practise each of the following motions:
motion A: vix 5 0; viy 5 0
motion B: vix . 0; viy 5 0
motion C: vix . 0; viy . 0
4. Turn on the sparker—use a low frequency, such as
10 Hz—and create motions A, B, and C from Step 3.
Use a separate sheet of construction paper for each
motion. Label each motion, including the period and
frequency of the sparker.
> >
>
5. Draw between 6 and 10 velocity vectors, v1, v2, . . . , vn,
to represent the linear motion of motion A (Figure 2).
(To determine the velocity vectors, draw displacement
vectors and divide each one by the time interval for
the displacement.)
sparker wire
puck
carbon paper
Figure 1 Air table with pucks
Purpose
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
To analyze two-dimensional projectile motion using an
air table
A2.4
∆d1 v1 Equipment and Materials
• air table with sparker puck
• material to support one end of the air table,
such as bricks
• metric ruler
• protractor
• construction paper
50
Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 50
∆d2
∆d1
∆t
∆d
v2 2
∆t
∆v
v2
v1
Figure 2 Motion A
NEL
4/2/12 4:15 PM
>
6. Calculate the corresponding Dv vectors using
vector subtraction.
>
7. Calculate the average acceleration for each Dv vector
using the equation
>
>
vn11 2 vn
>
aav, n 5
Dt
>
>
where Dt is the time interval between vn and vn11.
Finally, calculate the average acceleration of all
>
aav, n values.
8. Repeat Steps 5, 6, and 7 for motion B (Figure 3).
(Ignore sparker dots created when the puck comes
near the edge of the table or is in contact with the
pushing force.)
v1 motion
∆d1
∆t
v2 ∆v
∆d2
∆t
v1
Figure 3 Motion B
9. Repeat Steps 5, 6, and 7 for motion C (Figure 4).
v2
v1
v1
∆v
Analyze and Evaluate
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5
(a) Compare the magnitude and direction of acceleration
of the three motions you tested. T/I
(b) Determine the magnitude of acceleration down the
inclined plane. Use the equation a 5 g sin u, where g
is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s2). T/I
(c) Calculate the percent difference between your answer
in (b) and the other average accelerations. T/I
(d) Why do you think you calculated the percent
difference rather than the percent error in (c)?
Explain your answer. T/I C
(e) What is the direction of the acceleration of a projectile
on an inclined plane? T/I
(f) Describe random and systematic sources of error in
this investigation. How could you minimize these
sources of error? T/I
Apply and Extend
(g) Explain why the vertical component of projectile
motion on an inclined plane is independent of the
horizontal component. K/U
(h) Use a simulation to observe the motion of various
projectiles. Manipulate the variables in the simulation,
and observe how changing these variables affects
the motion of the different objects. Summarize your
results in a few paragraphs or a graphic organizer.
K/U
T/I
C
A
motion
WEB LINK
Figure 4 Motion C
NEL
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Chapter 1 investigation
51
4/2/12 4:16 PM
CHAPTER
1
SUMMARY
Summary Questions
1. Create a study guide for this chapter based on the
Key Concepts on page 6. For each point, create three or
four subpoints that provide further information, relevant
examples, explanatory diagrams, or general equations.
2. Look back at the Starting Points questions on page 6.
Answer these questions using what you have learned
in this chapter. Compare your latest answers with the
answers that you wrote at the beginning of the chapter.
Note how your answers have changed.
3. Draw a diagram showing the path of a ball undergoing
projectile motion. Show the magnitude and direction
of the horizontal and vertical components. Make
separate vector diagrams for displacement, velocity,
and acceleration. Describe the possible effects of air
resistance on these quantities.
Vocabulary
kinematics (p. 8)
average speed (p. 9)
instantaneous speed (p. 12)
projectile (p. 36)
dynamics (p. 8)
velocity (p. 9)
average acceleration (p. 14)
range (p. 36)
scalar (p. 8)
average velocity (p. 9)
projectile motion (p. 36)
vector (p. 8)
secant (p. 9)
instantaneous acceleration
(p. 14)
position (p. 8)
tangent (p. 12)
free fall (p. 20)
relative velocity (p. 44)
instantaneous velocity (p. 12)
component of a vector (p. 25)
displacement (p. 8)
frame of reference (p. 44)
CAREER PATHwAYS
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college diploma,
a B.Sc. degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or postgraduate
degrees. The graphic organizer below shows a few pathways to careers mentioned
in this chapter.
1. Select an interesting career from the graphic organizer below or another
career that relates to the study of kinematics and interests you. Research the
educational pathway you would need to follow to pursue this career. Summarize
your findings and share them with a classmate.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A6
cartographer
B.Sc.
GIS analyst
12U Physics
Ph.D.
OSSD
B.Eng.
robotics engineer
flight engineer
11U Physics
naval officer
college diploma
police officer
CAREER LINK
52
Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 52
NEL
4/2/12 4:16 PM
CHAPTER
1
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Under what condition is the average velocity equal to
the instantaneous velocity? (1.1) K/U
(a) always
(b) when an object is moving with constant velocity
(c) when an object is moving with constant acceleration
(d) never
2. The space shuttle accelerates to 28 162 km/h
in 8.5 min during a launch. What is the average
acceleration? (1.1) K/U T/I
(a) 7.5 m/s2
(b) 13 m/s2
(c) 14 m/s2
(d) 15 m/s2
3. An object moving with initial speed vi starts to slow
down with an acceleration of magnitude a. How far
does the object travel before stopping? (1.2) K/U T/I
2v 2i
(a)
2a
v 2i
(b)
2a
vi
(c)
2a
3v 2i
(d)
2a
4. When adding multiple two-dimensional displacement
vectors, which of the following methods is most
appropriate to accurately determine the total
displacement? (1.3) K/U
(a) scale diagram method
(b) trigonometric method
(c) algebraic component method
(d) magnitude adding method
5. For a car moving forward and then to the right,
how does the average speed compare to the average
velocity? (1.4) K/U
(a) The average speed is larger because the distance is
greater than the magnitude of the displacement.
(b) The average velocity is larger because the magnitude
of the displacement is greater than the distance.
(c) They are equal because the time is the same
for both.
(d) The average speed is larger because the magnitude
of the displacement is larger than the distance.
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. A batter hits the ball in the air. The time the ball takes
before it hits the ground depends on which of the
following? (1.5) K/U
(a) only the angle at which the ball is hit
(b) the material from which the ball is made
(c) only the initial speed with which the ball is hit
(d) both the angle and the initial speed with which
the ball is hit
7. A person is swimming with the flow of a stream.
The swimmer’s speed relative to the stream is
1.5 km/h, and the stream’s speed relative to the bank
is 1.0 km/h. What is the speed of the swimmer relative
to the bank? (1.6) K/U T/I
(a) 0.5 km/h
(b) 1.0 km/h
(c) 1.5 km/h
(d) 2.5 km/h
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
8. The instantaneous velocity at a particular time is
the slope of the displacement–time curve at that
position. (1.1) K/U
9. An object can be in free fall after it is dropped or after
it is thrown upward. (1.2) K/U
10. The addition of two displacement vectors depends on
the order in which they are added. (1.3) K/U
11. If the velocity vector of an object changes only in
direction, the average acceleration is zero. (1.4) K/U
12. For a ball thrown in a parabolic path, the y-component
of the velocity at the highest point in its trajectory is
equal to zero. (1.5) K/U
13. A stone projected horizontally from a cliff will reach
the ground faster than a stone dropped vertically
down from the same cliff. (1.5) K/U
14. The velocity of two cyclists relative to each other, if
they are moving in the same direction with equal
speed of 20 m/s, is zero. (1.6) K/U
>
>
15. If vAB 5 18.3 m/s 3 S 4 , then vBA 5 218.3 m/s 3 N 4 .
(1.6) K/U
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB L INK
NEL
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 53
Chapter 1 Self-Quiz 53
4/2/12 4:16 PM
CHAPTER
1
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Which is true for both uniform velocity and uniform
acceleration as depicted by velocity–time graphs?
(1.1) K/U
(a) The velocity–time graphs for both uniform
velocity and uniform acceleration are always
straight lines.
(b) The velocity–time graphs for both uniform
velocity and uniform acceleration are always
parallel to the x-axis.
(c) The velocity–time graphs for both uniform
velocity and uniform acceleration are always
parallel to the y-axis.
(d) The velocity–time graphs for both uniform
velocity and uniform acceleration are always
perpendicular to the y-axis.
2. You are standing at the origin of a set of coordinate
axes. You walk 4.0 m [E] and then 4.0 m [N].
What is your displacement? (1.3) K/U T/I A
(a) 5.7 m [NW]
(b) 5.7 m [NE]
(c) 8.0 m [NW]
(d) 8.0 m [NE]
3. You walk 10 m [E 308 N]. What are the horizontal
and vertical components of your displacement,
respectively? (1.3) K/U T/I A
(a) 9 m, 5 m
(b) 5 m, 9 m
(c) 5 m, 5 m
(d) 9 m, 9 m
4. The speed of an object moving in a straight line
increases from 10 m/s to 20 m/s in 2 s. What is the
average acceleration? (1.4) K/U T/I A
(a) 5 m/s2 in the direction of motion of the object
(b) 5 m/s2 in the direction perpendicular to the
motion of the object
(c) 5 m/s2 in the direction opposite to the motion of
the object
(d) "5 m/s2 in the direction of motion of the object
54 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 54
Thinking/Investigation
T/I
C
Communication
A
Application
5. The motion of a projectile is described in a coordinate
system. At a particular instant, the magnitude of the
horizontal component of velocity is 5 m/s and the
magnitude of the vertical component of velocity is
8 m/s. Which is correct about the object? (1.5) K/U A
(a) The projectile is at its maximum height.
(b) The projectile is about to hit the ground.
(c) The projectile is ascending.
(d) The projectile has hit the ground.
6. A river flows with velocity 8 m/s [N] relative to the
bank. A boat travels with a velocity of 6 m/s [E]
relative to the river. What is the magnitude of the
velocity of the boat relative to the bank? (1.6)
K/U
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
T/I
A
8 m/s
10 m/s
12 m/s
14 m/s
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
7. Speed is always a positive quantity or zero, but never
negative. (1.1) K/U
8. Average speed is the sum of all instantaneous speeds.
(1.1) K/U
9. Velocity is the slope of the position–time graph,
and acceleration is the slope of the velocity–time
graph. (1.1) K/U
10. When a moving object starts to slow down on a
straight track, the average acceleration of the object
at any time interval after it starts slowing down is
positive. (1.2) K/U
11. When two displacement vectors of equal magnitude
are aligned opposite to each other, the resultant
displacement is zero. (1.3) K/U
12. The average velocity of an object is always greater
than or equal to the average speed. (1.4) K/U
13. A ball thrown horizontally from a cliff is an example
of projectile motion. (1.5) K/U
14. Two students running toward each other with the
same speed have the same velocity vector relative to
each other. (1.6) K/U
NEL
4/2/12 4:16 PM
Write a short answer to each question.
15. A toy car is moving on a straight track. (1.1)
(a) Can the toy car have a constant velocity but a
varying speed? Explain.
(b) Is the numerical ratio of speed to velocity of the
toy car equal to one? Explain.
16. Is it possible for an object to have constant speed and
variable velocity? Explain your answer. (1.1) K/U T/I C
17. Can two displacement vectors of the same length have
a vector sum of zero? (1.3) K/U
18. Why can a sprinting football player not stop instantly?
(1.4) K/U
19. A skier jumps off a ramp. In this case, air resistance is
not negligible. How will air resistance affect the range
and the speed with which she lands on the ground?
(1.5) K/U
20. Explain what relative motion is using an example not
mentioned in this section. (1.6) K/U C
21. In your own words, define relative velocity.
(1.6) K/U C
K/U
C
A
Understanding
22. Discuss whether an object can have acceleration
without speeding up or slowing down. (1.1) K/U T/I C
23. Table 1 shows the combinations of values and
corresponding signs for the velocity and the
acceleration of an object in one dimension. Give an
example of each situation in the table. (1.1) K/U A
Table 1
(a) positive
(b) positive
(c) positive
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 55
35. Describe the motion of an object in segments P, Q,
R, and S in the position–time graph in Figure 1.
(1.1) K/U T/I A
Acceleration
negative
zero
Position v. Time
80
positive
24. Compare the position–time graph and velocity–time
graph for an object in uniform motion. Include a
simple diagram of each. (1.1) K/U C
25. You note the odometer and the speedometer readings
of your car at equal intervals of time over a long trip.
What information about the motion of the car can
you get from these readings? (1.1) K/U C
26. You throw a ball vertically upward, and it falls
back to your hand. Identify the points where the
instantaneous velocity is the same as the average
velocity for the entire motion. (1.1) K/U T/I
27. Discuss what conditions are needed for three
displacement vectors to have a vector sum of zero.
(1.3) K/U C A
NEL
Analysis and Application
d (m [E])
Velocity
28. Provide an example in which an object moves in two
dimensions but has acceleration in one dimension.
(1.3) K/U A
29. A ball is thrown vertically upward from the roof of
a building and lands back on the roof. Compare the
displacement of the ball and the ball’s velocity as seen
from the roof and as seen by a person on the ground.
(1.3) K/U
30. Give an example of why velocity and not acceleration
should be taken into account when predicting the
direction of motion of an object. (1.4) K/U C A
31. For a long jump event, describe the factors that
affect the distance an athlete jumps. (1.5) K/U T/I A
32. A ball is dropped from the window of a moving
car. Will the time it takes to fall to the ground
be the same, more, or less than the time it takes
to fall if the car is stationary? Explain your answer.
(1.5) K/U C A
33. An object is at rest as well as in motion at the same
time. Explain how this can be. (1.6) K/U C
34. You are piloting a fishing boat directly across
a fast-moving river to reach a pier directly
opposite your starting point. Explain how you
would navigate the boat in terms of your velocity
relative to the water. (1.6) K/U C
R
60
P
20
0
S
Q
40
0
2.0
4.0
6.0
t (s)
Figure 1
36. You start 1.5 m from a reference point, walk at a
constant speed for 5 s, stay at this position for 1 s,
and finally walk back with the same speed as earlier
for the next 3 s. Draw a position–time graph of your
movement. (1.1) K/U T/I C
37. Use concepts from this chapter to explain how a
juggler is able to juggle balls with perfect timing.
(1.2) K/U T/I A
Chapter 1 Review 55
4/2/12 4:16 PM
56 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 56
47. A car slows down from 100.0 km/h to 0 km/h in 5.2 s.
Determine the braking distance needed for the
vehicle to come to a complete stop. (1.2) T/I A
48. A ball is thrown vertically upward from the ground
with a velocity of 30.0 m/s. (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) How long will the ball take to rise to its
highest point?
(b) How high does the ball rise?
(c) How long after the throw will the ball have a
velocity of 10.0 m/s [upward]?
(d) How long after the throw will the ball have a
velocity of 10.0 m/s [downward]?
(e) At what time is the displacement of the ball zero?
49. Figure 2 shows the velocity of an object plotted as a
function of time. (1.2) T/I A
Velocity v. Time
50
40
v (m/s [S])
38. A squirrel drops a nut from the top of a tree, and the
nut falls to the ground. It takes 2.0 s for the nut to
reach the ground. Calculate the height of the squirrel
above the ground. (1.2) K/U T/I A
39. An athlete is running at a constant speed of 9 m/s. He
takes 3 s to come to a stop after he crosses the finish
line. Calculate his average acceleration from when he
crosses the finish line to when he stops. (1.2) T/I A
40. At the start of a 100.0 m race, a sprinter increases her
speed to 9.0 m/s in 2.0 s. (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the acceleration of the sprinter during
the first 2.0 s?
(b) From this point, she runs the rest of the race with
the same speed. Calculate the time to reach the
finish line.
41. A race car reduces its speed from 20.0 m/s and comes
to a complete stop after 50.0 m. (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the acceleration of the race car.
(b) Calculate the time taken by the race car to come
to a complete stop.
42. A bowler releases a ball at a bowling alley with a
speed of 5.0 m/s. The ball covers the distance of
10.0 m to the pins in 2.2 s. Calculate the acceleration
of the ball. (1.2) K/U T/I A
43. One stone is dropped from the top of a tall cliff, and a
second stone with the same mass is thrown vertically
from the same cliff with a velocity of 10.0 m/s [down],
0.50 s after the first. Calculate the distance below the
top of the cliff at which the second stone overtakes
the first. (1.2) K/U T/I A
44. Suppose the acceleration due to gravity on a certain
planet is 2.0 m/s2. (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) Will the height a high jumper can jump on this
planet increase or decrease compared to a high
jumper on Earth?
(b) How high could you throw a baseball with an
initial speed of 5 m/s on this planet?
45. A small aircraft is flying in a strong wind. The plane
moves in a direction 608 west of south with a speed
of 60 m/s. Determine the component of its velocity
directed due west. (1.2) K/U T/I A
46. At the instant the traffic light turns green, a car starts
from rest with a constant acceleration of 2 m/s2. At
that instant, a truck travelling with a constant speed
of 10 m/s overtakes and passes the car. (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) How far beyond its starting point will the car
overtake the truck?
(b) Calculate how fast the car will be travelling.
30
20
10
0
0
3
5
9
12
14
16
t (s)
Figure 2
50.
51.
52.
53.
(a) Calculate the instantaneous acceleration at
t 5 3 s, t 5 10 s, and t 5 13 s.
(b) What is the average acceleration for the
complete motion?
A ball thrown vertically upward passes the same
height, h, at 2 s and 10 s on its way up and down,
respectively. Calculate h. (1.2) K/U T/I A
Equation 3 in Table 1, page 18, is the equation
of motion from which vf has been eliminated.
Show that Equation 3 is dimensionally correct.
(1.2) K/U T/I
Refer to Table 1, page 18. (1.2) K/U T/I
(a) Use Equations 1 and 2 to derive Equation 4.
(b) Use Equations 1 and 2 to derive Equation 5.
Design an experimental procedure to determine the
acceleration of a ball rolling down a slope. Describe
your design in a few sentences. Which variables
will you measure, and how will you calculate the
acceleration? If possible, perform the activity.
(1.2) T/I C A
NEL
4/2/12 4:16 PM
v (m/s [W])
54. The velocity–time graph in Figure 3 describes the
motion of an object. (1.2) K/U T/I A
80
Velocity v. Time
40
60. A golf ball is hit from the ground, and it goes into a
parabolic trajectory. What is the average acceleration
in the x-direction? (1.4) K/U T/I A
61. The velocity–time graph in Figure 5 shows the
motion of a ball. (1.4) K/U T/I C A
0
40
v
Velocity v. Time
0 10 20 30 40 50
t (s)
t
Figure 3
55.
56.
57.
58.
(a) At which intervals is the acceleration of the object
positive, at which intervals is it negative, and at
which intervals is it zero?
(b) Determine the average acceleration of the object
for the complete motion.
(c) Determine the time(s) when the object changes
its direction.
(d) How does the displacement between times 0 s
and 10 s compare with the displacement between
10 s and 15 s?
You throw a dart horizontally with a speed of 10.0 m/s.
The dart hits the board 0.49 m below the height from
which it was thrown. Calculate your distance from
the board. (1.3) K/U T/I A
>
Vector A of length 5.0 units makes an angle of 458 to
>
another vector, B , of length 5.0 units along the positive
>
>
x-axis. Determine the components of A 2 B . (1.3) T/I A
A car travels 20.0 km due north and then 25.0 km
in a direction 60.08 west of north. Determine the
magnitude and direction of the car’s resultant
displacement. (1.3) K/U T/I A
>
>
In Figure 4, vectors d 1 and d 2 represent two
displacements of a student. (1.3) K/U T/I A
Figure 5
62.
63.
64.
65.
y
d1
6.0 m
23°
8.0 m
d2
dT
x
66.
Figure 4
(a) Determine the components
of the resultant
>
displacement, d T.
(b) Determine the total displacement of the student.
59. A car is moving with a velocity of 15 m/s [E].
It makes a turn steadily in 5.0 s so that the velocity
is 12 m/s [E 258 N]. Determine the average
acceleration of the car. (1.4) K/U T/I A
NEL
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 57
67.
(a) Sketch, qualitatively, the corresponding
position–time graph.
(b) Sketch, qualitatively, the corresponding
acceleration–time graph.
A cyclist moves with a constant acceleration, covering
the distance between two points in 6.0 s. The distance
between these two points is 60.0 m. Her speed at the
second point is 15 m/s. Calculate her acceleration and
the speed at the first point. (1.4) K/U T/I A
A puma can jump to a height of 3.7 m when its
initial velocity is at an angle of 458 to the horizontal.
Calculate the initial speed of the puma. (1.5) K/U T/I A
Two footballs are kicked from the ground with equal
initial speeds. Ball A is launched at a greater angle
above the horizontal than ball B. (1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine which ball reaches a higher elevation.
(b) Determine which ball stays in the air longer.
(c) Is it possible to calculate which ball travels
farther?
A baseball player hits a 200.0 m home run. The
ball travels at an angle of 458 with the horizontal
just after being hit. Determine the initial speed
with which the ball left the bat. Assume that air
resistance is negligible and that the ball lands at
approximately the same height from which it
was hit. (1.5) K/U T/I A
A basketball player is standing 9.5 m from the
basket, which is at a height of 3.1 m. She throws
the ball from an initial height of 2.0 m at an angle
of 358 above the horizontal. The ball goes straight
through the basket. Determine the initial speed of
the ball. (1.5) K/U T/I A
A batter hits a ball, which flies at an angle of 458 with
the horizontal. The ball’s speed after being hit by the
bat is 30.0 m/s. Calculate the time the ball stays in
the air. The ball lands at the same height at which it
was hit. Air resistance is negligible. (1.5) K/U T/I A
Chapter 1 Review 57
4/2/12 4:16 PM
68. A firefighter aims a hose at an angle of 60.08 with the
horizontal. The water comes out of the hose with a
speed of 60.0 m/s. (1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the maximum height the water can
reach.
(b) Determine the horizontal distance the water
travels from the hose.
69. A dolphin leaps out of the water at an angle of 60.08
above the horizontal. The horizontal component
of the dolphin’s velocity is 8.0 m/s. Calculate the
magnitude of the vertical component of its velocity.
(1.5) K/U T/I A
70. A tennis ball is struck such that it leaves the racquet
with a horizontal speed of 28.0 m/s. The ball hits
the top of the net, and the player loses the point.
What could she have done to avoid losing the point?
(1.5) K/U T/I A
71. An athlete in a long jump trial leaves the ground at
a certain angle and covers a horizontal distance of
8.7 m. The speed with which he can jump remains
constant. What should he do to increase the distance
of his jump? (1.5) K/U T/I A
72. In a snowball fight, a person throws one snowball at
26 m/s at an angle of 758 above the horizontal. While
the target (his friend) is watching the snowball, he
throws another at a smaller angle and the same speed
as the first person, and both snowballs hit the friend
at the same spot at the same time. Assume that the
snowballs land at the same level as the initial throw.
(1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the range of the first snowball?
(b) At what angle was the second snowball thrown?
(c) How long was the second snowball thrown after
the first?
73. A soccer player kicks the ball in a parabolic path.
The ball leaves the player’s foot with a speed of
27 m/s, making an angle of 20.08 with the horizontal.
(1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the maximum height of its trajectory.
(b) Determine its speed as it hits the ground again.
Air resistance is negligible.
74. In a practice session, a volleyball player hits a ball
horizontally with a speed of 27 m/s from a height
of 2.4 m. The ball travels until it hits the ground.
(1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the time the ball is in the air.
(b) Determine the horizontal distance travelled by
the ball.
(c) Calculate the ball’s speed as it hits the ground.
58 Chapter 1 • Kinematics
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 58
75. A boat is heading due north across a river with a
speed of 12.0 km/h relative to the water. The water in
the river has a uniform velocity of 6.00 km/h due east
relative to the ground. Determine the velocity of the
boat relative to an observer standing on either bank.
(1.6) K/U T/I A
76. A person on a raft is drifting downstream with the
current. Suddenly he dives off the raft and swims
upstream for a quarter of an hour. He then swims
downstream at the same velocity with respect to the
water and catches back up to the raft at a position
1.0 km downstream from where he started. What
is the speed of the current, in kilometres per hour?
(1.6) K/U T/I A
77. A swimmer swims across a river at a velocity of
0.45 m/s [N] with respect to the water. The current
is 2.5 m/s [W]. She crosses the river in 200.0 s.
Determine the width of the river. (1.6) K/U T/I A
78. The current in a 35 m–wide river flows at a speed of
0.25 m/s. A student rows a boat directly across the
river. The boat takes exactly 4.0 min to cross the river.
Calculate the velocity of the boat relative to the water.
(1.6) K/U T/I A
79. A plane is flying at 290 km/h [E 428 S] relative to
the air when the wind velocity is 65 km/h [E 258 N].
Calculate the velocity of the plane relative to the
ground. (1.6) K/U C
Evaluation
80. Two balls of different masses but the same surface
area are dropped from the same height. Using
equations of motion, prove that the time taken
for both the balls to reach the ground is the same.
(1.2) T/I A
81. Give an example of a scientific activity where the
concepts of vectors and vector addition can be
helpful. (1.4) K/U A
82. A javelin thrower argues with her coach that if her
throw can keep the javelin in the air for a longer time,
it will always travel a greater distance. Is the argument
correct? Explain why or why not. (1.5) K/U T/I A
83. Using the concepts in the chapter, explain why
an archer should aim at a point higher than the
bull’s-eye. (1.5) K/U T/I C A
84. Under non-windy conditions, a golfer can hit 200 m
when the angle of flight of the ball is 128. On a
particular day, the wind is blowing from behind the
golfer. Evaluate and explain how he should change
the angle of flight of the ball such that it reaches a
distance greater than 200 m. (1.5) K/U T/I A
NEL
4/2/12 4:16 PM
K/U
T/I
A
Reflect on Your Learning
87. What did you find different from your preconceptions
and intuitive understanding of the motion of
objects? Which concept did you find most difficult
to understand? Why was it difficult, and what helped
clarify it? T/I C
88. You learned about different ways the motion of an
object is measured and depicted and how various
other parameters are calculated. Can you explain
various physical phenomena where these concepts
can be applied? Are there any exceptions to these
concepts and theories in the real world? C A
89. Many people struggle to understand why the vertical
acceleration of a projectile is constant. What helped
to clarify this concept for you? T/I C
90. How can you apply the concepts in this chapter
to enhance your performance in the sports you
play? C A
Research
WEB LINK
91. Research how various scientists throughout history,
such as Aristotle, Galileo, and Newton, have
studied the motion of objects. Research the various
experiments they conducted to test different laws.
Create a timeline of advancements made by various
scientists on the theory of motion and projectile
motion. T/I C A
92. Research dirt bike tracks, and choose one. Research
the design of the dirt bike track, with specific
reference to the ramps and turns and how their
design aids and affects the bikers’ performance. Refer
to velocity, acceleration, and trajectory. Identify the
theories of kinematics that are used. T/I C A
NEL
8160_CH01_p030-059.indd 59
93. Select a sport, and research how the theories of
motion are involved in various aspects of the sport.
Formulate a plan using the theories of motion to
help an athlete perform better in the chosen sport.
Your plan should contain concepts of trajectories and
velocities. Describe the motion of any equipment
used in the sport. T/I C A
94. In a 100 m race at the Olympics or any other
prestigious event, runners start from rest and complete
the event so quickly that it is difficult to see what is
actually happening. Research the motion that occurs
during one such event by looking up the split times
for a particular runner. Use the terminology from this
chapter to describe in detail how the runner moved
to complete the race. Identify where the acceleration
was largest and if at any time the velocity was basically
uniform. Does the runner slow down at any time
during the race? To help with your explanation, draw
simple sketches of the motion graphs. T/I C A
95. A car driver’s reaction time is the average time
required for a driver to apply the brakes after seeing
an emergency. The average reaction times for a car
driver under the influence of alcohol are shown in
Figure 6. T/I C A
Reaction time (s)
85. The value for g on planet A is greater than the value
for g on Earth, and the value for g on planet B is less
than the value for g on Earth. An object is launched
from planet A, and an identical object is launched from
planet B. Both objects travel in a parabolic path.
Speculate on how the equations and values for the
time of flight, horizontal range, and maximum height
compare to those on Earth. (1.5) T/I A
86. Using a projectile launcher, you launch a snowball
at an angle of 358 from the roof of a building that is
45 m tall. The initial speed of the snowball is 29 m/s.
The snowball lands on the ground. Your friend says
the horizontal range of the snowball is 81 m. Is your
friend correct? Explain why or why not. (1.5)
3.0
2.0
1.0
0
0
1
2
3
4
Number of beers
5
Figure 6
(a) Use Figure 6 to complete Table 2.
Table 2
Speed
Reaction distance (m)
No alcohol 4 bottles of beer 5 bottles of beer
17 m/s (60 km/h)
25 m/s (90 km/h)
33 m/s (120 km/h)
(b) Using the Internet and other sources, research the
effects of alcohol on the average reaction time.
Search for direct evidence on how drivers are
impaired when under the influence of alcohol.
Prepare a brief summary of your findings.
(c) Some say there is no safe level of alcohol that can
be consumed by drivers. Discuss the validity of
this statement using examples from your research.
Chapter 1 Review 59
4/2/12 4:16 PM
CHAPTER
2
Dynamics
how Does our Understanding of Forces Affect
the Design and Use of Technology?
KEY CONCEPTS
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• demonstrate an understanding
of how forces affect the motion
of an object
• solve two-dimensional motion
and force problems
• predict the motion and forces
acting on a system of objects
and the forces involved
• explain the advantages and
disadvantages of friction in
situations involving various
planes
• conduct investigations into the
motion of a system of objects
• analyze a technological device
that applies the principles of
linear motion and assess the
social and environmental impact
of the device
Race car designers understand the forces that lead to speeding up and slowing
down. The car’s engine turns the wheels, which propel the car forward using
the force of friction between the tires and the road. The larger the force of
static friction between the tires and the road, the greater the acceleration. If
the driver tries to accelerate too quickly, the wheels overcome the force of
static friction and slip, spinning in place. When the tires slip on the road, the
force of kinetic friction causes the burning rubber that you see in the image
on the facing page. Once the car is moving, more frictional forces, such as air
resistance, act to slow the car down.
The shape of the car is also important. Shape affects the air resistance as
well as the force that the air exerts on the car. With an efficient body design,
there is an increased downward force from the air. An increased downward
force increases the normal force on the car, which affects the static friction between the tires and the road. As a result, the car can accelerate more
without slipping.
Decreasing the amount of friction between the moving parts inside the car
(the engine, the transmission, and other parts) is also important for maximizing speed. Motor oils help decrease the friction between the gears and
other moving parts, increasing the total force the tires can apply backward to
the road, propelling the car forward.
If the race car crashes, what happens to the driver? Newton’s laws tell
us that a sudden slowing down in the case of a crash means a large force on
the driver. The car’s safety features slow the driver in a way that decreases
the force and, therefore, the effect of the force. New designs can also help
make more efficient use of the materials required to make the car safe and
reduce the environmental impact of production of not only race cars but
everyday cars as well.
In this chapter, you will apply Newton’s laws of motion to learn how forces
affect the motion of an object in two dimensions.
STARTiNG PoINTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later,
applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
3. What safety features are visible in the car shown in
the image?
1. What forces are acting on the race car in the image on
the facing page? What effect, if any, does each force
have on the motion of the car?
5. What design features in a race car can be used to
improve the safety or operation of a typical family
car? If the features are not used in a family car,
explain why.
2. What features of the car help reduce resistance due to
the air and internal friction?
60
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 60
4. What dangers should a race car driver be aware of?
NEL
4/27/12 7:30 AM
Mini Investigation
Describing Motion Using Newton’s Laws
Skills: Predicting, Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
At three different stations, you will model situations that
demonstrate Newton’s laws of motion. The first law describes
what happens to an object that has a total force of zero acting
on it. The second law describes the relationship between
force and acceleration. The third law describes how an object
reacts to a force exerted on it.
Station 2
2. Use a string to attach the 50 g mass to the cart. Run the
string over the pulley at the edge of the table so that when
you release the mass it pulls the cart. Repeat the process
with the 200 g mass.
C. Describe the speed of the cart as the mass pulls it.
K/U
Equipment and Materials: pulley; 2 carts of equal mass, one
spring-loaded; 50 g mass; 200 g mass; string
D. Describe how the motion of the cart changes with the
different masses. K/U
Station 1
1. Place the 50 g mass on top of the cart. Slowly push the
cart toward the wall. Observe what happens to the mass
when the cart hits the wall.
E. Which of Newton’s laws describes the motion of the cart
when pulled by the mass? Explain your answer. K/U
Take care when moving the mass and cart. Do not
wear open-toed shoes. Do not allow the cart or the
masses to fall on your hands or feet.
A. What happens to the mass when the cart hits the wall?
Station 3
3. Place the two carts end to end with the loaded spring
between them. Allow the spring to suddenly release.
F. What happens to each cart when the spring expands?
K/U
G. Which of Newton’s laws describes this motion? Explain
your answer. K/U
K/U
B. Which of Newton’s laws describes what happens to the
motion of the mass? Explain your answer. K/U
NEL
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 61
Introduction 61
4/27/12 2:09 PM
2.1
Figure 1 A trebuchet converts the force
of gravity downward on the counterweight
into the motion of the projectile.
>
force (F ) a push or a pull
newton the SI unit of force; symbol N
contact force a force that acts between
two objects when they touch each other
non-contact force a force that acts
between two objects without the
objects touching; also called actionat-a-distance force
>
force of gravity (F g) the force of attraction
between all objects due to mass
>
normal force (F N ) a force perpendicular
to the surface between objects in contact
Forces and Free-Body Diagrams
Understanding forces is essential for designing and developing technologies, both
ancient and modern. For example, the machine in Figure 1 is a model of an ancient
weapon called a trebuchet. Trebuchets were used for hundreds of years, before gunpowder was available, to launch projectiles into cities under siege. In a trebuchet, the
force of gravity pulls downward on a counterweight. That force causes the motion of
WEB LINK
the projectile, which can travel quite quickly.
A modern example of converting force into motion is the linear actuator, which
can be used to reduce the strain of repetitive motion in the workplace. A motor drives
a series of gears or screws, which convert the motor’s power into the force of the
actuator. You will learn more about linear actuators in Section 2.5.
Common Forces
A force is a push or a pull. The measure of force in the SI system of units is called the
newton (N). You encounter different kinds of forces every day. A force can even stabilize
an object by counteracting another force on that object. Physicists classify forces as
contact forces, where one object exerts a force on another object when they touch each
other, and non-contact forces, such as gravity, where the two objects need not touch to
exert a force on each other. Non-contact forces are also called action-at-a-distance forces.
Earth’s force of gravity is responsible for everything from keeping your textbooks
on your desk to keeping satellites in orbit around Earth. The force of gravity is an
attractive force: all objects have mass and therefore attract each other. This attraction
is quite weak when the objects are small or far apart. Earth exerts a relatively large
attractive force on everything around you compared to other masses because Earth
is so massive compared to other masses on Earth, such as buildings and bridges. For
example, the gravitational attraction between a 30.0 kg desk and a 1.0 kg textbook
0.10 m apart is only 2.0 3 1027 N, but Earth’s force on the same textbook is 9.8 N.
If Earth’s force of gravity pulls downward on the textbook on your desk, why does
the book remain stationary? There must be a force pushing up on the book perpendicular to the surface to balance the force of gravity. This balancing force is called the
normal force, which is a force perpendicular to the surface between objects in contact.
In Figure 2, the normal force points upward because the contact surface is parallel
to the ground.
normal force
force of gravity
Figure 2 For a stationary object such as this textbook resting on a desk, Earth’s gravity pulls
downward while the normal force of the desk pushes upward, so the book does not move.
>
tension (F T) a force exerted by objects
that can be stretched
62 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 62
Another common force is tension, which is a pulling force exerted by objects such
as strings and ropes. Figure 3(a), on the next page, shows how to measure tension
using a spring scale. The more you stretch the spring in the spring scale, the more
difficult it becomes to pull. The degree of difficulty indicates the amount of tension.
Even when the direction of the force changes, such as when a string passes over a
pulley (Figure 3(b)), the amount of tension stays uniform.
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spring under
tension
Spring scale reads 9.8 N.
frictionless pulley
tension force
single
string
9.8 N
1.0 kg mass
(b)
(b)
Figure 3 (a) The larger the stretch in the spring, the greater the tension. (b) The tension in the
string is the same all along its length. The string pulls up on the 1.0 kg mass below the pulley with
the same force as it pulls horizontally on the spring to the left of the pulley.
(a)
force of gravity
The force of friction exists between objects and always resists the sliding motion or
attempted sliding motion between objects. Suppose a heavy box of books is on the
floor. You try to push the box across the floor with a horizontal force, but the box
does not move. You push harder, and the box starts to move. You have overcome the
force of static friction. Static friction is a force that resists attempted motion between
two surfaces—it keeps the stationary box of books from moving across the floor.
Kinetic friction is a force exerted on a moving object by the surface in a direction opposite to the motion of the object. Pushing a box across the floor is made more difficult
WEB LINK
because kinetic friction acts in the direction opposite to motion.
Another important type of kinetic friction is air resistance. Air resistance is the friction
between an object and the air around it. Air resistance is more noticeable for lightweight
objects, such as a piece of paper falling through the air, and objects moving at high
speeds, such as an airplane flying through the air. Air resistance can be neglected in
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most problem-solving situations unless it is logically required.
Finally, an applied force is a force due to one object coming into contact with another
object, such that a push or a pull results. When pushing on the box mentioned above
with your hands, you are applying a force.
>
friction (F f) a force that opposes the
sliding of two surfaces across one another;
acts opposite to motion or attempted motion
>
static friction (F S) a force that resists
attempted motion between two surfaces
in contact
>
kinetic friction (F K) a force exerted on
a moving object by a surface in the
direction of motion opposite to the motion
of the object
>
air resistance (F air) the friction between
objects and the air around them
>
applied force (F a) a force due to one
object pushing or pulling on another
Free-Body Diagrams
When solving physics problems, it is sometimes difficult to visualize all the forces
acting on an object. One way to visualize all the different forces acting on an object is
with a diagram. A free-body diagram (FBD) is a simple line drawing of an object that
shows all the forces acting on the object at one moment in time. Arrows represent the
approximate direction and magnitude of each force. A dot in the centre represents
the object. The underlying assumption is that we are modelling the object as a point
particle, so the dot makes this assumption visually apparent. Some people draw FBDs
with a dot and a rectangle, but in this textbook the FBDs just have the dot. All forces
point outward from the dot. Sometimes, you may need to sketch a system diagram
showing all objects involved in a situation first before drawing an FBD (Figure 4).
FT
free-body diagram a simple line drawing
that shows all the forces acting on an object
FN
FK
(a)
(b)
Fg
Figure 4 (a) A system diagram of a person pulling a sled. (b) An FBD shows the forces acting on the sled.
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In Tutorial 1, you will practise drawing both an FBD and a system diagram for
different forces.
Tutorial 1 Drawing Free-Body and System Diagrams
This Tutorial demonstrates how to draw free-body and system diagrams used to study forces.
Sample Problem 1: Applying a Horizontal Force
You are pushing with a horizontal force to the right against
a large printer on a table. The printer remains stationary.
Draw a system diagram and an FBD of the forces acting
on the printer.
Solution
Step 1. Identify the objects in the scenario.
The objects in the scenario are two hands, a printer,
a table, and Earth.
Step 2. Draw a simple system diagram.
Step 4. Determine the direction of each force.
The normal force exerted by the desk pushes upward
on the printer, and the force of gravity is pulling
downward on the printer. The applied force is acting
to the right. The force of static friction is acting on the
printer to the left.
Step 5. Draw an FBD by drawing a dot to represent the
printer. Draw individual arrows to represent each
force and its direction. The lengths of the arrows
should reflect the magnitudes of the forces. If two
forces have the same magnitude, then the lengths of
the arrows will be the same. Label each arrow with
the appropriate force symbol.
FN
Step 3. Identify the forces acting on the printer.
The forces acting on the printer are the force of gravity,
the normal force, and an applied force. The printer is not
moving, so the force of static friction is also acting on
the printer.
FS
Fa
Fg
Sample Problem 2: Applying a Non-horizontal Force
A rope pulls a skier up a hill to the right at a constant velocity.
Draw a system diagram and an FBD of the forces acting on
the skier.
Solution
Step 1. Identify the objects in the scenario.
The objects in the scenario are a skier, a rope,
and an incline.
Step 2. Draw a simple system diagram.
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Chapter 2 • Dynamics
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Step 3. Identify the forces acting on the skier.
The forces acting on the skier are gravity, the normal
force, the force of tension in the rope, and the force
of kinetic friction.
Step 4. Determine the direction of each force.
Step 5. Draw an FBD by drawing a dot to represent the skier.
Draw individual arrows to represent each force and
its direction. Indicate the magnitudes of the forces by
the lengths of the arrows. Label each arrow with the
appropriate force symbol.
Gravity acts in the downward vertical direction. The
normal force acts perpendicular to the slope of the hill.
The tension of the rope acts on the skier to the upper
right, and the kinetic friction between the skis and the
snow acts on the skis in the opposite direction of the
force of tension.
FN
FT
FK
y
x
Fg
Practice
1. Draw a simple system diagram and an FBD for each of the following objects. K/U C A
(a) a pen sitting on a table
(b) a rope connected to a crane raising a piano vertically upward at a constant speed
(c) a lamp that has just begun falling from a table to the floor; air resistance is negligible
(d)a dresser that is being pulled to the right up a ramp into a delivery truck by a cable
parallel to the ramp; the ramp is at an angle of 148 above the horizontal
2. You throw a ball vertically upward. Air resistance is negligible. Draw an FBD of the ball
(a) just after it leaves your hand
(b) at the top of its motion
(c) as it is falling back down K/U C A
3. A skydiver whose parachute is open can see his instantaneous height above ground level
on an electronic screen. The skydiver has reached terminal speed. (Recall from earlier
studies that when an object falls at terminal speed it is falling at a constant velocity.)
For this question, assume the skydiver and the parachute together act as one body.
Draw a system diagram and an FBD for the situation. K/U C A
Determining Net Force in Two Dimensions
Once you identify all of the forces acting on an object, you can calculate the net force
on the object,
> or the sum of all the forces acting on an object. The term net force and the
symbol SF are used to represent this sum, but the terms total force and resultant force
are also
> used. The symbol for net force uses the Greek letter Σ (sigma) in front of
the F . In mathematics, sigma indicates a sum of several different terms or numbers.
Sigma is used here to remind you to add up (or sum) all forces acting on a single
object at one moment in time to calculate the net force.
When several forces are acting on an object, those forces are not always parallel
or perpendicular to each other. This can make determining the sum of the forces
more difficult. In these cases, it is often convenient to think about the components of
the forces in the x- and y-directions. We will use the symbols SFx and SFy for these
components. In addition, FBDs are helpful to visualize the forces. In Tutorial 2, you
will calculate the net force on an object in different contexts.
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>
net force (SF ) the sum of all the forces
acting on an object
2.1 Forces and Free-Body Diagrams 65
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Tutorial 2 Determining Net Force
This Tutorial models how to determine the net force acting on objects when the individual forces
are not all parallel or perpendicular to each other.
Sample Problem 1: Net Force above the Horizontal
A baseball player lightly bunts a baseball with an average force of
14 N at 298 above the horizontal (Figure 5). The force of gravity
on the baseball is 1.4 N. Calculate the net force on the ball at the
moment of contact, assuming that air resistance is negligible.
Fa x 5 F cos u
5 114 N2 cos 298
Fa x 5 12.2 N
SFx 5 Fa x 1 Fg x
5 12.2 N 1 0.0 N
SFx 5 12.2 N
Fa y 5 F sin u
5 114 N2 sin 298
Fa y 5 6.79 N 1one extra digit carried2
SFy 5 Fa y 1 12Fg y 2
5 6.79 N 2 1.4 N
SFy 5 5.39 N 1one extra digit carried2
ΣF
Figure 5
>
Given: F a 5 14 N; u 5 298 above the horizontal; Fg x 5 0.0 N;
Fg y 5 1.4 N
Required: SFx (net force); u (direction)
Analysis: Draw FBDs to show the force on the baseball and the
components of the force. Use Fa x 5 F cos u and Fa y 5 F sin u
to determine the components of the force on the baseball.
Add the components to the components of the force of gravity,
>
and use 0 SF 0 5 " 1SFx 2 2 1 1SFy 2 2 to calculate the net force.
SFy
Use f 5 tan21 a
b to determine the direction.
SFx
Solution: The FBDs are shown in Figure 6 and Figure 7.
F a 14 N
12.2 N
Figure 7 Net force on the baseball
>
0 SF 0 5 " 1SFx 2 2 1 1SFy 2 2
5 " 112.2 N2 2 1 15.39 N2 2
>
0 SF 0 5 13 N
SFy
f 5 tan21 a
b
SFx
5 tan21 a
f 5 248
5.39 N
b
12.2 N
Fa sin Fa cos y
F g 1.4 N
Fg
(a)
5.39 N
Statement: The net force on the baseball is 13 N at 248 above
the horizontal.
Fa
29°
x
(b)
Figure 6 (a) The FBD shows forces acting on the baseball.
(b) Components of the forces in the vertical and horizontal
directions.
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Sample Problem 2: Total Force of Friction on a Towed Object
A go-cart is being towed north by a car along a road with a net
force of zero. The go-cart is attached to the car by two ropes.
The tension in the ropes is the same, 31 N. The ropes make
228 angles to the direction of motion, one on the west side and
the other on the east. Determine the force of friction on the
go-cart. Figure 8 shows a top view of the go-cart. The figure
does not show the normal force and gravity because they are
perpendicular to the page and cancel each other.
N
F1
22° 22°
For the x-component of the tension force,
F1x 5 2F1 cos u
5 2 131 N2 cos 228
F1x 5 228.7 N 1one extra digit carried2
F2x 5 F2 cos u
5 131 N2 cos 228
F2x 5 28.7 N 1one extra digit carried2
SFx 5 F1x 1 F2x 1 Ffx
Ffx 5 SFx 2 1F1x 1 F2x 2
5 0 2 1228.7 N 1 28.7 N2
Ffx 5 0 N
F2
For the y-component of the tension force,
F1y 5 F1 sin u
5 131 N2 sin 228
F1y 5 11.6 N
y
x
Figure 8
>
>
>
Given: SF 5 0; F 1 5 31 N [N 228 W]; F 2 5 31 N [N 228 E]
>
Required: force of friction on go-cart, F K
Analysis: Draw an FBD. There is no net force on the go-cart,
so SFx equals zero and SFy equals zero. The normal force and
the force of gravity cancel each other. Use Fx 5 F cos u and
Fy 5 F sin u to determine the components of the tension forces
on the go-cart. To calculate the force of friction on the go-cart, use
SFx 5 F1x 1 F2x 1 Ffx and SFy 5 F1y 1 F2y 1 Ffy . Use north
and east as the positive directions when determining components.
F2y 5 F2 sin u
5 131 N2 sin 228
F2y 5 11.6 N
Ffy 5 SFy 2 1F1y 1 F2y2
5 0 2 11.6 N 2 11.6 N
Ffy 5 223 N
Statement: The forces of the ropes in the x-direction cancel, so
there is no force of friction in that direction. The force of friction
is 23 N [S].
Solution: The FBD is shown in Figure 9.
F1x
F2x
F1y
F2y
F1
F2
Ff
Figure 9
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Practice
1. Determine the net force acting on each of the following objects. In each case assume that all
forces acting on the object are given. K/U T/I
(a) At an instant when a soccer ball is slightly off the ground, a player kicks it, exerting a
force of 25 N at 40.08 above the horizontal. The force of gravity acting on the ball is
4.2 N [down]. [ans: 23 N [328 above the horizontal]]
(b) Two children pull a sled across the ice. One child pulls with a force of 15 N [N 358 E],
and the other pulls with a force of 25 N [N 548 W]. There is negligible friction acting
on the sled. [ans: 29 N [N 238 W]]
(c) In a circus act, a performer with a force of gravity of 4.4 3 102 N on her is lifted by two
different ropes at the same time. One rope exerts a tension of 4.3 3 102 N [up and 358 left],
and the other rope exerts a force of 2.8 3 102 N [up]. [ans: 3.1 3 102 N [up 388 left]]
2. Two tractors pull a large rock east through a construction site with a net force of zero on the
rock. Tractor 1 exerts a force of 1.2 3 104 N [E 128 N] on the rock, and tractor 2 exerts a
force of 1.2 3 104 N [E 128 S]. K/U T/I
(a) Calculate the force of friction acting on the rock. [ans: 2.3 3 104 N [W]]
(b) Discuss two ways someone could spot that the force of friction on the rock must be to the
west before solving the problem.
3. Figure 10 shows three masses connected by wires and hung vertically. Draw an FBD for each
mass, and determine the tensions in the three wires. K/U T/I A [ans: top wire: 3.4 3 102 N;
middle wire: 2.0 3 102 N; bottom wire: 1.3 3 102 N]
15.0 kg
7.0 kg
13.0 kg
Figure 10
4. At one moment during its flight, a thrown baseball experiences a gravitational force of
1.5 N [down] and a force from air resistance of 0.40 N [328 above the horizontal].
Calculate the magnitude and direction of the net force on the ball. K/U T/I A
[ans: 1.3 N [758 below the horizontal]]
5. The force of gravity on a basketball is 16 N [down]. K/U T/I A
(a) What is the net force on the ball while held stationary in your hand? [ans: 0 N]
(b) Neglecting air resistance, calculate the net force acting on the ball if you suddenly
remove your hand. [ans: 16 N [down]]
(c) You push the ball with a force of 12 N [right]. Calculate the net force on the ball.
[ans: 20 N [right 538 down]]
(d) You push the ball with a force of 26 N [up 458 right]. Calculate the net force on the ball.
[ans: 19 N [right 7.48 up]]
68 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
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2.1
Review
Summary
• Examples of common forces that you encounter every day are Earth’s gravity,
the normal force, tension, friction, applied forces, and air resistance.
• Static friction prevents a stationary object from moving, and kinetic friction
opposes the motion of an object. Air resistance opposes the motion of an
object through air.
• A free-body diagram (FBD) is a simple drawing of an object that shows all
forces acting on the object. FBDs can help you visualize the forces, determine
the components, >and calculate the net force.
• The net force, SF , is the sum of all of the forces acting on an object.
Questions
1. Summarize the common forces in a table with
the following headings: Name, Symbol, Contact/
Non-contact, Direction, Example in daily life. K/U C
2. Study the traction system shown in Figure 11.
The tension in the vertical cord above the mass
is 22 N. A student claims that the tension in the
vertical cord above the leg must be more than 22 N.
Discuss the validity of this statement. K/U T/I C
57°
32°
fixed pulleys
22 N
Figure 11
3. Explain why ropes can only pull and never push. K/U
4. You push your textbook at a constant velocity to the
right across the table by applying a force at an angle
of 238 below the horizontal. K/U T/I C A
(a) List the forces acting on the textbook.
(b) Draw an FBD of the textbook.
>
>
5. Given the forces F A 5 2.3 N [S 358 W], F B 5 3.6 N
>
[N 148 W], and F C 5 4.2 N [S 248 E], calculate the
following:
>
>
>
(a) F A 1 F B 1 F C
>
>
(b) F B 2 F C T/I
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>
>
6. Given F A 5 33 N [E 228 N] and F B 5 42 N [S 158 E],
>
>
>
>
calculate the force F C needed so that F A 1 F B 1 F C
is zero. T/I
7. At the beach, three children pull on a floating toy.
Child 1 pulls with a force of 15 N [N 248 E],
child 2 pulls south, and child 3 pulls west. The net
force on the toy is zero. Assume that there are no
other significant forces acting on the toy. T/I
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the forces exerted
by child 2 and child 3 on the toy.
(b) Child 2 lets go, and the other children maintain
the same force. Calculate the net force on the toy.
(c) What force must child 3 exert on the toy to
cancel the force of child 1 on her own?
8. During a competition for charity, two students push
horizontally on a heavy cart during a race. The net
force on the cart is 180 N [E]. One student pushes
with a force of 120 N [E 148 S]. Calculate the force
that the second student exerts on the cart. T/I
9. You exert a force of 55 N on a heavy sled as shown
in Figure 12. The force of gravity acting on the sled
is 120 N [down]. The sled does not move across the
rough horizontal surface, and the net force is zero. T/I
Fa 55 N
28°
horizontal surface
Figure 12
(a) Draw an FBD of the sled.
(b) Determine the normal force acting on the sled.
Why is the magnitude of the normal force less
than the magnitude of the force of gravity?
Explain your answer.
(c) Calculate the force of static friction acting on
the sled.
2.1 Forces and Free-Body Diagrams 69
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2.2
Newton’s Laws of Motion
Newton’s laws of motion are three separate statements that explain how and why
objects move or stay at rest. When a player hits a puck on an air hockey table, as in
Figure 1, Newton’s laws describe what happens to the puck before, during, and after
the collision with the paddle. Newton’s laws also describe the forces the objects exert
on each other. You can use these three laws to explain the motion of many types of
objects experiencing and exerting different types of forces.
Figure 1 Newton’s laws of motion describe what happens to a puck on an air hockey table.
Newton’s First Law of Motion
If you watch a puck move across an air hockey table, you will notice that it moves at
a relatively constant velocity. This is because the puck floats on a cushion of air and
moves with very little friction acting on it. In fact, the net force on the puck is virtually zero. In addition, when the puck is at rest and no one hits it, the puck will remain
at rest. This example demonstrates Newton’s first law of motion.
Newton’s First Law of Motion
If the external net force on an object is zero, the object will remain at
rest or continue to move at a constant velocity.
Some important implications of Newton’s first law are the following:
• A net force is not required for an object to maintain a constant velocity.
• A net force is required to change the velocity of an object in magnitude,
direction, or both.
• External forces are required to change the motion of an object. Internal forces
have no effect on an object’s motion.
Inertia and Mass
inertia a measure of an object’s
resistance to change in velocity
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Galileo introduced the concept of inertia, and Newton used this concept to develop
his first law of motion. Inertia is the property of matter that causes an object to resist
any changes in motion. This means that an object at rest will stay at rest unless a
net force acts on it. In addition, if an object is in motion, it will maintain a constant
velocity unless a net force acts on it. The concept of inertia is closely related to
Newton’s first law.
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Some objects have more inertia than others. In fact, objects that have more
mass have more inertia. The degree to which an object resists a change in motion
depends on the magnitude of the object’s mass. Mass is a measure of the amount
of matter in an object. The SI unit for mass is the kilogram (kg). Objects that
contain a small amount of matter have a smaller mass and less inertia than objects
that contain a large amount of matter. For example, a basketball has a mass of
approximately 0.62 kg, and a volleyball has a mass of approximately 0.28 kg. If
you hit each one with an equal force, the heavier ball (basketball) changes its
motion less than the lighter ball (volleyball). Inertia is directly proportional to
the mass of the object.
mass a measure of the amount of matter
in an object
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
Newton’s second law of motion explains the relationship between mass, acceleration,
and net force.
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
If the net external force on an object is not zero, the object will accelerate
in the direction of the net force. The magnitude of the acceleration is
directly proportional to the magnitude of the net force and inversely
proportional to the object’s mass.
The acceleration of an object with mass m is then given by
>
> SF
a5
m
Newton’s second law is often written in the equivalent form
>
>
SF 5 ma
Recall from Section 2.1 that the net >force, or
on an object is the sum
> total force,
>
of all the individual external forces, F net 5 F total 5 SF . In most cases, more than
one force acts on an object at any given time. To determine the total
> force, you
add all these forces together. That resulting vector sum is the> force SF in Newton’s
>
second law, as shown in Figure 2. Newton’s second law, SF 5 ma ,> indicates that
>
the acceleration of an object, a , is always parallel to the net force, SF , acting on the
object (Figure 2). However, since acceleration and velocity might be in different
directions, velocity and net force need not be in the same direction. For example,
you can be moving forward in a car while applying the brakes. You and the car are
still moving forward, but you are accelerating backward.
The Newton
F1
Fnet ΣF
F2
Figure 2 When several forces act on an
object, the vector sum of these forces
determines the acceleration, according
to Newton’s second law.
You can write the newton in terms of the SI units for mass (kilograms) and acceleration (metres per second squared):
>
>
SF 5 ma
N 5 kg # m/s2
The value of the newton as a unit of force is therefore
1 N 5 1 kg.m/s2
In the following Tutorial, you will use the equation for Newton’s second law of
motion to predict how several different forces act on an object.
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Tutorial 1 Solving Two-Dimensional Problems Using Newton’s Second Law
The following Sample Problem models how to calculate the acceleration of an object.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Acceleration and Direction
Two tugboats are pulling a 4.2 3 103 kg barge into a harbour
(Figure 3). The first tugboat exerts a constant force of
1.8 3 103 N [E 378 N]. The second tugboat exerts a constant
force of 1.3 3 103 N [E 128 S]. Calculate the acceleration
(magnitude and direction) of the barge. Assume there is no
friction acting on the barge.
SFx 5 F1 cos u 1 1 F2 cos u 2
5 11.8 3 103 N2 cos 378 1 11.3 3 103 N2 cos 128
SFx 5 2.7 3 103 N
SFy 5 F1 sin u 1 1 12F2 sin u 22
5 11.8 3 103 N2 sin 378 1 12 11.3 3 103 N2 sin 1282
SFy 5 8.13 3 102 N 1one extra digit carried2
The direction of the force is
F1
SFy
b
SFx
8.13 3 102 N
5 tan21 a
b
2.7 3 103 N
u 5 178
u 5 tan21 a
N
37°
12°
F2
Figure 3
Given: m 5 4.2 3 103 kg; F1 5 1.8 3 103 N; F2 5 1.3 3 103 N;
u1 5 [E 378 N]; u2 5 [E 128 S]
Required: the acceleration of the barge, a; the angle at which
the barge moves, u
Analysis: Use north and east as positive for components. Break
the force into its components using SFx 5 F1 cos u 1 1 F2 cos u 2
and SFy 5 F1 sin u 1 1 12F2 sin u 22 . Draw an FBD.
SFy
Use u 5 tan21 a
b to determine the direction of the force.
SFx
>
Use 0 SF 0 5 " 1Fx 2 2 1 1Fy2 2 to calculate the magnitude of the
>
>
force. Use SF 5 ma to calculate the acceleration.
Solution:
FBD of barge
5 " 12.7 3 103 N2 2 1 18.13 3 102 N2 2
5 2.82 3 103 N
>
0 SF 0 5 2.8 3 103 N
The acceleration of the barge is
>
>
SF 5 ma
>
> SF
a5
m
2.82 3 103 N 3 E 178 N 4
5
4.2 3 103 kg
>
a 5 0.67 m/s2 3 E 178 N 4
Statement: The acceleration of the barge is 0.67 m/s2 [E 178 N].
F1
components
F1
The magnitude is
>
0 SF 0 5 " 1Fx 2 2 1 1Fy 2 2
F1 sin 1
37°
37°
12°
F1cos 1
F2
F2cos 2
12°
F2
2F2 sin 2
Practice
1. For each of the following, determine the acceleration of the mass. Assume no other forces
act on the object other than the ones given. T/I
(a) a mass of 1.2 3 102 kg with a force of 1.5 3 102 N [N] and a force of 2.2 3 102 N [W]
acting on it [ans: 2.2 m/s2 [N 568 W]]
(b) a mass of 26 kg with a force of 38 N [N 248 E] and a force of 52 N [N 368 E] acting
on it [ans: 3.4 m/s2 [N 318 E]]
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2. Two students push horizontally on a large, 65 kg trunk. The trunk moves east with an
acceleration of 2.0 m/s2. One student pushes with a force of 2.2 3 102 N [E 428 S].
The force of friction acting on the trunk is 1.9 3 102 N [W]. Determine the force that the
other student applies to the trunk. T/I [ans: 2.1 3 102 N [E 438 N]]
3. Two ropes are used to lift a 1.5 3 102 kg beam with a force of gravity of 1.47 3 103 N [down]
acting on it. One rope exerts a force of tension of 1.8 3 103 N [up 30.08 left] on the
beam, and the other rope exerts a force of tension of 1.8 3 103 N [up 30.08 right]
on the beam. Calculate the acceleration of the beam. T/I [ans: 11 m/s2 [up]]
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
Newton’s first two laws of motion deal with a single object and the forces acting on it.
Newton’s third law of motion deals with the forces that two objects exert on each other.
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
For every action force, there exists a simultaneous reaction force that is
equal in magnitude but opposite in direction.
Newton’s third law is also known as the action–reaction principle. For example,
if you push east on a wall, the wall exerts a simultaneous force west on you, causing
you to move away from the wall. Newton’s third law states that action–reaction
forces always come in pairs. According to Newton’s third law, these two equal and
opposite forces must always act on different objects. In Tutorial 2, you will use the
equation for Newton’s second law of motion to demonstrate Newton’s third law
of motion.
Tutorial 2 Solving Problems Related to Newton’s Third Law
The following Sample Problem shows how to use Newton’s second law of motion to calculate the
acceleration of two objects in an action–reaction pair.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Acceleration Due to Newton’s Third Law
The person on roller blades in Figure 4 is pushing on a
refrigerator that sits on a cart on a level floor. Assume no force
of friction exists on either the person or the refrigerator. The
person has a mass of 60.0 kg, and the refrigerator has a mass of
1.2 3 102 kg. The force exerted by the person on the refrigerator
is 1.8 3 102 N [forward]. Calculate the refrigerator’s acceleration
and the person’s acceleration.
Fa
Fperson
Figure 4
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2.2 Newton’s Laws of Motion
73
4/27/12 7:30 AM
Given:
mperson 5 60.0 kg; mrefrigerator 5 1.2 3 102 kg;
>
F a 5 1.8 3 102 N 3 forward 4
>
>
Required: arefrigerator; aperson
Analysis: The forces acting on the refrigerator are gravity, the
normal force, and the force applied by the person on the refrigerator.
The floor is level, so gravity and the normal force cancel each
other. Use Newton’s second
law to determine the refrigerator’s
>
> SF
acceleration, a 5
. Use the same equation to determine the
m
person’s acceleration. The action force of the person on the
refrigerator is equal to the reaction force of the refrigerator on
the person in magnitude but opposite in direction.
>
SF
>
Solution: arefrigerator 5
m
1.8 3 102 N 3 forward 4
5
1.2 3 102 kg
>
arefrigerator 5 1.5 m/s2 3 forward 4
>
SF
>
aperson 5
m
1.8 3 102 N 3 backward 4
5
60.0 kg
>
aperson 5 3.0 m/s2 3 backward 4
Statement: The acceleration of the refrigerator is 1.5 m/s2 [forward],
and the acceleration of the person is 3.0 m/s2 [backward].
Practice
1. Use Newton’s third law to explain the motion of each of the following objects.
Identify the action and reaction forces and their directions. K/U T/I A
(a) a rocket leaving a launch pad
(b) an airplane flying at a constant velocity
(c) a runner’s foot pushing straight down on the ground
2. A swimmer with a mass of 56 kg pushes horizontally against the pool wall toward the
east for 0.75 s with a constant force. Having started from rest, the swimmer glides to a
maximum speed of 75 cm/s. Neglecting friction, determine the magnitude of
(a) the (constant) acceleration [ans: 1.0 m/s2 [W]]
(b) the force exerted by the swimmer on the wall [ans: 56 N [E]]
(c) the force exerted by the wall on the swimmer [ans: 56 N [W]]
(d) the displacement of the swimmer from the wall after 1.50 s K/U T/I A [ans: 0.84 m [W]]
3. A boy is floating on an air mattress in a swimming pool. The mass of the boy is
32.5 kg, and the mass of the mattress is 2.50 kg. T/I
(a) Calculate the upward force of the water on the mattress. [ans: 3.4 3 102 N]
(b) Calculate the force that the boy exerts on the mattress. [ans: 3.2 3 102 N]
(c) Calculate the upward force of the mattress on the boy. [ans: 3.2 3 102 N]
4. A projectile launcher fires a projectile horizontally from a platform, which rests on a flat,
icy, frictionless surface. Just after the projectile is fired and while it is moving through the
launcher, the projectile has an acceleration of 25 m/s2. At the same time, the launcher has
an acceleration of 0.25 m/s2. The mass of the projectile is 0.20 kg. Calculate the mass of
the launcher. K/U T/I A [ans: 20 kg]
The Gravitational Force
Earth’s force of gravity is something you are quite familiar with from everyday life.
However, Newton realized that gravity is an attractive force between all objects,
including the motion of the planets and stars. As mentioned in Section 2.1, the gravitational force is weak when the objects are far apart and/or small. However, Earth is
so much more massive than any other nearby objects that the strongest gravitational
attraction on objects around you is toward Earth.
You know that if you allow an object to fall, it will accelerate downward (in
the absence of air resistance). The acceleration due to gravity near Earth’s surface
varies depending on the distance from Earth’s surface. At or near Earth’s surface, the
74 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
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>
acceleration due to gravity is g 5 9.8 m/s2 [down] (to two significant digits) when
the object is in free fall. When an object is in free fall, it is moving toward Earth
with only the force of gravity acting on it. In other words, we are assuming that air
resistance is negligible.
Weight and the Normal Force
>
>
According to Newton’s second law, when an object is in free fall, SF 5 ma , where
>
>
>
>
a 5 g . Since the only force acting on the object is gravity, then SF 5 F g. Therefore,
>
>
the force of gravity is given by F g 5 mg .
>
Another name for the gravitational force is weight. The weight, F g, of an object is a
force and is therefore measured in newtons (N). It is often convenient to indicate a force
that is directed downward by making the force negative, so when solving problems
you will often use Fg 5 2mg. The negative sign here indicates that the force is in the
negative y-direction, or down, toward the centre of Earth.
As you can see in Figure 5, in addition to the gravitational force, another force
acting on the person is the normal force exerted by the floor on her feet. The person
in Figure 5 is at rest with an acceleration of zero. Using Newton’s second law for components of the force and acceleration along y, you see that
weight the gravitational force exerted by
Earth on an object
SF 5 2mg 1 FN
ma 5 2mg 1 FN
0 5 2mg 1 FN
FN 5 mg
y
FN
Fg weight
FN normal
force
Fg
(a)
(b)
Figure 5 (a) The person standing still has two forces acting on her. (b) The FBD of the person in (a)
shows all the forces acting on her.
In this case, the normal force is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to
the person’s weight. This raises two common misconceptions in physics, which need
to be cleared up at this point.
First, the normal force is not the reaction force to gravity. The reaction force to the
force of gravity is another force of gravity. The normal force is the reaction force to
the object applying a force to the surface.
Second, since the normal force is not the reaction force to gravity, the normal force
is not always equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force of gravity. If
someone pushed down on the shoulders of the person in Figure 5, the normal force
would increase, but the force of gravity on the person remains the same. If the person
in Figure 5 were standing on a ramp, the normal force would be perpendicular to the
ramp and no longer vertical, but gravity would still point straight down.
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Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about Newton’s laws of motion to the
Unit Task on page 146.
2.2 Newton’s Laws of Motion 75
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2.2
Review
Summary
• Newton’s first law states that when the external net force on an object is zero,
the object will remain at rest or continue moving at a constant velocity.
• Inertia causes matter to resist changes in motion.
• Newton’s second law states that when the net external force on an object is not
zero, the object will accelerate in the direction of the net force. The magnitude
of the acceleration is directly proportional to the> magnitude of the net force
>
> SF
>
and inversely proportional to the mass: a 5
; also SF 5 ma .
m
• Newton’s third law states that for every action force, there exists a simultaneous
reaction force that is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction.
• Earth’s force of gravity on an object is the object’s weight.
The force of gravity
>
>
at Earth’s surface is determined using the equation F g 5 mg .
Questions
1. A snowboarder is sliding downhill when she
suddenly encounters a rough patch. Use Newton’s
first law of motion to describe and explain what will
likely happen to the snowboarder. K/U T/I
2. You are sitting on a bus moving at 50 km/h [E]
when you toss a ball in front of you and straight up
into the air. The ball reaches a height close to your
eyes. Will the ball hit you in the face? Explain. K/U
3. A child is sliding across the ice on a sled with an initial
velocity of 4.2 m/s [E]. The combined mass of the
child and the sled is 41 kg. There is a constant force of
friction between the ice and the sled of 25 N. K/U A
(a) Calculate the child’s acceleration across the ice.
(b) How long will it take the child to stop?
4. An object moves with an acceleration of magnitude
12 m/s2 while it is subjected to a force of magnitude
2.2 3 102 N. Determine the mass of the object.
K/U
T/I
A
5. Your friend’s car has broken down, so you volunteer
to push it with your own car to the nearest repair
shop, which is 2.0 km away. You carefully move
your car so that the bumpers of the two cars are in
contact. You then slowly accelerate to a speed of
2.5 m/s over the course of 1.0 min. The mass of
your friend’s car is 1.2 3 103 kg. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the normal force between the
two bumpers.
(b) You then maintain the speed of 2.5 m/s. How
long does it take you to reach the repair shop?
6. Two forces act on a 250 kg mass, 150 N [E] and
350 N [S 458 W]. Calculate the acceleration
of the mass. T/I
76
7. In each of the examples below, identify an action–
reaction pair of forces. K/U T/I A
(a) A tennis racquet hits a tennis ball, exerting a
force on the ball.
(b) A car is moving at high speed and runs into a
tree, exerting a force on the tree.
(c) Two cars are moving in opposite directions and
collide head-on.
(d) A person leans on a wall, exerting a force on
the wall.
(e) A mass hangs by a string attached to the ceiling,
and the string exerts a force on the mass.
(f) A bird sits on a telephone pole, exerting a force
on the pole.
8. Two 5.2 kg masses are suspended as shown in
Figure 6. K/U T/I
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 76
Figure 6
(a) Determine the tension in each string.
(b) Determine the reading on the spring scale.
(c) How would your answers to (a) and (b) change
if you replaced one mass with your hand and
held everything at rest? Explain your answer.
9. An athlete with a mass of 62 kg jumps and lands
on the ground on his feet. The ground exerts a total
force of 1.1 3 103 N [backward 558 up] on his feet.
Calculate the acceleration of the athlete. T/I
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Applying Newton’s Laws of Motion
2.3
As you read in Section 2.2, Newton’s laws of motion describe how objects move
as a result of different forces. In this section, you will apply Newton’s laws to
objects subjected to various forces in two dimensions, as well as objects that are
accelerating.
For example, Figure 1 shows a skier moving downhill. You can draw an FBD of
all the forces acting on the skier. Earth’s gravity acts directly downward and has components parallel and perpendicular to the slope. The normal force acts perpendicular
to the hill and cancels the component of gravity perpendicular to the hill. Finally,
friction acts parallel to the hill, opposing the skier’s motion. You can use the sum of
these forces and Newton’s laws to learn about the motion of the skier.
Fg
FN
Ff
Figure 1 The forces on this skier are gravity, the normal force, and friction. Compared to the
other forces acting on the skier, air resistance is negligible here. These forces can be broken into
components parallel and perpendicular to the hillside to analyze the motion of the skier.
Objects in Equilibrium
When the net force on an object is zero, that object is said to be in equilibrium. As
discussed in Section 2.2, an object with no net force acting on it will not accelerate.
So, an object in equilibrium will remain at rest or remain moving at a constant
velocity
until a force acts on it. Mathematically, an object is in equilibrium when
>
SF 5 0, or, when you break the forces down into their components, both SFx 5 0
and SFy 5 0.
When solving problems involving objects in equilibrium, you can set the positive
x-axis in any direction, but you should draw the FBD first and then pick the most
convenient direction. By “convenient” we mean the direction that will give you the
fewest components.
The Tutorial on the next page shows you how to solve problems when an object is
in equilibrium.
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8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 77
equilibrium a state in which an object
has no net force acting on it
Investigation
2.3.1
Static Equilibrium of Forces
(page 95)
In this investigation, you will analyze
the conditions for equilibrium using
vector components.
2.3 Applying Newton’s Laws of Motion 77
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Tutorial 1 Solving Problems for Objects That Are in Equilibrium
This Tutorial shows how to solve problems for objects in equilibrium when acted on by
two-dimensional forces.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Tension and the Normal Force
A sled has a mass of 14 kg and is on a hill that is inclined
258 to the horizontal, as shown in Figure 2(a). The hill is very
icy (negligible friction), and the sled is held at rest by a rope
attached to a post. The rope is parallel to the hill as shown.
Figure 2(b) shows the FBD.
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the tension in the rope.
(b) Calculate the magnitude of the normal force acting on the sled.
Solution
(a) Given: m 5 14 kg; u 5 258
Required: FT
Analysis: Tension is parallel to the hillside, and the normal
force is perpendicular to the hillside. So let the positive x-axis
point up the hillside as shown in Figure 2(b). Determine
the components of gravity, and resolve the forces in the
x-direction to solve for tension. The sled is in equilibrium,
so the net force is zero.
Solution: SFx 5 FT 1 12Fgx2
SFx 5 FT 1 12mg sin u 2
0 5 FT 2 mg sin u
FT 5 mg sin u
5 114 kg2 19.8 m/s22 sin 258
FT 5 58 N
Statement: The magnitude of the tension in the rope is 58 N.
(b) Given: m 5 14 kg; u 5 258
25°
Required: FN
Analysis: Resolve the forces in the y-direction to solve for
the normal force. The sled is in equilibrium, so the net force
is zero.
(a)
y
x
FN
FT
25°
Fg
mg
mg cos
mg sin
Solution: SFy 5 FN 1 12Fgy 2
SFy 5 FN 1 12mg cos u 2
0 5 FN 2 mg cos u
FN 5 mg cos u
5 114 kg2 19.8 m/s22 cos 258
FN 5 1.2 3 102 N
Statement: The magnitude of the normal force on the sled
is 1.2 3 102 N.
(b)
Figure 2
Sample Problem 2: Force Applied at an Angle
Your car is stuck in the mud, and you ask a friend to help
you pull it free using a rope. You tie one end of the rope to
your car and then pull on the other end with a force of 103 N.
Unfortunately, the car does not move. Your friend then suggests
that you make a knot in the middle of the rope, tie the other
end of the rope to a tree, and then pull on the knot. Although
you are skeptical that your friend’s idea will help, you try it
anyway. You make a knot in the middle of the rope. You leave
78
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 78
one end of the rope attached to the car and tie the other end to
a tree at an angle u 5 108. Then you
> and your friend pull on the
knot in the direction indicated by F a in Figure 3(a). Figure 3(b)
shows the FBD with the forces acting on the knot at point O.
You discover that when a 103 N force is applied to the knot in
the middle of the rope in the direction shown in Figure 3(a),
you are just able to free the car at a slow constant velocity.
Why does this work?
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4/27/12 7:30 AM
y
FT left
FT right
O
tree
x
10°
Fa
(a)
FT left sin FT left
FT left cos FT right sin FT right
O FT right cos Since the car is just on the verge of moving, you can apply the
conditions for equilibrium to this situation. Consider the forces acting
on the rope at point O (the point at which you and your friend exert
your force) to determine the tension in terms of the applied force.
Apply the conditions for static equilibrium to the rope at point O.
Use the x–y coordinate system to calculate the components of
the three forces along x and y, and then apply the condition for
equilibrium along y. The rope is continuous and the angles on the
two sides are equal, so the tensions in the left and right portions
of the rope are the same, F T right 5 F T left 5 F T.
Required: FT
Solution: SFy 5 1 FT right sin u 1 FT left sin u 2 F
0 5 1 FT sin u 1 FT sin u 2 F
F 5 2FT sin u
F
FT 5
2 sin u
103 N
5
2 sin 108
FT 5 3 3 103 N
Analysis: Calculate the magnitude of the tension in the rope given
the 103 N force exerted by you and your friend at the point where
the car has just started to move at a slow constant velocity.
Statement: This arrangement multiplies the applied force.
The tension in the rope is able to pull the car out because
it is 3 times the applied force (3F a ).
knot
in rope
Fa
(b)
Figure 3
Given: Fa 5 103 N; angle, u, of the rope to the x-axis is 108
Practice
1. The static friction on one block is holding another block up, as shown in Figure 4.
Block A has a weight of 6.5 N, sits on a table, and is connected to a wall by a string.
Block B has a weight of 2.8 N, is attached to a string, and is connected to block A’s
string at point P. The string from block A to point P is horizontal. The magnitude of
the force of friction on block A is 1.4 N. K/U T/I C A
(a) Draw an FBD for block B. Determine the magnitude of the tension in the vertical rope.
[ans: 2.8 N]
A
(b) Draw an FBD for block A. Determine the magnitude of the tension in the horizontal
rope and the magnitude of the normal force acting on block A. [ans: 1.4 N; 6.5 N]
(c) Draw an FBD of point P. Calculate the tension (the magnitude and the angle u)
in the third rope. [ans: 3.1 N [right 638 up]]
2. A 62 kg rock climber is attached to a rope that is allowing him to hang horizontally with
his feet against the wall. The tension in the rope is 7.1 3 102 N, and the rope makes an
angle of 328 with the horizontal. Determine the force exerted by the wall on the climber’s
feet. K/U T/I A [ans: 6.5 3 102 N [left 218 up]]
P
u
B
Figure 4
3. The three forces shown in Figure 5 act on an object. The object is in equilibrium.
Calculate the magnitude of the force F3 and the angle u3. T/I [ans: 78 N; W 9.88 S]
50.0 N
60.0°
3
F3
30.0°
60.0 N
Figure 5
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2.3 Applying Newton’s Laws of Motion
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Accelerating Objects
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
If an object is not in equilibrium,
then it is accelerating in some direction. You can
>
>
use Newton’s second
> law, SF 5 ma , to determine the acceleration from the net force
on the object, SF .
When solving problems that involve accelerating objects, set the positive x-axis
in the direction of the net force (acceleration). This will ensure that the net force has
no additional y-component, which will simplify the solution. If you do not know the
direction of the net force, then just set the positive x-axis in the direction that is the
most convenient to solve the problem.
In the following Tutorial, you will use Newton’s second law of motion to calculate
velocity, acceleration, and tension for objects acted on by two-dimensional forces.
You can apply what you have learned
about forces and acceleration to the
Unit Task on page 146.
Tutorial 2 Solving Problems for Objects That Are Accelerating
The Sample Problems model how to calculate velocity, acceleration, and tension for objects that
are accelerating when acted on by two-dimensional forces.
Sample Problem 1: Velocity Due to Acceleration
A sled is at the top of a hill, which makes an angle of 188 with
the horizontal, as shown in Figure 6(a). Figure 6(b) shows the
FBD for the sled. The height of the hill is 25 m. Calculate the
speed of the sled as it reaches the bottom of the hill. Assume
that no friction acts on the sled.
y
FN
h
Fg
h
sin 18°
x
Given: Ddy 5 25 m; u 5 188, vi 5 0
Required: vf
Analysis: The sled will accelerate down the hill, so the net force
is down the hill according to Newton’s second law. Therefore,
make the positive x-axis down the hill. This means that the normal
force is in the direction of the positive y-axis. Determine the
components of the force of gravity in the x- and y-directions as
defined by the coordinate axes in Figure 6(b). Use Newton’s second
law of motion to determine the acceleration along x ; then apply
v 2fx 5 v 2ix 1 2axDdx to calculate the final speed.
Solution: SFx 5 mg sin u
max 5 mg sin u
ax 5 g sin u
v 2fx 5 v 2ix 1 2ax Ddx
(a)
y
18°
Ddx 5
h
sin u
v 2fx 5 02 1 2 1g sin u 2 a
FN
mg cos x
mg sin F
g
(b)
vfx 5 "2gh
h
b
sin u
5 "2 19.8 m/s22 125 m2
vfx 5 22 m/s
Statement: The speed of the sled at the bottom of the hill
is 22 m/s.
Figure 6
80 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 80
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Sample Problem 2: Acceleration and Tension
A crate with a mass of 32.5 kg sits on a frictionless surface and is
connected to a second crate by a string that passes over a pulley, as
shown in Figure 7(a). The second crate has a mass of 40.0 kg. The
pulley is frictionless and has no mass. The string also has no mass.
FBDs are shown in Figure 7(b). Determine the acceleration of the
system of crates and the magnitude of the tension in the string.
FN
Solution:
FN
m1
FT
FT
m1
m1g
m1g
FT
m2
FT
m2
m2g
m2g
x
(a)
in Figure 7(b) show all these forces. The positive x-direction for
each FBD is determined by the direction of the acceleration of
each mass: right for mass 1 and down for mass 2. Write Newton’s
second law for each crate, and solve for the unknown values.
To determine the magnitude of the tension, use the FBD for the
crate on the surface. The accelerations of both masses are equal
because they are tied together and the string does not stretch.
(b)
Figure 7
Given: m1 5 32.5 kg; m2 5 40.0 kg
Required: the acceleration of the crates, a; the magnitude of the
tension in the string, FT
Analysis: Apply Newton’s laws to determine the acceleration of
the crates, considering all the forces acting on them. The FBDs
1For crate 12
SFx 5 1FT
1Equation 12
m1a 5 FT
1For crate 22
SFx 5 m2g 2 FT
1Equation 22
m2a 5 m2g 2 FT
1
m1a 1 m2a 5 1FT 1 m2g 2 FT Equation 1 1 Equation 22
m1 a 1 m2 a 5 m2 g
m2g
a5
m1 1 m2
40.0 kg 19.8 m/s22
5
32.5 kg 1 40.0 kg
a 5 5.41 m/s2 1one extra digit carried2
SFx 5 1FT
m1a 5 FT
FT 5 132.5 kg2 15.41 m/s22
FT 5 1.8 3 102 N
Statement: The acceleration of the crates is 5.4 m/s2, and the
magnitude of the tension in the string is 1.8 3 102 N.
Practice
1. Two blocks are fastened onto strings inside an elevator, as shown in Figure 8. The mass
of the top block is 1.2 kg, and the mass of the bottom block is 1.8 kg. The elevator is
accelerating up at 1.2 m/s2. K/U T/I A
1.2 kg
a
1.8 kg
Figure 8
(a) Calculate the tension in each string. [ans: top string: 33 N; bottom string: 20 N]
(b) The maximum tension the strings can withstand is 38 N. Determine the maximum
acceleration of the elevator that will not break the strings. [ans: 2.9 m/s2 [up]]
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2.3 Applying Newton’s Laws of Motion
81
4/27/12 7:30 AM
2. A skier with a mass of 63 kg glides with negligible friction down a hill covered with
hard-packed snow. The hill is inclined at an angle of 148 above the horizontal.
K/U
T/I
A
(a) Determine the magnitude of the normal force on the skier. [ans: 6.0 3 102 N]
(b) Determine the magnitude of the skier’s acceleration. (Hint: Remember to choose the
1x-direction as the direction of the acceleration, parallel to the hillside.) [ans: 2.4 m/s2]
3. A child on a toboggan slides down a hill with an acceleration of magnitude 1.9 m/s2. Friction
is negligible. Determine the angle between the hill and the horizontal. K/U T/I A [ans: 118]
4. You pull a desk across a horizontal floor by exerting a force of 82 N, at an angle of 178 above
the horizontal. The normal force exerted by the floor on the desk is 213 N. The acceleration of
the desk across the floor is 0.15 m/s2. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the mass of the desk. [ans: 24 kg]
(b) Determine the magnitude of the friction force on the desk. [ans: 75 N]
5. A store clerk pulls three loaded shopping carts connected with two horizontal cords to help
customers load their cars (Figure 9). Cart 1 has a mass of 9.1 kg, cart 2 has a mass of 12 kg,
and cart 3 has a mass of 8.7 kg. Friction is negligible. A third cord, which pulls on cart 1 and
is at an angle of 238 above the horizontal, has a tension of magnitude 29 N. K/U T/I A
29 N
m3
m2
cart 3
cart 2
m1
23°
cart 1
Figure 9
(a) Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the carts. [ans: 0.90 m/s2]
(b) Determine the magnitude of the tension in the cord between m3 and m2. [ans: 7.8 N]
(c) Determine the magnitude of the tension in the cord between m2 and m1. [ans: 19 N]
6. Block A, with a mass of 4.2 kg, is suspended from a vertical string as shown in Figure 10.
The string passes over a pulley and is attached to block B. The mass of block B is 1.8 kg.
The pulley and the surface of the ramp are essentially frictionless. Calculate (a) the
acceleration of the blocks and (b) the tension in the string. T/I [ans: (a) 5.3 m/s2; (b) 19 N]
block B
block A
32°
Figure 10
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2.3
Review
Summary
• An object is in equilibrium when the net force on it is zero.
• For objects experiencing forces in two dimensions, break the motion into
perpendicular components, which can be analyzed independently.
• Once you have determined the net force using components, use Newton’s
second law to determine the acceleration.
Questions
1. In Figure 11, two ropes are pulling on a skater,
and they exert forces on her as shown in the figure.
Calculate the magnitude and direction of the total
force exerted by the ropes on the skater. T/I
30 N
top view
4. A car is parked on a slippery hill (Figure 14).
The hill is at an angle of 158 to the horizontal.
To keep it from sliding down the hill, the owner
attaches a cable at the back of the car and to a post.
The mass of the car is 1.41 3 103 kg. K/U T/I C
cable
30°
15°
50°
Figure 14
40 N
Figure 11
2. Determine the tensions in all three cables in
Figure 12. T/I
y
FT3
FT1
60.0°
x
FT2
m 45 kg
Figure 12
3. A flag of mass 2.5 kg is supported by a single rope
as shown in Figure 13. A strong horizontal wind
exerts a force of 12 N on the flag. Calculate the
tension in the rope and the angle, u, the rope makes
with the horizontal. T/I
wind
Figure 13
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(a) Draw an FBD showing the forces on the car.
(b) Write the equations for the conditions for static
equilibrium along the horizontal and vertical
directions.
(c) Calculate the tension in the cable. Assume there
is no friction between the road and the tires.
5. A student pushes on a lawn mower from rest
parallel to the handle of the mower. The student
pushes with a force of magnitude 42 N. The handle
makes an angle of 358 to the horizontal. The mower
accelerates across a level driveway with negligible
friction on the mower toward the lawn, 5.0 m away.
The mass of the lawn mower is 18 kg. K/U T/I C
(a) Draw the FBD of the mower.
(b) Calculate the acceleration of the mower.
(c) Calculate the normal force acting on the mower.
(d) Calculate the velocity of the mower when it
reaches the lawn.
6. In a physics experiment, a 1.3 kg dynamics cart is
placed on a ramp inclined at 258 to the horizontal.
The cart is initially at rest but is then pulled up the
ramp with a force sensor. The force sensor exerts
a force on the cart parallel to the ramp. Negligible
friction acts on the cart. T/I
(a) What force is required to pull the cart up the
ramp at a constant velocity?
(b) What force is required to pull the cart up the
ramp at an acceleration of 2.2 m/s2?
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2.4
Forces of Friction
Friction may seem like it always makes movement more difficult because it always
opposes motion. However, friction is actually essential for much of the motion that
we rely on. Have you ever tried getting around on ice? The reason that walking,
driving, or riding a bicycle on ice is difficult is the lack of friction.
When you take a step, you push backward on the ground. The static friction of
the ground opposes the attempted motion of your foot and exerts a simultaneous
and opposite force that propels you forward. A sprinter, such as the one in Figure 1,
tries to maximize the forward force of the ground. This means wearing shoes that have
a large force of static friction with the running surface. It also means pushing on the
ground with a force that has a large component parallel to the ground. However,
if the sprinter pushes on the ground at an angle that is too shallow, his feet will overcome the static friction and slip on the track.
Fs
>
Figure 1 The sprinter is using the static friction between his shoes, F s, and the running surface
to accelerate.
Types of Friction: Kinetic and Static
Figure 2(a) shows a hockey puck sliding across the ice. Although this surface is quite
slippery, there is still a small amount of friction. Eventually, the force of friction stops
the puck. Figure 2(b) is an FBD of the hockey puck. The puck moves horizontally to
the right. Only one force acts along the horizontal, the force of kinetic friction. The
puck’s velocity is to the right, so the force of friction opposes this motion to the left.
Two forces act in the vertical direction: the weight of the puck (the force of gravity)
and the normal force exerted by the icy surface acting on the puck. (You read about
these forces in Section 2.2.)
FN
FN
v
FK
FK
Fg
Fg
(a)
(b)
Figure 2 (a) The hockey puck experiences only one force in the horizontal direction, a small force
of friction, which slows and eventually stops the puck. (b) The FBD shows all the forces acting on
the puck.
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Kinetic Friction
The force of gravity and the normal force cancel each other in the y-direction, and the
puck’s motion is entirely in the x-direction. So why do you think you need to know
about the forces along y if they cancel each other? Actually, the normal force is closely
connected to the force of friction. For a sliding object, the magnitudes of these two
forces are related by FK 5 mKFN. The number mK is the coefficient of kinetic friction,
the number that relates the force of kinetic friction between two surfaces in contact
with the normal force where they meet. The frictional force occurs when two surfaces
are in motion (slipping) with respect to each other. As a coefficient, mK is a number
without dimensions or units, and its value depends on the surface properties.
For a hockey puck on an icy surface, mK is relatively small, so the frictional force
is similarly small. The value of mK depends on the smoothness of both the ice and
the hockey puck, and might typically be 0.005. The coefficient of kinetic friction for
two rough surfaces is larger. For example, the surface of wood is much rougher than
the surface of ice, and the surface of wet snow is rougher than that of ice. For wood
slipping on wet snow, the coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.10.
Table 1 lists coefficients of kinetic and static friction (discussed below) for some
common materials. These values of mK show that the frictional force depends on the
properties of the surfaces that are in contact. Note that the coefficient of kinetic friction is less than or equal to the coefficient of static friction. Note also the value for
synovial joints in humans. Biomedical research into friction in joints is an advancing
CAREER LINK
field.
Table 1 Typical Values for the Coefficients of Kinetic Friction and Static Friction for Some
Common Materials
Surface
mK
mS
Surface
Investigation
mK
mS
0.1
rubber on dry concrete
0.6–0.85
steel on ice
0.01
rubber on wet concrete
0.45–0.75
rubber on ice
0.005
rubber on dry asphalt
0.5–0.80
wood on dry snow
0.18
0.22
rubber on wet asphalt
0.25–0.75
wood on wet snow
0.10
0.14
steel on dry steel
0.42
0.78
Teflon on Teflon
0.04
0.04
steel on greasy steel
0.029–0.12
0.05–0.11 near-frictionless carbon
0.001
leather on oak
0.52
0.61
0.003
ice on ice
0.03
0.1
synovial joints in humans
coefficient of kinetic friction (mK ) the
ratio of kinetic friction to the normal force
2.4.1
Inclined Plane and Friction
(page 96)
The coefficients of friction can
be determined experimentally by
exerting a horizontal force and
using measuring equipment. In this
investigation, you will estimate these
coefficients using objects on an
inclined plane.
0.01
Note: The values for mS for rubber and concrete are not normally provided because there are no reliable methods to
determine them. In addition, the range depends on a variety of conditions.
Remember, too, that the magnitude of the frictional force depends on the normal
force. If you increase the normal force—perhaps by adding an additional mass to the
top of the hockey puck—the frictional force increases. However, this relationship is
not a “law” of nature. It is simply an approximation that works well in a wide variety
of cases. To derive a fundamental law or theory of friction, we need to consider
in detail the atomic interactions that occur when two surfaces are in contact. This
problem is quite complicated and is currently a topic of much research.
Static Friction
The example of the sliding hockey puck illustrates surfaces that are moving (slipping)
against each other. What about when two surfaces are in contact but not slipping?
Such cases involve static friction.
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investigation
2.4.2
Motion and Pulleys (page 97)
You will design your own
investigation in which you will predict
the acceleration of a mass and then
measure the acceleration. Then
you will evaluate your results by
comparing the measured value with
the calculated value.
In Figure 3(a), a worker is trying to push a refrigerator, but the refrigerator is not
moving. This example demonstrates static friction. Unlike the hockey puck example,
here, the person pushing on the refrigerator adds an additional force. The FBD in
Figure 3(b) shows the additional force of the push working against the force of static
friction. Intuitively, you know that when the force exerted by the person is small, the
refrigerator will not move. Since the acceleration is then zero, the force of static friction and the force of the push cancel each other:
ma 5 SFx
5 Fa 1 12FS2
ma 5 0
y
FN
Fa
FN
x
Fa
FS
FS
(a)
Fg
Fg
(b)
Figure 3 (a) Static friction opposes the attempted motion of the refrigerator. (b) FBD for the refrigerator.
coefficient of static friction (mS )
the ratio of the maximum force of static
friction to the normal force
UNiT TASK BooKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about friction to the Unit Task on
page 146.
The force of static friction is suffi
> ciently
> strong that no relative motion (no slipping)
occurs. In terms of magnitudes, 0 F a 0 5 0 F S 0 . However, the value of the applied force, Fa,
can vary, and the refrigerator will still remain at rest. That is, the worker can push harder,
a little, or not at all without the refrigerator moving. In all these cases, the frictional force
exactly cancels Fa. The only way this can happen is when the magnitude of the frictional
force varies depending on the value of Fa, as described by 0 Fa 0 # mSFN, where mS is the
coefficient of static friction. The coefficient of static friction is the number that relates the
force of static friction between two surfaces to the normal force where they meet.
The term static means that the two surfaces—the floor and the bottom of the
refrigerator—are not moving relative to each other. The magnitude of the force of static
friction can take any value up to a maximum of mSFN. If Fa in Figure 3 is small, the force
of static friction is small and will cancel Fa so that the total horizontal force is zero. If
Fa is increased, the force of static friction increases but again cancels Fa. However, the
magnitude of the force of static friction has an upper limit of mSFN. If Fa is greater than
this upper limit, the worker will succeed in moving the refrigerator.
Mini Investigation
Light Investigation
from Friction
Mini
Skills: Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
In this investigation, you will observe the production of light from
friction. This is called triboluminescence (from the Greek tribein,
meaning “to rub”) and means that light is generated from the
friction of materials rubbing together.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; pliers; wintergreen
mints
1. Extinguish the room lights and close the blinds to make
the room as dark as possible. Alternatively, enter a dark
closet for the investigation. Wait until your eyes adapt to
the dark.
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HANDBOOK
A2.1
2. Put on your eye protection. Place the mints in the pliers
and crush them. Observe the result. If nothing happens,
try repeating the process.
Use caution when working in the dark. Wear eye
protection when crushing the candy. Never eat or taste
anything while in the science laboratory.
A. What happened when you crushed the mints? T/I
B. What materials rubbed together to create the friction that
produced the light? K/U T/I
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In the following Tutorial, you will explore friction problems and calculate acceleration,
angle, and mass.
Tutorial 1 Solving Friction Problems
The Sample Problems in this Tutorial model how to use the coefficients of kinetic and static
friction to calculate other unknowns, such as acceleration, angle, and mass.
Sample Problem 1: Comparing Pushing and Pulling
A worker must move a crate that can be either pushed or pulled, as
shown in Figure 4. The worker can exert a force of 3.6 3 102 N.
The crate has a mass of 45 kg. The worker can push or pull the
crate at an angle of 258, and the coefficient of kinetic friction
between the floor and the crate is 0.36. The worker wants to
move the crate as quickly as possible, but he does not know
whether it is better to push or pull.
SFy 5 1FN 1 12Fg2 1 12Fa sin u 2
0 5 FN 2 Fg 2 Fa sin u
FN 5 Fg 1 Fa sin u
5 mg 1 Fa sin u
5 145 kg2 19.8 m/s22 1 13.6 3 102 N2 sin 258
FN 5 593.1 N 1two extra digits carried2
SFx 5 F cos u 1 12mKFN2
5 13.6 3 102 N2 cos 258 2 10.362 1593.1 N2
SFx 5 112.8 N 1two extra digits carried2
(a) Calculate the acceleration when pushing the crate.
(b) Calculate the acceleration when pulling the crate.
(c) Evaluate your answers to (a) and (b). Does it matter
whether the worker pushes or pulls the crate? Explain
your answer.
SFx
m
112.8 N
5
45 kg
a1 5 2.5 m/s2
a1 5
Statement: The acceleration when pushing the crate
is 2.5 m/s2.
(b) Given: F 5 3.6 3 102 N; m 5 45 kg; u 5 258; mK 5 0.36
Required: the acceleration when pulling the crate, a2
(a)
(b)
Figure 4
Solution
(a) Given: F 5 3.6 3 102 N; m 5 45 kg; u 5 258; mK 5 0.36
Analysis: In this case, the x-component of the force is the
same, but the worker is now pulling so the y-component
of the worker’s force changes: it is now upward instead of
downward. Draw an FBD for the pull.
Solution:
Required: the acceleration when pushing on the crate, a1
Analysis: Draw an FBD for the push. The force in the
y-direction must be zero because the crate is not
accelerating upward or downward. Calculate the normal
force on the crate as well as the y-components of all the
forces on the crate. The worker is pushing, so make the
y-component downward. Use the horizontal components
to calculate the acceleration.
Solution:
FN
FK
Fa cos
25°
Fg
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Fa sin
Fa
FN
FK
25°
Fa cos
Fa
Fa sin
Fg
SFy 5 1FN 1 12Fg2 1 11Fa sin u 2
0 5 FN 2 Fg 1 Fa sin u
FN 5 Fg 2 Fa sin u
5 mg 2 Fa sin u
5 145 kg2 19.8 m/s22 2 13.6 3 102 N2 sin 258
FN 5 288.9 N 1two extra digits carried2
SFx 5 Fa cos u 1 12mKFN2
5 13.6 3 102 N2 cos 258 2 10.362 1288.9 N2
SFx 5 222.3 N 1two extra digits carried2
2.4 Forces of Friction
87
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(c) Statement: The worker should pull the crate because
pulling decreases the normal force on the crate.
Consequently, the force of friction is less, which
produces a greater acceleration.
SFx
m
222.3 N
5
45 kg
a2 5 4.9 m/s2
a2 5
Statement: The acceleration when pulling the crate
is 4.9 m/s2.
Sample Problem 2: Overcoming Static Friction
A crate is placed on an inclined board as shown in Figure 5.
One end of the board is hinged so that the angle u is adjustable.
The coefficient of static friction between the crate and the board
is 0.30. Determine the angle at which the crate just begins to slip.
SFy 5 1FN 1 12Fg cos u 2
0 5 FN 2 Fg cos u
FN 5 Fg cos u
FS 5 mSFN
5 mS 1Fg cos u 2
FS 5 mSFg cos u
SFx 5 1Fg sin u 2 FS
0 5 Fg sin u 2 FS
Fg sin u 5 FS
Fg sin u 5 mS Fg cos u
sin u
5 mS
cos u
sin u
5 tan u
cos u
tan u 5 mS
u 5 tan21mS
5 tan21 10.302
u 5 178
hinge
Figure 5
Given: mS 5 0.30
Required: u
Analysis: The force of static friction on the crate can be as
large as FS 5 mSFN, where FN is the normal force. First draw
the FBD of the crate. Then calculate the normal force using
the y-components. Then calculate the angle u using the
x-components and the fact that the object is in equilibrium.
Statement: The angle at which the crate just begins to slip
is 178.
Solution:
FN
FS
Fg cos Fg sin Fg
Sample Problem 3: Calculating Mass in Friction Problems
Figure 6 shows two blocks joined with a rope that runs over
a pulley. The mass of m2 is 5.0 kg, and the incline is 358.
The coefficient of static friction between m1 and the inclined
plane is 0.25. Determine the largest mass for m1 such that both
blocks remain at rest.
m1
m2
Given: m2 5 5.0 kg; u 5 358; mS 5 0.25
Required: m1
Analysis: Draw an FBD of the situation. As long as the blocks are
at rest, the tension in the rope is equal to the force of gravity on
m2, FT 5 Fg 2 5 m2g.
Now consider m1. To remain at rest, the net force must also
be zero. First, use the y-components to determine the normal
force; then use the x-components to calculate m2.
Figure 6
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Solution:
SFy 5 1FN 1 12Fg1 cos u 2
0 5 FN 2 Fg1 cos u
FN 5 Fg1 cos u
FN
FT
m1
Fg cos FK
m1g
Fg sin FT
m2
m2g
FS 5 mSFN
5 mS 1Fg1 cos u 2
5 mSFg1 cos u
FS 5 mSm1g cos u
SFx 5 1Fg sin u 1 12FS2 1 12FT2
0 5 m1g sin u 2 mSm1g cos u 2m2g
2m1 sin u 1 mSm1 cos u 5 2m2
m1 1mS cos u 2 sin u 2 5 2m2
2m2
m1 5
mS cos u 2 sin u
2 15.0 kg2
5
10.252 cos 358 2 sin 358
m1 5 14 kg
Statement: The largest mass for m1 for the blocks to remain at
rest is 14 kg.
Practice
1. A small textbook is resting on a larger textbook on a horizontal desktop. You apply a horizontal
force to the bottom book and both books accelerate together. The top book does not slip on
the lower book. K/U T/I C A
(a) Draw an FBD of the top book during its acceleration.
(b) What force causes the top book to accelerate horizontally?
2. A stack of dinner plates on a kitchen counter is accelerating horizontally at 2.7 m/s2. Determine
the smallest coefficient of static friction between the dinner plates that will prevent slippage.
K/U
T/I
[ans: 0.28]
3. A rope exerts a force of magnitude 28 N, at an angle 298 above the horizontal, on a box
at rest on a horizontal floor. The coefficients of friction between the box and the floor are
mS 5 0.45 and mK 5 0.41. The box remains at rest. Determine the smallest possible mass
of the box. K/U T/I [ans: 6.9 kg]
4. A sled takes off from the top of a hill inclined at 6.08 to the horizontal. The sled’s initial speed
is 12 m/s. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the sled and the snow is 0.14. Determine
how far the sled will slide before coming to rest. K/U T/I A [ans: 2.1 3 102 m]
5. You are pulling a 39 kg box on a level floor by a rope attached to the box. The rope makes
an angle of 218 with the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and
the floor is 0.23. Calculate the magnitude of the tension in the rope needed to keep the box
moving at a constant velocity. (Hint: The normal force is not equal in magnitude to the force
of gravity.) K/U T/I A [ans: 87 N]
6. A 24 kg box is tied to a 14 kg box with a horizontal rope. The coefficient of friction between
the boxes and the floor is 0.32. You pull the larger box forward with a force of 1.8 3 102 N
at an angle of 258 above the horizontal. Calculate (a) the acceleration of the boxes and
(b) the tension in the rope. K/U T/I [ans: (a) 1.8 m/s2 [forward]; (b) 59 N]
7. The coefficient of kinetic friction between a refrigerator and the floor is 0.20. The mass of the
refrigerator is 100.0 kg, and the coefficient of static friction is 0.25. Determine the acceleration when
you apply the minimum force needed to get the refrigerator to move. K/U T/I A [ans: 0.49 m/s2 ]
8. You are given the job of moving a stage prop with a mass of 110 kg across a horizontal floor.
The coefficient of static friction between the stage prop and the floor is 0.25. Calculate the
minimum force required to just set the stage prop into motion. T/I [ans: 2.7 3 102 N [horizontal]]
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2.4
Review
Summary
• The coefficients of static friction and kinetic friction relate the force of friction
between two objects to the normal force acting at the surfaces of the objects.
These coefficients have no units and depend on the nature of the surfaces.
• Frictional force increases as the normal force increases.
• The force of static friction, FS # mSFN, opposes the force applied to an object,
increasing as the applied force increases, until the maximum static friction
is reached. At that instant, the object begins to move and kinetic friction,
FK 5 mKFN, opposes the motion.
Questions
1. A car is moving with a speed of 20 m/s when the
brakes are applied. The wheels lock (stop spinning).
After travelling 40 m, the car stops. Determine the
coefficient of kinetic friction between the tires and
the road. K/U T/I A
2. A hockey puck slides with an initial speed of 50.0 m/s
on a large frozen lake. The coefficient of kinetic friction
between the puck and the ice is 0.030. Determine
the speed of the puck after 10.0 s. K/U T/I A
3. You are trying to slide a sofa across a horizontal
floor. The mass of the sofa is 2.0 3 102 kg, and you
need to exert a force of 3.5 3 102 N to make it just
begin to move. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the coefficient of static friction
between the floor and the sofa.
(b) After it starts moving, the sofa reaches a speed
of 2.0 m/s after 5.0 s. Calculate the coefficient of
kinetic friction between the sofa and the floor.
4. A crate is placed on an adjustable, inclined board.
The coefficient of static friction between the crate
and the board is 0.29. T/I
(a) Calculate the value of θ at which the crate just
begins to slip.
(b) Determine the acceleration of the crate down
the incline at this angle when the coefficient of
kinetic friction is 0.26.
5. Friction can be helpful in some situations but cause
problems in other situations. K/U T/I A
(a) Describe two situations in which friction is
helpful for an object moving on a horizontal
surface.
(b) Describe two situations in which it would be
ideal if there were no friction when an object
moves across a horizontal surface.
6. Two blocks are connected by a massless string that
passes over a frictionless pulley (Figure 7). The
coefficient of static friction between m1 and the table
is 0.45. The coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.35.
Mass m1 is 45 kg, and m2 is 12 kg. K/U T/I
m1
m2
Figure 7
(a) Is this system in static equilibrium? Explain.
(b) Determine the tension in the string.
(c) A mass of 20.0 kg is added to m2. Calculate the
acceleration.
7. A block of rubber is placed on an adjustable
inclined plane and released from rest. The angle
of the incline is gradually increased. T/I
(a) The block does not move until the incline
makes an angle of 428 to the horizontal.
Calculate the coefficient of static friction.
(b) The block stops accelerating when the incline is
at an angle of 358 to the horizontal. Determine
the coefficient of kinetic friction.
8. Two masses, connected by a massless string, hang
over a pulley that connects two inclines (Figure 8).
Mass m1 is 8.0 kg, and mass m2 is 12 kg. The coefficient
of kinetic friction for both inclines is 0.21. Determine
the acceleration of the two masses. T/I
m1
1 26°
m2
2 39°
Figure 8
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2.5
Explore an Application in Dynamics
Linear Actuators
Skills Menu
A growing trend in dynamics is the field of ergonomics. Ergonomics is the study of
the design and efficiency of different working environments, particularly how the
working environment affects the health and safety of workers. A linear actuator is a
device that converts energy into linear motion. Linear actuators can be used in many
different working environments to prevent injuries in muscles, joints, and nerves
resulting from repetitive motion and strain. They can also be used in rehabilitation
CAREER LINK
centres to help everyone from infants to the elderly.
Simply put, linear actuators convert energy into motion to turn a gear, which turns
a screw, which pushes on a plunger (Figure 1). The plunger then applies a linear
(constant) force. This force may lower the counter for a cashier, open or close power
windows in cars, raise a workstation for an extremely tall worker, lift a patient into
a harness and onto a stretcher for transportation, or tighten the screws fastening the
dashboard to a vehicle in an automobile assembly line. Linear actuators consistently
apply the same force every time. Due to this reliability, more and more industries and
businesses are discovering new applications for this innovative technology.
• Researching
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
• Identifying
Alternatives
linear actuator a device that converts
energy into linear motion
electric motor turns the gears
plunger applies force
gears turn the screw
screw pushes the plunger
Figure 1 The linear actuator shown here uses an electric motor to turn a gear to push a plunger.
Linear actuators are classified by type; the total distance the plunger can move—
called the stroke; the power of the motor; and speed. Different types of actuators use
different types of energy, such as mechanical energy, electrical energy, and potential
energy stored in compressed liquids or gases.
Actuators are also classified based on their energy source: electromechanical,
mechanical, hydraulic (potential energy in compressed liquid, Figure 2), and pneumatic
(potential energy in compressed gas). Each type has advantages and disadvantages.
FPO
Figure 2 Hydraulic actuators are used in lifts like the one shown here. Hydraulic actuators can
exert large forces to lift heavy objects.
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Mechanical actuators are typically inexpensive and do not require an external
power source. That means, however, that they are not automated at all and are
only manually operated. Electromechanical actuators are also typically inexpensive
and can be automated. However, they have many moving parts that can wear out.
Hydraulic and pneumatic actuators are useful for exerting large forces, but they are
not as precise and repeatable as mechanical and electromechanical actuators.
The Application
You are considering getting a co-op placement. The co-op placement could be at any
number of locations, such as a warehouse, a manufacturing facility, a rehabilitation
centre, or an engineering department. However, each placement requires a working
knowledge of linear actuators. You want to learn more about linear actuators and how
they are used so you can make a good impression in the interview.
Your Goal
To learn how a specific linear actuator works, how it is used to make a task easier and
safer for workers or patients, and how it affects society and the environment
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Research
A4.1
Research the different types of linear actuators and how they are used. Then pick one
type of linear actuator with a specific application. Once you have chosen an application, use the following points to guide your research:
•
•
•
•
the application and how it works
the advantages of the device to the job and to society
any disadvantages of the device to society and the environment
WEB LINK
any new tasks on the horizon for the device
Summarize
Summarize your research and conclusions. Use the following questions as a guide:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
What type of linear actuator did you choose?
How does the linear actuator work?
What task does the linear actuator perform?
What advantages does the device have in performing the task over other
methods, such as manual labour?
How does the device make the work environment more ergonomic?
Does the device help reduce workdays lost to strain and injury?
Are there disadvantages to the application?
Summarize how the linear actuator compares with other methods of
doing a task.
Assess the impact of the device on society and the environment.
Communicate
Summarize your research in a format that you can review for your co-op interview:
•
•
•
•
•
92
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 92
web page
blog
email to a friend
electronic slide presentation
written consumer report
•
•
•
•
poster
video
oral presentation
other format of your choosing
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4/27/12 7:31 AM
2.6
Physics JOURNAL
The Physics of Downhill Skiing
ABSTRACT
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A3
Downhill skiing involves forces in a variety of different ways. Skiers race down the
mountain as the force of Earth’s gravity pulls them toward the bottom of the slope, while
air resistance and kinetic friction resist the motion. The skier’s stance and equipment
help the skier reach the bottom of the slope as quickly as possible by reducing the air
resistance on the skier as well as the friction between the skier and the snow. The skier
must also maintain control while going down the slope by taking advantage of the friction between the skis and the snow. Finally, the design of the skier’s safety equipment
must take into account the forces on the skier during a crash.
The Forces Acting on a Skier
What are the forces acting on a downhill skier? Gravity acts
to accelerate the skier down the hill, while various frictional
forces oppose the skier’s motion (Figure 1).
air resistance, Fair. To show this, we draw an FBD and we have
the positive x-axis pointing downhill, as shown in Figure 2.
y
FN
Fair
x
Fg
Figure 1 Downhill skiing is all about maximizing the forces
acting down the slope and minimizing the forces that oppose
the skier’s motion.
Reducing friction is a significant element of downhill
skiing. Wax on the bottom of the skis helps reduce the
kinetic friction between the skis and the snow. This directly
increases the acceleration of a skier because any reduction
in the coefficient of kinetic friction between the skis and the
snow will decrease the frictional force accordingly.
Body position is also important for reducing friction in
the form of air resistance. The air resistance of an object is
proportional to the area of the object. By making herself as
small as possible, a skier can reduce the force of air resistance. This is why skiers go into a crouching position, called
a tuck, as much as possible.
Having a large mass will not necessarily cause the skier to
go faster. The mass of an object does not affect its acceleration
due to gravity, but when air resistance becomes important, that
can change. The equation for the acceleration of a skier with
a mass of m at an angle u (the slope of the mountain) incorporates the coefficient of kinetic friction, mK, and the force of
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8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 93
FK
Fgy
Fgx
Figure 2
Therefore, the forces of kinetic friction and air resistance both
point uphill and are negative. Taking components parallel to
the incline gives the following:
SFx 5 Fgx 1 12FK2 1 12Fair2
ma 5 mg sin u 2 mKmg cos u 2 Fair
Divide both sides of the equation by the mass, m:
Fair
a 5 g sin u 2 mK g cos u 2
m
Unlike the forces of gravity and kinetic friction, the force
of air resistance does not depend on the mass of an object.
So according to the above equation, a more massive skier
should have a slightly larger acceleration as the skier’s speed
increases. However, the ability to make sharp turns is also
important for a skier, and a heavier skier might have more
trouble making such turns.
Another important aspect of downhill skiing is maintaining control going down the slope. This often requires
making many sharp turns during the descent. A skier turns
by using the friction between the skis and the snow to slow
2.6 Physics Journal: The Physics of Downhill Skiing
93
4/27/12 7:31 AM
down and to help make turns. When turning, the skier has
to angle the skis to dig into the snow, making use of the
CAREER LINK
normal force (Figure 3).
Figure 3 By angling his skis, a skier can change the relative
values of the components of friction in different directions,
causing him to turn.
The radius of curvature of these turns is important
for overall speed. The tighter the curve, the shorter the
overall distance the skier has to go and the faster he
reaches the bottom. Skis that are shorter and side-cut can
significantly reduce the radius of curvature (Figure 4).
Leg strength is also important for making sharp, controlled
turns that increase overall speed down the slope. Skiers
train the muscles that allow them to make the purest possible carves (turns).
Skiers can also use poles to give a boost of extra force
when they start from rest. When a skier pushes on the
slope with the poles, the slope exerts a force on the skier
according to Newton’s third law. This force will have components both parallel and perpendicular to the slope (surface
of the snow). The parallel force will directly increase acceleration down the slope. The perpendicular force will reduce
the normal force of the slope on the skier and thus reduce
the kinetic friction.
Finally, safety is a major issue in downhill skiing. During
a crash, a skier’s speed changes from a high speed to zero
almost instantly. Newton’s second law explains that this large
change causes a large force to act on the skier. Safety equipment is intended to reduce the effect of the sudden slowing
felt by the skier and, thus, the force on the skier. Reducing the
force on the skier’s head is particularly important. A helmet
provides a cushion that allows the skier’s head to take more
time to slow down from full speed to zero during a crash.
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned about the physics of skiing to the
Unit Task on page 146.
radius
side-cut
(a)
(b)
Figure 4 (a) The side-cut is the amount of curving at the sides of
a ski. (b) The side-cut radius is an imaginary oval that you could
draw if you followed the side-cut in the ski. The side-cut radius
affects the skier’s turning radius.
Further Reading
Lind, D., & Sanders, S.P. (2004). The physics of skiing
(2nd ed.). New York: Springer.
The physics of skiing. (2011). Real-world Physics
Problems.
Swinson, D.B. (1992). Physics and skiing. Physics Teacher,
30 (8), 458–63.
Weinstock, M. (2004, February). The physics of . . . skiing.
Discover Magazine.
WEB LINK
2.6
Questions
1. List four forces that act on a downhill skier. K/U
2. How does equipment used by downhill skiers
reduce friction and resistance? K/U
3. Does a large mass necessarily cause a skier to go
faster? Explain your answer. K/U
4. Why is a helmet important for a downhill
skier? K/U
5. Research improvements in skiing equipment,
technology, and ski suits (clothing). Use search
terms such as side-cut (or parabolic) skis and
K/U T/I
A
anti-drag suits.
(a) What is the relationship between improvements
in skiing technology and safety?
(b) Is there any evidence that supports the use of
the technology?
(c) Why do skiers wear special clothing?
WEB LINK
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CHAPTER
2
Investigations
investigation 2.3.1
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Static equilibrium of Forces
In Section 2.3, you learned about using the components of
force vectors to analyze the conditions required for static
equilibrium. In this investigation, you will set up and evaluate
the conditions for static equilibrium. This will require using
the components of force vectors in two dimensions.
Purpose
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.4
To analyze how forces of friction and other forces affect
a system in equilibrium
equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
3 small pulleys
padding, such as a towel or blanket
circular protractor
vertical force board (or a support structure)
3 hangers with masses (100 g and two 200 g)
string
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
Do not use masses that are larger than 500 g. Do not wear
open-toed shoes. Take care not to allow the masses to fall
on your hands or feet.
3. Measure the angles a, b, c, and d (see Figure 1(a)).
4. Draw a system diagram for the setup. Label all angles
and masses. Draw an FBD for each mass and for the
common point of the strings.
5. Using the values of the masses and the angles of the
strings, calculate the vertical components of the
tensions in the strings attached to m1 and m3. Use up
as positive. Calculate the vertical force produced by
m2. Compare the sum of the vertical components of
the tensions in the strings attached to m1 and m3 to
the vertical force produced by m2 by calculating the
percent difference.
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8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 95
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
6. Using the values of the masses and the angles of the
strings, calculate the horizontal components of the
tensions in the strings attached to m1 and m3 and
compare them by calculating the percent difference.
Use right as positive.
7. Change the angles of the strings connecting m1 and
m3, while keeping the string supporting m2 vertical,
and repeat Steps 3 to 6.
8. Use the third pulley to offset the string holding m2 so it is
no longer vertical (see Figure 1(b)). Determine the
vertical components of the tensions in the three
strings and compare them. Determine the horizontal
components of the tensions in the three strings and
compare them.
9. Repeat Steps 7 and 8 for different force values and angles.
b
b
c
a
Procedure
1. Place padding at the base of the force board in case a
string breaks and a mass falls.
2. Put on your eye protection. Hang the three different
masses (m1, m2, and m3) from strings tied together
at a common point, with two of the strings hanging
over pulleys as shown in Figure 1(a). Make sure
the masses are all at rest. Line up the origin of the
protractor with the common point of the strings.
SKILLS MeNU
c
a
d
d
e
origin
m3
m1
m2
m1
f
protractor
m3
m2
(a)
(b)
Figure 1 (a) Original setup of masses, as described in Step 1.
(b) Add the third pulley, as described in Step 8.
Analyze and evaluate
(a) What is the condition for static equilibrium? K/U
(b) Describe how friction between the strings and the
pulleys affects the results of this investigation. T/I
(c) How could you improve the accuracy of your
measurements in this investigation? K/U T/I A
A
Apply and extend
(d) If you have access to a force sensor, replace m2 in
Figure 1(a) with the sensor. Start with the strings
attached to m1 and m3 as horizontal as possible, and
then gradually pull down with the force sensor until
the angles b and c decrease significantly. T/I A
Chapter 2 investigations
95
4/27/12 7:31 AM
(i) What happens to the reading on the force sensor?
(ii) What implications does this trend have?
(e) Imagine pulling down slightly on m2 so that the
point where the strings tie together moves, and
then letting go. Predict what would happen. If the
equipment is still available, try it. Describe the motion
investigation 2.4.1
CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT
Inclined Plane and Friction
In Section 2.4, you solved problems using the formulas
for determining the coefficients of friction. In this
investigation, you will approximate a reliable estimate of
these coefficients using objects on an inclined plane.
Testable Questions
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.2
(a) How do the coefficients of static and kinetic friction
compare for an object on a ramp?
(b) How do the coefficients of friction for different objects
compare to each other when placed on the same ramp?
hypothesis
After reading through the Experimental Design and
Procedure, formulate hypotheses for the Testable Questions.
Explain the reasoning for your hypotheses.
variables
Identify the controlled, dependent, and independent
variables in your investigation.
experimental Design
You will test the effects of different objects (such as the
sole of a running shoe or a friction block with rubber
backing) on the coefficients of static friction and kinetic
friction using an inclined plane. You will need to raise
the inclined plane until each object begins to slide to
determine the coefficient of static friction. You will need
to lower the inclined plane until the object moves down
the plane at a constant speed to determine the coefficient
of kinetic friction. How much do the coefficients vary?
Are they ever the same? These and similar questions
should form the basis of your investigation.
equipment and Materials
• metre stick
• inclined plane
• test objects (for example, running shoe, textbook,
plastic block, piece of wood)
• protractor (optional)
96
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 96
of the masses after you let go. Assume that you do
not pull down far enough to pull any of the masses
over their pulleys, and that the pulleys and strings
are frictionless. Remember that after you let go of
the mass, the net force goes back to zero. Was your
prediction correct? T/I A
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKILLS MeNU
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Procedure
1. Place the first object on the inclined plane. Determine
the angle at which the object just starts to slide down
the incline. Explain how the mass of the object relates
to the coefficient of static friction.
Do not wear open-toed shoes. Take care not to allow the
test objects to fall on your hands or feet.
2. Use the angle from Step 1 to determine the coefficient
of static friction.
3. Determine the angle that will allow the object to slide
down the incline at a constant speed. You can do this
by lowering the angle slightly once the object has
started to move.
4. Use the angle from Step 3 to calculate the coefficient
of kinetic friction.
5. Repeat Steps 1 to 4 for different test objects.
Analyze and evaluate
(a) What variables were measured, recorded, and
manipulated in this investigation? What type of
relationship was being tested? K/U T/I
(b) Why are the coefficients of friction different for the
different objects that you measured? K/U T/I
(c) Compare the coefficients of static and kinetic friction
for shoe soles, wood, and plastic. Which object has
the highest coefficient of friction? K/U T/I
(d) What actions could you take to improve the accuracy
of your measurements in this activity? K/U T/I
Apply and extend
(e) Describe an experimental procedure that shows
that the coefficients of friction for two materials are
independent of the mass of an object. T/I A
(f) Describe another experimental procedure that can
determine the coefficient of kinetic friction using an
inclined plane. What new equipment, if any, would
this method require? T/I A
NEL
4/27/12 7:31 AM
Investigation 2.4.2
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Motion and Pulleys
In Investigation 2.4.1, you determined the coefficients
of friction of objects on an inclined plane. In this
investigation, you will use the inclined plane, an object,
and its coefficient of friction from Investigation 2.4.1.
You will then calculate the acceleration of the object on
the inclined plane. You will design your own investigation
in which you will measure the acceleration of a mass and
compare it to your calculated value.
Purpose
To design your own investigation to measure the acceleration
of a mass and compare the measured value to the actual
calculated value of the acceleration
Equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
ticker tape timer, motion sensor, or video camera
metre stick
protractor
stopwatch
masses (100 g, 200 g, 500 g)
pulley
string
one object from Investigation 2.4.1
inclined plane from Investigation 2.4.1
Procedure
1. Design an investigation to calculate and then
measure the acceleration of a moving mass. Include
all applicable safety precautions. Decide what you
are going to measure and how you can determine
the acceleration from the information that you have.
Suggestion: Suspend one mass from a string that goes
over a pulley, which is then tied to the object from
Investigation 2.4.1 on the inclined plane.
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8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 97
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
Skills Menu
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Ensure the pulley is attached to a secure support. Do not
wear open-toed shoes. Take care not to allow the test
objects to fall on your hands or feet.
2. Before you conduct your investigation, draw an FBD
of your setup.
3. Calculate the result that you expect for the
acceleration using the coefficient of friction
determined in Investigation 2.4.1.
4. Have your design approved by your teacher.
5. Conduct your investigation.
6. Repeat the investigation using a different mass.
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) Compare your measured values for acceleration with
your predicted values. Account for any differences
between the two sets of values. K/U T/I A
(b) Calculate the percent error. T/I
(c) Determine how you can improve the accuracy of your
measurement. K/U T/I
Apply and Extend
(d) List some other values that you could measure using a
similar setup. K/U T/I A
(e) Careful design of an experiment can help lead to
accurate and precise results. Describe some common
mistakes that students and researchers make when
designing experiments. Explain how these mistakes
affect the experimental results. T/I A
Chapter 2 Investigations 97
4/27/12 7:31 AM
CHAPTER
2
SUMMARY
Summary Questions
2. Look back at the Starting Points questions on page 60
about the race car burning rubber. Answer these
questions using what you have learned in this chapter.
Compare your latest answers with the answers you
wrote at the beginning of the chapter. Note how your
answers have changed.
1. One of the Key Concepts at the beginning of the
chapter was to analyze a technological device that
applies the principles of motion and forces and
assess the social and environmental impact. Provide
some relevant examples of such devices along with
explanatory diagrams and equations.
vocabulary
force (p. 62)
friction (p. 63)
newton (p. 62)
weight (p. 75)
static friction (p. 63)
Newton’s first law of
motion (p. 70)
kinetic friction (p. 63)
inertia (p. 70)
non-contact force (p. 62)
air resistance (p. 63)
mass (p. 71)
coefficient of kinetic
friction (p. 85)
force of gravity (p. 62)
applied force (p. 63)
normal force (p. 62)
free-body diagram (p. 63)
Newton’s second law of
motion (p. 71)
coefficient of static
friction (p. 86)
tension (p. 62)
net force (p. 65)
Newton’s third law of
motion (p. 73)
linear actuator (p. 91)
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college diploma,
a B.Sc. degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or postgraduate degrees.
This graphic organizer shows a few pathways to careers mentioned in this chapter.
1. Select two careers related to Dynamics that you find interesting. Research the
educational pathways that you would need to follow to pursue these careers. What is
involved in the required educational programs? Prepare a brief report of your findings.
2. For one of the two careers that you chose above, describe the career, main duties
and responsibilities, and working conditions. Also, outline how the career benefits
society and the environment.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
contact force (p. 62)
equilibrium (p. 77)
CAREER PAThwAYS
A6
ergonomist
M.Sc.
occupational therapist
Ph.D.
B.Sc.
OSSD
B.Eng.
11U Physics
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
hydraulics engineer
architect
college diploma
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 98
commercial pilot
biomedical engineer
12U Physics
98
postgraduate
certificate
biomedical researcher
helicopter pilot
CAREER LINK
NEL
4/27/12 7:31 AM
CHAPTER
2
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. A pitcher throws a fastball. After the ball has left the
pitcher’s hand and is moving through the air, which
forces are acting on the baseball? (2.1) K/U
(a) the force from the throw and the downward force
of gravity
(b) the force from the throw, a force exerted by the
air, and the downward force of gravity
(c) a force exerted by the air and a force from the
throw
(d) a force exerted by the air and the downward force
of gravity
2. A person with a mass of 62 kg is in an elevator moving
at a constant velocity of 2.3 m/s [up]. What is the
magnitude of the net force acting on the person?
(2.1) K/U
(a) 0 N
(b) 610 N
(c) 620 N
(d) 6100 N
3. When the net force acting on an object is doubled,
the effect on the acceleration of the object will be
(a) tripled
(b) doubled
(c) quartered
(d) constant (2.2) K/U
4. A force of 9.0 N exerted by a rope pulls a block with
a mass of 4.5 kg. The block is resting on a smooth
surface. What is the force of reaction exerted by the
block on the rope? (2.2) T/I
(a) 4.5 N
(b) 9.0 N
(c) 41 N
(d) 44 N
5. An object is suspended from a spring balance in an
elevator. The reading is 240 N when the elevator is
at rest. The spring balance reading changes to 220 N.
Which of the following describes how the elevator is
moving? (2.3) K/U
(a) downward with constant speed
(b) downward with decreasing speed
(c) downward with increasing speed
(d) upward with increasing speed
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. A child with mass m is sliding down a slide that is
inclined at an angle of u above the horizontal. The
magnitude of the normal force on the child is
(a) mg tan u
(b) mg sin u
(c) mg cos u
(d) mg (2.3) T/I A
7. A horizontal force of 95.0 N is applied to a 60.0 kg
crate on a rough, level surface. The crate accelerates
at 1.20 m/s2. What is the magnitude of the force of
kinetic friction acting on the crate? (2.4) T/I
(a) 16.0 N
(b) 23.0 N
(c) 33.0 N
(d) 45.0 N
8. When the normal force is doubled, the coefficient of
friction is
(a) halved
(b) doubled
(c) quadrupled
(d) unchanged (2.4) K/U
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
9. When you jump up in the air, the net force on you is
equal to the force of air resistance. (2.1) K/U
10. A golf ball on the Moon has the same inertia as it has
on Earth. (2.2) K/U
11. According to Newton’s third law of motion, the forces
of action and reaction always act on the same body
and balance each other. (2.2) K/U
12. In a tug-of-war between two athletes, each pulls on
the rope with a force of 300 N. The tension in the
rope is 600 N. (2.3) K/U
13. A block with a mass of 0.10 kg is held against a wall
by applying a horizontal force of 5.0 N on the block.
The magnitude of the frictional force acting on the
block is 0.98 N. (2.4) T/I
14. On a rainy day, it can be dangerous to drive a car
at high speed, because the rain on the road surface
increases the coefficients of friction. (2.4) K/U T/I
15. Downhill skiers go into a crouching position to
increase air resistance and decrease speed. (2.6) K/U
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB L INK
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Chapter 2 Self-Quiz 99
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CHAPTER
2
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. When a body is at rest, the net force acting on it is
(a) maximum
(b) zero
(c) minimum
(d) constant (2.1) K/U
2. The inertia of an object is directly proportional to its
(a) mass
(b) velocity
(c) acceleration
(d) speed (2.2) K/U
3. When a constant net force acts on an object, which
quantity remains constant? (2.2) K/U
(a) velocity
(b) displacement
(c) acceleration
(d) momentum
4. Action and reaction forces
(a) act on two different objects
(b) have the same direction
(c) have unequal magnitude
(d) always cancel each other (2.2) K/U
5. A 5.0 kg object undergoes an acceleration of 2.0 m/s2.
What is the magnitude of the resultant force acting on
the object? (2.2) T/I
(a) 0 N
(b) 2.0 N
(c) 5.0 N
(d) 1.0 3 101 N
6. The tension in a cable supporting a beam at a
construction site is less than the weight of the beam.
The beam may be
(a) going up or down with non-uniform velocity
(b) going up with increasing velocity
(c) going down with decreasing velocity
(d) going down with increasing acceleration (2.3) K/U
7. A 2.0 kg mass sits at rest on a plane inclined at
30.08 from the horizontal. The coefficient of static
friction is 0.70. What is the frictional force on the
mass? (2.4) T/I
(a) 5.9 N
(b) 6.9 N
(c) 8.5 N
(d) 9.8 N
100 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 100
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
8. A bicyclist brakes suddenly, and the wheels skid
across the ground. The force of friction between the
wheels and the ground acts
(a) backward on the front wheels and forward on the
rear wheels
(b) forward on the front wheels and backward on the
rear wheels
(c) backward on both wheels
(d) forward on both wheels (2.4) K/U
9. A snowboarder is sliding down a frictionless hill
inclined at an angle of θ to the horizontal. What is
the acceleration of the skier? (2.4) K/U
(a) g tan θ
(b) g sin θ
(c) g cos θ
(d) g
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
10. If only three forces of equal magnitude act on an object,
the object must have a non-zero net force. (2.1) K/U
11. When a non-zero net force acts on an object, the object
will speed up in the direction of the net force. (2.2) K/U
12. When you pull up on an object at rest on a horizontal
surface, you decrease the normal force on the object
but not the weight of the object. (2.2) K/U
13. When a skater bumps into the boards in an arena,
first the skater exerts a force on the boards, and then
the boards exert an equal and opposite reaction force
on the skater. (2.2) K/U
14. In an elevator with an acceleration of 0.20g up, the
force exerted on the floor by a passenger of mass m
is 1.2mg. (2.3) K/U
15. When a person walks on a rough surface, the
frictional force exerted by the surface on the person
is opposite to the direction of the person’s motion.
(2.3) K/U
16. When you are sliding down a hill on a snowboard,
the normal force on you is larger in magnitude than
the force of gravity. (2.3) K/U
17. When two objects slip over each other, the force of
friction between them is called static friction. (2.4) K/U
18. The magnitude of the frictional force depends on the
nature of the two surfaces in contact. (2.4) K/U
19. One advantage of a linear actuator over manual
labour is that a linear actuator can apply the same
force each time. (2.5) K/U
NEL
4/27/12 7:31 AM
Understanding
20. A 75 kg man stands in an elevator. Calculate the
force that the floor exerts on him when the elevator
starts moving upward with an acceleration of
2.0 m/s2. (2.1) K/U T/I
21. The airline pilot in Figure 1> is pulling a suitcase at a
constant speed with force F applied to the handle at
an angle of θ above the horizontal. A small force of
friction resists the motion. (2.1) K/U T/I C A
24. An astronaut is separated from his small spacecraft
accelerating in interstellar space at a constant rate of
100 m/s2. Determine the acceleration of the astronaut
the instant he is outside the spaceship. (Assume that
there are no nearby stars to exert a gravitational force
on him.) (2.2) T/I A
25. Explain why action and reaction forces cannot
cancel each other, even though they are equal
and opposite. (2.2) K/U C
26. A constant horizontal force of magnitude 20.0 N
is applied to block A with a mass of 4.0 kg, which
pushes against block B with a mass of 6.0 kg. The
blocks slide eastward over a frictionless surface.
Calculate the acceleration of the blocks. (2.2) T/I
27. A student holding a spring balance in his hand
suspends from it an object with a mass of 1.0 kg. The
balance slips from his hands and falls down. What is
the reading of the balance while it is in the air? (2.3)
K/U
Figure 1
(a) Draw an FBD of the suitcase.
(b) Determine the components of the net force. Choose
the direction of motion to be the 1x-direction.
(c) Determine the components of the forces. Choose
the 1x-direction as the direction in which the
handle is pointing.
(d) Which choice of 1x is more convenient?
Explain your answer. (Hint: Did you show the
components of all the forces in your diagrams?)
22. Express the magnitude and direction of the net force
acting on the following. (2.1) T/I A
(a) a drop of rain falling with a constant speed
(b) a cork with a mass of 10 g floating on still water
(c) a stone with a mass of 0.1 kg just after it is
dropped from the window of a stationary train
(Neglect air resistance.)
(d) the same stone at rest on the floor of a train,
which is accelerating at 1.0 m/s2
23. Draw an FBD for each of the following objects.
(2.1) K/U T/I C A
(a) a saucepan hanging from a hook
(b) a person standing at rest on the floor
(c) a puck sliding in a straight line on the ice
to the right
(d) a toboggan pulled by a rope at an angle above the
horizontal to the right with significant friction on
the toboggan
NEL
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 101
T/I
A
28. Is it always necessary for the coefficient of friction to
be less than one? Explain your answer. (2.4) K/U C A
29. Provide one advantage and one disadvantage each
of static and kinetic friction in situations involving
inclined planes. Explain your reasoning. (2.4) K/U C
30. How are linear actuators used to make the workplace
more ergonomic, reducing workdays lost to strain
and injury? (2.5) K/U
Analysis and Application
31. Describe how a trebuchet applies the principles of
linear motion. (2.1) K/U T/I
32. A rope with a mass of 0.53 kg is pulling a block with
a mass of 8.6 kg with a force of 31.5 N. Calculate the
force of reaction exerted by the block on the rope
when the block is resting on a smooth horizontal
surface. (2.1) T/I A
33. A helicopter with a mass of 1.5 3 103 kg rises with
a vertical acceleration of 12 m/s2. The crew and the
passengers have a total mass of 4.2 3 102 kg. Express
the magnitude and direction of the force on the floor
by the crew and the passengers. (2.1) T/I A
34. Two forces are acting on a 23 kg object. One force has
a magnitude of 45 N and is directed east. The other
force has a magnitude of 29 N and is directed north.
Determine the object’s acceleration. (2.1) T/I A
35. Three forces act on an object: a 47 N force at 318
north of east, a 58 N force at 468 north of east, and a
force of magnitude F at an angle of θ south of west.
The object is in equilibrium. Calculate F and θ.
(2.1) T/I A
Chapter 2 Review 101
4/27/12 7:31 AM
36. Two blocks are connected by a string passing over a
frictionless pulley, as shown in Figure 2. When the
blocks are in motion, block A experiences a force of
kinetic friction of magnitude 5.4 N. The mass of mA is
2.3 kg, and the mass of mB is 3.5 kg. (2.1, 2.2) T/I A
mA
mB
Figure 2
37.
38.
39.
40.
102
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the acceleration of
the blocks.
(b) Calculate the magnitude of the tension in
the string.
A man is floating on an air mattress in a swimming
pool. (2.1) K/U T/I C A
(a) Draw two FBDs: one for the man and one for
the mattress.
(b) Identify the reaction forces for all of the forces in
your FBDs in (a).
(c) The mass of the man is 1.1 3 102 kg, and the
mass of the mattress is 7.0 kg. Determine the
normal force of the water on the mattress.
(d) Determine the normal force of the mattress on
the man.
Describe how you could use this textbook, a piece of
paper, and a desk to demonstrate Newton’s first law
of motion. (2.2) K/U T/I C A
The engines of an airplane exert a force of
1.2 3 102 kN [E] during takeoff. The mass of the
airplane is 42 t (1 t 5 103 kg). (2.2) T/I A
(a) Calculate the acceleration produced by the
engines.
(b) Calculate the minimum length of runway needed
if the speed required for takeoff on this runway
is 71 m/s.
Two masses, 1.3 kg and 2.4 kg, are tied together
with a string. The string has negligible mass and
does not stretch. The masses are pulled on a
frictionless horizontal surface with a force of
8.6 N [W]. (2.2) T/I A
(a) Determine the acceleration of the masses.
(b) Calculate the force acting on the 1.3 kg mass.
Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 102
41. A horizontal force of 5.3 3 102 N pulls two masses,
11 kg and 19 kg, which are at rest on a frictionless
table and connected by a light string. Calculate the
tension in the string
(a) when the applied force pulls directly on the
11 kg mass
(b) when the applied force pulls directly on the
19 kg mass (2.3) T/I A
42. A sign with a mass of 2.5 kg is supported by a single
rope, as shown in Figure 3. A strong horizontal wind
exerts a force of 12 N on the sign. Calculate
(a) the tension in the rope
(b) the angle, u, the rope makes with the
horizontal (2.3) T/I A
wind
Bridge Slippery
When Wet
Figure 3
43. A circus performer with a mass of 54 kg hangs from
some ropes, as shown in Figure 4. (2.3) T/I A
35.0°
Figure 4
(a) Calculate the tension in each rope.
(b) What would happen to the tension in each rope
if the horizontal rope were slightly longer and
attached to the wall at a higher point? Explain
your reasoning.
44. A water skier with a mass of 65 kg is pulled behind a
boat that is moving with a constant speed of 25 m/s.
The tension in the horizontal rope is 1.2 3 103 N [S].
Calculate the magnitude and direction of the force
that the water exerts on the skier’s ski. (2.3) T/I A
45. A hockey stick is in contact with a puck for 0.011 s.
The speed of the puck when it leaves the stick is 32 m/s.
The hockey puck has a mass of 160 g. Calculate the
magnitude of the force applied to the puck. (Assume
that this force is constant while the stick and puck
are in contact.) (2.3) T/I A
NEL
4/27/12 7:31 AM
46. A spacecraft requires a force of 1.7 3 104 N to
accelerate in deep space at 6.9 m/s2. How much force
is required for the same spacecraft to accelerate at the
same rate upward from Earth? (2.3) T/I A
47. Three masses are connected by strings, as shown in
Figure 5. Assume that the masses of the strings are
negligible. Calculate the acceleration of each mass
and the tension in the string. (2.3) T/I A
string A
4.0 kg
string B
3.0 kg
6.0 kg
Figure 5
48. The tightrope walker in Figure 6 gets tired and decides
to stop for a rest. During this rest period, she is in
equilibrium. She stops at the middle of the rope and
notices that both sides of the rope make an angle of
158 below the horizontal. Calculate the tension in the
rope on both sides of the tightrope walker. The mass
of the tightrope walker is 60.0 kg. (2.3) K/U T/I C A
52. You are trying to slide a heavy trunk across a
horizontal floor. The mass of the trunk is 85 kg, and
you need to exert a force of 3.3 3 102 N to make it
just begin to move. (2.4) T/I A
(a) Determine the coefficient of static friction
between the floor and the trunk.
(b) After the trunk starts moving, you continue to
push with this force. The trunk reaches a speed
of 2.0 m/s after 5.0 s. Calculate the coefficient of
kinetic friction.
53. A race car driver discovers that she can accelerate at
4.0 m/s2 without spinning her tires, but if she tries to
accelerate more rapidly, she always “burns rubber.”
Determine the coefficient of static friction between
the driver’s tires and the road. (2.4) T/I A
54. A hockey puck slides along a rough, icy surface.
It has an initial speed of 35 m/s and slides to a
stop after travelling a distance of 95 m. Calculate
the coefficient of kinetic friction between the puck
and the ice. (2.4) T/I A
55. A piece of wood with a mass of 2.4 kg is held in a vise
sandwiched between two wooden jaws, as shown in
Figure 7. A blow from a hammer drives a nail that
exerts a force of 450 N on the wood. The coefficient
of static friction between the wood surfaces is 0.67.
Calculate the magnitude of the minimum normal
force that each jaw of the vise exerts on the wood
block to hold the block in place. (2.4) T/I A
Figure 6
49. Your moving company runs out of rope, so you are
forced to push two crates along the floor, one in front
of the other. The crates have masses of 45 kg and
22 kg, and you push on the 45 kg crate. The crates
are moving at constant speed, and the coefficient of
kinetic friction between both crates and the floor is
0.35. Calculate the magnitude of the normal force
between the two crates. (2.4) T/I A
50. A person sits on an office chair with wheels on it. A
co-worker exerts a force of 2.2 3 102 N [right 358 down]
on the chair. The person and the chair accelerate at
0.62 m/s2 [right]. The force of friction acting on the
chair is 1.4 3 102 N [left]. (2.4) K/U T/I
(a) Determine the total mass of the chair and person.
(b) Calculate the normal force acting on the chair.
51. You are given the job of moving a refrigerator with
a mass of 1.3 3 102 kg across a horizontal floor. The
coefficient of static friction between the refrigerator
and the floor is 0.25. Calculate the magnitude of
the minimum force that is required just to set the
refrigerator into motion. (2.4) T/I A
NEL
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 103
Figure 7
56. Two crates with masses of 15 kg and 35 kg are stacked
on the back of a truck, with the lighter crate on top of
the heavier. The frictional forces are strong enough
that the crates do not slide off the truck. The truck is
accelerating at 1.7 m/s2. Draw FBDs for both crates,
and determine the values of all forces in your diagrams.
Indicate the direction of the truck’s motion in your
diagrams. (2.1, 2.4) K/U T/I C A
57. A block with a mass of 2.0 kg is placed on a plane
inclined at 328 to the horizontal. The coefficient of
friction between the block and the plane is 0.70.
(2.4) T/I A
(a) Calculate the force of friction acting on the block.
(b) Is the force of friction static or kinetic? Explain.
Chapter 2 Review 103
4/27/12 7:31 AM
58. A chest of drawers with a mass of 66 kg rests on the
floor. The coefficient of static friction between the
chest and the floor is 0.45. Calculate the magnitude
of the minimum horizontal force that a person must
apply to start the chest moving. (2.4) T/I A
59. A block resting at the top of a plane inclined at 268
with the horizontal slides down with an acceleration
g
of [down the plane]. Calculate the coefficient of
5
kinetic friction. (2.4) T/I A
60. A person is standing without slipping in a train that is
accelerating forward. The coefficient of static friction
between the passenger and the train floor is 0.43.
(2.4) T/I C A
(a) Draw an FBD of the person.
(b) Determine the maximum acceleration of the train
before the person starts to slip.
(c) Describe what the person can do, without
changing any of his clothing or grabbing on
to anything, to keep from slipping when the
acceleration exceeds this value.
61. Determine the maximum acceleration of a train in
which a box lying on its floor will remain stationary,
given that the coefficient of static friction between
the box and the train floor is 0.16. (2.4) T/I A
62. A block slides down an incline of angle 268 with an
acceleration of 2.5 m/s2. Determine the coefficient
of kinetic friction between the block and the incline.
(2.4) T/I A
63. A metal block with a mass of 2.2 kg is resting on a
table. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the
block and the table is 0.41. Calculate the acceleration
of the block when a force of 18 N [E] is applied on it.
(2.4) T/I A
64. An object sliding on a rough horizontal plane
slows down at 6.6 m/s2. Calculate the coefficient
of kinetic friction between the object and the
plane. (2.4) T/I A
65. A box with a mass of 2.2 kg sits on top of another
box with a mass of 3.8 kg. The coefficient of friction
between the two boxes is 0.25, and the coefficient
of kinetic friction between the larger box and the
horizontal surface is 0.32. Determine the largest
horizontal force that can be applied to the larger box
so that the smaller box does not slip off. (2.4) T/I A
Evaluation
66. A student says, “If action–reaction forces cancel,
then the net force must always be zero. How can
anyone ever accelerate?” Discuss the validity of this
statement. (2.2) K/U T/I C
104 Chapter 2 • Dynamics
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 104
67. You tie a rope to a large crate and try to pull it across
a horizontal surface toward a fence, but it will not
move. Suggest a way of moving the crate without
getting any help from another person. Discuss any
limitations of the method. (2.3) T/I C A
68. A person with a mass of 59.2 kg sits on a light seat
attached to a rope that runs over a pulley, as shown in
Figure 8. The person pulls down on the rope to move
herself up at a constant velocity. (2.3) T/I A
Figure 8
(a) Explain why this setup provides an advantage
over climbing up a rope.
(b) What magnitude of force does the person exert
on the rope?
(c) What assumptions are you making about the
setup when calculating the force exerted by
the person?
69. The following steps summarize the strategy for
solving two-dimensional force problems that require
Newton’s second law of motion. Place the steps in the
correct order. (2.3) K/U T/I C
(a) Solve the problem using Newton’s second law
of motion.
(b) Determine the x- and y-components of each
force, and write the necessary equations.
(c) Identify the given variables and the required
variables.
(d) Choose a coordinate system, and draw an FBD.
Include a label for each force.
(e) Identify the object on which the forces act.
(f) Read the problem before trying to solve it.
70. A student claims the following about cross-country
skiing: “I wish there was no friction when I’m sliding
down those small hills, but I’m sure glad there is a
little friction when I’m trying to go uphill.” Why do
you think the student would say this? Explain your
reasoning. (2.4) K/U T/I A
NEL
4/27/12 7:31 AM
71. The coefficient of static friction between your running
shoes and dry pavement is 0.81. When the pavement
is wet, the coefficient of static friction is 0.58. (2.4) T/I
(a) Determine the maximum acceleration you can
achieve in both cases.
(b) How quickly could you run 100 m if you could
sustain these accelerations? Are these times
reasonable?
72. Two workers move a 52 kg crate by sliding it across
the floor. Worker 1 can exert a force of 3.4 3 102 N,
and worker 2 can exert a force of 1.7 3 102 N.
One worker must push on the crate below the
horizontal and the other must pull at the same angle
above the horizontal (Figure 9). Determine the
acceleration of the crate. Assume that the coefficient
of kinetic friction is 0.52 and u = 258. (2.4) T/I A
Figure 9
73. A driver makes an emergency stop and inadvertently
locks up the brakes of the car, which skids to a stop
on dry concrete. Consider the effect of heavy rain on
this scenario. Using the values in Table 1, determine
how much farther the car would skid (expressed as
a percentage of the dry-weather skid) if the concrete
were wet instead. What does this question imply
about driving safely? (2.4) T/I A
Table 1 Coefficients of Kinetic Friction for Rubber
on Concrete
8160_CH02_p060-105.indd 105
WEB LINK
81. Research biomechanics. How are the principles of
biomechanics used by athletes? Identify the various
fields that make use of a force platform and discuss
its use. K/U T/I C A
82. Research automobile seat belts. Explain why seat belts
are equipped with pre-tensioners and web clamps.
Prepare a short oral presentation on automatic belt
systems to give to your class. K/U T/I C A
83. Research the effect of belt friction. Describe the
various techniques involved in friction management
for climbing operations. K/U T/I C A
84. Research the physics of archery. What aspects
of the principles of motion are applied in archery
(Figure 10)? K/U C A
mK
0.85
0.45
74. Two skiers are racing down a hill that is inclined at
238 to the horizontal. Skier 1 has a mass of 59 kg, and
skier 2 has a mass of 73 kg. The coefficient of kinetic
friction between the skis and the hill is 0.10. Use the
equation below to answer the following questions.
(2.6) T/I A
Fair
a 5 g sin u 2 mKg cos u 2
m
(a) Compare the accelerations of the skiers if air
resistance is negligible. Explain your answer.
(b) The air resistance on race day is 82 N. Compare
the accelerations of the skiers.
(c) Evaluate the difference in accelerations. Does the
difference affect the race?
NEL
75. How would you explain the common forces
experienced in everyday life to a class if you were
the teacher and your students had not taken physics?
How would you explain FBDs to your class? T/I C A
76. In what areas of your daily experience do you now
see the physics concepts that were explored in this
chapter? T/I C
77. How did the information you learned in this chapter
affect your thinking about frictional forces? T/I C A
78. Identify a situation you have experienced that
involves concepts from this chapter. Write a question
about it, and share it with a classmate. A
79. What was the most surprising thing you learned in
this chapter? C
80. Was there any example in this chapter that you found
particularly relevant to your daily life? C
Research
Surface
rubber on dry concrete
rubber on wet concrete
Reflect on Your Learning
Figure 10
Chapter 2 Review
105
4/27/12 7:31 AM
CHAPTER
3
Uniform Circular Motion
What Conditions Are Necessary for an Object
to Move in a Circle at a Constant Speed?
KEY CONCEPTS
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• distinguish between inertial and
non-inertial frames of reference
• analyze uniform circular motion
qualitatively and quantitatively
• derive the equations for uniform
circular motion
• investigate the forces and
acceleration experienced by an
object in uniform circular motion
• conduct inquiries into uniform
circular motion
• analyze a technological device
that applies the principles
of uniform circular motion
and assess the social and
environmental impact
One of the thrills of professional auto racing is the danger of the sport. Drivers
must drive at high speeds, even on curves, like the one on the facing page. Yet
curves are where it is easiest to skid out of control. If drivers slow down to
maintain control of the car, they fall behind other racers. How are they able
to maintain high speeds at all times and do so safely? The design of the race
cars themselves, along with the skills of the drivers, helps the drivers maintain
high speeds along the track. The design of the racetrack is also extremely
important.
Consider Newton’s first law of motion: an object will keep the same velocity
unless acted on by an external force. As a car enters a turn, in the absence of
any external forces the car’s tendency is to continue going straight. The driver
steering the car and the friction between the tires and the pavement provide
some of the force for changing the direction of the car. Yet these may not be
enough, depending on the car’s speed and the radius of the curve.
One simple way to keep the car on the track during the curve is to bank
the track. A banked track has an incline, so that the inner side of the track has
a lower elevation than the outer side. When a car moves on a banked track,
gravity pulls the car straight down—not toward the lower inner side—and is
unchanged in magnitude. When the other forces acting on the car are not quite
large enough to keep it in a curved path, how does the banked curve help?
The idea of banked roads is just one example of how to make moving objects
change direction, in particular, along circular paths. In this chapter, you will
learn how accelerations and forces appear in different frames of reference, and
how these accelerations and forces cause circular motion at constant speed.
You will then apply these principles in specific and familiar situations.
STARTING POINTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later,
applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. What forces act on a car speeding along a racetrack?
2. How do you think increasing the banking angle affects
the maximum speed of the car? Explain your answer.
106
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 106
3. Why do you think that banked curves are a common
safety feature of exit ramps on highways and
other roads?
4. Why do you think city streets are not built with
banked curves?
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Mini Investigation
Observing Circular Motion
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
In this Mini Investigation you will explore circular motion at
constant speed.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; small eye screw;
small rubber stopper; plastic tube; three small 50 g masses;
alligator clip; string
Be sure the area around you is clear from material
hanging from the ceiling that you may accidentally hit
while swinging the stopper. Ensure no one can be hit
by the swinging stopper.
1. Place the eye screw into the rubber stopper. Ensure the
screw is secure.
2. Tie the string through the eye of the eye screw. Make
sure that the knot is tight and will not slip during the
activity. Place the string through the tube, and hang one
mass on the other end of the string. Place the alligator
clip on the string between the mass and the tube.
3. Put on the eye protection.
NEL
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 107
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.1
4. Swing the rubber stopper in a horizontal circle when
holding the tube in your hand above your head. Note the
force exerted on your hand.
5. Repeat Step 4, but spin the stopper at both faster and
slower speeds using a different number of masses.
6. Shorten the radius of the stopper’s circular path by putting
the alligator clips at different spots. Repeat Steps 4 and 5.
A. Did you notice the force on your hand when you swung
the stopper in a circle? How do you think the tension
in the string is related to the circular motion of the
stopper? T/I A
B. As the speed of the stopper increases, what happens
to the stopper and the angle that the string makes with
respect to the vertical? T/I A
C. How did the tension in the string change with the speed
of the stopper? T/I A
D. How did the tension in the string change with the length
of the string? T/I A
Introduction
107
4/26/12 9:49 AM
3.1
Inertial and Non-inertial
Frames of Reference
Think about riding on a bus. When the bus moves at a steady speed without changing
direction, you could close your eyes and possibly not even be aware that the bus is
moving. If you place a ball in the aisle of the bus, the ball does not move relative to the
bus (Figure 1). When the bus slows down, however, you will see the ball roll forward.
When the bus speeds up again, the ball will roll backward. When the bus turns, the
ball will roll to the side. What forces cause the ball to accelerate? The fact is, no forces
WEB LINK
act on the ball to accelerate it.
vball
vbus
Figure 1 The bus and the ball placed in the aisle of the bus are moving at the same velocity with
respect to the ground, although the ball is not moving relative to the bus.
Defining Frames of Reference
frame of reference a coordinate system
relative to which motion is described
or observed
inertial frame of reference a frame of
reference that moves at a zero or constant
velocity; a frame in which the law of
inertia holds
non-inertial frame of reference a frame
of reference that accelerates with respect
to an inertial frame; the law of inertia does
not hold
108
A person on the bus will view all motion from the point of view of the bus, so to her,
the moving bus in Figure 1 is a moving frame of reference. A frame of reference is an
observer’s choice of coordinate system, including an origin, for describing motion.
A person standing on the sidewalk is in the stationary frame of reference of the
ground. In many cases, people use the ground as a frame of reference, especially
when they are not moving with respect to the ground. When you are at rest in a frame
>
of reference that has a constant velocity, whether that frame is itself at rest (v 5 0) or
moving with a non-zero velocity, your velocity relative to that frame is zero. When
the bus is moving at a constant velocity, no net force acts on it. Therefore, no net force
acts on you inside it. Newton’s first law of motion (the law of inertia) states that any
>
object moving at a constant velocity (including v 5 0) remains at that velocity if no
net force acts on it. The bus in this case is an inertial frame of reference, which is a frame
of reference in which the law of inertia is valid.
Now think about what happens when the bus slows down and the ball begins to
roll forward inside the bus. What causes the ball to move forward? As the bus slows,
it accelerates (that is, changes velocity) in a direction that is opposite to the direction
of motion. Therefore, the bus is no longer an inertial frame of reference. It becomes
a non-inertial frame of reference, which is a frame of reference in which the law of
inertia is no longer valid. The reason there appears to be a net force on the ball is that
the ball continues to move with the same velocity it had before. Obeying the law of
inertia, the ball does not immediately slow down with the bus (Figure 2). Within the
accelerating bus, or non-inertial frame of reference, this looks as if a force is pushing
the ball forward.
Similarly, when the bus starts from rest and speeds up, the ball tends to stay at
rest. To you and other passengers in the non-inertial frame, it appears as if there
was a push on the ball toward the back of the bus. There also appears to be a force
on the ball when the bus turns a corner. The ball continues moving in the same
direction as the bus before the turn. From your point of view in the bus, this would
be like a force pushing the ball in the direction opposite to that in which the bus
was turning.
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
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vball
abus
vbus
Figure 2 As the bus slows, the ball continues to move forward. In the bus, it appears as if a force
has been applied to the ball.
To explain these various motions, we invent the idea of fictitious forces. Fictitious forces
are apparent but non-existent forces that explain the motion in accelerating (noninertial) frames of reference. In the bus example, a fictitious force pushed the ball in
the direction opposite the acceleration of the bus. As you continue learning about
mechanics, you will encounter other fictitious forces. Fictitious forces simply explain
non-accelerated motion in accelerated frames of reference. Tutorial 1 shows how to
solve problems involving an object placed in a non-inertial frame of reference.
fictitious force an apparent but
non-existent force invented to explain the
motion of objects within an accelerating
(non-inertial) frame of reference
Tutorial 1 Solving Problems Related to Objects in a Non-inertial Frame of Reference
This Tutorial models how to solve problems involving objects placed in a non-inertial frame
of reference.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Acceleration of a Non-inertial Frame of Reference
A teacher suspends a small cork ball from the ceiling of a bus.
When the bus accelerates at a constant rate forward, the string
suspending the ball makes an angle of 10.08 with the vertical.
Calculate the magnitude of the acceleration of the bus.
Vertical components of force:
SFy 5 0
FT cos u 2 mg 5 0
FT 5
Given: u 5 10.08; g 5 9.8 m/s2
Required: ax
mg
cos u
Horizontal components of force:
Analysis: Look at the situation from an Earth (inertial) frame of
reference. Draw an FBD to show the forces acting
> on the cork
ball. The horizontal component of the tension F T balances the
acceleration, so express the components of the tension in terms
of the horizontal and vertical applied forces. Then calculate the
magnitude of the acceleration.
Solution:
FT sin
sin u
b5a
cos u
sin u
Substitute
5 tan u
cos u
a 5 g tan u
5 19.8 m/s2 2 1tan 10.082
ga
FT
FT cos
SFx 5 ma
FT sin u 5 ma
mg
Substitute FT 5
cos u
mg
a
b sin u 5 ma
cos u
y
x
a 5 1.7 m/s2
Statement: The magnitude of the bus’s acceleration is 1.7 m/s2.
Fg
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3.1 Inertial and Non-inertial Frames of Reference
109
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Practice
1. You are in a car moving with a constant velocity of 14 m/s [E]. A baseball lies on the floor at
your feet. K/U T/I C
(a) Describe the motion of the ball from your point of view. How is it different from when the
car is at rest?
(b) How would an observer on the sidewalk describe the motion of the ball?
(c) Now the car accelerates forward. Describe the ball’s motion from your point of view.
(d) Draw two FBDs showing the ball’s motion in (c) from the frame of reference of the car and
the frame of reference of the sidewalk. Which frame of reference is non-inertial? In which
frame do you observe a fictitious force?
2. You use a string to suspend a cork ball with a mass of 22.0 g from the ceiling of a moving
speedboat. The ball and string hang at an angle of 32.58 from the vertical. K/U T/I C A
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the speedboat’s acceleration. Do you need to know the mass
of the ball to make this calculation? Why or why not? [ans: 6.2 m/s2 ]
(b) Determine the magnitude of the tension in the string. Do you need to know the mass of
the ball to make this calculation? Why or why not? [ans: 0.26 N]
3. A person is standing in a subway train holding a strap that is attached to a piece of luggage on
wheels (Figure 3). The mass of the luggage is 14 kg. The strap makes an angle of 358 to the
vertical. Assume there is no friction between the luggage wheels and the floor. K/U T/I A
35°
Figure 3
(a) D
etermine the tension in the strap when the subway is moving at a constant velocity. [ans: 0 N]
(b) Determine the tension in the strap when the subway is accelerating forward at 1.4 m/s2.
[ans: 34 N]
4. A passenger stands in a train that is accelerating forward. The passenger is able to stay in
place because of the force of static friction between his shoes and the floor. The coefficient of
static friction between the shoes and the floor is 0.42. Determine the maximum amount the
train, relative to the track, can accelerate before the passenger begins to slip along the floor.
K/U
T/I
A
[ans: 4.1 m/s2 ]
Apparent Weight
The study of vertical acceleration can also introduce fictitious forces. To understand
this, consider what happens when you stand on a bathroom scale (Figure 4(a)). As
in all cases when you stand up, you feel a force pushing upward against the soles of
your feet. This is the normal force, and it is equal and opposite to the weight (mg) of
your body when you stand on level ground.
Now suppose that you stand on the same scale inside an elevator. When the
elevator is at rest, the normal force is again the same as your weight. This is also true
when the elevator is moving at a constant non-zero speed upward or downward.
However, what happens when the elevator accelerates? When the elevator accelerates
downward, the normal force decreases, so that the magnitude of the reading on the
110 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
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scale is less than your weight, mg (Figure 4(b)). Similarly, when the elevator accelerates
upward, the normal force increases, resulting in a greater reading on the scale.
As with the bus at the beginning of this section, the elevator can be an inertial
frame of reference when it has a constant velocity going up or down. It becomes a
non-inertial frame of reference when it accelerates, resulting in a normal force that is
either greater or less than your weight. The magnitude of this normal force in a noninertial frame of reference is called the apparent weight.
Other non-inertial frames of reference produce other values for apparent weight.
On a free-fall ride at an amusement park, the acceleration of the ride is equal to g, and
the normal force is zero (Figure 4(c)). Thus, the scale will read an apparent weight of
zero. Similarly, an astronaut aboard the International Space Station is constantly in
free fall. Therefore, the normal force acting on the astronaut is zero (Figure 4(d)).
apparent weight the magnitude of
the normal force acting on an object
in an accelerated (non-inertial) frame
of reference
a 9.8 m/s2 [down]
a 9.8 m/s2 [down]
scale
FN mg
FN mg
(a)
scale
scale
(b)
scale
a 9.8 m/s2 [down]
FN 0
(d)
(c)
FN 0
Figure 4 The readings on the scale will be (a) equal to mg when standing still, (b) less than mg
when the elevator accelerates downward, (c) equal to zero in vertical free fall on an amusement
park ride, and (d) equal to zero in free fall during orbit.
In the following Tutorial, you will learn how to solve problems that involve the
apparent weight of an object in a non-inertial frame of reference.
Solving Problems Related to Apparent Weight in a Non-inertial
Tutorial 2
Frame of Reference
Sample Problem 1: Apparent Weight in an Accelerating Elevator
An elevator accelerates upward with an acceleration of magnitude
1.5 m/s2, after which it moves with a constant velocity. As the
elevator approaches its stopping point, it undergoes a downward
acceleration of magnitude 0.9 m/s2. Calculate the apparent weight
of a passenger with a mass of 75 kg when
(a) the elevator undergoes positive acceleration
(b) the elevator moves at constant velocity
(c) the elevator undergoes negative acceleration
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8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 111
Solution
(a) Given: a 5 1.5 m/s2 [up]; m 5 75 kg; g 5 9.8 m/s2 [down]
Required: FN
Analysis: Draw an FBD of the passenger, and solve for the
normal force. Use up as positive.
3.1 Inertial and Non-inertial Frames of Reference 111
4/26/12 9:49 AM
Solution:
FN
(c) Given: a 5 0.9 m/s2 [down]; m 5 75 kg;
g 5 9.8 m/s2 [down]
Required: FN
Analysis: Draw an FBD of the passenger, and solve for the
normal force. Use down as positive.
Fg
1FN 1 12mg2 5 ma
FN 5 mg 1 ma
5 m 1g 1 a2
5 175 kg2 19.8 m/s2 1 1.5 m/s2 2
FN 5 8.5 3 102 N
Statement: The apparent weight of the passenger when
the elevator undergoes positive acceleration of 1.5 m/s2
is 8.5 3 102 N.
(b) Given: a 5 0 m/s2; m 5 75 kg; g 5 9.8 m/s2 [down]
Required: FN
Analysis: In an inertial frame, there is no acceleration, so the
apparent weight of the passenger is mg; FN 5 mg 1 0 5 mg.
Solution:
FN
Fg
2FN 1 11mg2 5 ma
FN 5 mg 2 ma
5 m 1g 2 a2
5 175 kg2 19.8 m/s2 2 0.9 m/s22
FN 5 6.7 3 102 N
Statement: The apparent weight of the passenger when
the elevator undergoes negative acceleration of 0.9 m/s2
is 6.7 3 102 N.
Solution: FN 5 mg
5 175 kg2 19.8 m/s22
FN 5 7.4 3 102 N
Statement: The apparent weight of the passenger when the
elevator moves at constant velocity is 7.4 3 102 N.
Practice
1. A student with a mass of 55 kg stands in an elevator that accelerates (a) upward at 2.9 m/s2
and then (b) downward at 2.9 m/s2. Determine the student’s apparent weight during each
acceleration. K/U T/I A [ans: (a) 7.0 3 102 N; (b) 3.8 3 102 N]
2. Two boxes of books are stacked and placed on the floor of an elevator. The masses of the
bottom and top boxes are 9.5 kg and 2.5 kg, respectively. The normal force between the floor
and the bottom box is 70.0 N. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the magnitude and direction of the elevator’s acceleration. [ans: 4.0 m/s2 [down]]
(b) Determine the force that the larger box exerts on the smaller box. [ans: 15 N [up]]
3. Rope A is tied to block 1, and rope B is attached to both block 1 and block 2 (Figure 5).
The mass of block 1 is 4.2 kg, and the mass of block 2 is 2.6 kg. You lift both blocks straight up.
Calculate the tension in the ropes when the blocks (a) move at a constant velocity of
1.5 m/s [up] and (b) accelerate at 1.2 m/s2 [up]. K/U T/I A
[ans: (a) rope A: 67 N; rope B: 25 N; (b) rope A: 75 N; rope B: 29 N]
4. The Taipei 101 Tower, in Taipei, has 101 floors. Although the elevators in the Taipei 101
Tower are the fastest in the world, they have an acceleration of only 0.98 m/s2. Calculate
the apparent weight of a passenger with a mass of 61 kg when one of these elevators is
accelerating downward. K/U T/I A [ans: 5.4 3 102 N]
112
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 112
rope A
block 1
4.2 kg
rope B
block 2 2.6 kg
Figure 5
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3.1
Review
Summary
• A frame of reference is a coordinate system relative to which motion is
described or observed.
• An inertial frame of reference is one that moves at a constant velocity or is at
rest. The law of inertia holds.
• A non-inertial frame of reference is one that undergoes acceleration because
of an external force. The law of inertia does not hold.
• Fictitious forces help explain motion in a non-inertial frame of reference.
• Apparent weight is the magnitude of the normal force acting on an object in
a non-inertial frame of reference.
Questions
1. Suppose you are on a train moving with a constant
velocity. Another train on parallel tracks is moving
with the same velocity. A passenger in the other
train is tossing a ball vertically in the air. T/I C A
(a) Describe how the path of the ball would look
to you.
(b) Describe how the path of the ball would look if
the trains moved in opposite directions.
2. A mass on a string is suspended from the ceiling of
an airplane. Calculate the angle that the mass makes
when the airplane has a horizontal acceleration of
magnitude 1.5 m/s2. K/U T/I A
3. A jet reaches a takeoff speed of 255 km/h in 10.0 s.
This jet has a ball-on-a-string accelerometer hanging
from the ceiling of the cabin. Assume the jet
accelerates uniformly during takeoff. Calculate
the angle of the string during takeoff. K/U T/I A
4. A student constructs an accelerometer by attaching
cork balls to strings anchored to the bottom of
a fish tank. When the student fills the tank with
water, the balls float to the surface. When the tank
is at rest, the strings align in the vertical direction.
While riding in a car and holding the tank level, the
student notices that the strings make an angle of 168
with respect to the vertical. Calculate the magnitude
of the car’s acceleration. K/U T/I A
5. The passenger elevators at the Brookfield Place
towers in Toronto reach a top speed of about 6.0 m/s
upward. Suppose one of the elevators reaches this
speed in 10.0 s. Calculate the apparent weight of a
passenger whose mass is 64 kg. T/I
6. A student on a free-fall ride at an amusement park
brings a scale to check her apparent weight during
the ride. At one point, she notices a reading of 255 N.
The student’s mass is 52 kg. Calculate the acceleration
of the ride at the time of the reading. T/I A
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7. A vintage sports car accelerates down a hill at an
angle of 178 to the ground, as shown in Figure 6.
The driver notices that the string of ornamental
fuzzy dice hanging from his rear-view mirror is
perpendicular to the roof of the car. K/U T/I C A
Figure 6
(a) Draw an FBD of the dice from the frame of
reference of the level ground, both when the car
is at rest on the hill and when it is accelerating.
Explain how the two FBDs differ.
(b) Calculate the car’s acceleration.
8. In Figure 7, mass 1 does not slide with respect to
the surface when the horizontal force shown is
applied. Determine the magnitude of the horizontal
force in both Figure 7(a) and Figure 7(b). Assume
there is no friction. K/U T/I A
m1 1.8 kg
Fa
m3 3.0 kg
(a)
m1 1.2 kg
pulley
Fa
m2 1.2 kg
25°
m2 2.8 kg
(b)
Figure 7
3.1 Inertial and Non-inertial Frames of Reference
113
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3.2
uniform circular motion the motion of
an object with a constant speed along a
circular path of constant radius
Centripetal Acceleration
The hammer throw is a track-and-field event in which an athlete throws a
“hammer”—a heavy metal ball attached to a wire and handle—the farthest distance
possible (Figure 1). To do this, the athlete first swings the ball in a circular path. After
giving it a maximum circular speed with three or four turns, the athlete releases the
hammer, which then flies down the field. Just before the hammer is released, it has
uniform circular motion, which is motion in a circular path at a constant speed.
Figure 1 To give the hammer enough speed to travel a long distance down the field, the athlete
must move it rapidly in a circular path.
>
centripetal acceleration (ac ) the
instantaneous acceleration that is directed
toward the centre of a circular path
By moving the ball in a circle, the athlete introduces the force of tension in the
wire. This tension keeps the ball in a circular path. The greater the tension, the greater
the acceleration toward the centre of the circle and the faster the ball moves in a
circular path. When the tension is very large, so is the speed of the ball. When the
athlete releases the hammer, the ball travels far down the field.
You may not always realize it, but objects moving in circular paths are all around
you. Clothes in a washing machine during the spin cycle, the drum of a clothes dryer,
the hands of certain electric clocks, and the spinning blades of a blender and a lawn
mower: all of these objects move with uniform circular motion. What you may not
have considered is that these are all among the most common non-inertial frames of
reference. These objects move in a circular path, so their velocity constantly changes
direction. Therefore they are accelerating. Acceleration that is directed toward the
>
centre of a circular path is called centripetal acceleration, ac.
Equations for Centripetal Acceleration
>
>
Recall that the average acceleration, aav, of an object equals the change in velocity, Dv ,
>
Dv
>
during an interval of time, Dt: aav 5 . For an object moving with uniform circular
Dt
>
motion, the velocity changes direction continuously with time, so Dv is definitely not
zero. Therefore, centripetal acceleration is not zero.
To calculate centripetal acceleration, we now consider the example of a runner
moving at a constant speed along a circular track. The velocity of the runner changes
with time and is always tangential to the circular path, as shown in Figure 2. Figure 2(a)
shows a runner’s velocity vectors at two nearby positions: A9 and A. Figure 2(b)
>
shows the corresponding change in velocity, Dv , over a short time interval, Dt. Recall
from Section 1.4 that the difference in velocity vectors is the same as adding one
>
vector to the negative of the other vector. First, shift vector v2 down so that its
>
>
>
head is at point A (Figure 2(b)). Then reverse v1 so v1 becomes 2v1. Place the tail of
>
>
>
vector 2v1 at the head of vector v2, so that the sum of the vectors is Dv , which points
114 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
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toward the centre of the circle. It should be noted that we actually need to decrease
>
the size of the time interval until it is very small for Dv to point directly toward the
centre. For the sake of discussion and illustrating the concept, however, our model in
Figure 2 is satisfactory.
>
>
As you can see in Figure 2(a), the individual velocity vectors v1 and v2 are both tangent
to the circle, perpendicular to the circle’s radius, and equal in length (magnitude). This
is true for all of the runner’s velocity vectors along the circular path. The acceleration
>
vector has the same direction as Dv , so it follows that the centripetal acceleration of an
object must always point toward the centre of the circular path.
y
v2
r
O
r
A
s
v1
A
A
x
v1 O
2
v2
C
∆v
B
x
(a)
(b)
>
Figure 2 (a) The velocity v of an object (in this case, a runner) moving with uniform circular motion
>
>
is shown as v1 and v2 at two different locations along the circular path. The distance travelled in
>
going from point A9 to point A is s. (b) The difference in the velocity vectors, Dv , is directed toward
the centre of the circle when the time interval is very small.
Now use the triangle BAC in Figure 2(b) to calculate the magnitude of the accel>
>
eration. This triangle has two sides with equal lengths, 0 v1 0 and 0 v2 0 . In general, the
>
>
>
velocity magnitude is the same at any point around the circle, so 0 v1 0 5 0 v2 0 5 0 v 0 , or
>
>
simply v. The third side of this triangle is the vector Dv , which has a length of 0 Dv 0 .
The triangle BAC has the same interior angles as triangle AOA9 in Figure 2(a), so
these triangles are similar. You can check this by using the relations below to show
that the angle θ is the same for both triangles. Note in Figure 2(b) that the angle at
>
point A between v2 and the radius is 908, so
u
1 a 5 908
2
u 1 2a 5 1808
u 5 1808 2 2a
When you add the two equal angles, a, within triangle BAC to the third angle, they
equal 1808, so the third angle must equal
180 2 2a 5 u
Two sides of triangle AOA9 are along the radius of the circle, so they have length r,
while the other side (between points A9 and A) has length s. When Dt is small, the
arc length between points A9 and A approaches a straight-line length that connects
A9 and A. Therefore, the distance the runner travels from A9 to A is approximately
equal to the distance given by s < vDt. The triangles BAC and AOA9 are similar, so
the ratios of their corresponding sides are equal. Substituting v for the magnitude of
>
>
either v1 or v2, and assuming a very small Dt:
>
0 Dv 0
s
5
r
v
>
0 Dv 0
vDt
5
r
v
2
v Dt
>
0 Dv 0 5
r
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3.2 Centripetal Acceleration 115
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The magnitude of the average acceleration equals the magnitude of the difference
>
in the velocities ( 0 Dv 0 ) divided by Dt:
>
0 Dv 0
aav 5
Dt
v 2Dt
r
5
Dt
v2
aav 5
r
In the above equation, aav 5 ac when the time interval is very small:
ac 5
period (T ) the time required for a
rotating, revolving, or vibrating object
to complete one cycle
v2
r
where ac is the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration, v is the speed of the object
moving along the circular path, and r is the radius of the circular path. Note that,
although this derivation started with the definition of average acceleration, the result
becomes exact for a very small time interval Dt, so the centripetal acceleration in this
case is an instantaneous quantity directed toward the centre of the circle.
The equation for centripetal acceleration indicates that, when the speed of an
object moving with uniform circular motion is large for a constant radius, such as in
the case of the hammer in the hammer throw, the direction of the velocity changes
more rapidly than it would for a smaller speed. This means that, to produce these
rapid changes in velocity, you need a larger acceleration. When the radius is larger
for a constant speed, the direction of the velocity changes more slowly, so the object
has a smaller acceleration.
Sometimes you may not know the speed of an object moving with uniform circular motion. However, you may be able to measure the time it takes for the object
to move once around the circle, or the period, T. Then you can calculate the speed.
Remember that the speed is constant, and that it equals the length of the path the
object travels (the circumference of the circle, or 2πr) divided by the period, T:
Dd
Dt
Dd 5 2pr and Dt 5 T , so
2pr
v5
T
v5
Substitute the above expression for v into the above equation for centripetal acceleration to obtain the acceleration in terms of the period and the radius:
v2
r
2pr 2
a
b
T
5
r
2 2
4p r
T2
5
r
ac 5
ac 5
116 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 116
4p2r
T2
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For high rotational speeds, frequency is the preferred quantity of measurement.
The frequency, f, equals the number of revolutions per unit of time, or
1
f5
T
The unit of frequency is hertz (Hz), or cycles per second.
In terms of frequency and radius, the equation for centripetal acceleration takes
the form
frequency (f ) the number of rotations,
revolutions, or vibrations of an object
per unit of time; the inverse of period;
SI unit Hz
4p2r
T2
4p2r
5
1 2
a b
f
ac 5
5
4p2r
1
f2
a c 5 4p2rf 2
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You now have three equations for determining the magnitude of the centripetal
acceleration. When dealing with the vector of this acceleration, remember that
centripetal acceleration always points toward the centre of the circle. The following
Tutorial models how to solve problems involving centripetal acceleration.
You can use some of the equations
for centripetal acceleration when you
complete the Unit Task on page 146.
Tutorial 1 Solving Problems with Objects Moving with Centripetal Acceleration
This Tutorial shows how to calculate the centripetal acceleration for an object undergoing uniform
circular motion using the different equations for the magnitude of centripetal acceleration.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Magnitude of Centripetal Acceleration
A child rides a carousel with a radius of 5.1 m that rotates with
a constant speed of 2.2 m/s. Calculate the magnitude of the
centripetal acceleration of the child.
v2
r
12.2 m/s2 2
5
5.1 m
ac 5 0.95 m/s2
Solution: ac 5
Given: r 5 5.1 m; v 5 2.2 m/s
Required: ac
Analysis: ac 5
v2
r
Statement: The magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of the
child is 0.95 m/s2.
Sample Problem 2: Calculating the Magnitude and Direction of Centripetal Acceleration
A salad spinner with a radius of 9.7 cm rotates clockwise with a
frequency of 12 Hz. At a given instant, the lettuce in the spinner
moves in the westward direction (Figure 3). Determine the
magnitude and direction of the centripetal acceleration of the
piece of lettuce in the salad spinner at the moment shown in
Figure 3.
N
direction
of rotation
ac
v
lettuce
Figure 3
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3.2 Centripetal Acceleration 117
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Given: r 5 9.7 cm 5 0.097 m; f 5 12 Hz
>
Required: ac
Analysis: First, determine the direction of the acceleration from
Figure 3. Then calculate the magnitude of the acceleration using
the equation ac 5 4p2rf 2.
Solution: The westward velocity vector is at the south end of
the spinner, as Figure 3 indicates. The direction of the centripetal
acceleration is north.
ac 5 4p2rf 2
5 4p2 10.097 m2 112 Hz2 2
ac 5 5.5 3 102 m/s2
Statement: The centripetal acceleration of the lettuce at the
moment shown in Figure 3 is 5.5 3 102 m/s2 [N].
Sample Problem 3: Calculating Frequency and Period of Rotation for a Spinning Object
The centripetal acceleration at the end of an electric fan blade
has a magnitude of 1.75 3 103 m/s2. The distance between
the tip of the fan blade and the centre is 12 cm. Calculate the
frequency and the period of rotation of the fan.
Given: ac 5 1.75 3 103 m/s2; r 5 12 cm 5 0.12 m
Required: f ; T
Analysis: Use the equation for centripetal acceleration that
includes frequency and radius: ac 5 4p2rf 2; rearrange and solve
for f. Then use the equation relating frequency and period to
1
calculate the period of rotation: T 5 .
f
ac 5 4p2rf 2
ac
5 f2
4p2r
ac
f5
Å 4p2r
Solution: f 5
5
ac
Å 4p2r
1.75 3 103 m/s2
Å 4p2 10.12 m2
5 619.2 Hz
Choose the positive root because frequency cannot be negative.
f 5 19.2 Hz 1one extra digit carried2
T5
1
f
1
19.2 Hz
T 5 5.2 3 1022 s
5
Statement: The frequency of the fan is 19 Hz, and the period of
rotation is 5.2 3 1022 s.
Practice
1. At a distance of 25 km from the eye (centre) of a hurricane, the wind moves at nearly
50.0 m/s. Assume that the wind moves in a circular path. Calculate the magnitude of the
centripetal acceleration of the particles in the wind at this distance. T/I A [ans: 0.10 m/s2]
2. An athlete in a hammer throw competition swings the hammer with uniform circular motion
clockwise as viewed from above at a speed of 4.24 m/s and a distance of 1.2 m from the
centre of the circle. At a given instant, the hammer’s velocity is directed southward.
Determine the centripetal acceleration at this instant. T/I [ans: 15 m/s2 [W]]
3. A ball on a string moves in a horizontal circle of radius 1.4 m. The centripetal acceleration
of the ball has a magnitude of 12 m/s2. Calculate the speed of the ball. T/I A [ans: 4.1 m/s]
4. The planet Venus moves in a nearly circular orbit around the Sun. The average radius
of its orbit is 1.08 3 1011 m. The centripetal acceleration of Venus has a magnitude of
1.12 3 10–2 m/s2. Calculate Venus’s period of revolution around the Sun (a) in seconds
and (b) in Earth days. T/I A [ans: (a) 1.95 3 107 s; (b) 226 days]
5. Suppose a satellite revolves around Earth in a circular orbit. The speed of the satellite is
7.27 3 103 m/s, and the radius of its orbit, with respect to Earth’s centre, is 7.54 3 106 m.
Calculate the magnitude of the satellite’s centripetal acceleration. T/I A [ans: 7.01 m/s2]
6. A research apparatus called a centrifuge undergoes centripetal acceleration with a magnitude
of 3.3 3 106 m/s2. The centrifuge has a radius of 8.4 cm. Calculate the frequency of the
centrifuge (a) in hertz and (b) in revolutions per minute (rpm). T/I A [ans: (a) 1.0 3 104 Hz;
(b) 6.0 3 105 rpm]
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3.2
Review
Summary
• Uniform circular motion is the motion of any body that follows a circular
path at a constant speed.
• Centripetal acceleration is the instantaneous acceleration of an object toward
the centre of a circular path.
v2
• There are three equations to determine centripetal acceleration: ac 5 ,
r
4p2r
ac 5 2 , and ac 5 4p2rf 2.
T
Questions
1. You have a puck on a string, and you twirl the puck
with uniform circular motion in a horizontal circle
along virtually frictionless ice. K/U T/I A
(a) What causes the centripetal acceleration
of the puck?
(b) How does doubling the radius of the circle
and leaving the speed unchanged affect the
centripetal acceleration?
(c) How does doubling the speed and leaving
the radius unchanged affect the centripetal
acceleration?
2. Two athletes compete in the hammer throw. One
athlete can spin the hammer twice as fast as the
second athlete. Compare the magnitudes of the
two centripetal accelerations for the two hammer
throws. Explain your answer. T/I C A
3. In a rodeo, a performer twirls a lasso (rope) at a
constant speed, and the lasso turns in a circle of
radius 0.42 m. The lasso has a period of rotation
of 1.5 s. Calculate the magnitude of the centripetal
acceleration of the lasso. T/I A
4. A motorcyclist maintains a constant speed of
28 m/s while racing on a circular track with
a constant radius of 135 m. Calculate the
magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of
the motorcyclist. T/I A
5. The centripetal acceleration of an object at Earth’s
equator results from the daily rotation of Earth.
Calculate the object’s centripetal acceleration,
given that the radius of Earth at the equator is
6.38 3 106 m. T/I A
6. An amusement park ride consists of a rotating
cylinder with a coarse fabric on the walls, for friction.
Participants on this ride stand against the wall as the
cylinder rotates. After the cylinder reaches a constant
speed, the floor of the ride drops away beneath the
occupants. They remain against the wall because of
the centripetal acceleration, which must be greater
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7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
than about 25 m/s2. This ride has a radius of 2.0 m.
Determine the minimum frequency of rotation of the
cylinder. T/I A
The centripetal acceleration of a car moving around
a circular curve at a constant speed of 22 m/s has a
magnitude of 7.8 m/s2. Calculate the radius of the
curve. T/I A
A jogger is running around a circular track that has
a circumference of 478 m. The magnitude of the
centripetal acceleration of the jogger is 0.146 m/s2.
Calculate the jogger’s speed in kilometres
per hour. T/I A
A bicycle wheel with a radius of 0.300 m is spinning
clockwise at a rate of 60.0 rpm. T/I A
(a) Calculate the period of the wheel’s motion.
(b) Calculate the centripetal acceleration of a point
on the edge of the wheel if at that instant it
moves westward.
The Moon’s period of revolution is 27.3 days, and
the magnitude of its centripetal acceleration is
about 2.7 3 1023 m/s2. T/I A
(a) Calculate the distance between the centre of the
Moon and the centre of Earth. Assume that the
orbit of the Moon is circular and that its speed
is constant.
(b) Compare your answer with the value provided
in Appendix B. If different, suggest reasons why.
The record distance for the hammer throw is
about 87 m. To achieve this distance, an athlete
must produce a centripetal acceleration of nearly
711 m/s2. K/U T/I A
(a) Given a radius of 1.21 m, calculate the speed of
the ball when it is released.
(b) The athlete lets go when the ball is 2.0 m above
the ground and moving at an angle of 428
above the horizontal. Determine the range.
Ignore any air friction.
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3.3
Centripetal Force
Think of a time when you were a passenger in a car going around a sharp curve
at high speed (Figure 1). If the car were going fast enough, you might feel the side
of the car door pushing on your side. If you look closely at Figure 1, you can see
that the road is banked. In this case, the bank assists the force of friction to help
make the car and passengers move in a circle more safely for a given speed. A force
is also required on objects when you play crack the whip when ice skating, or when
you swing a yo-yo on a string around your head. If you were to let go of the crackthe-whip line, you would no longer feel the force and would continue in a straight
line in the direction you were moving. The implications of the forces causing circular
motion is one reason highway exit ramps often have banked curves like the one in
CAREER LINK
Figure 1.
Figure 1 Passengers in a car that is going around a sharp curve at high speed will experience a
strong force pushing them toward the centre of the curve.
Forces That Cause Centripetal Acceleration
Investigation
3.3.1
Simulating Uniform Circular
Motion (page 135)
You have learned about the principles
related to objects in uniform circular
motion. In this investigation, you will
use a simulation program to verify
the relationship between frequency
and variables such as force, mass,
speed, radius, and period.
As you learned in Section 3.2, any object moving with uniform circular motion has a
centripetal acceleration of magnitude
v2
ac 5
r
From Newton’s second law, we know that forces cause accelerations. So, for an object
moving with uniform circular motion, we have
SF 5 mac
mv 2
Fc 5
r
where Fc is the magnitude of the net force required to make an object of mass m travel
with a constant speed v in a circle of radius r. Centripetal acceleration is directed
toward the centre of the circle, so the centripetal force must also be directed toward
the centre of the circle according to Newton’s second law.
To further analyze the forces involved in uniform circular motion, suppose a
person is twirling a yo-yo on a string so that the yo-yo moves in a circle. To keep the
situation simple, assume this demonstration is being performed by an astronaut in
deep space, where gravitational forces are negligible (Figure 2(a)).
Since gravitational forces are negligible, the only force on the yo-yo comes from
the string. According to Newton’s second law and the equation
mv 2
Fc 5
r
mv 2
a force of magnitude
causes this acceleration. And since the force comes from
r
the tension FT in the string,
mv 2
FT 5
r
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Investigation
FT
v
r
v
Analyzing Uniform Circular
Motion (page 136)
An object in circular motion at
a constant speed is constantly
undergoing centripetal acceleration
directed toward the centre of the
circle. This investigation will give
you an opportunity to observe an
object in uniform circular motion and
collect data to describe relationships
between the object, its mass, and the
radius of its path.
v
(a)
3.3.2
(b)
Figure 2 (a) An astronaut in deep space twirls a yo-yo on a string. In deep space all gravitational
forces are negligible, so the only force on the yo-yo is due to the tension in the string. (b) When
mv 2
FT 5
, the yo-yo will move with uniform circular motion. If the string breaks, the yo-yo will
r
move along a straight line, obeying Newton’s first law.
For the yo-yo to travel in a circle, the tension must have this value. In other situations, the force might be due to gravity, friction, or some other source. The net force
that causes centripetal acceleration is called the centripetal force, Fc. Without such a
force, the object cannot move in uniform circular motion.
What happens if the string in Figure 2 suddenly breaks? After the string breaks
(Figure 2(b)), the force on the yo-yo is zero. According to Newton’s first law, the
yo-yo will then move away in a straight-line path with a constant velocity. The yo-yo
does not move radially outward, nor does it “remember” its circular trajectory. The
only way the yo-yo can move in a circle is when there is a force that makes it do so.
Before the string broke, the string provided that force. The following Tutorial models
how to solve problems that involve different centripetal forces.
centripetal force (Fc) the net force that
causes centripetal acceleration
Tutorial 1 Solving Problems Related to Centripetal Force
In this Tutorial, you will solve for different variables in situations in which an object is moving with
uniform circular motion.
Sample Problem 1: Determining Centripetal Acceleration and Identifying the Centripetal Force
Suppose a bug is sitting on the edge of a horizontal DVD.
The bug has a mass of 5.0 g, and the DVD has a radius of
6.0 cm. The DVD is spinning such that the bug travels around
its circular path three times per second. Calculate the centripetal
acceleration of the bug and the net force on the bug. Also,
identify the force or forces responsible for the centripetal force.
Given: m 5 5.0 g 5 0.0050 kg; r 5 6.0 cm 5 0.060 m;
t 5 1.0 s
Required: ac; Fc; origin of Fc
Analysis: Draw an FBD to determine the force or forces
responsible for the centripetal force. Calculate the speed of the
Dd
DVD using v 5
. Then use the speed in the equation for
Dt
v2
centripetal acceleration, ac 5 , and calculate the centripetal
r
force, SFc 5 mac; circumference of a circle 5 2pr.
Solution: The FBD is shown in Figure 3. The bug’s acceleration
is in the horizontal plane, so the bug’s acceleration in the vertical
plane is zero. Therefore, the normal force, FN, and the force of
gravity, mg, must cancel: FN 5 mg. The bug is moving with
uniform circular motion, so we know a third force must provide
the force required to produce the centripetal acceleration, ac.
This force keeps the bug from slipping relative to the DVD, so
the force is the force of static friction. To make the bug move
with uniform circular motion, the force of static friction must be
directed toward the centre of the circle.
FN
r
FS
Fg
Figure 3
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The bug travels around the circle three times in 1.0 s, so it travels
a distance equal to three times the circumference each second:
Dd
v5
Dt
132 12pr2
5
Dt
16p2 10.060 m2
5
1.0 s
v 5 1.13 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
The force is
SFc 5 mac
5 10.0050 kg2 121.3 m/s22
SFc 5 0.11 N
Statement: The centripetal acceleration of the bug is 21 m/s2,
and the total force on the bug is 0.11 N. The centripetal force on
the bug is static friction.
v2
r
11.13 m/s2 2
5
0.060 m
ac 5 21.3 m/s2 1one extra digit carried2
ac 5
Sample Problem 2: Calculating Speed Using Apparent Weight
A roller coaster car is at the lowest point on its circular track.
The radius of curvature is 22 m. The apparent weight of one
of the passengers in the roller coaster car is 3.0 times her true
weight. Determine the speed of the roller coaster.
Given: r 5 22 m; FN 5 3.0mg
Required: v
Analysis: Draw an FBD for the scenario. The uniform circular motion
is in the vertical plane in this problem. At the lowest point on the
circular track, the forces on the person are gravity and the normal
force. The normal force is the apparent weight. Since the roller
coaster is at the low point of the track, the normal force is directed
toward the centre of the circular arc defined by the track (up), and
gravity is downward, away from the centre. Apply Newton’s second
law to relate the normal force to the speed of the roller coaster. Then
mv 2
.
apply the equation for circular motion, Fc 5
r
Solution: Figure 4 shows the FBD.
SF 51FN 1 12mg2
FN
Fc 5 FN 2 mg
mv 2
5 3.0mg 2mg
r
mv 2
5 2.0mg
r
mv 2
5 2.0mg
r
v 5 "2.0rg
Fg
Figure 4
5 " 12.02 122 m2 19.8 m/s22
v 5 21 m/s
Statement: The speed of the roller coaster is 21 m/s.
Sample Problem 3: Calculating Speed on a Banked Turn
A car making a turn on a dry, banked highway ramp is
experiencing friction (Figure 5). The coefficient of static friction
between the tires and the road is 0.60. Determine the maximum
speed at which the car can safely negotiate a turn of radius
2.0 3 102 m with a banking angle of 20.08.
y
FN
FS
(a)
x
mg
(b)
Given: mS 5 0.60; r 5 2.0 3 102 m; u 5 20.08
Required: v
Analysis: In two separate diagrams, draw the vector components
of the frictional force and the vector components of the normal
force. The car is moving with uniform circular motion, so the
mv 2
centripetal force on the car is Fc 5
directed toward the
r
centre of the circular path. In Figure 5, the centre is 2.0 3 102 m
to the left of the car. Use the direction toward the centre as
positive for the x-direction, and use up as positive for the
y-direction. We have two unknown quantities: the speed of the
car and the normal force. We can get two equations by applying
Newton’s second law along the vertical and horizontal directions.
We can then solve for FN and v; FS 5 mSFN
Figure 5
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Solution: The vector component diagrams are shown in
Figure 6.
y
y
FN cos FS cos FS sin FS
(a)
x
FN sin (b)
Figure 6 (a) The vector components for the force of static friction
(b) The vector components for the normal force
Vertical components of force:
The car is not slipping up or down the incline, so the acceleration
along y is zero. The total force along y must be zero. From
Figure 6(a) and 6(b),
SFy 5 0
SFy 5 1FN cos u 2 FS sin u 2 mg
1FN cos u 2 FS sin u 2 mg 5 0
FS 5 mSFN
FN cos u 2 mSFN sin u 2 mg 5 0
FN 1cos u 2 mS sin u 2 5 mg
FN 5
The total force along the horizontal direction provides the
centripetal acceleration. From Figure 6(a) and 6(b),
SFx 5 FN sin u 1 FS cos u
FN
x
Horizontal components of force:
mg
cos u 2 mS sin u
FS 5 mSFN
SFx 5 FN sin u 1 mSFN cos u
mac 5 FN sin u 1 mSFN cos u
mv 2
5 FN 1sin u 1 mS cos u 2
r
Solving for v then gives
FNr 1sin u 1 mS cos u 2
Å
m
Insert the result for the normal force:
v5
v5
5
5
r 1 sin u 1 mS cos u 2
mg
ba
b
Å cos u 2 mS sin u
m
a
Å
Å
gr a
sin u 1 mS cos u
b
cos u 2 mS sin u
19.8 m/s2 2 12.0 3 102 m2 a
v 5 49 m/s
sin 20.08 1 10.602 cos 20.08
b
cos 20.08 2 10.602 sin 20.08
Statement: The maximum speed at which the car can safely
negotiate a turn with a radius of 2.0 3 102 m and with a banking
angle of 20.08 is 49 m/s. It is really the horizontal components
of the normal force and the force of friction that contribute to the
net force and the acceleration. (Note: This is the maximum speed
the car can go but not the speed the car should go.)
Practice
1. A model airplane with a mass of 0.211 kg pulls out of a dive. The bottom of the dive
is a circular arc with a radius of 25.6 m. At the bottom of the arc, the plane’s speed
is a constant 21.7 m/s. Determine the magnitude of the upward lift on the plane’s
wings at the bottom of the arc. K/U T/I A [ans: 5.9 N]
2. A curved road with a radius of 450 m in the horizontal plane is banked so that the
cars can safely navigate the curve. Calculate the banking angle for the road that will
allow a car travelling at 97 km/h to make it safely around the curve when the road is
covered with black ice. (Assume no friction.) K/U T/I A [ans: 9.38]
3. A 2.00 kg mass is spinning horizontally in a circle on a virtually frictionless surface.
It completes 5.00 revolutions in 2.00 s. The mass is attached to a string 4.00 m long.
Calculate the magnitude of the tension in the string. Air resistance is negligible.
K/U
T/I
A
[ans: 2.0 3 103 N]
4. A barn swallow chasing a moth is flying in a vertical loop of radius 150 m. At the top
of the loop, the vertical force exerted by the air on the bird is zero. At what speed is
the swallow flying at this point? K/U T/I A [ans: 38 m/s]
5. The highway ramp in Sample Problem 3 was dry. Now suppose the highway is wet
or covered in ice. Predict how the maximum speed will change. Test your prediction
by using the value 0.25 for the coefficient of static friction and determining the
maximum speed. K/U T/I A [ans: 36 m/s]
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3.3
Review
Summary
• An object moving with uniform circular motion experiences a net force
directed toward the centre of the object’s circular path.
• The net force that causes uniform circular motion is the centripetal force,
which may comprise one or more other forces such as gravity, the normal
force, or tension.
• Combine the equation for Newton’s second law with the equations for
centripetal acceleration to calculate the magnitude of the net force:
mv 2
SF 5 mac; Fc 5
.
r
Questions
1. The track near the top of a roller coaster has a
circular shape with a diameter of 24 m forming a
hill. When you are at the top, you feel as if your
weight is only one-third your true weight. Calculate
the speed of the roller coaster as it rolls over the top
of the hill. T/I A
2. A car with a mass of 1000.0 kg is travelling over
the top of a hill, as shown in Figure 7. The hill’s
curvature has a radius of 40.0 m, and the car is
travelling at 15 m/s. T/I C A
v
r
Figure 7
(a) Draw an FBD.
(b) Determine the magnitude of the normal force
between the hill and the car at the top of the hill.
(c) Determine the speed required to make the driver
feel weightless at the top of the hill.
3. A civil engineer is designing a banked curve on a
highway. The banked curve is designed to allow
the cars to move safely in a horizontal circle. What
will happen to the maximum speed of a car on
the curve when the following changes are made?
Explain your reasoning, considering each change
separately. K/U T/I A
(a) The banking angle between the road and the
horizontal is increased.
(b) The coefficient of friction between the tires and
the road is larger.
(c) A heavier car is used.
124 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
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4. A car moves in a horizontal circle on a test track
with a radius of 1.2 3 102 m. The coefficient of
static friction between the tires and the road is
0.72. Draw an FBD, and calculate the maximum
speed of the car. T/I C A
5. Consider a banked curve on an exit ramp for a
highway in the middle of winter when the road
surface is covered with very slippery ice. K/U T/I A
(a) How does the banking angle of the road help
drivers make it safely around the curve? What
force (or component of force) is responsible?
Explain your reasoning.
(b) Explain why drivers must go much more slowly
under these circumstances.
(c) A student claims, “If banking angles help drivers
safely navigate curved sections of road, why not
make the banking angles significantly larger?”
Identify one problem that might occur if this
suggestion were used. Justify your answer.
6. An air puck with a mass of 0.26 kg is tied to a
string and moves at a constant speed in a circle
of radius 1.2 m. The other end of the string goes
through a hole in the air table and straight down to
a suspended mass of 0.68 kg, which hangs at rest
(Figure 8). Calculate the speed of the air puck.
K/U
T/I
A
m1 0.26 kg
r
v
m2 0.68 kg
Figure 8
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3.4
Rotating Frames of Reference
The force of gravity acting on any object is due strictly to the other masses in the
space around it. On Earth, the gravity we experience is mainly due to Earth itself
because of its large mass and the fact that we are on it. There is no device that can
make or change gravity. So how can we simulate gravity? The answer is uniform circular motion. Incorporating the principles of uniform circular motion in technology
has led to advances in many fields, including medicine, industry, and the space program. For example, while in training, astronauts and jet pilots lie in the compartment
at the end of a large centrifuge like the one in Figure 1. A centrifuge is a device that
spins rapidly. The arm of the centrifuge in Figure 1 spins around the centre, and the
astronauts and pilots experience large forces that feel like a larger force of gravity
pulling on them. Experiencing such forces allows us to better understand how the
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human body reacts during launches and in space.
centrifuge a rapidly rotating device used
to separate substances and simulate the
effects of gravity
Figure 1 Russian cosmonauts (astronauts) lie in a large centrifuge such as this one as part of their
training for space missions.
Centrifugal Force and Rotating Frames of Reference
Before we discuss how circular motion can simulate gravity, we need to look more
closely at frames of reference and uniform circular motion. Merry-go-rounds and
other rides in which people move in a circle are popular, so we will start with a
merry-go-round. When you watch a merry-go-round from your vantage point on the
ground, you are observing the motion of the merry-go-round relative to your reference frame on the ground. But the riders sitting on the merry-go-round observe you
from a rotating frame of reference.
Now imagine that you are one of the riders sitting on the merry-go-round, leaning
against a handrail as it spins. You feel as if the rail is pushing against your body. From
Earth’s frame of reference (the inertial frame), Newton’s first law of motion explains
the force that you feel when you tend to maintain your initial velocity in both magnitude and direction. When the merry-go-round turns left, you tend to go straight, but
the rail prevents you from going straight. The rail pushes on you toward the centre
of the ride and causes you to go in a circular path along with the merry-go-round
(Figure 2 on the next page). The centripetal force acting on your body in this situation is the push from the rail.
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centrifugal force the fictitious force in
a rotating (accelerating or non-inertial)
frame of reference
Consider the same situation from the accelerating frame of reference of the
merry-go-round. As it spins, you feel as if you are being pushed to the right toward
the outside of the merry-go-round’s circle. This force in a rotating frame of reference, acting away from the centre, is a fictitious force called the centrifugal force
(Figure 3).
FN vertical
actual path
of rider
FN rail
radius
centre of
curve
force of rail
on rider
instantaneous
velocity
mg
y
rider
rail
top view
x
side view
(b)
(a)
Figure 2 (a) The top view of a rider on a merry-go-round from Earth’s frame of reference as the
ride turns to the left. (b) The side-view FBD of the rider shows the forces acting on the rider.
FN
path of rider
radius
centre of
curve
force of rail
on rider
centrifugal
force
on rider
FN rail
mg
y
rider
top view
(a)
FN centrifugal
side view
x
(b)
Figure 3 (a) The top view of a rider on a merry-go-round from the merry-go-round’s frame of
reference as the ride turns to the left. (b) The side-view FBD of the rider shows the (fictitious)
centrifugal force in the non-inertial frame of reference.
Centrifugal Force and Centrifuges
Figure 4 A centrifuge rotates at an
extremely high rate, producing a large
centripetal acceleration for the contents
of the test tubes. As a result, the higherdensity cells move to the outer end of
the tube and separate.
Centrifuges are frequently used in medical laboratories to separate blood samples.
The centrifuge rotates the test tubes containing blood samples at high speeds. Red
blood cells are the densest components of blood. If the red blood cells are near the
top of a test tube as the centrifuge starts spinning, centrifugal force will move the
cells toward the bottom of the tube. The red blood cells settle on the bottom due to
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the spinning motion of the centrifuge (Figure 4).
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To further clarify how a centrifuge works, consider the single, dense particle in the
test tube at A in Figure 5. Note that A is near the top of the test tube. To keep the situation as simple as possible, we will disregard the fluid friction acting on this particle.
As the centrifuge spins, the particle continues to move at a constant velocity because
the net force acting on it is zero. This velocity will carry the particle along in a straight
line toward B, near the bottom of the test tube. In the rotating frame of reference of
the test tube, the fictitious centrifugal force appears to move the particle toward B.
Relative to Earth’s frame of reference, the particle moves according to Newton’s first
law of motion because it is moving in a straight line at a constant velocity while the
test tube and the contents accelerate toward the centre of the centrifuge.
direction of rotation
C
A
B
velocity of particle
Figure 5 The particle at position A moves according to Newton’s first law of motion as the
centrifuge spins.
Centrifugal Force and Earth’s Surface
Earth’s surface is another example of a rotating and, therefore, non-inertial frame of
reference. Objects near the surface of Earth are pulled down by gravity toward the
centre of Earth by a centripetal force. The rotation of Earth on its axis creates a centrifugal force on objects at Earth’s surface, but the effects are very small. If you stand
at the equator and drop a rock, the force of gravity pulls the rock straight toward
Earth’s centre. There is also a centrifugal force directed away from Earth’s centre relative to Earth’s rotating frame of reference. The net force on the rock you dropped in
Earth’s rotating frame is less than the force of gravity in a non-rotating frame of reference, as shown in the FBD in Figure 6. The rock’s acceleration at the equator is about
0.34 % less than the acceleration by gravity alone. At the equator, the magnitude of
the centrifugal force is at a maximum. As you move toward the north or the south,
the magnitude of the centrifugal force decreases, eventually reaching zero when you
reach the poles.
Fcentrifugal
mg
y
(not to scale)
Figure 6 A falling rock at the equator
experiences a small centrifugal force as
well as gravity.
The Coriolis force
When studying the physics of the motion of objects in Earth’s rotating frame of reference more closely, we discover another fictitious force. This fictitious force, called
the Coriolis force, is perpendicular to the velocity of an object in the rotating
frame of reference. The Coriolis force, named after the French mathematician
Gaspard-Gustave de Coriolis, acts on objects that are in motion relative to the
rotating Earth.
The effect of the Coriolis force is not very noticeable on objects moving on Earth’s
surface. The effect is more noticeable for objects that move for a very long time above
Earth’s surface. Weather patterns are one example. On the television news, you may
see a weather map detailing low-pressure systems that rotate counterclockwise in the
northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern hemisphere. The Coriolis force
WEB LINK
is responsible for this rotation.
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Coriolis force a fictitious force that acts
perpendicular to the velocity of an object
in a rotating frame of reference
3.4 Rotating Frames of Reference 127
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Mini Investigation
Foucault
Pendulum
Mini
Investigation
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.1
It is difficult to envision Earth as a rotating frame of reference
because, standing on its surface, you cannot see Earth move.
In 1851, French physicist Jean Foucault designed an experiment
to prove that Earth rotates—he strung a weight on a wire over
60 m long above Earth’s surface. In this activity, you will work
in a group and use a smaller pendulum and a globe to model
Foucault’s demonstration.
2. Rotate the globe slowly, and observe what happens to
the mass.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; globe (or large ball);
50 g mass; wooden splints or straws; string; tape
A. How does the rotating globe affect the behaviour of the
pendulum mass? T/I
1. Put on your eye protection. Make a pendulum and attach it
to the globe, in a setup similar to that in Figure 7.
Use caution when spinning the globe to ensure that the
pendulum remains securely attached.
3. Rotate the globe more quickly, and observe what happens.
B. How does the period of rotation affect the behaviour of the
pendulum mass? What does this imply about the effect of
the rotation of Earth on a Foucault pendulum? T/I
C. How would the observed behaviour of a Foucault pendulum
at the equator differ from the observed behaviour at your
latitude? T/I A
Figure 7
Artificial Gravity
artificial gravity a situation in which
the value of gravity has been changed
artificially to more closely match
Earth’s gravity
128
Now that we have had a closer look at frames of reference and uniform circular
motion, we are ready to discuss how circular motion can simulate gravity. Have you
ever wondered why astronauts and other objects in orbiting spacecraft look as if they
are floating? The spacecraft and everything in it are in free fall, and that makes the
apparent weight of the spacecraft and all the objects zero.
Over the past several decades, researchers have investigated the effects of extended
free fall on the human body. We know that the absence of forces against the human
body causes the muscles to become smaller and the bones to lose calcium and become
brittle. The heart and blood vessels swell from the buildup of excess body fluids in
the upper body. This imbalance of fluids causes the kidneys to release excess urine.
Astronaut-training programs include vigorous exercise programs on space flights
to help astronauts reduce these negative effects on their bodies. The problems caused
by extended free fall would still be catastrophic if humans travelled in space over the
long periods needed to reach Mars and other parts of the solar system. To combat this
problem, scientists and engineers are designing interplanetary spacecraft that have
artificial gravity, which is a situation in which the value of gravity has been changed
artificially.
Making a spacecraft rotate constantly can simulate gravity. And, if the spacecraft
rotates at the appropriate frequency, the simulated gravity can equal Earth’s gravity,
making the astronauts’ apparent weight equal to their weight on Earth. The following
Tutorial illustrates the variables needed to simulate Earth’s gravity in space.
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 128
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Tutorial 1 Simulating Gravity
This Tutorial models how to solve problems in which an object moving with uniform circular
motion simulates the effects of gravity.
Sample Problem 1: Designing a Space Station
Consider a rotating space station similar to the one in Figure 8.
The radius of the station is 40.0 m. How many times per minute
must the space station rotate to produce a force due to artificial
gravity equal to 30.0 % of Earth’s gravity?
FN
ac
FN
ac
r
C
ac
FN
Figure 8
Given: FN 5 0.30mg ; r 5 40.0 m; g 5 9.8 m/s2
Required: f (revolutions per minute, rpm)
Analysis: The only force acting on the astronauts in Figure 8
is the normal force, and it is directed toward the centre of the
mv 2
station. Therefore, SFc 5 FN 5
. We can use this equation
r
to determine the speed of the space station. Once we have the
d
speed, we can determine the period of rotation, T 5 . Then we
v
can use the period, T, to determine the frequency (in revolutions
60 s/min
per minute), f 5
; circumference of a circle 5 2pr.
T
mv 2
r
mv 2
0.30 mg 5
r
v 5 "0.30gr
Solution: FN 5
5 " 10.302 19.8 m/s22 140.0 m2
v 5 10.8 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
d
T5
v
2pr
5
v
2p 140.0 m2
5
10.8 m/s
T 5 23.3 s 1one extra digit carried2
60 s/min
T
60 s/min
5
23.3 s
f 5 2.6 rpm
f5
Statement: The space station must rotate 2.6 times per minute
to produce a force due to artificial gravity equal to 30.0 % of
Earth’s gravity.
Practice
1. A spacecraft travelling to Mars has an interior diameter of 324 m. The craft rotates around its
axis at the rate required to give astronauts along the interior wall an apparent weight equal in
magnitude to their weight on Earth. K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the speed of the astronauts relative to the centre of the spacecraft. [ans: 39.8 m/s]
(b) Determine the period of rotation of the spacecraft. [ans: 26 s]
2. Suppose there are two astronauts on the space station in Sample Problem 1. One has a
mass of 45 kg, and the other has a mass of 65 kg. Would each astronaut experience artificial
gravity equal to about 30.0 % of Earth’s gravity? Explain your answer. K/U T/I A
3. Imagine another planet with an acceleration of 10.00 m/s2 at its equator when ignoring the rotation
of the planet. The radius of the planet is 6.2 3 106 m. An object dropped at the equator yields an
acceleration of 9.70 m/s2. Determine the length of one day on this planet. K/U T/I A [ans: 7.9 h]
4. A 56 kg astronaut stands on a bathroom scale inside a rotating circular space station. The
radius of the space station is 250 m. The bathroom scale reads 42 kg. At what speed does
the space station floor rotate? K/U T/I A [ans: 43 m/s]
5. In theory, if a car went fast enough it could fly off Earth’s surface. This is because, at a fast
enough speed, Earth’s gravity is not strong enough to pull the car in a circle with a radius
equal to the radius of Earth. Approximately how fast would a car have to move for this to
happen? Refer to Appendix B for Earth’s radius. K/U T/I A [ans: 7.9 3 103 m/s]
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3.4 Rotating Frames of Reference
129
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3.4
Review
Summary
• A centrifuge is a device that spins rapidly and is used to separate substances
by density, as well as simulate the effects of gravity. A spinning centrifuge
applies a centrifugal force to the objects it contains.
• A rotating frame of reference is the frame of reference of any object moving
in a circle.
• Centrifugal force is a fictitious force used to explain the outward force
observed in a rotating frame of reference.
• Making a spacecraft rotate at the appropriate frequency can simulate gravity
equal to Earth’s gravity.
Questions
1. When you swing a bucket full of water in a vertical
circle at just the right speed, the water stays inside.
Explain why. K/U C A
2. Explain how the spin cycle of a washing machine
uses circular motion to remove water from clothes.
K/U
C
A
3. You are standing 2.7 m from the centre of a
spinning merry-go-round holding one end of a
string tied to a 120 g mass. The merry-go-round
has a period of 3.9 s. K/U T/I C A
(a) Draw a system diagram of the situation.
(b) Draw an FBD of the mass in Earth’s frame
of reference.
(c) Draw an FBD of the mass in the merry-goround’s rotating frame of reference.
(d) What angle does the string make with
the vertical?
(e) Determine the magnitude of the tension
in the string.
4. Show that the acceleration of an object dropped
at the equator is about 0.34 % less than the
acceleration due to gravity alone. K/U T/I A
5. In a science fiction movie, a spacecraft has a
rotating section to provide artificial gravity for the
long voyage. A physicist watches a scene filmed
from the interior of the spacecraft and notices
that the diameter of the rotating section of the
craft is about five times the height of an astronaut
walking in that section (or about 10 m). Later, in a
scene showing the spacecraft from the exterior, she
notices that the living quarters of the ship rotate
with a period of about 30 s. Did the movie get the
physics right? Compare the centripetal acceleration
of a 1.7 m–tall astronaut at his feet to that at his
head. Compare these accelerations to g. T/I C A
130 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 130
6. A space station has a radius of 100 m. K/U T/I A
(a) What period of rotation is needed to provide
an artificial gravity of g at the rim?
(b) At what speed is the rim moving?
(c) What is your apparent weight if you run
along the rim at 4.2 m/s opposite the rotation
direction?
(d) What is your apparent weight if you instead run
in the direction of rotation?
(e) In which direction would you run to get the
best workout, with or against the rotation?
Or does it matter?
7. An astronaut with a mass of 65 kg is in a rotating
space station with a radius of 150 m. She stands on
a scale, and the reading is 540 N. K/U T/I A
(a) At what acceleration do objects fall when
dropped near the floor of the space station?
(b) Calculate the speed of rotation of the outer rim
of the space station.
(c) Calculate the period of rotation of the space
station.
8. A centrifuge spins with a frequency of 1.1 3 103 Hz.
A particle in a test tube is positioned 3.4 cm from
the centre of the centrifuge. K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the acceleration of the particle at
this position from Earth’s frame of reference.
(b) Why do you think centrifuges need such a
high frequency?
(c) Why do you think medical researchers want to
separate particles at all?
9. Research large-scale centrifuges. In a format of your
choosing, describe how large-scale centrifuges are
K/U T/I
C
A
used in wastewater treatment.
WEB LINK
NEL
4/26/12 9:50 AM
Physics JOURNAL
3.5
The Physics of Roller Coasters
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
ABSTRACT
A3
The earliest known ride resembling a roller coaster appeared in seventeenth-century
Russia in the form of a large ice slide built on top of a wooden structure. Over the
centuries, roller coasters have become more sophisticated in design and structure.
The first roller coaster design that had a loop appeared in the early twentieth century.
The roller coaster car had to move fast enough that it could complete the circle without
falling. However, the speed required to accomplish this is too fast, and many people
were injured on the ride. Today, roller coaster loops are in a shape called a clothoid.
Roller Coaster Designs
The earliest rides classified as roller coasters date from the
early seventeenth century, in St. Petersburg, Russia. Builders
constructed 21 m–tall wooden structures and covered them
with sheets of ice. Riders climbed stairs at the back of the
structure, sat on a sled, and coasted down slopes hundreds
of metres long. Later, grooved tracks were added and the
sleds were fitted with wheels.
Amusement park designers constructed the first looping
roller coaster in the early twentieth century. It had one circular loop. The roller coaster car had to be fast enough that
it could complete the circle without falling, but many people
were injured on the ride because of the high speed required.
Designers soon abandoned this dangerous design in favour
of a safer one. Today, looping roller coasters have a much
different design. They curve with a radius that is longer at
the bottom of the loop and shorter at the top of the loop.
This shape is called a clothoid loop (Figure 1).
r1
height
r1
(a)
r2
height
(b)
Figure 2 (a) The circular design (b) The clothoid design
circle
clothoid
Figure 1 Modern roller coasters have clothoid loops.
Comparing the Two Designs
Using our understanding of circular motion, we can compare the old, circular roller coaster design to the clothoid
design and see why the old design is dangerous. To accomplish this, first assume we have two riders, one on each
roller coaster design. Next, assume that the heights of both
designs are the same but the radius of the circular design is
twice the radius of the clothoid design at the top (Figure 2).
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Assuming the roller coaster car is not attached to the
track in any way, the car would need a minimum speed at
the top of either type of loop or it would simply fall off at
some point. We can calculate the minimum speed for each
type of loop and compare them. For simplicity, assume the
radius of the circular loop is 15 m and the radius of the
clothoid at the top is 7.5 m.
For the circular loop:
SF 5 mac
mv 2
FN 1 mg 5
r
Set FN 5 0 to calculate the minimum speed.
mv 2
0 1 mg1 5
r
v2
g5
r
v 2 5 gr
v 5 "gr Take the positive root.
5 " 19.8 m/s22 115 m2
v 5 12 m/s
3.5 Physics Journal: The Physics of Roller Coasters
131
4/26/12 9:50 AM
For the clothoid loop:
v 5 "gr
5 " 19.8 m/s22 17.5 m2
v 5 8.6 m/s
The minimum speed of the old design roller coasters had
to be much faster than the minimum speed of the clothoid
design roller coaster to clear the loop, even though the
heights of both loops are equal (Figure 2). Changing the
radius of the loop made the roller coaster safer.
If you were moving at 8.6 m/s at the top of a clothoid loop
of this design, you would feel weightless for an instant. This
results because the normal force drops down to zero at the
top and your apparent weight drops to zero. Keep in mind
that gravity still acts on you at this point to keep you moving
in a circle, but you lose sense of it because you are in free fall.
Roller Coasters and Apparent Weight
Typically, the ride moves much faster than the minimum
speed required, and the riders experience normal forces
much larger than those in everyday life. This is part of the
thrill, of course, but if your apparent weight (normal force)
becomes too large or suddenly increases, it can be dangerous.
In fact, this is another reason for using the clothoid design.
Now consider an old roller coaster that has a horizontal
section of track leading into a circular loop. Once the ride
enters the loop, the riders will suddenly experience a centripetal force directed up toward the centre of the loop. The
normal force must suddenly increase, not only to overcome
3.5
gravity but to produce this large centripetal force. This sudden
increase in apparent weight can be dangerous to riders.
How does a clothoid design solve this problem? One of
the features of a clothoid loop is that the radius of curvature
of a clothoid gradually decreases from top to bottom. Even
though the radius of curvature of the clothoid at the top
is much smaller than that of a circular loop, the same clothoid has a much larger radius of curvature at the bottom.
This larger radius of curvature decreases the centripetal
force experienced by riders at the bottom of the loop
mv 2
according to the equation Fc 5
. Since the radius (in
r
the denominator) is larger, the centripetal force required is
smaller. This means the normal force required at the start
of the loop is reduced and riders do not experience a large
sudden increase in apparent weight. In addition, since the
radius gradually decreases, the apparent weight is gradually
increased, allowing the rider time to adjust without taking
CAREER LINK
away from the excitement of the ride.
Further Reading
Alcorn, Steve. (2007). Theme park design: Behind the scenes
with an engineer. Seattle: CreateSpace.
Baine, Celeste. (2007). The fantastical engineer: A thrillseeker’s
guide to careers in theme park engineering. Springfield, OR:
Engineering Education Service Center. Print and e-book.
The Imagineers. (2010). Walt Disney imagineering: A behind
the dreams look at making more magic real. New York:
Disney editions. 1st ed.
WEB LINK
Questions
1. You are on a clothoid roller coaster upside down at
the top of a loop with an accelerometer like the one
in Figure 3. The radius of the loop’s curvature is
18 m. You experience a force of 2.0 times your
normal weight from your seat. K/U T/I A
0g
1g
2g
3g
(c) What reading will you observe at the top of
the loop if the accelerometer is calibrated as in
Figure 3?
(d) If you actually tried to use an accelerometer
like the one in Figure 3 on a roller coaster, what
likely sources of error would you expect?
2. A clothoid loop in a roller coaster has the same
height as a circular loop but half the radius at
the top. A rider at the top of either loop typically
experiences a net force of 1.5mg. What is the ratio
of the speed at the top of the circular loop to the
speed at the top of the clothoid loop? K/U T/I A
3. Explain in your own words why the normal force
must be set to zero to calculate the minimum
possible speed a rider can have at the top of a loop.
K/U
4g
Figure 3 When this accelerometer
is stationary, the reading is 1g, as
shown here.
(a) Calculate your speed at the top of the loop.
(b) Identify the forces acting on the accelerometer.
132 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 132
T/I
C
A
4. A 62 kg rider is moving at a speed of 22 m/s at the
bottom of a loop that has a radius of 35 m at that
point. Determine the normal force acting on the
rider due to the seat. K/U T/I
NEL
4/26/12 9:50 AM
Explore an Issue in Dynamics
3.6
Improvements in Athletic Technology
SKIllS MENU
Athletic performance is often a function of innate physical abilities and technical
equipment. Winners in early tennis competitions played with speed, agility, and
coordination. They also wore specialized shoes and clothing, and used specialized
racquets. The quality of play in those early tennis matches was different in many
ways from that of the tennis matches we watch today. Over the decades, clothing and
equipment improvements have been made in every sport: track and field, hockey,
cycling, tennis, baseball, and snowboarding, to name a few (Figure 1).
(a)
• Defining the
Issue
• Researching
• Identifying
Alternatives
• Analyzing
• Defending a
Decision
• Communicating
• Evaluating
(b)
Figure 1 (a) Some early snowboards were made of plywood. (b) Modern snowboards are lighter
weight and faster because of the new materials and construction.
Thanks to innovations in the field, athletes today run faster, jump higher, and
hit harder. The technological innovations have also expanded to include sports
nutritionists, physicians, trainers, and psychologists. Everyone seems determined to
push the boundaries of human ability, and engineers and scientists are designing the
CAREER LINK
equipment that keeps moving that boundary forward.
The list of athletic items subject to technological innovation for enhanced performance is staggering. We tend to think of bats, balls, and clothes, but engineers are
also redesigning playing surfaces, such as field turf and court flooring. Sports physicians
are developing more precise surgeries, and nutritionists are creating recipes for
CAREER LINK
muscle-recovery drinks.
With professional sports teams in Canada generating roughly $1.5 billion in revenue
per year, sports is a serious business. In 2010, Americans spent in excess of $414 billion
on their sports industry. Innovations in athletic technology will continue to generate
profits, and interest in sports will continue to grow.
The Issue
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A4
Sports technology is a rapidly growing industry. With thousands of new products on
the market claiming to improve performance, athletes, consumers, and event organizers need to consider which products live up to their claims and which products do
not. Is it fair to compare the results of previous sporting events with those aided by
improved technology and equipment?
You are a member of an athletic committee for the Olympics or a professional league
that is considering the fairness of comparing previous accomplishments and records to
current results. The committee has asked you to investigate the issue and report back.
Your teacher and classmates will represent the members of the committee.
Goal
To research the issue, take a stand on the issue, and then report your findings and
make recommendations to the committee
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3.6 Explore an Issue in Dynamics
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Research
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can use some of the sports
concepts in this section when you
complete the Unit Task on page 146.
Choose a sport. Research specific details related to the sport you have chosen. You
may wish to consider the following ideas in your research:
• Serious research and engineering goes into the design of sports products, such
as shoes, swimwear, balls, javelins, and clothing. Some of these innovations have
stemmed from NASA research. What are some recent developments in sports
products? How have they affected performance or even the nature of the sport?
• Is there any evidence to suggest that changing from wood to aluminum hockey
sticks improves hockey shots?
• Is there any evidence to suggest that the change in tennis racquets over the
years corresponds to improved serves or performance?
• Have any new developments in cycling ever produced a measurable
improvement in the performance of an athlete during the Tour de France?
• At the turn of the twentieth century, 18 professional football players in the
United States died as a result of the poorly padded equipment they wore.
What is the origin of protective football gear?
• In the sport of jai alai, players use a scoop made of old-fashioned wicker to catch
and throw a ball at speeds of around 300 km/h. The equipment has not changed
over the years. Are modern wood resins and metal alloys better materials?
• Are there any disadvantages to society and the environment in improving
WEB LINK
sporting equipment and related technologies?
Possible Solutions
You may wish to consider the following questions to help you form an opinion:
• Summarize any evidence you found in your research related to improved athletic
ability and modern equipment and clothing related to the sport you chose.
• Are manufacturers contributing to sports in a positive way, or are they simply
in the market to improve profits?
• Have any controversies developed over the use of new sports technology?
• What are the implications for professional athletes as sports technology
continues to advance?
• What are the advantages and disadvantages of improved sports technology to
society and the environment?
Decision
Decide whether you think that the advances in sports technologies have improved
sports in a quantitative way. Is the change desirable or controversial? Identify and
consider all stakeholders before making a final decision.
Communicate
• Prepare a slide show or multimedia presentation for your committee. Your
presentation should help you convince the committee of your decision.
• The presentation should highlight the changes in sports technology over the years.
• Include performance statistics and comparisons to similar products, using
charts, tables, flow charts, or any other suitable format.
• Be prepared to answer questions from the members of the committee.
Plan for Action
Prepare a letter to be submitted to the international governing
body for your sport. Your letter should include a summary of the
134 Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p106-134.indd 134
findings that led to your decision and a recommendation for the
governing body to implement.
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4/26/12 9:50 AM
CHAPTER
3
Investigations
Investigation 3.3.1
OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
Simulating Uniform Circular
Motion
You have learned about the principles related to objects in
uniform circular motion. In this investigation, you will use
a simulation program to verify the relationship between
centripetal force and variables such as mass, speed, radius,
frequency, and period for a mass attached to a rope
swinging in a circle with uniform circular motion.
Purpose
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.4
To verify the relationship between centripetal force and
variables such as mass, speed, radius, frequency, and
period in uniform circular motion
equipment and Materials
• access to a computer with an Internet connection
• graph paper or graphing software
Procedure
1. Go to the Nelson Science website and start the
simulation.
2. Display the vectors for force, acceleration, and
velocity in your simulation. Determine net force
(centripetal force) for different values of the radius,
keeping the mass and speed constant. Record all
information in a table, and use at least five different
values of the radius.
3. Graph the centripetal force versus the radius and the
1
centripetal force versus
separately.
radius
4. Repeat Steps 1 and 2, but change the mass and keep
the speed and radius constant. Graph the centripetal
force versus the mass.
5. Repeat Steps 1 and 2, but change the speed and keep
the radius and mass constant. Graph the centripetal
force versus the speed and the centripetal force
versus the square of the speed.
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 135
SKIllS MeNU
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
6. Determine the period and frequency for each speed
used in Step 5, and record the results in your table.
Analyze and evaluate
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5.5
(a) Examine all your graphs. Calculate the slope of each
graph that produces a straight line. How is the slope
of each graph related to mass, speed, and/or radius?
Explain your reasoning. K/U T/I C
(b) What is the effect of increasing the following on the
centripetal force? Explain your reasoning. T/I
(i) radius
(ii) mass
(iii) speed
mv 2
(c) What would a graph of centripetal force versus
r
look like? What would the slope of this graph equal?
Explain your reasoning. K/U T/I C A
(d) How is the speed of the mass related to the frequency
and the period? T/I
(e) What happens to the centripetal force when the
frequency increases? When the period increases? T/I
Apply and extend
(f) How would you use this simulation to describe the
motion of a satellite in orbit? T/I C A
WEB LINK
Chapter 3 Investigations
135
4/26/12 9:55 AM
Investigation 3.3.2
CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT
Analyzing Uniform Circular Motion
You have learned that while an object is in uniform
circular motion at a constant speed, its velocity is also
constantly changing direction. This causes the object to
accelerate toward the centre of its circular path. In this
investigation, you will build an apparatus to observe a
small object in uniform circular motion and collect data
to describe relationships between the object, its mass,
and the radius of its path.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Testable question
A2.2
How do the magnitude of the force, the radius of a circular
path, and an object’s mass affect the frequency of the
revolution of an object in uniform circular motion?
Prediction
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
electronic balance or scale
3 small rubber stoppers with centre holes
hollow tube
50 g, 100 g, 200 g, 250 g masses
metre stick
1.5 m string or fishing line
paper clip or masking tape
graph paper or graphing software
Procedure
Predict the relationship between the frequency of revolution
and each variable in the Testable Question. Explain your
reasoning.
variables
Read the Testable Question, Experimental Design, and
Procedure, and identify the dependent, independent,
and controlled variables.
experimental Design
Figure 1 shows a simple setup that can be used to perform
this investigation. You will hold a hollow tube vertically in
your hand while you twirl the rubber stopper around in a
horizontal circle. A string is tied to the rubber stopper and
then passed down through the hollow tube, where it is
tied to the mass. The force of gravity provides the tension
required to make the rubber stopper move in a circle.
r
FT
rubber stopper
hollow tube
paper clip
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MeNU
This space should remain
constant while twirling.
string
1. Create a data table for each of the following
observations: three sets of values for changing the
force of tension, three sets for changing the radius,
and three sets for changing the mass.
2. Measure and record the mass, in kilograms, of each
rubber stopper.
3. Tie one rubber stopper tightly to one end of
the string.
4. Thread the string through the tube, hang the 200 g
mass on the other end (Figure 1), and put on your
eye protection.
Wear eye protection. Be sure the area around you is clear
from material hanging from the ceiling that you may
accidentally hit while swinging the stopper. Be careful not to
drop the masses on your feet. Do not wear open-toed shoes.
Ensure no one can be hit by the stopper.
5. Practise swinging the stopper around your head with
a constant speed and constant radius. Make sure you
are comfortable and proficient with this step before
proceeding to the next step.
6. Lay the equipment on the floor, and measure a 75 cm
distance from the centre of the stopper to the top of
the hollow tube. Fix this radius by placing the paper
clip at the bottom of the tube (Figure 1).
7. Swing the stopper at a constant speed at a radius of
75 cm. Try to keep the paper clip slightly below the
bottom of the tube to ensure that it is not pushing
on the tube and increasing the tension.
Figure 1
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Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 136
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8. Complete 20 cycles, and record the time in your table.
To obtain a reasonable average value, you will need to
repeat this step several times.
9. Calculate the frequency of revolution, and record it in
your table.
10. Repeat Steps 6 to 9 using a different tension force by
changing the mass at the end of the string to 150 g
and then to 100 g.
11. Measure the time for 20 complete cycles when the
radius is 60 cm and when the radius is 45 cm, with
the same mass of stopper and the tension force due
to the 100 g mass. Calculate all the frequencies and
record them in your table.
12. Add another stopper and measure the time for 20
complete cycles at a constant radius of 75 cm and
a constant tension force due to the 100 g mass.
13. Repeat the process with a third stopper and the other
masses. Calculate the frequencies and record them in
your table.
Analyze and evaluate
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5.5
(a) What variables were measured and/or manipulated
in this investigation? What type of relationship was
being tested? T/I
(b) Graph the relationships between the frequency of
revolution and each of the following:
• the magnitude of the tension force
• the radius of the circle
• the mass of the object in motion T/I C
(d) The equation Fc 5 4p2mrf 2 gives the magnitude of
the net force causing the acceleration of an object in
uniform circular motion. T/I A
(i) Manipulate the equation to solve for frequency.
How does this compare with your results
from (c)?
(ii) What are the most likely causes for any
discrepancies?
(e) To obtain the best accuracy, the tension force acting
on the stopper should be horizontal. What happens
to the accuracy as the frequency of revolution of the
stopper increases? T/I A
(f) What sources of error did you encounter and how did
you minimize them? T/I A
Apply and extend
(g) Explain how this investigation illustrates all three of
Newton’s laws of motion. T/I C
(h) How might you apply your findings to a sports
activity that involves circular motion? T/I A
(i) If you look carefully at the swinging stopper, you
will notice that the string tied to the stopper is not
completely horizontal. K/U T/I C
(i) What effect, if any, will this have on the accuracy
of your results?
(ii) What happens to the orientation of the string as
the speed of the stopper increases? Explain your
reasoning.
(c) Derive an equation for the frequency in terms of the
tension, the radius, and the mass by combining your
results from (b). T/I
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Chapter 3 Investigations
137
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CHAPTER
3
SUMMARY
Summary questions
1. Create a study guide for this chapter based on the
Key Concepts on page 106. For each point, create
three or four subpoints that provide further
information, relevant examples, explanatory
diagrams, or general equations.
2. Look back at the Starting Points questions on page 106.
Answer these questions using what you have learned
in this chapter. Compare your latest answers with the
answers you wrote at the beginning of the chapter.
Note how your answers have changed.
3. Design a one-page graphic organizer that summarizes
and connects the concepts in this chapter.
vocabulary
frame of reference (p. 108)
fictitious force (p. 109)
period (p. 116)
centrifugal force (p. 126)
inertial frame of reference
(p. 108)
apparent weight (p. 111)
frequency (p. 117)
Coriolis force (p. 127)
uniform circular motion (p. 114)
centripetal force (p. 121)
artificial gravity (p. 128)
non-inertial frame of reference
(p. 108)
centripetal acceleration (p. 114)
centrifuge (p. 125)
CAREER PAThwAYS
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college
diploma, a B.Sc. degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or
postgraduate degrees. This graphic organizer shows a few pathways to careers
mentioned in this chapter.
1. Select an interesting career that involves the use of centrifuges. Research the
educational pathway you would need to follow to pursue this career.
2. What is involved in becoming an amusement park design engineer? Research at
least two pathways that could lead to this career, and present your findings in the
form of a graphic organizer similar to the one shown here.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A6
nutritionist
M.Sc.
meteorologist
M.B.A.
energy operations manager
Ph.D.
sports psychologist
B.Sc.
M.A.
12U Physics
OSSD
11U Physics
military engineer
B.Eng.
amusement park design engineer
geothermal engineer
phlebotomist
college diploma
sports medic
138
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 138
CAREER LINK
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4/26/12 9:55 AM
CHAPTER
3
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. How does the acceleration of a non-inertial frame of
reference cause objects in the frame to move? (3.1) K/U
(a) in a straight line
(b) at a constant velocity
(c) as if a force were acting on them
(d) as if they remained at rest
2. In addition to the radius of an object’s path, what
variable do you need in order to calculate an object’s
centripetal acceleration? (3.2) K/U
(a) the object’s direction
(b) the object’s mass
(c) the object’s period
(d) the object’s circumference
3. An object in uniform circular motion with speed v
experiences a centripetal force, Fc. What value of Fc
is needed if the radius of the path is halved and the
velocity is kept the same? (3.3) K/U T/I A
Fc
(a)
4
Fc
(b)
2
(c) 2Fc
(d) 4Fc
4. Which particle experiences the largest centripetal
force in a centrifuge? (3.3) K/U T/I
(a) a 0.05 g particle at a distance of 2 cm from
the centre
(b) a 0.05 g particle at a distance of 5 cm from
the centre
(c) a 0.1 g particle at a distance of 2 cm from
the centre
(d) a 0.1 g particle at a distance of 5 cm from
the centre
5. A 30.0 kg mass is attached to the end of a light
wooden stick of length 1.0 m and swung around in a
vertical circle at a constant speed of 12 m/s. What is
the maximum tension in the stick? (3.3) K/U T/I A
(a) 2.9 3 102 N
(b) 4.0 3 103 N
(c) 4.3 3 103 N
(d) 4.6 3 103 N
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. A car moves around a banked curve at a constant
speed over black ice with virtually no friction.
What causes the car to accelerate? (3.3) K/U A
(a) the normal force
(b) gravity
(c) the horizontal component of the normal force (d) the vertical component of the normal force
7. When will a bathroom scale with nothing on it read
zero? (3.4) K/U A
(a) on the ground
(b) in an elevator moving up
(c) in an elevator moving down
(d) in space
8. A cart on a roller coaster is upside down at the
top of a clothoid loop. At this point, the riders feel
weightless. The radius of the loop at the top is 10.0 m.
What is the speed of the cart? (3.5) K/U T/I A
(a) 7.0 m/s
(b) 9.9 m/s
(c) 14 m/s
(d) 98 m/s
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
9. During free fall, the apparent weight is zero because
there is no force of gravity acting on the objects.
(3.1) K/U
10. For two objects moving in the same circular path
with different speeds, the faster object experiences
less centripetal acceleration. (3.2) K/U
11. When two objects move in the same circular path
with the same speed, the heavier object requires a
greater centripetal force. (3.3) K/U
12. Earth’s surface is an example of a rotating non-inertial
frame of reference. (3.4) K/U
13. The effect of the Coriolis force is very noticeable on
everyday objects moving along Earth’s surface.
(3.4) K/U
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB LINK
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CHAPTER
3
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Which of the following describes an inertial frame
of reference? (3.1) K/U
(a) one in which Newton’s first law of motion
holds true
(b) one in which Newton’s first law of motion does
not apply
(c) one in which Newton’s second law of motion no
longer applies
(d) one in which Newton’s third law of motion no
longer applies
2. Which of the following is an example of a noninertial frame of reference? (3.1) K/U
(a) a spinning centrifuge
(b) a digital clock on a moving bus
(c) an airplane moving with a constant velocity
(d) a stationary DVD
3. Which of the following describes an object that
follows a circular path at a constant speed? (3.2) K/U
(a) inertial motion
(b) uniform circular motion
(c) motion with constant acceleration
(d) motion with constant velocity
4. Which of the following would result if a tetherball
on a rope came off the rope midway through its path
around the pole? (3.3) K/U A
(a) The ball would continue its circular path around
the pole, eventually dropping with the force
of gravity.
(b) The ball would fly away from the pole in the
straight-line direction it was travelling at the
moment it came off the rope.
(c) The ball would drop to the ground at the moment
it came off the rope.
(d) The ball would continue to move in its circular
path around the pole but with a decreasing radius.
5. In which of the following directions is the centripetal
force acting on an object undergoing circular motion?
(3.3) K/U
(a) in a straight line away from the centre of the
object’s path
(b) in a straight line away from the object at
a 908 angle
(c) toward the centre of the circular path
(d) along the object’s path
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Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 140
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. Which of the following causes merry-go-round riders
to feel as if they are being pushed away from the
centre of the ride? (3.4) K/U
(a) being in an inertial reference frame
(b) the Coriolis force
(c) centripetal acceleration
(d) centrifugal force
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
7. An amusement park ride moving down with a
constant velocity is an example of a non-inertial
frame of reference. (3.1) K/U
8. The law of inertia does not hold in a non-inertial
frame of reference. (3.1) K/U
9. The direction of centripetal acceleration for a car on
a banked curve is always down the incline parallel to
the road surface. (3.2) K/U
10. The magnitude of an object’s centripetal acceleration
increases with the mass, the radius of the circular
path, and the velocity of the object. (3.2) K/U
11. An observer looking down on a passenger in a car
driving around a sharp curve would see that the
passenger is being pushed by the car in the direction
of the curve. (3.3) K/U A
12. The Moon is not an example of an object in uniform
circular motion. (3.4) K/U A
13. Objects moving in a rotating frame of reference
experience a force parallel to the velocity of the object
in the rotating frame. (3.4) K/U
14. A Foucault pendulum demonstrates that Earth is not
a rotating frame of reference. (3.4) K/U
15. A roller coaster car in free fall has no apparent
weight. (3.4) K/U A
Write a short answer to each question.
16. You are swinging your keys at the end of a lanyard
in a horizontal circle around your head. What is the
effect on the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration
of the keys in each case? (3.2) K/U
(a) You keep the radius of the circle constant but
double the speed.
(b) The speed of the keys stays the same, but you
double the radius of the circle.
17. Two cars with the same mass are driving around a
curved road at different velocities. Which car will
experience a greater centripetal force, the one moving
with the faster velocity or the one moving with the
slower velocity? (3.3) K/U A
NEL
4/26/12 9:55 AM
18. How are centrifuges used in blood analysis?
(3.4) K/U C
19. Identify the force that is causing the centripetal force
in each situation. (3.3, 3.4) K/U
(a) the Moon orbiting Earth
(b) a car turning a corner
(c) a rock twirled on the end of a string
Understanding
20. While riding in a car heading east, you hold an
accelerometer in your hand, like the one in Figure 1.
The angle of the bead changes with the acceleration
of the car. (3.1) K/U T/I C
80 70
70 8
0
vertical
60
60
50
40
30
20 10
0 10 20
30
40
50
bead
Figure 1
(a) How must you hold the accelerometer so that
it correctly measures acceleration? Explain
your answer.
(b) Describe what happens to the bead when the
vehicle is at rest.
(c) Describe what happens to the bead when the
vehicle is accelerating toward the east.
(d) Describe what happens to the bead when the
vehicle is moving with a constant velocity.
(e) Describe what happens to the bead when the
vehicle begins to slow down while moving toward
the east.
(f) The bead is at an angle of 138 from the vertical.
Calculate the magnitude of the car’s acceleration.
21. Determine the magnitude of the centripetal
acceleration in each scenario. (3.2) K/U T/I A
(a) A penny is 13 cm from the centre of a vinyl
record. The record is playing on a turntable at
33.5 rpm.
(b) A rodeo performer is twirling his lasso with
uniform circular motion. One complete
revolution of the rope takes 1.2 s. The distance
from the end of his rope to the centre of the circle
is 4.3 m.
(c) An electron is travelling around a nucleus at
2.18 3 106 m/s. The diameter of the electron’s
orbit is 1.06 3 10210 m.
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22. You are operating a remote-controlled car around a
circular path in an open field. The car is undergoing
centripetal acceleration of 33.8 m/s2. The radius of
the car’s path is 125 m. Calculate the car’s speed.
(3.2) K/U T/I A
23. WindSeeker, a 30-storey swing ride at Canada’s
Wonderland, ascends 91.7 m, spreads its metal
arms, and swings riders at speeds up to 50.0 km/h.
Calculate the ride’s centripetal acceleration when the
ride operates at maximum speed and at full swing
with a diameter of 33.5 m. (3.2, 3.3) K/U T/I A
24. The track near the top of your favourite roller coaster
is looped with a diameter of 20 m. When you are at
the top, you feel as if you weigh one-third of your
true weight. How fast is the roller coaster moving?
(3.3) K/U T/I A
25. A locomotive engine of mass 3m, pulling an empty
cargo car of mass m, is making a turn on a track.
Assuming that the engine and cargo car are moving at
the same speed, compare the centripetal forces acting
on each. Explain your answer. (3.3) K/U T/I A
26. You are riding on Air Gliders, a thrill ride at Calaway
Park, Calgary, that swings riders around in a circle while
metal arms move the cars up and down. (3.3) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the centripetal force experienced by a
90 kg rider swinging around at 20 m/s in a circle
with a 16 m radius?
(b) Calculate the force when the ride’s arms close to
a radius of 10 m.
(c) Calculate the force when the ride slows to 5 m/s,
keeping the radius at 10 m.
27. A discus thrower at a track meet hurls a 2.0 kg
discus. She exerts a horizontal force of 2.8 3 102 N
on it as she spins. She rotates the disc, with her arm
outstretched, in uniform circular motion, with a
radius of 1.00 m. How fast will the discus travel
when released? (3.4) K/U T/I A
28. A 2.0 kg jewellery box is sitting at the edge of
a rotating shelf in a mechanical display case.
The radius of the rotating shelf is 0.50 m.
Calculate the centripetal force when
(a) the shelf is rotating at 1.0 rpm
(b) the shelf frequency increases to 5.0 rpm
(c) the shelf frequency decreases to 0.50 rpm
(3.3, 3.4) K/U T/I A
29. On the Drop Tower at Canada’s Wonderland, riders
free-fall 23 storeys at speeds close to 100 km/h.
At some point during the ride, a person experiences
a force equivalent to 2g and the ride’s seat is pushing
up with a force of 1.1 3 103 N. What is the person’s
weight at this point? (3.4) K/U T/I A
Chapter 3 Review 141
4/26/12 9:55 AM
Analysis and Application
30. The blades of a blender of radius 0.030 m are
spinning at a rate of 60 rpm. What is the centripetal
acceleration of a single point on the edge of one
of the blades? (3.2) K/U T/I A
31. The rock in Figure 2 is moving with uniform circular
motion in a horizontal circle on a frictionless surface. The
string is old and can only exert a maximum force of 25 N
on the rock. Determine the minimum speed the rock
can have without breaking the string. (3.3) K/U T/I A
35. A rock tied to a string spins in a circle of radius
1.5 m, as shown in Figure 5. The speed of the rock
is 10.0 m/s. (3.3) K/U T/I C A
r
Figure 5
m 1.5 kg
r 0.50 m
Figure 2
32. A roller coaster car is near the bottom of its track, as
shown in Figure 3. At this point, the normal force
on the roller coaster is 3.5 times its weight. The speed
of the roller coaster is 26 m/s. Determine the radius of
the track’s curvature. (3.3) T/I A
36.
r
v
37.
Figure 3
33. A 35 kg child sits on a Ferris wheel that has a
diameter of 22 m. The wheel rotates 3.5 times
per minute. (3.3) T/I C A
(a) What force does the seat exert on the child at the
top of the ride?
(b) What force does the seat exert on the child at
the bottom of the ride?
34. A rock with a mass of 1.5 kg attached to a light rod
with a length of 2.0 m twirls in a vertical circle as
shown in Figure 4. The speed v of the rock is constant;
that is, it is the same at the top and at the bottom of the
circle. The tension in the rod is zero when the rock is at
its highest point. Calculate the tension when the rock is
at the bottom. (3.3) T/I A
side
view
y
y
y
mg
x
FT
(b)
(a)
mg
(c)
Figure 4
142
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 142
39.
40.
41.
FT
x
x
38.
(a) Draw two simple diagrams: one that shows a
top view and one that shows a side view of the
motion of the rock.
(b) Draw an FBD for the rock.
(c) Determine the total force on the rock directed
toward the centre of its circular path. Express
your answer in terms of the (unknown) tension
in the string, FT.
(d) Apply Newton’s second law along the vertical and
the horizontal directions to calculate the angle
the string makes with the horizontal.
A car with a mass of 1.7 3 103 kg is travelling
without slipping on a flat, curved road with a radius
of curvature of 35 m. The speed of the car is 12 m/s.
Calculate the frictional force between the road and
the tires. (3.3) K/U T/I A
A stone with a mass of 0.30 kg is tied to a string with
a length of 0.75 m and is swung in a horizontal circle
with speed v. The string has a breaking-point force of
50.0 N. What is the largest value v can have without
the string breaking? Ignore any effects due to gravity.
(3.3) K/U T/I A
A hammer thrower is swinging a ball on a rope.
The mass of the ball is 70.0 kg, and it is swinging
at 2.0 m/s in a circle of radius 1.0 m. Calculate the
centripetal force. (3.3) K/U T/I A
A 30.0 kg child is riding a bicycle around a
circular driveway with a diameter of 20.0 m. He is
experiencing 32 N of centripetal force. How fast is
the child cycling? (3.3) K/U T/I A
Roller coaster cars are travelling around a clothoid
loop in the track at 55 m/s. The cars have a mass of
125 kg, and the loop has a radius of 25 m. Calculate
the centripetal force. (3.3, 3.5) K/U T/I A
A child is operating a remote-controlled boat around
the edge of a pond with a radius of 2 m. The boat is
moving with a speed of 2 m/s. The centripetal force is
16 N. (3.3) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the mass of the boat.
(b) In order to decrease the centripetal force to 4 N,
how fast should the boat go?
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4/26/12 9:55 AM
42. Figure 6 shows a car travelling around a curve in the
road. (3.3.) K/U T/I A
v
46. In an amusement park ride, a motor rotates two
platforms with a period of 4.0 s in a vertical circle
(Figure 9). The mass of platform 1 is 1200 kg, and the
mass of platform 2 is 1800 kg. Calculate the tension
in each support when the platforms are at the bottom
as shown in the figure. (3.3, 3.4) K/U T/I A
Fc
support A
4.0 m
r
platform 1
Figure 6
(a) If the car doubles its speed, how much of an
increase in centripetal force from friction is
needed to keep the car in a circular path?
(b) What would happen to the car’s path if the road
was covered in ice and there was no friction?
43. Determine the centripetal force needed to keep a 105 kg
motorboat moving in a circular path on a lake at 7.0 m/s.
The radius of the path’s curve is 15 m. (3.3) K/U T/I A
44. Two masses are tied together by strings as shown in
Figure 7 and swung around in a horizontal circle
with a period of 2.00 s on a frictionless surface.
Mass 1 is 3.00 kg, and mass 2 is 5.00 kg. Determine
the tension in each string. (3.3) K/U T/I
string A
4.00 m
support B
3.0 m
platform 2
Figure 9
47. The amusement park ride shown in Figure 10 is a
large, rapidly spinning cylindrical room with a radius
of 3.0 m. The riders stand up against the wall, and the
room starts to spin. Once the room is spinning fast
enough, the riders stick to the wall. Then the floor
slowly lowers, but the riders do not slide down the
wall. Assume the coefficient of friction between
the wall and the riders is 0.40. (3.3, 3.4) K/U T/I C A
string B
2.00 m
mass 2
mass 1
Figure 7
45. Mass 1 (2.0 kg) sits on top of mass 2 (5.0 kg), which
rests on a frictionless surface (Figure 8). The coefficient
of static friction between mass 1 and mass 2 is 0.30.
A string of length 5.0 m is tied to mass 2, and both
masses are swung around in a horizontal circle.
Calculate (a) the maximum speed of the masses
and (b) the tension in the string. (3.3) K/U T/I
Figure 10
(a) Draw an FBD of a person on the ride. What force
or forces cause the net force on the rider?
(b) Calculate the minimum speed of the rider
required to keep the person stuck to the wall
when lowering the floor.
48. A 6.0 kg object is attached to two 5.0 m–long strings
(Figure 11) and swung around in a circle at 12 m/s.
Determine the tension in the two strings, and
explain why the tensions are not the same.
(3.3, 3.4) K/U T/I A
mass 1
5.0 m
mass 2
A
8.0 m
Figure 8
B
5.0 m
Figure 11
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143
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49. A race car driver wants to complete two laps in
1 min around a circular track with a 30.0 m radius.
The combined mass of her body and her car equals
9.8 3 102 kg. What is the magnitude of centrifugal
force she will feel? (3.4) K/U T/I A
50. A top-loading washing machine with 2.0 kg of
clothes inside is on spin cycle. The tub, with a radius
of 0.35 m, is rotating at 50.0 rpm. Determine the
centripetal force acting on the clothes. (3.4) K/U T/I A
51. A coin is resting on a vinyl record. The coin slips
off the record when the rotation rate is 0.30 rps
(rotations per second). Determine the coefficient
of static friction between the coin and the record.
The radius of the record is 15 cm. (3.4) K/U T/I A
52. A roller coaster car is at the lowest point on its track,
where the radius of curvature is 20.0 m. At this point,
the apparent weight of a passenger on the roller
coaster is 3.00 times her true weight. What is the
speed of the roller coaster? (3.4, 3.5) K/U T/I A
53. A space station is rotating at 12 m/s. The artificial
gravity is equal to 50.0 % of that found on Earth.
What is the radius of the station? (3.4) K/U T/I A
54. A bucket of water is attached to a rope and is being
swung around in a vertical circle. (3.4) K/U T/I A
(a) What force is responsible for keeping the bucket
moving in a circle?
(b) Identify the source of the force in (a).
(c) The water-filled bucket has a mass of 15 kg and is
swinging at a velocity of 2 m/s in a circle with a
radius of 2 m. Calculate the magnitude of the force.
55. A popular circus act features a daredevil motorcycle
rider encased in a spherical metal cage, as shown
in Figure 12. The diameter of the cage is 4 m.
(3.4) K/U T/I A
Figure 12
(a) A 65 kg performer on a 95 kg motorcycle rides
horizontally around the middle of the cage. He
completes 22 loops in one minute. Calculate the
coefficient of friction he needs between his tires
and the cage to keep him in place.
(b) How many loops will the rider make per second?
(c) If the performer rides around the cage in vertical
loops at 6 m/s, what force is needed at the top
and bottom of the cage to support his mass?
144
Chapter 3 • Uniform Circular Motion
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 144
56. Two skaters are performing on ice. One skater is
gripping the other’s hand and spinning her in an arc
around his body. The distance between the skaters’
grip and the outer edge of the arc is 3.0 m. The skater
is being swung around at 2.0 rpm and has a mass of
54 kg. Calculate the centripetal force. (3.4) K/U T/I A
57. A horse trainer is leading a 450 kg horse on a long
lead rope around a training pen, making one rotation
around the ring per minute. The centripetal force on
the horse is 48 N. Determine the length of the lead
rope. (3.4) K/U T/I A
58. Consider the performer in Figure 13. How fast
must the horse go around a circus ring with a radius
of 25 m in order to maintain constant centripetal
acceleration of 1.0g? Give your answer in
kilometres per hour. (3.5) K/U T/I A
Figure 13
Evaluation
59. Using your knowledge of forces, explain the following
in a format of your choice. (3.1, 3.2, 3.3) T/I C
(a) centrifugal force
(b) Coriolis force
(c) fictitious forces, and why they are called that
60. Describe the effects on a person in each of the
following frames of reference. (3.1) T/I C A
(a) riding the elevator to the top of the CN Tower
in Toronto
(b) free falling in a skydive from an airplane
61. Create a three-column table, either electronically or
on paper. (3.2) K/U T/I C A
(a) In the first column, list the three equations for
centripetal acceleration. In the second column,
identify the variables found in each equation.
In the third column, identify the variables not
found in each equation. Give your table a title.
(b) In your own words, briefly describe how each
equation was derived.
NEL
4/26/12 9:55 AM
62. A rodeo performer spins a lasso above her head.
(3.2) T/I C A
(a) Explain the purpose of twirling the rope before
throwing it.
(b) Describe how she could maximize the distance
the rope can be thrown.
(c) Describe the path the rope will take once she
releases it.
63. Explain how the principles of centripetal force
are used to make safer driving conditions.
(3.3) T/I C A
64. How would you explain the concepts of artificial
gravity to a fellow student who has not taken
physics? (3.4) T/I C A
Reflect on Your Learning
65. What did you learn in this chapter that was
surprising? Explain your answer. T/I C
66. In this chapter, you learned how to solve some
types of centripetal force problems. What questions
do you still have about solving centripetal force
problems? T/I C A
67. Prepare a Know–Want to Know–What You Learned
(K-W-L) chart on the topic of artificial gravity or
another topic from this chapter. T/I C A
68. How has your understanding of uniform circular
motion changed? Did you learn anything particularly
relevant to you on this topic? T/I C A
69. Consider the different topics you have studied in this
chapter. Choose one that you feel has an important
impact on your life. Write a one-page report about
the topic, explaining why it is important to you.
What else would you like to know about this topic?
How could you go about learning this? T/I C A
Research
WEB LINK
70. Research the history of roller coasters, showing how
the designs have changed over the centuries. Present
your findings in a timeline, on paper, as a Wiki page,
as an electronic slide presentation, or in another
format of your choosing. T/I C A
71. Research the effects of the Coriolis force in
meteorology. In your own words, describe the
effect using the movement of a hurricane as an
example. C A
72. Research the effects of uniform circular motion on
growing plants. What effects would a continuously
spinning pot of soil have on the grass seed planted in
it? How would the grass grow differently? T/I C A
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 145
73. Gas centrifuge technology is an emerging technology.
The technology enriches mined uranium to levels
at which it can be used to generate nuclear power.
The use of centrifuges increases the concentration
of the isotope uranium-235 in the uranium. Research
the various applications of gas centrifuge technology.
How has it affected the efficiency of energy
production? T/I C A
74. Astronauts undergo rigorous physical training to
be able to function in the altered environments in
space. Research astronaut training. How has astronaut
training changed from the first piloted space
mission to today’s missions? What are the health
risks associated with space flight and travel? What
technologies are in development to help astronauts
prepare for longer space travel than has ever
been attempted? T/I C A
75. The centrifuge is an integral piece of machinery in
many industries, from oil production to laundry
applications to the dairy industry. T/I C A
(a) Choose an industry, and trace the use of
centrifuges in the industry over the past century.
How have centrifuges contributed to advances
in the industry?
(b) List two major implications of the use of
centrifuges on society.
76. Research the track layout and dimensions of the
Behemoth, a ride at Canada’s Wonderland. Prepare
a concept map on all the possible forces riders will
experience at each new twist in the track. T/I C A
77. Research windmills and wind turbines, how
they work, and their effect on the environment.
T/I
C
A
(a) How do windmills and wind turbines use the
principles of dynamics and circular motion to
generate power? Include a simple diagram in
your answer.
(b) What is the environmental impact of wind power
and wind farms?
78. Using an online resource, design your own roller
coaster. List each design feature you have included
and explain your reasoning. Explain how you have
kept the ride exciting while keeping it safe for
customers. Decide on a theme for your roller
coaster, and try to include the theme in your
design. K/U T/I C A
Chapter 3 Review 145
4/26/12 9:55 AM
UNIT
1
Unit Task
A New Extreme Sport
Sports use physics in some of the most original and
extreme ways. In speed sports such as luge (Figure 1),
motorcycle racing, skateboarding, and bobsledding, the
goal is to reach extreme speeds while navigating courses
filled with twists and turns.
Figure 1 In luge competitions, the athlete rides on a small sled at high
speeds (140 km/h) along an iced track. The design of the track must
keep the competitor on the track while allowing for extreme speeds.
These sports are particularly dangerous, so designing
tracks for them requires an understanding of several laws
and principles of physics in order to make each sport as safe
as possible. The extreme physics of the tracks requires the
use of banked and pitched sides, so that centripetal forces
are large enough to keep the participants and vehicles on
the track. Minimizing friction and drag helps participants
achieve the highest speeds possible.
In addition, sports such as snowboarding, skateboarding,
and ski jumping require an understanding of projectile
motion, so that the participants land in the right places.
These sports also rely on the ability of the participant, as
well as the proper design of the equipment, machinery,
and course on which they take place.
The Task
In this Unit Task, you will design a new extreme sport
and apply the physics principles in Unit 1 to ensure that
anyone can participate in the sport reliably and safely.
You will then build a model of your sport that you can
then analyze in terms of the physics principles that you
have studied so far.
Read through the questions at the end of the Unit Task
to help you plan your procedure and presentation.
146
Unit 1 • Dynamics
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 146
Extreme Sport Design
Brainstorm ideas in a group. Your task is to come up with
a new extreme sport and then design and build a model
track, a series of obstacles, or a device that the participant
will travel across or use safely. Here are some suggestions:
• an extreme snowboarding track
• an extreme bicycle motocross or skate track
• an extreme race car track
Note how your sport uses the track, obstacles, or
device to reach high speeds and large changes in velocity
while still permitting the participant to safely complete
the course.
Once you have selected your sport and have discussed
the features it will require, you will design those features,
using the principles of physics that you have learned so
far. Before you begin construction, research the topic of
sports physics using print sources and the Internet to
understand how certain principles (acceleration, friction,
centripetal force) affect different features and challenges
of a given sport. Then have your teacher approve your
WEB LINK
sport.
Once you have collected the essential information for
your design, write a proposal describing your sport; the
design of the track, course, device, or obstacles involved;
and what the participants must achieve to successfully
and safely perform the sport. Be sure that your teacher
approves your proposal for completeness and accuracy.
Have your teacher approve your design before you begin
constructing your model. Obtain permission before using any
tools in the lab. Review safety and design rules before you
begin. Use all tools safely, and test your design in a safe and
controlled manner. Wear eye protection.
Using your approved proposal as a guide, construct a
working model based on your design. Use materials that
are easy to obtain and require readily available tools. You
could use some of the following materials:
• eye protection
• ice blocks
• marbles
• wheels
• steel ball bearings
• wire coat hangers
• cardboard tubes
• rubber tubing
• elastic bands
• paper
• tape
• staples
• glue
• wood
NEL
4/26/12 9:55 AM
Construction and Demonstration
Apply and Extend
During the construction process, test your model to be
sure it works properly, and modify it if it does not. Upon
completion of the model, test it again, and modify it as
needed until the task is successfully completed. Keep a log
or blog during this process to monitor your progress.
At this point, you are ready to analyze your model to
see how well it performs. Collect and record data (for
example, measurements of time or angle), and apply the
equations for kinematics, force, and uniform circular
motion. Determine how well your model performs.
Assess your results. Use them to improve the model.
Demonstrate your model to the class. Describe the
ideas behind the extreme sport, and share the data and
the analysis of your process. Describe how you applied
the principles of kinematics, linear dynamics, and circular
motion in your design. Mention any setbacks and changes
that you needed to make to the design and why you
needed to make them.
(h) Assess the environmental impact of your design.
What could you do to reduce the impact of your
device on the environment? T/I C A
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) Which physics principles did you use to design your
model? K/U A
(b) Briefly describe your testing procedure. T/I C A
(c) Take measurements and calculate the various
velocities and accelerations of the object tested in
your model. Estimate how friction, gravity, and
centripetal acceleration affect the object’s motion.
If your model uses projectile motion, determine the
inclination angle, maximum height, and speed of
the object. T/I A
(d) What measures did you take to ensure that the object
travelled safely from start to finish? How did these
measures change during the design and testing of
your model? How would these safety measures relate
to a full-scale version of your model? T/I C A
(e) Describe any changes you made to the design after
testing your model. Which parts of your model
worked well, and which did not? T/I C A
(f) List problems that you encountered while designing
the model. Describe how you overcame them.
T/I
C
A
(g) Create a flow chart or other graphic organizer of
the process you followed to design and build your
model. Did your final design meet your original
expectations? If you had to do this task again, how
would you change the process? What changes would
you make to your design? T/I C A
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 147
Assessment Checklist
Your completed Unit Task will be assessed according
to these criteria:
Knowledge/Understanding
■
✓ Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of velocity
and acceleration.
■
✓ Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of forces.
■
✓ Demonstrate understanding of two-dimensional motion.
■
✓ Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of uniform
circular motion, projectile motion, centripetal acceleration,
and centripetal force.
✓ Demonstrate safety skills in the laboratory.
■
Thinking/Investigation
■
✓ Investigate the relationships between velocity and
acceleration in real-life situations.
■
✓ Analyze velocities and accelerations in your model.
■
✓ Incorporate safety features in your model corresponding
to the safety features in a full-scale version of the model.
■
✓ Improve the design of your model based on testing.
■
✓ Construct a working model of an extreme-sport design.
■
✓ Evaluate the success of your model.
■
✓ Evaluate and improve your design process.
■
✓ Identify and locate relevant research sources.
■
✓ Use appropriate terminology related to dynamics.
■
✓ Express the results of any calculations involving data
accurately and precisely.
Communication
■
✓ Communicate design, procedure, and modifications in the
form of a flow chart or other graphic organizer.
■
✓ Demonstrate and explain the purpose, design, and
functionality of the model in a report and/or presentation.
■
✓ Explain the design process and various modifications of
the design in a format determined by your teacher.
■
✓ Communicate your results clearly and concisely.
Application
■
✓ Assess the cost and environmental impacts of your design.
Take into account how your design may require changes to
terrain, and how this may affect the environment.
Unit 1 Task 147
4/26/12 9:55 AM
UNIT
1
Self-qUIz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. The position–time graph shown in Figure 1 depicts
which of the following situations? (1.1) K/U
d
Position v. Time
t
Figure 1
(a) positive velocity, positive acceleration, negative
acceleration
(b) zero velocity, negative acceleration, positive
acceleration
(c) zero velocity, positive acceleration, negative
acceleration
(d) negative velocity, zero acceleration, positive
motion
2. An ice hockey player set a record speed for a slap shot:
177.58 km/h. Suppose the hockey player accelerated
the hockey puck through a distance of 1.25 m. What
was the magnitude of the acceleration? (1.2) K/U T/I A
(a) 19.7 m/s2
(b) 71.0 m/s2
(c) 973 m/s2
(d) 1260 m/s2
3. A ship sails 150.0 km [E 608 N] into Hudson Bay
from Fort Severn. The ship then changes course and
travels 350.0 km [N]. What is the total displacement
of the ship? (1.3) K/U T/I A
>
(a) Dd T 5 485.7 km [E 81.128 N]
>
(b) Dd T 5 485.7 km [E 8.7128 N]
>
(c) Dd T 5 444.4 km [E 73.008 N]
>
(d) Dd T 5 444.4 km [E 17.018 N]
4. To cross a river with a current in the least amount of
time, how should a boat point? (1.3) K/U T/I A
(a) somewhat downstream
(b) somewhat upstream
(c) directly at the opposite shore
(d) in a direction that will take the boat directly
across
148
Unit 1 • Dynamics
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 148
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
5. A helicopter moves in an arc so that its velocity
changes from 77 km/h [S] to 77 km/h [E] in 15 s.
What is the acceleration of the helicopter?
(1.4) K/U T/I A
(a) 1.4 m/s2 [W 458 S]
(b) 2.0 m/s2 [E 458 N]
(c) 5.1 m/s2 [E 458 S]
(d) 5.1 m/s2 [E 458 N]
6. A ball kicked with a speed of 12.0 m/s at an angle
of u above the horizontal lands at a distance of
14.47 m away from the kicker. The total vertical
displacement of the ball is zero. What is the value
of u? (1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) 30.08
(b) 35.08
(c) 40.08
(d) 45.08
7. A ship travelling at 39.0 km/h [N] across the
St. Lawrence Seaway encounters a current of
13.0 km/h [E 50.08 N]. What is the velocity of the
ship with respect to the shore? (1.6) K/U T/I A
(a) 48.4 km/h [E 78.18 N]
(b) 48.4 km/h [E 11.98 N]
(c) 49.7 km/h [E 80.38 N]
(d) 49.7 km/h [E 9.78 N]
8. The block in Figure 2 remains motionless against
the wall because of an applied force and the force of
static friction between the block and the wall. The
coefficient of static friction is mS. Which equation
correctly describes the magnitude of the frictional
force between the wall and the block? (2.1) K/U A
m
Fa
Figure 2
>
(a) 0 F S 0
>
(b) 0 F S 0
>
(c) 0 F S 0
>
(d) 0 F S 0
>
5 1 0 mg 0 cos u 2 mS
>
5 1 0 F a 0 sin u 2 mg2 mS
>
5 1 0 F a 0 cos u 2 mg2 mS
>
5 1 0 F a 0 cos u 2 mS
NEL
4/26/12 9:55 AM
9. A car and driver with a combined mass of 1.5 3 103 kg
experience a forward force of 7.67 3 103 N and forces
of friction and drag of 7.7 3 102 N. What is the
acceleration of the car and driver? (2.2) K/U T/I A
(a) 4.1 m/s2
(b) 4.6 m/s2
(c) 5.1 m/s2
(d) 5.6 m/s2
10. An object is pushed horizontally at a constant
velocity. What is true about the forces acting on
the object? (2.2) K/U T/I
(a) The force or forces acting forward are greater
than the force or forces acting backward.
(b) The sum of all forces is directed forward.
(c) The forces acting on the object can be said to
be “unbalanced.”
(d) The sum of all forces is zero.
11. A winch pulls a mass of 1.75 3 103 kg up a 248 slope.
Friction is negligible. What is the tension in the
winch cable? (2.3) K/U T/I A
(a) 7.0 3 103 N
(b) 9.0 3 103 N
(c) 1.6 3 104 N
(d) 1.7 3 104 N
12. A force of 1.0 3 103 N moves a heavy box up
a ramp with a 218 incline. The weight of the box is
1.69 3 103 N, and it moves up the ramp at a constant
speed. What is the coefficient of kinetic friction
between the box and the ramp? (2.4) K/U T/I A
(a) 0.02
(b) 0.25
(c) 0.48
(d) 0.71
13. An object is pulled across a rough horizontal surface
with an applied force of 300 N [408 below the
horizontal]. The applied force is slowly rotated up
toward the horizontal, decreasing the 408 angle.
What will happen to the force of friction acting
on the object and the acceleration? (2.4) K/U T/I
(a) Both increase.
(b) Both decrease.
(c) Friction decreases and acceleration increases.
(d) Friction increases and acceleration decreases.
14. For a frame of reference to be inertial, it must
(a) undergo positive acceleration
(b) undergo negative acceleration
(c) change direction without changing speed
(d) move in one direction with constant speed
(3.1) K/U
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 149
15. An object moving in a circular path with radius
0.25 m experiences a centripetal acceleration of
2.5 m/s2. What is the frequency? (3.2) K/U T/I A
(a) 0.016 Hz
(b) 0.13 Hz
(c) 0.25 Hz
(d) 0.50 Hz
16. You are spinning two identical balls attached to
strings in uniform circular motion. Ball 2 has a string
that is twice as long as the string with ball 1, and the
rotational speed of ball 2 is three times the rotational
speed of ball 1. What is the ratio of the centripetal
force of ball 2 to that of ball 1? (3.3) K/U
3
(a)
4
3
(b)
2
9
(c)
4
9
(d)
2
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
17. A straight line on a position–time graph indicates
that the acceleration is zero. (1.1) K/U
18. The variables in the kinematics equation
>
> >
1 >
>
>
Dd 5 viDt 1 a 1Dt2 2 are Dd , vi , and a . (1.2) K/U
2
19. The magnitude of the average velocity is always
greater than or equal to the average speed in two
dimensions. (1.4) K/U
20. The time of flight for a projectile fired horizontally from
a given height equals the time it takes for the same
projectile to fall vertically from the same height. (1.5) K/U
21. An FBD shows only the forces acting on an object or
a group of objects. (2.1) K/U
22. According to Newton’s third law, the action force
occurs first, causing an equal and opposite reaction
force. (2.2) K/U
23. For any two materials, the coefficient of static friction
is greater than or equal to the coefficient of kinetic
friction. (2.4) K/U
24. For the apparent weight of a passenger in an elevator
to equal zero, the elevator must accelerate upward at
9.8 m/s2. (3.1) K/U
25. The tension acting on a horizontal string swinging
a ball around in a horizontal circle on a frictionless
>
v2
surface is F T 5 m [toward the centre of the circle].
r
(3.2, 3.3) K/U
26. In a centrifuge, the walls of the test tubes provide the
centripetal force. (3.4) K/U
Unit 1 Self-Quiz 149
4/26/12 9:55 AM
UNIT
1
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
d
d
1. Which of the position–time graphs in Figure 1
depicts motion due to a constant negative
acceleration? (1.1) K/U T/I
0
0
(a)
(c)
d
d
t
0
(b)
2. You drop a stone from a cliff. Which equation
describes the displacement of the stone? (1.2)
1
(a) Ddy 5 2 g 1Dt2 2
2
1
(b) Ddy 5 g 1Dt2 2 1 vi y Dt
2
(c) Ddy 5 vi y Dt
Fa
A
Application
FS
Fa
Fg
Fg
(c)
(a)
K/U
FN
FN
Fg
Fg
FS
Fa
v 2iy
2g
3. A student walks 50.0 m [W 60.08 N]. Which pair of
displacements equals the east–west and north–south
displacements? (1.3) K/U T/I A
(a) 30.0 m [W], 40.0 m [N]
(b) 40.0 m [W], 30.0 m [N]
(c) 25.0 m [W], 43.3 m [N]
(d) 43.3 m [W], 25.0 m [N]
4. A train approaches a rail yard with a velocity of
18 m/s [W]. After 95 s, the train has a velocity
of 7.0 m/s [W]. What is the average acceleration
of the train? (1.4) T/I A
(a) 0.12 m/s2 [W]
(b) 0.12 m/s2 [E]
(c) 0.26 m/s2 [W]
(d) 0.26 m/s2 [E]
Unit 1 • Dynamics
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 150
Communication
t
(d)
(d) Ddy 5
C
5. A plane travelling at 192 km/h [S] is blown eastward by
a wind with a speed of 56.0 km/h. What is the velocity
of the plane with respect to the ground? (1.6) K/U T/I A
(a) 1.36 3 102 km/h [E 16.38 S]
(b) 2.00 3 102 km/h [E 73.78 S]
(c) 2.00 3 102 km/h [N 73.78 E]
(d) 2.48 3 102 km/h [E 73.78 S]
6. A mover attempts to pull a washing machine away
from the wall. A force of static friction acts in the
opposite direction of the applied force. The applied
force is parallel to the level ground. Identify the FBD
in Figure 2 that correctly depicts the forces acting on
the machine. (2.1) K/U T/I A
FS
Figure 1
150
Thinking/Investigation
FN
0
t
t
T/I
(b)
(d)
Figure 2
7. Which of the following describes a situation
explained by Newton’s third law? (2.2) K/U
(a) a person pushes left on a wall while the wall
pushes right on a person
(b) clothes in a washing machine moving to the edge
of the drum during the spin cycle
(c) a spacecraft moving far from any massive bodies
(d) a car accelerating forward by an amount equal to
the ratio of the net forward force and the mass of
the car
NEL
4/26/12 9:55 AM
8. A skier with mass m slides down a slope that makes
an incline of u with the horizontal. Which expression
describes the component of the force of gravity
parallel to the slope? (2.3) K/U T/I A
(a) mg
(b) mg sin u
(c) mg cos u
(d) mg tan u
9. The coefficient of static friction between a heavy
box and a ramp is 0.45. The weight of the box is
1.2 3 103 N, and the ramp has an incline of 168.
What minimum force is needed for the box to
overcome the force of static friction? (2.4) K/U T/I A
(a) 1.9 3 102 N
(b) 3.8 3 102 N
(c) 5.2 3 102 N
(d) 7.4 3 102 N
10. Which of the following best describes a fictitious
force? (3.1) K/U
(a) an apparent force used to explain the motion of
objects within an inertial frame of reference
(b) an apparent force used to explain the motion of
objects within a non-inertial frame of reference
(c) a real force that appears to act in the opposite
direction because of the motion of the frame
of reference
(d) a force that is imaginary when observed in a
non-inertial frame of reference but real when
observed in an inertial frame of reference
11. What provides the centripetal force for a car moving
around in a circle on a banked curve covered with
very slippery ice? (3.3) K/U A
(a) friction between the tires and banked curve
(b) the horizontal component of the normal force
(c) the vertical component of the normal force
(d) the weight of the car
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
12. Acceleration always occurs in the same direction as
the motion of the object. (1.1) K/U
13. Use the equation v 2f 5 v 2i 1 2aDd when you know
the changes in distance and speed, and acceleration is
constant. (1.2) K/U
14. The force of gravity affects only the vertical
component of the velocity of a projectile and not the
horizontal component of the velocity. (1.5) K/U
15. To cross a river as quickly as possible, the velocity
of the boat relative to the water should be directed
upstream. (1.6) K/U
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 151
>
16. A boat travels with velocity vBR with respect to a river.
>
The river moves with velocity vRS with respect to the
shore. The equation that describes the boat’s velocity
>
>
>
with respect to the shore is therefore vBS 5 vBR 2 vRS.
(1.6) K/U
17. In the process of determining the net force on an
object, you can first separate all the forces acting
on the object into x- and y-components, and then
add components as vectors to obtain the x- and
y-components of the net force. (2.1) K/U
18. An object is in a state of equilibrium when the net
force acting on it is zero. (2.3) K/U
19. Static friction resists the motion of an object as long
as the applied force is larger than the force of static
friction. (2.4) K/U
20. For an object kept in a circular path, the centripetal
acceleration increases with the period of revolution.
(3.2) K/U
21. Objects move in uniform circular motion because
they are acted on by a force that points toward the
centre of the circular motion. (3.3) K/U
Match each term on the left with the most appropriate
description on the right.
22. (a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
acceleration
inertia
kinetic friction
static friction
equilibrium
inertial frame of
reference
non-inertial
frame of reference
centrifugal force
linear actuator
centripetal
acceleration
a t rest or moving
with constant velocity
(ii) fictitious force
(iii) undergoes
acceleration
(iv) directed toward the
centre of a circular
path
(v) converts energy into
linear motion
(vi) the difference between
two velocities divided
by an interval of time
(vii) resists the motion of
a sliding mass
(viii) proportional to an
object’s mass
(ix) net force is zero
(x) keeps objects from
slipping on surfaces
(i)
(1.3, 1.4, 2.2, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.4)
K/U
Unit 1 Review 151
4/26/12 9:55 AM
Write a short answer to each question.
23. What must be true about the average velocity of an
object when the position–time graph for the object is
a straight line with a negative slope? (1.1) K/U C
24. What must be true about the average acceleration
of an object when the position–time graph for
the object is a straight line with a positive slope?
(1.1) K/U C
25. Describe how the position of a freely falling object
changes with time. (1.1, 1.2) K/U C
26. Determine the acceleration of a drag racer who
starts at rest and reaches a speed of 39.6 m/s in
1.2 s. (1.2) K/U T/I A
27. Identify the condition that must be satisfied when
using the kinematics equations. (1.2) K/U
28. When solving problems related to vector addition,
what are the advantages and disadvantages of using
the cosine and sine laws compared to the component
method of vector addition? (1.3) K/U
29. Write the expression for the magnitude of a vector
displacement in terms of its horizontal and vertical
components. (1.3) K/U
30. Explain why average speed can be larger than average
velocity. (1.4) K/U C
31. How would you modify the equation for projectile
motion with a non-horizontal initial velocity to
obtain the equation for projectile motion with a
horizontal initial velocity? (1.5) K/U
32. One student kicks a ball from 30.0 cm above the
ground with an initial speed of 8.0 m/s, at an angle
of 558 above the horizontal. Shortly after, another
student catches the ball at 30.0 cm above the ground.
Write the equation for the horizontal range the ball
has travelled. (1.5) K/U T/I A
33. A plane drops a crate of parts for use by technicians
on the ground. Unfortunately, the parachute fails to
open. (1.6) K/U C A
(a) Describe where the plane is with respect to the
crate at the moment it lands.
(b) Describe the path of the crate as observed from
the cargo hatch of the plane.
34. A plane travels into a headwind. In terms of vectors,
describe how to determine the relative velocity of the
plane with respect to the ground. (1.6) K/U C A
35. A train passes by a platform. To a passenger at rest
on the train, objects on the platform appear to be
moving south at 72 km/h. What is the velocity of the
train? (1.6) K/U A
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Unit 1 • Dynamics
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 152
36. The car in Figure 3 is in a state of equilibrium on a
frictionless surface. The cable is parallel to the incline.
(2.1) K/U A
FN
Fg
Figure 3
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
(a) Write an expression for the tension in the cable.
(b) Write an expression for the normal force acting
on the car.
(c) What will happen to each force acting on the
car if the steepness of the incline is gradually
decreased? Explain your reasoning.
Define inertia. (2.2) K/U
When you push against a heavy object, what evidence
is there of Newton’s third law? (2.2) K/U
Explain what must be true for the forces on an object
to be in a state of equilibrium. (2.3) K/U
Suppose you attach a wooden ball with a weight of
1.0 N to a string. A wind exerts a horizontal force
of 4.0 N on the ball, producing a tension in the string.
Determine the magnitude of the tension. (2.3) K/U T/I A
Explain why a car jack (Figure 4) is a mechanical
linear actuator. (2.5) K/U A
Figure 4
42. Identify three things in Figure 5 that help make the
skier complete the race faster. (2.6) K/U
Figure 5
43. In a Venn diagram, compare inertial and non-inertial
frames of reference. (3.1) K/U C
44. Describe the conditions under which you can observe
fictitious forces. (3.1) K/U
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4/26/12 9:55 AM
45. Describe how centripetal acceleration varies with
distance from the centre of the circular path. (3.2) K/U
46. Describe two examples of centripetal force that hold
a car on a curved stretch of road. (3.3) K/U C
47. A car moves in a circular track with an initial speed
of 7.5 m/s. The car accelerates to a speed of 15 m/s.
By how much does the centripetal force that keeps
the car in the circular path change? (3.3) K/U C A
48. A disc-shaped space station rotates to produce
artificial gravity. Write the equation that relates the
radius of the station to the speed of rotation needed
to produce the same gravitational force as on Earth’s
surface. (3.4) K/U T/I C
Understanding
49. Provide an example for each condition below. (1.1) K/U A
(a) negative velocity with positive acceleration
(b) negative displacement with zero acceleration
(c) negative displacement with positive acceleration
(d) positive velocity with negative acceleration
50. You walk 1.3 km to the store and then return home.
The entire trip takes 40.0 min, ignoring the time
spent shopping. (1.1) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine your total displacement, and explain
how you obtained this result.
(b) Determine your average speed, in kilometres per
hour, and explain how you obtained this result.
(c) Determine your average velocity, in kilometres
per hour, and explain how you obtained this result.
51. A rock falls off a cliff on the Moon. (1.2) K/U A
(a) Identify how the motion of the rock differs from
the motion of a rock falling from a cliff on Earth.
(b) Identify how the motion of the rock is similar to
the motion of a rock falling from a cliff on Earth.
52. Describe the method for algebraically determining
the sum of two vectors. (1.3) K/U C A
53. Suppose that you have the vector displacement
information for the two-dimensional motion of a
train. (1.4) K/U C A
(a) Explain how you would calculate the average
velocity of the train.
(b) Explain how you would calculate the average
speed of the train.
54. A moon orbits a planet in a circular orbit so that its
velocity along the circular path changes continuously
with time. (1.4, 3.2) K/U C A
(a) Does the force of gravity act perpendicular or
parallel to the moon’s velocity? Explain.
(b) Explain how the force of gravity changes the
moon’s velocity.
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 153
55. Write the projectile motion equation for the magnitude
of vertical displacement in each situation. (1.5) K/U A
(a) A rock thrown upward from the edge of a high
cliff with a speed of vi and at an angle u from the
horizontal falls toward a canyon floor.
(b) A rock kicked horizontally with a speed of vi from
the edge of a high cliff falls toward a canyon floor.
(c) A rock dropped from the edge of a high cliff falls
toward a canyon floor.
56. If you row a small boat or raft horizontally across
a river, the current of the river displaces you
downstream by a certain distance. Indicate how the
various sides of a right triangle relate to the vectors
of relative motion in this situation. (1.6) K/U A
57. A plane flies due north into a wind that is directed
288 south of east. The speed of the plane is
3.6 3 102 km/h with respect to the air, and the
speed of the wind is 75 km/h with respect to the
ground. Describe how to express the relative motion
of the plane with respect to the ground. Then show
the equations. (1.6) K/U T/I C A
58. A student is pushing a heavy box up a ramp with a
158 incline. The box is speeding up as it moves up
the ramp. A small force of friction opposes the force
applied by the student. (2.1) K/U C A
(a) Draw an FBD for the box.
(b) Identify the direction of the net force acting on
the box.
59. Describe the procedure for determining the net force
on an object, starting with drawing an FBD. (2.1) K/U C
60. Workers lift a piano from street level to the top floor
of a building using cables and pulleys. At one point,
the piano is at rest. Summarize how to calculate the
tension in the cables at this point using vectors and
Newton’s first and second laws. (2.3) K/U C A
61. Distinguish between the two kinds of frictional
forces. (2.4) K/U
62. An elevator rises from the ground floor of a tall
building to the top floor. Describe how the upward
acceleration of the elevator affects the apparent weight
of the passengers. (3.1) K/U A
63. You are riding on a bus. During your trip, you place
a heavy book on the floor. When the bus turns right
at a constant speed, the book slides to the left side
of the bus. (3.1) K/U C A
(a) Describe how the book’s motion provides an
example of a fictitious force in a non-inertial
frame of reference.
(b) Suppose the book did not slide but remained in
its original position on the floor. How would this
demonstrate the existence of a centripetal force?
Unit 1 Review 153
4/26/12 9:55 AM
69. The velocity–time graph in Figure 7 shows the
change in velocity for a truck. (1.1) K/U T/I A
d (m [W])
200
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
150
100
75.
50
0
0
5
t (s)
10
Figure 6
(a) From the graph, estimate the total displacement
of the car.
(b) From the graph, estimate the average velocity of
the car.
154
Unit 1 • Dynamics
8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 154
15
10
5
0
5
t (s)
10
Figure 7
Position v. Time
250
20
0
Analysis and Application
68. The position–time graph in Figure 6 describes the
westward motion of a car. (1.1) K/U T/I A
Velocity v. Time
25
v (m/s [W])
64. For an object moving in a circular path, distinguish
between the behaviour of centripetal acceleration and
acceleration along the direction of motion. (3.2) K/U C
65. List three examples in which centripetal forces affect
the motion of an object. (3.3) K/U
66. A spacecraft moves with constant speed in a circular
orbit around a planet. Then the spacecraft accelerates
in the direction it is moving. Arrange the statements
below in the correct order to explain why the distance
of the spacecraft from the planet must increase in
order to remain in a circular orbit. (3.3) K/U C A
(a) The centripetal force is provided by gravity, which
depends on mass and distance.
(b) To offset the increase in speed, the distance must
also increase.
(c) An acceleration in the direction the spacecraft is
moving means that the spacecraft is increasing
in speed.
(d) The masses of both the spacecraft and the planet
are constant, so the distance from the planet
must change.
67. A cylindrical spacecraft rotates around its axis.
(3.4) K/U C A
(a) Explain how rotating a spacecraft produces
artificial gravity.
(b) Explain how the spacecraft could be used
to simulate the gravity an astronaut would
experience on Earth.
76.
(a) At what point is the instantaneous velocity of the
truck equal to the average velocity?
(b) Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of
the truck from the graph in Figure 7.
A race car begins accelerating at a constant rate. In
25 s, the race car travels 7.8 3 102 m. Determine the
magnitude of the acceleration. (1.2) K/U T/I A
A sprinter accelerates at a constant rate of 4.8 m/s2
during the first 10.0 m of a 100.0 m event. Determine
the runner’s speed at the end of the first 10.0 m
of the race. (1.2) K/U T/I A
A parachutist falling at a terminal velocity of
50.0 m/s [down] opens her parachute. At that
point a net acceleration of about 12.5 m/s2 [up]
reduces her velocity to about 10.0 m/s [down].
Calculate the time over which this acceleration
takes place. (1.2) K/U T/I A
A student throws a ball vertically upward. It takes
the ball 0.50 s to come to a stop and another 0.50 s
to return to the student. The maximum height of the
ball is 1.225 m. Calculate the initial speed with which
the student threw the ball. (1.2) K/U T/I A
A student walks across a field with a displacement of
125 m [E 60.08 N]. Determine the components of the
displacement. (1.3) K/U T/I A
A sailboat first sails 125 km [E], then 85.0 km
[E 45.08 N], and finally 94.0 km [S]. The voyage
takes place in 6.75 h. (1.3) K/U T/I A
(a) Use addition of vector components to determine
the total displacement of the sailboat.
(b) Calculate the average velocity of the sailboat.
(c) Calculate the average speed of the sailboat.
An airplane with an initial velocity of 65 m/s [S] turns
until its velocity after 15 s is 75 m/s [E]. Calculate the
average acceleration of the airplane. (1.4) K/U T/I A
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77. The Cap aux Diamants is a high bluff overlooking
the St. Lawrence River at Québec City, rising about
98 m above the river. Suppose you launch a projectile
horizontally over the river from the bluff with an
initial speed of 2.9 3 102 m/s. (1.5) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the time it takes for the projectile to land.
(b) Calculate the range of the projectile, in kilometres.
78. For the same bluff as in Question 77, make the
following assumptions: the terrain south and
southeast of the Cap aux Diamants has the same level
as the river, the initial speed of the projectile is 290 m/s,
and the projectile launcher points up at an angle of
248 above the horizontal. (1.5) K/U T/I C A
(a) Calculate the time of flight for the projectile.
(b) Calculate the range of the projectile, in kilometres.
(c) What would the range be if you set the angle of the
projectile launcher at 458 above the horizontal?
(d) Consider the range equation when the net
vertical displacement is zero. Explain why your
answer to (c) equals the greatest possible range
for the given initial speed of the projectile.
79. Consider an airplane that travels at 800.0 km/h [E]
against a wind with a velocity of 75.0 km/h [W 30.08 S].
(1.6) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the speed of the plane with respect to
the ground.
(b) Calculate how many kilometres south of its due
east course the plane would be displaced after
3.0 h of flight.
80. A student paddles a canoe with a speed of 5.0 m/s
relative to the river. The river has a current that
moves south with a speed of 3.0 m/s. Determine the
time it takes the student to travel 4.0 km upstream
and then 5.0 km downstream. (1.6) K/U T/I A
81. An applied force pulls a car up an inclined plane
that has an angle of 258. The weight of the car is
6.8 3 103 N. (2.1) K/U T/I C A
(a) Draw an FBD of the car.
(b) Calculate the magnitude of the minimum applied
force required to pull the car up the incline.
82. A space probe far from any planets and stars requires
a force of 1.2 3 103 N to accelerate at 2.4 m/s2.
Determine the force needed to accelerate the
probe at the same rate away from Earth’s surface.
(2.2) K/U T/I A
83. Two ice skaters, one with a mass of 57 kg and the
other with a mass of 75 kg, stand facing each other
on the surface of a frozen pond. One of the skaters
exerts a 135 N force against the other. Calculate
the magnitude of the acceleration of each skater.
(2.2) K/U T/I A
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 155
84. Two heavy crates, m1 and m2, lie on different inclines
with angles 18.08 and 33.08, respectively (Figure 8).
A cable, which runs over a pulley, connects the crates.
The masses of the cable and the pulley are negligible.
Assume that each incline is frictionless and that
the system is in equilibrium. The mass of m1 is
4.26 3 102 kg. (2.3) K/U T/I A
m1
18.0°
m2
33.0°
Figure 8
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
(a) Determine the tension in the cable.
(b) Calculate the mass of m2 needed to keep the
system in a state of equilibrium.
(c) Now suppose that the mass of m1 is 4.26 3 102 kg,
and the mass of m2 is 1.95 3 102 kg. The crates
move to the left. The angles of the inclines and
all other conditions are the same. Determine the
magnitude of the acceleration of the crates.
You are helping a friend move, and you need to load
a 2.65 3 102 kg box of books. You slide the box up a
ramp, which has an incline of 30.08 and a coefficient
of static friction of 0.45. You apply the force on the
box at an angle of 39.08 with respect to the ramp.
(2.4) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the minimum force needed to slide the
box up the ramp.
(b) Now you want to stop halfway up the ramp.
What coefficient of static friction must exist
between the box and the ramp for the box to
stay in place?
An elevator accelerates upward in 3.4 s to a final
speed of 7.4 m/s. Determine the apparent weight
of a passenger with a mass of 56 kg. (3.1) K/U T/I A
Suppose Earth turned with a greater rotation speed.
Determine what the period of rotation, in hours, must
be for the centripetal acceleration to equal g. The radius
at Earth’s equator is 6.378 3 103 km. (3.2) K/U T/I A
A skilled skateboarder can do a loop-the-loop.
A concrete vertical-loop track has a radius of
6.53 m. Determine the minimum speed needed
for the skateboarder to remain on the track when
upside down. (3.2) K/U T/I A
A cylindrical space station has a radius of 57 m.
The rotation produces artificial gravity equal to 90.0 %
of the gravity on Earth’s surface. (3.2, 3.4) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the centripetal acceleration along the
wall of the station.
(b) Determine the period of rotation of the station.
Unit 1 Review 155
4/26/12 9:55 AM
90. A way to test the tensile strength of a wire is to
place a mass at the end of it and spin the mass with
uniform circular motion. The speed at which the wire
breaks is a measure of its strength. The maximum
frequency of rotation before a certain wire breaks is
22.5 Hz. The wire is 51.5 cm long and has a mass of
0.656 kg. (3.3) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the speed with which the mass moves.
(b) Calculate the centripetal force acting on the wire.
91. Humans can endure accelerations over 45 times as
great as g. One of the main ways of testing human
endurance of these accelerations was the “human
centrifuge,” the first of which was built by the U.S.
Navy in 1950 and operated by them from 1950 through
1996. This device consisted of a large metal sphere in
which the subject sat. This sphere connected to the end
of a 15.2 m metal arm, which rotated rapidly to create
accelerations as great as 40g. Calculate the maximum
rotational speed of the centrifuge. (3.4) K/U T/I A
92. A clothoid loop of a roller coaster is 40.0 m high with
a radius of curvature of 10.0 m at the top. Assume
that a cart rolls around the inside of the loop with
nothing holding it onto the track. (3.5) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the minimum speed of the cart at the top
of the clothoid loop?
(b) What is the minimum speed of the cart on a
circular loop of the same height?
(c) Explain why modern roller coasters often have
clothoid loops instead of circular loops.
Evaluation
93. As straightforward as the algebraic component method
is for adding vectors, it can become very involved if you
have more than three vectors to add. Propose how you
could program a computer, an electronic spreadsheet, or a
calculator to determine the total displacement for
a set of 20 ordered displacement vectors. Identify what
each step of the program would do. (1.3) K/U T/I C
94. Traction between tires and the road is critical for
automobile safety and efficiency. Suppose a road
surface provides, by means of static friction, an
average acceleration of 6.37 m/s2. A car travelling
at 35.0 m/s around a circular segment of highway
changes its direction by 458. (1.4) K/U T/I A
(a) Using the equation that defines average
acceleration and noting that only the direction
changes, calculate the minimum time it takes for
the driver to follow the curve without skidding.
(b) Suppose the road is a complete circular track.
Calculate the minimum time in which the driver
could complete the circle once without skidding.
(c) From your answer to (b), determine the radius of
the circular track.
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Unit 1 • Dynamics
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95. There are a number of things to consider when designing
a building. List three forces that you need to anticipate
before designing a building. Draw an FBD of a tall
apartment building, showing as many of these forces as
possible acting on the structure. (2.1) K/U T/I C A
96. Before they were decommissioned, the NASA space
shuttles required two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) to
launch the shuttle from Earth’s surface. Both SRBs
produced 2.5 3 107 N at liftoff. The combined mass of
a shuttle and rocket boosters was about 2.0 3 106 kg.
(2.2) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the net acceleration of a space shuttle
and rockets at the time of liftoff.
(b) Calculate, in kilometres per hour, the speed of the
shuttle and rockets after 5.0 s.
(c) Calculate, in kilometres per hour, the speed of
the shuttle and rockets after 15 s. (Note that the
speed is actually greater because of the increase in
thrust shortly after takeoff and reduced mass due
to spent fuel.)
97. Pick one everyday activity that involves motion and
forces, for example, cycling, running, or driving.
(2.2, 2.3) K/U T/I C A
(a) Describe the fundamentals of the activity using
Newton’s laws.
(b) Using examples, describe how Newton’s laws have
changed the way you think about this activity.
98. A block and tackle is a combination of pulleys
and rope that makes it easier to lift heavy objects
(Figure 9). As the number of pulleys in the block
and tackle increases, the force needed to raise a
given weight is reduced. However, the length of rope
needed to raise the object increases in proportion to
the amount that the applied force decreases. Suppose
a worker lifts a 2.5 3 103 N crate 22 m to the top of a
building. The worker pulls 88 m of rope to raise the
crate completely. (2.3) K/U T/I A
Figure 9
(a) Determine the force the worker exerts on
the rope.
(b) What is the tension in each segment of rope
in the block and tackle?
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4/26/12 9:55 AM
99. The alloy aluminum magnesium boride (called BAM)
has one of the lowest coefficients of friction: 0.02.
A ramp with a 30.08 incline has a BAM coating.
A box with a mass of 122 kg slides down the ramp.
(2.4) K/U T/I A
(a) Calculate the acceleration of the box.
(b) How does this value compare to the acceleration
of the box if the ramp were truly frictionless?
100. While it is fairly easy to imagine a non-inertial frame
of reference, it is much more difficult to visualize a
true inertial frame. Think about the requirement for
a frame of reference to obey the law of inertia. Then
describe how objects would appear and behave in that
frame of reference. (3.1) K/U T/I C A
101. In a graphic organizer, organize the following
statements to justify why launching rockets near the
equator is more advantageous than launching them at
latitudes far from the equator. (3.3) K/U T/I C A
• An object’s apparent weight is less at the equator
than at the poles (where it is greatest).
• The maximum rotational motion at the equator
gives rockets a boost if they are launched in an
orbit that moves with Earth (that is, eastward).
• Gravity must provide more of the centripetal force
at the equator than anywhere else on Earth’s surface.
• At Earth’s equator, the velocity of uniform circular
motion is greatest.
• The lower apparent weight makes it easier to rise
against Earth’s gravity.
Reflect on Your Learning
102. How did the information you learned in this unit
affect your thinking about the directions of the vectors
for displacement, velocity, and acceleration? Describe
in your own words how these three properties of
motion can point in different directions. K/U T/I C
103. How did your study of forces help you understand how
objects move or do not move? For the various objects
around you—your computer, a table or desk, anything
that you can move from one place to another—ask
yourself, “What forces act on that?” Try to explain
these forces in terms of Newton’s three laws of motion.
In particular, think of how the various forces interact
according to Newton’s third law. K/U T/I C
104. What new perspective on the motion of objects did
your studies of relative motion and projectile motion
give you? Consider why relative motion is important
when launching rockets and probes for space
exploration. Why does the fact that planets and other
bodies in the solar system move with respect to each
other make it necessary to apply concepts of relative
motion? K/U T/I C A
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8160_CH03_p135-157.indd 157
105. After completing this unit, how does your
understanding of dynamics relate to your understanding
of how technologies use dynamics? K/U T/I C
106. How did your learning in this unit connect to your
prior studies in dynamics? K/U T/I C
Research
WEB LINK
107. Research the manoeuvres, or “tricks,” used by
skateboarders and how they relate to the physics of
motion and forces. See how some of the basic tricks,
such as an Ollie, a frontside 180, or a 360 flip, are done
and how skateboarders use forces to make them happen.
Note also how skateboard design makes tricks easier or
possible. Compile your results and present them to your
class as an oral report or visual presentation. K/U T/I C A
108. Research drag racing, noting how the performance
of drag racers differs from the performance of other
racers and sports cars. Find out what features of
drag racers affect their ability to accelerate, and learn
how changes over the past several decades have
led to greater accelerations. Examine the physics of
drag racing in terms of kinematics, Newton’s second
law, the weight and normal force of the racer, and
the coefficients of friction between pavement and
different types of tires. Present your findings to your
class orally. K/U T/I C A
109. Research the substance aluminum magnesium boride
(BAM). Learn about the properties of this ceramic, in
particular, its low coefficient of friction for both static
and kinetic cases and its extreme hardness. Examine
the results of early tests on this material, and evaluate
applications of BAM to moving parts subjected to
extreme mechanical forces and wear from friction.
Choose a format to present your findings. K/U T/I C A
110. Research “pop bottle” rockets. How do you make one?
How does a pop bottle rocket use the principles of
motion? K/U C
111. Research Elizabeth MacGill, and describe some of her
contributions. K/U T/I C
112. Oscar Pistorius, also known as the blade runner, is a
double-leg amputee. He was the first amputee to win
an able-bodied world track medal in 2011. K/U T/I C
(a) Research the athletic accomplishments of
Oscar Pistorius.
(b) Why is there some controversy surrounding his
artificial legs?
(c) What possible ethical questions does it raise to
allow a person with artificial limbs to compete
against those without artificial limbs?
(d) In your opinion, should people with artificial limbs
be allowed to compete against those without?
Write a paragraph defending your position.
Unit 1 Review 157
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UNIT
2
Energy and Momentum
ovErall
EXpEctatIons
• analyze, and propose ways to improve,
technologies or procedures that
apply principles related to energy
and momentum, and assess the
social and environmental impact of
these technologies or procedures
• investigate, in qualitative and
quantitative terms, through
laboratory inquiry or computer
simulation, the relationship between
the laws of conservation of energy
and conservation of momentum,
and solve related problems
• demonstrate an understanding of
work, energy, momentum, and the
laws of conservation of energy and
conservation of momentum, in one
and two dimensions
BIg IDEas
• Energy and momentum are conserved
in all interactions.
• Interactions involving the laws
of conservation of energy and
conservation of momentum can be
analyzed mathematically.
• Technological applications that
involve energy and momentum can
affect society and the environment
in positive and negative ways.
UNIT TASK PrEvIEw
In this Unit Task, you will design either a safety device to protect
a fragile object or a machine that does a simple task in a
complicated way. The Unit Task is described in detail on page 270.
As you work through the unit, look for Unit Task Bookmarks to see
how information in the section relates to the Unit Task.
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Unit 2 • Energy and Momentum
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Focus on STSE
Innovations in Energy Technology
Society uses an enormous amount of energy to do its work. Power companies and other
commercial energy providers give us easy access to needed energy. They extract this
energy from many different sources, including natural sources such as falling water, wind,
and sunlight, and induced sources such as burning coal and nuclear fission.
Energy providers do not create energy. They convert certain forms of energy into other
more useful forms. The image on these pages shows Niagara Falls, over which almost
2 000 000 L of water flows every second. The water drops over 52 m, or almost the height
of a 20-storey building. Hydroelectric power plants on the Niagara River use some of the
energy of the flowing water to supply one-quarter of Ontario’s power needs.
For many years, our society has used fossil fuels to meet most of our energy needs.
We now face problems as these non-renewable resources dwindle and the environmental impact of their use becomes clear. Coal-fired power plants, for example, use the
thermal energy of combusting coal to create electricity. Coal mining, however, produces
poisonous chemicals such as sulfuric acid, while coal combustion releases greenhouse
gases such as sulfur dioxide. As a result of these concerns, scientists and engineers have
begun to study alternative energy sources more seriously to find clean, inexpensive, and
renewable forms of energy.
Humans have used hydro power since ancient times. In 1881, the world’s first hydroelectric power plant opened at Niagara Falls. Current technology, however, allows us
to extract more energy than ever before from a growing assortment of water sources.
Developing technology will also allow us to extract more energy while having fewer negative effects on the natural environment of the sources. For instance, new innovations in
hydroelectric power allow us to harness energy from ocean tides, currents, and waves,
and even from the difference in temperature between deep and surface ocean water.
Work, energy, and the physics of collisions are important concepts related to energy
production. Scientists and engineers must understand these concepts to make innovations in energy technology. In this unit, you will learn about these concepts and the role
they play in society’s production and use of energy.
Questions
1. What forms of energy are present in Niagara Falls?
2. Is Niagara Falls a source of renewable energy? Explain your answer.
3. Do you think Niagara Falls is a sustainable energy source? Explain your thinking.
4. How does hydroelectricity compare with other sources of energy used by society?
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Focus on STSE 159
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2
Are you ready?
Concepts
•
•
•
•
•
•
Skills
energy transformations
Newton’s laws of motion
acceleration
forces
friction
vector and scalar quantities
Concepts Review
drawing and interpreting graphs
drawing and interpreting free-body diagrams
solving problems using algebraic equations
identifying and analyzing social and environmental issues
related to the use of energy
Skills Review
1. Describe an energy transformation that can be used to
produce electrical energy. K/U C
2. Describe the energy transformations that occur when
an airplane takes off. K/U C
3. Briefly state Newton’s three laws of motion. Then, give
a specific example that illustrates each law. K/U C
4. A worker moves a box with mass m along a warehouse
floor (Figure 1). What variables determine the amount
of work done on the box by the worker? Be specific in
your answer. K/U
m
Figure 1
5. Explain why it is important to consider the effect of
friction when examining the forces that act on an
object. K/U C
6. Airbags are a type of safety device installed in vehicles to
protect passengers from injury in a collision. T/I C A
(a) Explain how energy transformations are used in
airbags to protect passengers from injury during a
collision.
(b) What are some of the limitations of airbags as a
safety device?
160 Unit 2 • Energy and Momentum
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 160
•
•
•
•
7. Figure 2 is a velocity–time graph of a falling brick.
Determine the acceleration of the brick at
t 5 3.0 s. K/U T/I
t (s)
0
v (m/s)
unit
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Figure 2
8. Draw a free-body diagram for each object in italics in
the sentences below. K/U T/I C
(a) A cellphone lies at rest on a countertop.
(b) A skydiver whose parachute has opened falls toward
the ground with constant speed. Assume there is
no wind.
(c) A box of books is pushed up a rough inclined ramp.
(d) A sports car travelling at a constant speed makes
a banked turn on an icy (frictionless) highway
exit ramp.
9. You push a small cup of water across a table with
a force of 5.5 N. The force of friction on the cup is
4.0 N. K/U T/I C
(a) Draw a free-body diagram of the cup.
(b) Calculate the net force on the cup.
10. Explain the difference between vector and scalar
quantities. K/U C
11. Solve the equation 3x 2 17 5 x2 2 27 for x. T/I
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12. Write the proportionality statement relating the
variables that are defined in italics, and sketch the
corresponding graph for each case. K/U T/I
(a) The gravitational potential energy of a person
walking up a flight of stairs doubles when the
height of the stairs doubles.
(b) The kinetic energy of a vehicle depends on the
square of its speed.
(c) The acceleration of a particle triples as the applied
force increases by a factor of three.
13. Calculate the magnitude and sign of the x-component
and y-component of the force shown in each part of
Figure 3. K/U T/I
y
10 N
14. Your class is investigating how the speed of a mass
when it hits the floor depends on the distance from
which it is dropped. What safety precautions would
you follow for this investigation? T/I C A
15. Compare the costs and benefits of operating a laptop
computer using its battery versus using an electrical
outlet. Include at least one social impact, one
environmental impact, and one economic impact
in your response. T/I C A
16. A digital balance scale is often used to measure the
mass of an object (Figure 4). K/U T/I C
(a) Describe how to calibrate the scale using a set
of reference masses.
(b) Explain why you should check that the scale is
calibrated before measuring the mass of any object
in an investigation.
(c) What other sources of error should you minimize
when attempting to determine an object’s mass?
x
(a)
y
x
50°
10 N
(b)
Figure 4
y
CAREER PATHWAYS Preview
x
10 N
(c)
Figure 3
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Throughout this unit, you will see Career Links. Go to the Nelson
Science website to find information about careers related to Energy
and Momentum. On the Chapter Summary page at the end of each
chapter, you will find a Career Pathways feature that shows you
the educational requirements of the careers. There are also some
career-related questions for you to research.
Are You Ready? 161
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chaptEr
4
work and Energy
How Can understanding work and Energy
Improve our Quality of life?
kEy concEpts
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• explain the concepts of work,
energy, friction, and the
work–energy theorem
• explain the concepts of
gravitational potential energy,
conservation of energy, Hooke’s
law, elastic potential energy,
and simple harmonic motion
and solve related problems in
one and two dimensions
• describe technological
applications involving energy
and explain how they can affect
society and the environment
• analyze the relationship between
the work–energy theorem and the
law of conservation of energy
and solve related problems in
one and two dimensions
Energy is such a central part of our lives that we tend to use it without
thinking about it. Energy allows us to travel long distances in a short time,
communicate with others around the world, enjoy movies and games, and
stay comfortable during the changing seasons. Life would be quite different
without the scientific and technological advances that apply energy to our
advantage. To understand the role of energy in our everyday lives, it is important to grasp basic energy concepts.
Energy takes many forms and can transform between forms. A tree converts radiant energy from the Sun into chemical energy through photosynthesis. The chemical energy transforms to thermal energy if you burn wood
from the tree. When wood burns in a steam engine, the thermal energy transforms into mechanical energy.
Sports and other activities revolve around exchanges between forms of
energy. Bungee jumping, downhill skiing, and roller coasters are all examples.
During a bungee jump, the type of energy is different at the top of the jump
than it is in the middle of the fall or at the bottom.
All sports and activities must balance excitement and safety. Successful
safety equipment protects us from extreme exchanges of energy. Hockey pads
protect the player by absorbing the kinetic energy of a check and transforming
it into another form of energy. An athlete’s physical condition also helps. Peak
health means an athlete can generate and absorb energy efficiently. In this
chapter, you will learn about work and energy and how their applications
affect society and the environment.
• conduct an inquiry to test the
law of conservation of energy
STARTING PoInTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later,
applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. What forces are acting on a bungee jumper before the
fall? During the fall?
2. What type of energy do you think is present at the top
of the bungee jump? In the middle? At the bottom?
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Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 162
3. Describe the nature of a bungee jumper’s motion.
4. What do you think a graph of the bungee jumper’s height
versus time would look like?
5. At what point(s) would the bungee jumper’s speed be at
a maximum? At what point(s) would the bungee jumper’s
speed be at a minimum?
6. Would the bungee jumper’s speed ever be zero? Explain.
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Mini Investigation
on the rebound
Skills: Predicting, Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Evaluating
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
A2.1, A5.5
In this activity, you will investigate the energy changes of a
bouncing ball.
A. Compare your prediction with the actual result. Account
for any discrepancies. K/u T/I
Equipment and Materials: computer with graphing software;
motion sensor; ball; metre stick
B. Describe the form of energy of the ball before it is
dropped. K/u T/I
1. Determine the height from which you will hold the ball
before you drop it. Record the height of the ball using the
height at the bottom of the ball as your measurement.
2. Predict how a graph of ball height versus time will look.
Sketch a rough graph of height versus time to show your
prediction. Your graph should show the height of the ball
on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis.
C. Describe the form the energy of the ball takes as it hits
the floor and as it continues to bounce. K/u T/I
D. At what point did the ball have the greatest amount of
energy? Explain. K/u T/I
E. What happens to the total energy of the ball over time?
Why does this happen? K/u T/I
3. Place the motion sensor directly above the ball. Start the
sensor, and then drop the ball. Let it bounce several times.
4. Make a graph of your data from the motion sensor.
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Introduction
163
4/26/12 11:15 AM
4.1
work the product of the magnitude of an
object’s displacement and the component
of the applied force in the direction of the
displacement
Work Done by a Constant Force
Studying can feel like a lot of work. Imagine studying several hours for a difficult test or
spending all afternoon writing a report for class. While this is a significant amount of hard
work, in the scientific sense of the word, you have done no work at all. In physics, work
is the energy that a force gives to an object when the force moves the object. When you
read your notes, you do no work because you do not exert a force on an object to move it.
Your everyday life, however, is filled with examples of work in the scientific sense.
You do work on a backpack when you lift it to your shoulders. You do work on the
classroom door when you push it open or pull it closed. You do work on a basketball
by bouncing or throwing it. In these cases, a force does work on an object to move it.
You may notice that you do more work lifting a backpack filled with heavy books
than lifting an empty one, and more work lifting a backpack from the floor than
from a desk because the distance from the floor to your shoulder is greater than the
distance from a desk to your shoulder. The scientific definition of work is consistent
with these experiences.
Work
Work depends on the magnitude of the force applied to an object and the distance the
object moves. In fact, work depends only on the object’s displacement in the direction
of the applied force and not displacement perpendicular to the force. In other words,
the work depends only on the component of force in the direction of motion and not
the force perpendicular to the motion.
Suppose, for example, you are shovelling snow. You might push on the snow at an
angle θ to the ground, but the snow moves horizontally (Figure 1). The component of
force directed into the ground does not help move the snow across the ground. Only
the component of force along the ground moves the snow.
In any situation, only the force in the direction of an object’s displacement does>
work on the object. The equation for> calculating the work, W, that a constant force, F ,
does to cause the displacement, Dd , of an object is
W 5 F∆d cos θ
Figure 1 The force of the shovel does
work on the snow. Only the horizontal
force component contributes to the work.
where F is the magnitude of the force, ∆d is the magnitude of the object’s displacement, and θ is the angle between the force and the displacement. The component of
the force in the direction of the motion is F cos θ (Figure 2).
F
F
F sin u
u
F cos u
u
displacement direction
(a)
(b)
∆d
y
x
Figure 2 (a) A force acts at an angle to the displacement. (b) Only the component parallel to the
displacement does work.
164 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
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The work done by a force depends on two vectors: the applied force and the
resulting
displacement. > The work done on an object is proportional to both force,
>
F , and displacement, Dd . However, the amount of work done is a scalar quantity, not
a vector.
The SI units of work are newton-metres (N?m), or kilograms times metres
squared per second squared (kg?m2/s2). This unit is called a joule (J). In the following Tutorial, you will explore how to use the work equation to determine the
work done in different situations.
joule the SI unit of work and energy;
a force of 1 N acting over a displacement
of 1 m does 1 J of work; symbol J
Tutorial 1 Calculating Work Done
You can determine the amount of work done on an object if you know the applied force,
the displacement of the object, and the angle between the force and the displacement.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Work Done When the Force Is Parallel to the Displacement
The displacement of an object is often in the same direction as
the applied force. In this case, the equation for calculating the
work done by the force is simplified. Suppose a hockey player
slides a puck along the ice with a constant force of 85 N in
the forward direction (Figure 3). The puck moves a horizontal
distance of 0.20 m while in contact with the hockey stick.
Calculate the amount of work done on the puck by the stick.
Given: F 5 85 N; ∆d 5 0.20 m
Required: W
Analysis: Use the equation for work, W 5 F∆d cos u. F and ∆d
are in the same direction, so the angle between them is zero, u 5 0.
Solution: W 5 F∆d cos u
5 (85 N)(0.20 m) cos 08
5 (17 N?m)(1)
5 17 N?m
W 5 17 J
Statement: The hockey stick does 17 J of work on the puck.
Note that the stick only does work on the puck while the stick
is in contact with the puck, applying force.
F = 85 N
Dd = 0.20 m
Figure 3
Sample Problem 2: Calculating the Work Done When the Force Is at an Angle to the Displacement
The applied force and the displacement can be at an angle to each
other. For example, a student pushes a lawnmower forward with a
constant force of 48 N for a distance of 7.5 m (Figure 4). The angle
between the force and the displacement of the lawnmower is 32°.
Calculate how much work is done on the lawnmower by the student.
y
x
∆d
u
F sin u
displacement
direction
F
Given: F 5 48 N; ∆d 5 7.5 m; u 5 328
Required: W
Analysis: The work done on the lawnmower by the student
depends only on the component of force in the direction
of the mower’s displacement. Use the equation for work,
W 5 F∆d cos u. F and ∆d are at an angle of 328 to each other.
Solution: W 5 F∆d cos u
5 (48 N)(7.5 m) cos 328
5 (360 N?m)(0.848)
W 5 3.1 3 102 J
Statement: The student does 3.1 3 102 J of work
on the lawnmower.
F cos u
Figure 4
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4.1 Work Done by a Constant Force
165
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Sample Problem 3: Calculating the Work Done When the Force Is Perpendicular to the Displacement
Suppose you carry books with a weight of 22 N a distance of
3.8 m across a room (Figure 5). Determine the work done
on the books.
Given: F 5 22 N; ∆d 5 3.8 m; u 5 908
Required: W
Analysis: By Newton’s third law, the upward force you exert on the
books is equal to the weight of the books, 22 N. Use the equation for
work, W 5 F∆d cos u. F and ∆d are at an angle of 908 to each other.
Solution: W 5 F∆d cos u
5 (22 N)(3.8 m) cos 908
5 (22 N)(3.8 m)(0)
5 0 N?m
W50J
F
displacement
direction
Figure 5
Statement: No work is done on the books.
Practice
1. A weightlifter uses a force of 275 N to lift weights directly upward through a distance of 0.65 m.
Determine the work done on the weights by the weightlifter. T/I A [ans: 1.8 3 102 J]
2. Calculate the work done on a wall if you push on it with a constant force of 9.4 N and the wall
does not move. T/I A [ans: 0 J]
3. A pool cue stick strikes a ball with a constant force of 0.73 N, causing the ball to move 0.65 m
in the direction of the force. The ball moves 0.080 m while the cue stick is in contact with it.
Calculate the work done on the ball by the cue stick. T/I A [ans: 0.058 J]
4. A tow truck uses a winch with a rope attached to pull a car that is stuck in a ditch.
The rope exerts a force of 9.9 3 103 N on the car body, and the angle between the rope and
the direction the car moves is 12°. Determine the amount of work done on the car by the tow
truck to move the car 4.3 m. T/I A [ans: 4.2 3 104 J]
Positive and negative work
The force of the hockey stick on the puck in Sample Problem 1 resulted in positive
work that caused the puck’s speed to increase. What if the puck slides to rest? The
displacement of the puck and the force on the puck by friction are in opposite directions. When an object moves in a direction opposite to an applied force, the force
does negative work. Negative work will cause a loss of kinetic energy.
Forces that cause negative work are exerted at an angle between 908 and 1808,
opposite to the object’s direction. As you read in Chapter 2, friction is the force
resisting the motion of objects moving against each other. Tutorial 2 gives you an
opportunity to calculate the negative work that occurs when a force, such as friction,
and displacement are in opposite directions.
Tutorial 2 Calculating Negative Work
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Negative Work in One Dimension
Suppose a car is moving along a straight road when the driver
suddenly applies the brakes. The force of friction between the
ground and the car tires is opposite to the car’s direction of motion
and decreases the car’s speed. Calculate the work done by a
constant frictional force of 1.4 kN over a distance of 1.2 3 102 m.
166
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 166
Given: F 5 1.4 kN 5 1.4 3 103 N;
Dd 5 1.2 3 102 m; u 5 1808
Required: W
Analysis: W 5 FDd cos θ
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Solution: W 5 FDd cos u
5 (1.4 3 103 N)(1.2 3 102 m) cos 1808
5 (1.4 3 103 N)(1.2 3 102 m)(21)
5 21.70 3 105 N?m
W 5 21.70 3 105 J
Statement: Friction does 21.7 3 105 J of work on the car
to slow it down. The negative sign indicates that the force is
opposing the motion.
Sample Problem 2: Calculating Negative Work in Two Dimensions
An ice skater slides to a stop by pushing her blades against
the ice (Figure 6). The ice exerts a constant force of 95 N on the
skater, and the skater stops in 1.2 m. The angle between the force
and the skater’s direction of motion is 1408. Calculate the work
done on the skater by the ice.
95 N
Required: W
Analysis: Use the work equation, W 5 FDd cos u. Remember
that cos u is negative for angles between 908 and 1808.
Solution: W 5 FDd cos u
5 (95 N)(1.2 m) cos 1408
5 287 N?m
W 5 287 J
Statement: The ice does –87 J of work on the skater.
140°
1.2 m
Given: F 5 95 N; Dd 5 1.2 m; u 5 1408
Figure 6
Practice
1. A drop tower ride lifts riders at a constant speed to a height of 78 m and suddenly drops them. T/I A
(a) Determine the work done on a 56 kg rider by the machine as she is lifted to the top of the ride. [ans: 4.3 3 104 J]
(b) Determine the work done on the rider by gravity as she is lifted to the top of the ride. [ans: 24.3 3 104 J]
2. As a passenger airplane touches down it skids across the runway to a stop. Friction between the ground
and the plane’s wheels applies a constant force of 5.21 kN as the plane slides a distance of 355 m. T/I A
(a) Calculate the work done on the airplane by friction. [ans: 21.85 3 106 J]
(b) Determine the distance the plane would slide if friction applied the same force but did
21.52 3 106 J of work. [ans: 292 m]
3. A skier slides down a snowy hill and then stops by pressing his skis at an angle to the snow. The snow
exerts a constant force of 5.9 N on the skier at an angle of 1508 to the skier’s displacement. The skier
moves a distance of 3.5 m. Calculate the work done on the skier by the snow. [ans: 218 J]
You observed in Tutorial 1 that a force does positive work on an object when the
object’s displacement is in the same direction as the force. The work is also positive
when the direction of the object’s displacement is at an angle between 08 and 908 to
the applied force. Similarly, Tutorial 2 showed that a force does negative work on an
object when the object’s displacement is opposite to the direction of the force, at
an angle between 908 and 1808 to the applied force. Recall that zero work is done on
an object when the object’s displacement is exactly 908 to the applied force. Are there
other situations involving an applied force in which zero work is done?
zero work
When the direction of an object’s displacement is exactly 908 to the applied force, the force
does no work on the object. Look back at Sample Problem 3 in Tutorial 1. As the
student walks across the room, he pushes up on the books, but the books move to the
right. The angle between the force and the displacement is 908. Since W 5 FΔd cos θ
and cos 908 5 0, the student does no work on the books.
The work also equals zero when the force on an object is zero. Consider a probe
travelling in space far from any gravitational forces. The probe’s motion is due to
inertia, but the force on it is zero. As a result, zero work is done on the probe.
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4.1 Work Done by a Constant Force
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The third variable in the work equation is the displacement of the object. Have you
ever tried to twist the lid off a jar, but the lid was stuck? Regardless of how much force
you exert on the lid, you do zero work unless the lid moves. The work on an object is
zero when any of the force, the displacement, or the cosine of the angle between the
force and the displacement is zero. In the following Tutorial, we will examine another
example of a force that does zero work.
Tutorial 3 Work and Centripetal Acceleration
When a centripetal force acts on an object moving along a circular path, the direction of the force
is perpendicular to the direction of the object’s motion.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Work Done on an Object Moving in a Circular Path
A student attaches one end of a string to a rubber stopper. She
then holds the other end of the string and twirls the rubber
stopper in a horizontal circle around her head. The string exerts
a tension force on the stopper directed toward the centre of the
circle (Figure 7). Determine the work done on the stopper by the
string during a revolution.
direction of stopper’s motion
v
rubber stopper
FT
direction of
displacement
over a short
time interval
FT
force over a short
time interval
path of stopper
(a)
(b)
Figure 7 (a) The circular path of the rubber stopper, seen from
above. (b) During a very short time interval, the displacement
of the stopper is perpendicular to the tension force.
Given: u 5 908
Required: W
>
Analysis: The tension force, F T, causes the stopper’s centripetal
acceleration. At each moment, the stopper’s instanta­neous
velocity is at an angle of 908 to the tension force. During a very
short time interval, the very small displacement of the stopper
is also at an angle of 908 to the tension force. We can break one
loop around into a series of many small displacements, each
occurring during a very short time interval. During each time
interval, the tension and the displacement are perpendicular.
The total work done during one loop around will equal the sum
of work done during each small displacement. For each small
displacement, use the work equation, W 5 FDd cos u, with u 5 908.
Solution: W 5 FDd cos u
5 FDd cos 908
5 FDd (0)
W50J
Statement: Summing the work done during all the small
displacements of the loop gives a total of W 5 0 J during each
revolution. The tension force exerted by the string does zero work
on the stopper during the revolution.
Practice
1. Earth exerts a gravitational pull that causes the Moon to experience a centripetal acceleration
during its orbit. Assume that the Moon’s orbit around Earth is circular. Determine the work done by
Earth’s gravitational pull on the Moon. As part of your solution, include a diagram that illustrates
Earth, the Moon, the direction of travel, and the force at one instant in time. K/U T/I C [ans: 0 J]
In Tutorial 3, the work does not depend on the magnitude of the tension force or
the total distance the stopper moves. We treated the stopper’s orbit as a series of tiny
displacements perpendicular to the tension force. For each tiny displacement, the
tension force does zero work on the stopper. We conclude that the work done by the
centripetal force acting on an object in circular motion is zero.
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Work Done by Multiple Forces
Almost all real-world examples of work involve friction plus other forces. Tutorial 4
explores how the presence of multiple forces affects the work done on an object.
Tutorial 4 Calculating Work Done by Multiple Forces
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Work Done by Multiple Forces on a Dragged Object
Figure 8 shows a long-distance hiker pulling a sled across
a snowy field.
y
Ff
FN
Solution: Wh 5 Fh Dd cos uh
5 (135 N)(345 m) cos 48.08
5 3.116 3 104 N?m
Wh 5 3.116 3 104 J (one extra digit carried)
Fh
h
Wf 5 Ff Dd cos uf
x
Fg
Analysis: W 5 FDd cos u. The total work done is the sum of
the work done by the individual forces.
Figure 8
The hiker exerts a constant force of 135 N on the sled at a 48.08
angle to the sled’s displacement. At the same time, a constant
67.0 N frictional force on the sled from the snow opposes the
motion. The sled also experiences the force from gravity and the
normal force from the snow, but these forces do not contribute to
the work. Calculate the work done by the hiker (h), the work done
by friction (f), and the total (T) work done on the sled when the
hiker pulls the sled 345 m over the snow.
Given: Fh 5 135 N; Ff 5 67.0 N; Dd 5 345 m; uh 5 48.08; uf 5 1808
5 (67.0 N)(345 m) cos 1808
5 22.312 3 104 N?m
Wf 5 22.312 3 104 J (one extra digit carried)
WT 5 Wh 1 Wf
5 3.116 3 104 J 2 2.312 3 104 J
WT 5 8.04 3 103 J
Statement: The hiker does 3.12 3 104 J of work on the sled.
Friction does 22.31 3 104 J of work on the sled. The total
work done on the sled is 8.04 3 103 J.
Required: Wh ; Wf ; WT
Practice
1. A hiker pulls a sled a distance of 223 m with a constant force of 122 N exerted at an angle
of 378. Friction acts on the sled with a constant force of 72.3 N. Calculate the work done
on the sled by the hiker and by friction, and the total work done on the sled. T/I A
[ans: 2.2 3 104 J; 21.6 3 104 J; 5.6 3 103 J]
2. If together the hiker and friction do 2.42 3 104 J of total work on the sled in Figure 8, how
far did the hiker pull the sled? T/I A [ans: 963 m]
A frictional force is present in many parts of the hiker and sled problem in Tutorial 4.
Friction acts, for example, between the hiker’s hands and the rope, between the rope
and the sled, and between the hiker’s boots and the snow.
A frictional force acts and does work on any surfaces that slide past each other.
In each case, the frictional force transfers energy to surfaces, increasing their kinetic
energy. The energy does not disappear. The increase in temperature occurs because of
the motion of atoms at the surfaces. All substances are composed of particles in constant
motion. When friction heats two surfaces, the vibrations of the particles become larger,
and the particles move more quickly. The faster-moving particles have more energy, and
the energy stored in the chemical bonds increases.
In summary, when analyzing the total work done on an object, all forces that are
present, including friction, must be considered. The net effect of these forces can
result in either positive, negative, or zero total work done on the object.
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4.1
Review
Summary
>
>
• Work occurs when a force F is applied to move an object a displacement Dd .
• The work >done on
> an object is given by W 5 FDd cos u, where u is the angle
between F and d . The SI unit of work is the joule (J).
• When an object moves at an angle to an applied force, only the component of
the force in the direction of the displacement does work on the object.
• When an object moves in a direction opposite to an applied force, the force
does negative work on the object.
• A force does zero work on an object when the angle between the force and the
object’s displacement is 908. Zero work is also done when either the force or
the displacement is zero.
Questions
1. Two ropes pull on a crate toward the left with forces
of equal magnitude, F, causing the crate to move
horizontally (Figure 9). Which rope does more
work on the crate? Explain. K/U
5. A warehouse worker pushes a crate of mass 24 kg
up a ramp (Figure 11). Assume that the friction
between the crate and ramp can be ignored. K/U T/I
F2
F1
u 5 30.0°
Figure 9
2. A toy consists of a small plastic tube connected at
the centre to one end of a long string. A girl holds
the other end of the string and swings the toy in a
horizontal, circular path above her head. Is work
done on the toy by the string during each revolution?
Explain your reasoning. K/U
3. A shopper pushes a loaded grocery cart with a force
of 12.6 N. The force makes an angle of 21.88 above
the horizontal. Determine the work done on the cart
by the shopper as he pushes the cart 14.2 m. T/I A
4. The horse in Figure 10 pulls a rider on a sleigh
across a snowy horizontal field. The force of the rope
is 22.8 N, and the horse does 9.53 3 102 J of work
pulling the sleigh a distance of 52.6 m. Calculate the
angle between the rope and the horizontal. T/I A
F
u
Figure 11
(a) Determine the component of gravitational force
directed along the ramp’s surface.
(b) Calculate the force required to move the crate
at a constant speed up the ramp.
(c) Calculate the work done in pushing the crate
23 m as measured along the ramp. Assume the
crate moves at a constant velocity.
(d) Assume the coefficient of kinetic friction
between the crate and the ramp is μK 5 0.25.
Calculate the work done on the crate by the
worker and by friction, and calculate the total
work done as the worker pushes the crate
16 m up the ramp.
6. A boy and a girl pull and push a crate along an icy
horizontal surface, moving it 13 m at a constant
speed. The boy exerts 75 N of force at an angle of
328 above the horizontal, and the girl exerts a force
of 75 N at an angle of 228 above the horizontal.
Calculate the total work done by the boy
and girl together. T/I
Figure 10
170 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
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4.2
Kinetic Energy and the
Work–Energy Theorem
Imagine the energy that a jet, like the one in Figure 1, needs to climb into the air. The
jet has a mass of hundreds of thousands of kilograms, yet during takeoff, it seems to
rise easily above the ground.
How can the jet have so much energy? You read in the previous section that the
work a force does on an object is proportional to the distance the object moves. The
work is also proportional to the component of the force in the direction of the object’s
displacement. The jet engines cause a force that pushes the jet forward. As it moves
along the runway, air rushing past the wings exerts an upward force on the wings.
The engines help maintain this effect. The forces of the engines and the air do work
on the jet as it takes off. In this section, you will learn about the relationship between
work done on an object and energy transferred to the object. The jet engines and air
are the sources of energy that the jet uses to fly.
Figure 1 Work done by jet engines
and the surrounding air gives a jet the
kinetic energy needed to take off.
Kinetic Energy
Kinetic energy, Ek, is the energy an object has due to its motion. An object’s kinetic
energy is directly related to its mass and the square of its speed, according to the following relationship:
Ek 5
kinetic energy (E k) the energy an object
has because of its motion
1
mv 2
2
where m is the mass of the object and v is its speed.
Consider how this relationship affects the kinetic energy of the jet in Figure 1. The
jet’s kinetic energy increases during takeoff because its speed increases. If the speed
doubles, for example, the kinetic energy increases by a factor of 4. The jet has a tremendous amount of kinetic energy because its mass is so great.
Notice that kinetic energy is a scalar quantity. The equation above defines the magnitude of kinetic energy, but kinetic energy does not have a direction associated with it.
The mass and speed of the airplane, and not its direction, determine its kinetic energy.
You can use dimensional analysis of the above equation to identify the units of
kinetic energy. Expressing the mass in kilograms (kg) and the speed in metres per
second (m/s) shows that the units of kinetic energy are joules (J):
3 Ek 4 5 3 kg 4 c
5 3 kg 4
5
m 2
d
s
3 m 42
3 s 42
3 kg 4 3 m 4
3m 4
3 s 42
5 3N 4 # 3m 4
3 Ek 4 5 3 J 4
Notice that the units of kinetic energy are the same as the units of work. We will
explore this important result further after Tutorial 1, which shows how to determine
the kinetic energy of a moving object when you know its mass and its speed.
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Tutorial 1 Solving Problems Involving Kinetic Energy
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Kinetic Energy
A car has a mass of 1.50 3 103 kg and is travelling at a speed
of 85.0 km/h. Calculate the car’s kinetic energy.
km
1h
1000 m
3
3
h
3600 s
1 km
v 5 23.6 m/s
1
Ek 5 mv 2
2
1
5 11.50 3 103 kg2 123.6 m/s2 2
2
Ek 5 4.18 3 105 J
Solution: v 5 85.0
Given: m 5 1.50 3 103 kg; v 5 85.0 km/h
Required: Ek
1
Analysis: Use the equation for kinetic energy, Ek 5 mv 2.
2
First, convert speed into units of metres per second.
Statement: The car’s kinetic energy is 4.18 3 105 J.
Sample Problem 2: Using Kinetic Energy to Determine the Speed of an Object
When fleeing a predator, a 1.4 kg rabbit has a kinetic energy of
96 J. Calculate the speed of the rabbit.
Given: m 5 1.4 kg; Ek 5 96 J
Required: v
1
Analysis: Rearrange the kinetic energy equation, Ek 5 mv 2, to
2
isolate the unknown variable, v.
1
Solution: Ek 5 mv 2
2
Multiply both sides of the equation by 2. Then, divide both sides
by m to isolate v on one side of the equation.
2Ek 5 mv 2
2Ek
mv 2
5
m
m
2Ek
5 v2
m
Take the square root of both sides.
2Ek
Åm
Substitute known values into the equation and solve.
v5
2 196 J2
Å 1.4 kg
v 5 12 m/s
v5
1
2Ek 5 2 a mv 2 b
2
Statement: The rabbit’s speed is 12 m/s.
Practice
1. By what factor does a car’s kinetic energy increase when the car’s speed
(a) doubles [ans: 4] (b) triples [ans: 9] (c) increases by 26 % T/I [ans: 1.6]
2. If a bowling ball with mass 8.0 kg travels down the lane at 2.0 m/s, what is its
kinetic energy? T/I [ans: 16 J]
3. Calculate the mass of a blue jay moving at 15 km/h with 0.83 J of kinetic
energy. T/I [ans: 0.095 kg]
Kinetic Energy and the Work–Energy Theorem
F
vf
vi 0
di
initial
position
∆d
df
x
final
position
Figure 2 When a force, F, acts on this
hockey puck, the puck accelerates.
The force does work on the puck, and
the puck’s kinetic energy changes.
172 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 172
Newton’s second law of motion tells us that when an object is subject to a net external
force, it accelerates in the same direction as the force. This motion results in work
being done on the object. When the object’s speed changes from this acceleration,
then its kinetic energy also changes (Figure 2).
You have seen that for the simplest case of one-dimensional motion, with the force
directed parallel to the displacement, the work done by a force on an object is equal to
the magnitude of the force multiplied by the object’s displacement: W 5 F∆d. Using
Newton’s second law (FT 5 ma for this one-dimensional case), the equation becomes
W 5 FT Dd
W 5 maDd
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Assume that the force is constant so that the acceleration is also constant. Recall
the following kinematics equation for motion with constant acceleration:
v 2 5 v 2i 1 2aDd
Notice that the subscript i indicates the initial velocity and position and the subscript f indicates the final velocity. The displacement is just Δd 5 (df 2 di), so
v 2f 2 v 2i
2
To calculate the work done on the object as it moves from the initial position di to
the final position df, combine the previous equations:
v 2 5 v 2i 1 2a 1df 2 di2
or
a 1df 2 di2 5
W 5 ma 1df 2 di2
v 2f 2 v 2i
5m
2
1
1
W 5 mv 2f 2 mv 2i
2
2
The equation shows that doing work on an object changes its kinetic energy. The
following shows this relationship explicitly:
1
1
mv 2f 2 mv 2i
2
2
5 Ek f 2 Ek i
W5
W 5 DEk
This equation is the work–energy theorem: the total work done on an object by an
external force equals the change in its kinetic energy. This relation tells us how work,
force, and displacement connect to the kinetic energy of an object. Notice that this
theorem is also consistent with the result discovered earlier, that work and kinetic
energy are both measured in the same units, joules.
work–energy theorem the total work
done on an object equals the change in
its kinetic energy
Tutorial 2 Applying the Work–Energy Theorem
You can use the work–energy theorem to solve problems involving the kinetic energy transferred
when a force does work on an object.
Sample Problem 1: Using the Work–Energy Theorem to Calculate Work Done
A blue whale with a mass of 1.5 3 105 kg is swimming with
a speed of 6.1 m/s. A nearby boat startles the whale, and the
whale increases its speed to 12.8 m/s. Calculate the work done
on the whale by the water.
Given: m 5 1.5 3 105 kg; vi 5 6.1 m/s; vf 5 12.8 m/s
Required: W
Analysis: As the whale swims, it exerts a backward force on
the water. By Newton’s third law, the water exerts an equal and
opposite forward force on the whale, causing it to accelerate and
gain kinetic energy. Use the work–energy theorem, W 5 DEk , to
calculate the positive work done by the water on the whale.
Solution: First, determine the initial and final kinetic energies.
1
Ek i 5 mv 2i
2
1
5 11.5 3 105 kg2 16.1 m/s2 2
2
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Ek i 5 2.79 3 106 J
1
Ek f 5 mv 2f
2
1
5 11.5 3 105 kg2 112.8 m/s2 2
2
Ek f 5 1.23 3 107 J
Apply the work–energy theorem.
W 5 DEk
5 Ek f 2 Ek i
5 1.23 3 107 J 2 2.79 3 106 J
W 5 9.5 3 106 J
Statement: The water does 9.5 3 106 J of work on the whale.
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Sample Problem 2: Applying the Work–Energy Theorem in the Presence of Friction
A shuffleboard player wants to slide a 430 g disc a distance of
precisely 12 m. If the coefficient of kinetic friction between the
disc and the playing surface is 0.62, calculate the initial speed at
which the player must release the disc.
Given: m 5 430 g 5 0.43 kg; mk 5 0.62; Dd 5 12 m
Required: v
>
>
>
Analysis: The force due to friction is F f 5 mKF N, where F N is the
normal force. Calculate the force due to friction, then the work
done by friction. The work done by friction is W 5 Ff Dd cos u.
The work–energy theorem is W 5 DE k, and Ek 5 1 mv 2.
2
Solution: The force due to friction is
>
>
F f 5 mKF N
5 mKmg
5 10.622 10.43 kg2 19.8 m/s22
>
F f 5 2.61 N
Friction opposes the motion of the disc, so u is 1808, and cos u
is 21.
The work done by friction is
W 5 FDd cos u
5 12.61 N2 112 m2 1cos 18082
W 5 231.3 J
The work–energy theorem tells us that the change in kinetic
energy will equal the work done, or 231.3 J. The final velocity
is zero, so the final kinetic energy is zero, and the initial kinetic
energy is the negative of the work done.
Ek 5 Ef 2 Ei
5 0 2(231.3 J)
Ek 5 31.3 J
We can solve for the initial speed:
1
Ek 5 mv2
2
2Ek
5 v2
m
2Ek
v5 a b
Å m
2 131.3 J2
5 a
b
Å 0.43 kg
v 5 12 m/s
Statement: The initial speed of the disc must be 12 m/s.
Sample Problem 3: Applying the Work–Energy Theorem to Calculate Initial Speed
A police car of mass 2.4 3 103 kg is travelling on the highway
when the officers receive an emergency call. They increase the
speed of the car to 33 m/s. The increase in speed results in
3.1 3 105 J of work done on the car. Determine the initial
speed of the police car in kilometres per hour.
Given: m 5 2.4 3 103 kg; vf 5 33 m/s; W 5 3.1 3 105 J
Required: vi
Analysis: Rearrange the work–energy equation to solve for the
initial speed of the car. First, calculate the final kinetic energy
of the car; then, subtract the work done to determine the initial
kinetic energy.
Then, solve for vi.
Ek i 5
2
2 1
a bEk i 5 a b mv 2i
m
m 2
2
v 2i 5 a bEk i
m
vi 5
Solution: First, determine the final and initial kinetic energies.
1
mv 2f
2
1
5 12.4 3 103 kg2 133 m/s2 2
2
Ek f 5 1.31 3 106 N
Ek f 5
W 5 DEk
5 Ek f 2 Ek i
1
mv 2i
2
5
2
a bEk i
Å m
2
b1.00 3 106 J
Å 2.4 3 103 kg
a
vi 5 28.9 m/s
The initial speed is 29 m/s. To determine the speed in
kilometres per hour,
m 1 km 3600 s
s 1000 m 1 h
vi 5 1.0 3 102 km/h
vi 5 29
Statement: The initial speed of the police car was 1.0 3 102 km/h.
Ek i 5 Ek f 2 W
5 1.31 3 106 2 3.1 3 105 J
Ek i 5 1.00 3 106 J
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Practice
1. An archer pulls back her bowstring (Figure 3) loaded with a 22 g arrow and then releases the
string. The arrow’s speed as it leaves the bowstring is 220 km/h. Calculate the work done on
the arrow by the bowstring. T/I [ans: 41 J]
Figure 3
2. A space probe travels far out in the galaxy to a point where the force of gravity is very weak.
The probe has a mass of 3.8 3 104 kg and an initial speed of 1.5 3 104 m/s. The probe’s
engines exert a force of 2.2 3 105 N in the original direction of motion as the probe travels
a distance of 2.8 3 106 m. Calculate the final speed of the probe. K/U T/I [ans: 1.6 3 104 m/s]
3. A skater moves across the ice a distance of 12 m before a constant frictional force of 15 N
causes him to stop. His initial speed is 2.2 m/s. Calculate the skater’s mass. K/U T/I
[ans: 74 kg]
Underlying Assumptions Related
to the Work–Energy Theorem
You can use the work–energy theorem to solve several types of physics problems.
However, you cannot control all of the variables in the real world as easily as you can
in a physics experiment. The work–energy theorem is only true if no energy losses
occur. In many real-world situations, energy will seem to disappear in the form of
light, sound, heat, or changes in the shape of an object. For instance, in a car collision, energy goes into the sounds of the crash and the bending of materials in the
car. The work done on a given car does not equal the change in the kinetic energy
of that car.
This discussion assumes that the applied force is constant. The derivation of
the work–energy theorem for a varying force requires calculus, but the result is
the same. The work–energy theorem holds true, even when the applied force is
not constant.
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Investigation
4.2.1
The Work–Energy Theorem
(page 209)
Now that you have learned about
the work–energy theorem, you are
ready to complete an investigation
to test the theorem. This Controlled
Experiment will give you an opportunity
to calculate the force of friction.
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4.2
Review
Summary
• Kinetic energy, Ek, is the energy an object has due to its motion. It is a scalar quantity
because no direction is associated with it. The units of kinetic energy are joules (J).
• An object’s kinetic energy is related to its mass, m, and its speed, v, by the
1
equation Ek 5 mv 2.
2
• According to the work–energy theorem, the total work done on an object is equal
to the change in the object’s kinetic energy: W 5 ΔEk.
Questions
176 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 176
9. At room temperature, an oxygen molecule with
mass 5.31 3 10226 kg has kinetic energy of
about 6.25 3 10221 J. Determine the speed
of the molecule. T/I
10. A horizontal force of 15 N pulls a block of mass
3.9 kg across a level floor. The coefficient of kinetic
friction between the block and the floor is µK 5 0.25.
If the block begins with a speed of 0.0 m/s and is
pulled for a distance of 12 m, determine the final
speed of the block. T/I
11. Centripetal forces do non-zero work on objects in
non-circular orbits. Satellites in non-circular orbits
around Earth have different speeds at different
positions in their orbit. The change in kinetic
energy comes from work done on the satellites by
gravity. A satellite of mass 5.55 3 103 kg has a speed
of 2.81 km/s at one point in its orbit and a speed of
3.24 km/s at a second point. Calculate the work
done on the satellite by gravity as the satellite moves
from the first point to the second point. T/I A
12. Figure 4 shows the kinetic energy of a robot as a
function of its speed. K/U T/I
10
Kinetic energy (J)
1. Could an elephant walking slowly across a field have
more kinetic energy than a cheetah chasing its prey?
Explain your answer. K/U T/I
2. A cat with a mass of 5.0 kg is chasing a mouse with
a mass of 35 g. The mouse is running away from the
cat at a constant speed in a straight line. K/U T/I
(a) The cat’s kinetic energy is 100 times the mouse’s
kinetic energy. Will the cat be able to catch up
with the mouse? Explain your answer.
(b) What is the minimum kinetic energy that the
cat must have to keep up with the mouse?
3. A car of mass 1.5 3 103 kg is initially travelling
at a speed of 11 m/s. The driver then accelerates
to a speed of 25 m/s over a distance of 0.20 km.
Calculate the work done on the car. K/U T/I
4. A truck of mass 9.1 3 103 kg is travelling along a
level road at an initial speed of 98 km/h and then
slows to a final speed of 27 km/h. Determine the
total work done on the truck. T/I
5. Two objects have the same kinetic energy. One
has a speed that is 2.5 times the speed of the other.
Determine the ratio of their masses. K/U T/I
6. Consider a small car of mass 1.2 3 103 kg and a large
sport utility vehicle (SUV) of mass 4.1 3 103 kg. The
car is travelling at 99 km/h. The car and the SUV
have the same kinetic energy. Calculate the speed
of the SUV. K/U T/I
7. An archer is able to shoot an arrow with a mass
of 0.020 kg at a speed of 250 km/h. If a baseball
of mass 0.14 kg is given the same kinetic energy,
determine its speed. T/I
8. A hockey player shoots a puck at a speed of 150 km/h.
The mass of the puck is 0.16 kg, and the player’s
stick is in contact with it over a distance of 0.25 m.
Calculate the average force exerted on the puck by
the player. T/I
8
6
4
2
1 2 3 4
Speed (m/s)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure 4
What type of function is this?
Why does the graph pass through the origin?
Determine the mass of the robot.
Write an equation that relates kinetic energy as
a function of speed for the robot.
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4.3
Gravitational Potential Energy
The extreme sport of heli-skiing starts with a helicopter ride to the top of a remote
mountain. A skier like the one in Figure 1 then jumps out of the helicopter onto the
steep slopes. How do you know that the skier in Figure 1 has energy before jumping
from the helicopter? How can this energy be transformed into another form? In this
section, you will learn the answers to these questions.
Potential Energy
You can sense that the skier in Figure 1 has energy because of her height above the
ground. The force of gravity will do work on the skier as soon as she steps out of the
helicopter. As she falls, and then skis down the mountain, her kinetic energy will
increase. Her height above the ground means that she has the potential to pick up
kinetic energy from the force of gravity. This potential to increase kinetic energy is a
form of stored energy. The stored energy that an object has that can be released into
another form of energy is potential energy.
Many forms of potential energy exist. A long-jumper poised to jump has potential
energy stored in his muscles. The flexed muscles have stored biomechanical energy
that is released as the jumper springs into the air. A stretched elastic band also
has elastic potential energy. When you let an elastic band go, the potential energy
becomes kinetic energy.
Kinetic energy and potential energy have a close relationship, and one form can
transform into the other as work is done on or by an object. The sum of the kinetic
energy and potential energy of an object is called the mechanical energy of the object.
You will read more about properties of mechanical energy in Section 4.5. This section
will focus on the potential energy an object has due to gravity.
Figure 1 The skier’s kinetic energy will
increase as she falls. Her height gives
her potential energy.
potential energy the stored energy an
object has that can be converted into
another form of energy
mechanical energy the sum of an
object’s kinetic and potential energies
Gravitational Potential Energy
An object near Earth’s surface has a potential energy that depends on the object’s
mass, m, and height, h. The gravitational potential energy, Eg , is stored energy as a
result of the gravitational force between the object and Earth. Although we will often
speak of the gravitational potential energy of an object, note that Eg is actually a property of the object and Earth together. Potential energy is always a property of a system
of objects, as we will discuss in Section 4.5.
Analyzing gravitational potential energy mathematically can help clarify how to
apply it when solving problems. Suppose a worker lifts a crate onto the back of a
pickup truck (Figure 2).
Fa
gravitational potential energy (Eg)
stored energy an object has because of its
position and the applied gravitational force
Dy
Figure 2 A worker applies a force Fa to a crate, doing work as he lifts the crate from the ground up
to the truck bed. The change in height of the crate is Dy.
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Let Dy be the change in the elevation of the crate. The force the worker applies to
the crate to raise it is in the same direction as the crate’s displacement. The work done
on the crate by the force is
W 5 FDd cos u
5 FDy cos u
5 mgDy (cos 08)
W 5 mgDy
Note that we replaced Dd with Dy because we often use y to represent vertical
displacements. When the bottom of the crate reaches the height of the truck’s bed,
the crate has gravitational potential energy relative to the ground. Suppose the
worker decides instead to place crates on top of each other. You could then describe
a crate’s gravitational potential energy relative to the ground, or describe its gravitational potential energy relative to the truck bed. Since gravitational potential energy
depends on position relative to an object, it is a relative quantity. Its value depends
on the height of the object above some point of reference that you choose. You can
choose the level that is most convenient for solving any given problem. The work
done to increase the elevation of an object relates to the change in the elevation
instead of a specific height:
DEg 5 mgDy
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about work, kinetic energy, and
gravitational potential energy to the
Unit Task on page 270.
178 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 178
where DEg is the change in gravitational potential energy, m is the mass, g is the gravitational acceleration, and Dy is the vertical component of the displacement.
The equation for gravitational potential energy presents a few important points to
consider. First, the equation determines the change in gravitational potential energy
for a given change in elevation. It does not assign a fixed value of potential energy
to a given elevation, but only the difference in potential energy between different
elevations, Dy. You can freely choose a reference point to act as a zero gravitational
potential elevation. When solving a problem, choose the elevation that is most convenient for that problem. Earth’s surface is often a convenient choice, but it is not
the only choice, or necessarily the best choice. Choose a reference point that will
result in the easiest calculations. Often, choosing the surface of Earth for this point
is most convenient because the gravitational potential energy will then be either
zero or positive.
Second, Dy does not depend on any changes in the horizontal position or on the
path the object took to reach its new height. When the object increases its height, Dy
is positive; when the object falls to a lower height, Dy is negative.
Finally, you will read in Chapter 6 that the acceleration due to gravity, g, actually
varies slightly by height above Earth’s surface. The equation above is only accurate
when the change in height is small enough that you can ignore the change in g.
An object thrown upward will begin with kinetic energy, but the amount of kinetic
energy decreases as the object slows down because of the gravitational force. At the
same time, the object gains potential energy as its height increases. Whenever an
object falls, the force of gravity will do work on the object, giving it kinetic energy
according to the work–energy theorem. At the same time, it loses gravitational potential energy.
Suppose that you hold a physics book above your desk. If you drop the book, its
initial velocity is zero, but it has gravitational potential energy relative to the desktop.
As it falls, the force of gravity does work on the book and converts its gravitational
potential energy to kinetic energy. Before it hits the desktop, all of the initial potential
energy relative to the desktop has converted into kinetic energy. As the book strikes
the desktop, kinetic energy is converted into sound energy, thermal energy, and other
forms of energy.
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units of Gravitational Potential Energy
Gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy are different manifestations of the same
quantity—energy. They both have the same units—joules—and both are scalar quantities.
In the equations below, you can see how to calculate the units of gravitational potential
energy, DEg 5 mgDy. The units of m are kilograms. The units of g are metres per second
squared. The units of Dy are metres. Putting these facts together gives
3m 4
3m 4
3 s2 4
5 3N 4 # 3m 4
3 Eg 4 5 3 J 4
3 Eg 4 5 3 kg 4
Similar to kinetic energy, no direction is associated with gravitational potential
energy. The following Tutorial examines how to use gravitational potential energy in
problems involving rising and falling objects.
Tutorial 1 Applications Involving Gravitational Potential Energy
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Gravitational Potential Energy
A hiker stands near the edge of a cliff and accidentally drops a rock of mass 1.2 kg to the
ground at the base of the cliff 28 m below (Figure 3). Calculate the potential energy of
the rock relative to the ground just before the hiker drops it.
y
yi
∆y
yf 0
Figure 3
Given: m 5 1.2 kg; g 5 9.8 m/s2; Dy 5 28 m
Required: DEg
Analysis: Use the gravitational potential energy equation, DEg 5 mgDy. Let the
positive y-direction be upward. Let the reference point, yf 5 0, be the base of the cliff.
Solution: DEg 5 mgDy
5 11.2 kg2 19.8 m/s22 128 m2
DEg 5 3.3 3 102 J
Statement: The rock’s potential energy just before the hiker drops it is 3.3 3 102 J.
Sample Problem 2: Applying Gravitational Potential Energy to Determine Mass
A weightlifter raises a loaded barbell 2.2 m. The lift increases the gravitational potential
energy of the barbell by 490 J. Determine the mass of the loaded barbell.
Given: Dy 5 2.2 m; g 5 9.8 m/s2; DEg 5 490 J
Required: m
Analysis: Rearrange the gravitational potential energy equation, DEg 5 mgDy,
to solve for m.
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4.3 Gravitational Potential Energy
179
4/26/12 11:16 AM
Solution: DEg 5 mgDy
Divide both sides of the equation by gDy.
DEg
m5
gDy
490 J
5
19.8 m/s22 12.2 m2
m 5 23 kg
Statement: The mass of the loaded barbell is 23 kg.
Sample Problem 3: Gravitational Potential Energy
and the Work–Energy Theorem
A physics textbook is 3.6 cm thick and has a mass of 1.6 kg. A student stacks 10 of the
books in a single pile on a table. Each book starts from table level before the student lifts
it to the top of the stack.
(a) Calculate the gravitational potential energy of the stack of books with respect to the table.
(b)Determine the total work done by the student to make the stack of books.
(c) Calculate the work done by the student to move the books from the stack and set
each on the desk.
Given: height of each book, h 5 3.6 cm 5 0.036 m; number of books 5 10
Required: W
Analysis: DEg 5 mgDy
(a) Each book has a separate gravitational potential energy. Since the first book does
not move, no energy is expended. The second book is lifted 3.6 cm, the third is lifted
2 3 3.6 cm, and so on. The gravitational potential energy of the stack is the sum of
the gravitational potential energies for the individual books.
(b)Since work and energy use the same units, W is equal to the gravitational potential
energy of the stack.
(c) The work done to move the books from the stack is equal in magnitude to W but
opposite in sign.
Solution: DEg 5 mgDy
5 11.6 kg2 19.8 m/s22 3 0 10.036 m2 11 10.036 m2 12 10.036 m2
1 c19 10.036 m2 4
5 11.6 kg2 19.8 m/s22 10.036 m2 10 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 4 1 5 1 6
1 7 1 8 1 92
5 10.56 J2 1452
DEg 5 25 J
W 5 25 J
Statement:
(a) The potential energy of the stack relative to the table is 25 J.
(b) The work done by the student to create the stack is 25 J.
(c) The work done to move the books from the stack is 225 J.
Practice
1. A grey squirrel drops a 0.02 kg walnut from a branch that is 8.0 m high. Determine the
change in potential energy of the walnut between the branch and the ground. T/I [ans: 1.6 J]
2. The weightlifter in Sample Problem 2 increases the mass of the weights on the
barbell and lifts it one more time. The new lift increases the potential energy of the
bar by 660 J. Calculate the new mass of the barbell. T/I [ans: 31 kg]
3. Calculate the work required by the student in Sample Problem 3 to stack 2 more
physics books on the original stack of 10. T/I [ans: 12 J]
180 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 180
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4.3
Review
Summary
• Potential energy is the stored energy an object has that can be released into
another form of energy.
• Mechanical energy is the sum of the kinetic and potential energies.
• Gravitational potential energy is the energy that an object has due to its height
above a reference point. It is a scalar quantity and is measured in joules (J).
• When solving problems related to gravitational potential energy, choose a
reference point, y 5 0, from which to measure the gravitational potential energy.
• The gravitational potential energy of an object near Earth’s surface depends on
the object’s mass, m; the acceleration due to gravity, g; and the object’s change
in height as measured from a reference height, Dy: DEg 5 mgDy.
Questions
1. A 2.5 kg piece of wood falls onto a carpenter’s table
from a height of 2.0 m above the table. T/I
(a) Calculate the kinetic energy of the wood as it
hits the table.
(b) Calculate the speed of the wood as it hits the table.
2. Calculate the gravitational potential energy relative
to the ground of a 5.0 kg Canada goose flying at a
height of 553 m above the ground. T/I
3. A hockey referee drops a 175 g hockey puck from
rest vertically downward from a height of 1.05 m
above the ice surface. K/U T/I
(a) Determine the gravitational potential energy of the
puck relative to the ice before the referee drops it.
(b) Calculate the change in gravitational potential
energy of the puck as it drops from the referee’s
hand to the ice surface.
(c) Calculate the work done on the puck by gravity
as the puck travels from the referee’s hand to
the ice surface.
4. You lift your pet cat vertically by 2.0 m, and
then you lower it vertically by 2.0 m. During this
exercise, is the total work done by gravity positive,
negative, or zero? Explain your answer. K/U C
5. A pole vaulter clears the bar at a height of 5.4 m,
and then falls to the safety mat. The change in the
pole vaulter’s gravitational potential energy from
the bar to the mat is –3.1 3 103 J. Calculate the
pole vaulter’s mass. T/I
6. A 0.46 kg golf ball on a tee is struck by a golf club.
The golf ball reaches a maximum height where its
gravitational potential energy has increased by 155 J
from the tee. Determine the ball’s maximum height
above the tee. T/I
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7. A 59 kg snowboarder descends a 1.3 km ski hill from
the top of a mountain to the base (Figure 4). The slope
is at an angle of 14° to the horizontal. Determine the
snowboarder’s gravitational potential energy relative to
the mountain base when she is at the top. T/I
y
1.3 km
5 14°
Drawing not to scale
Figure 4
8. Suppose that you have N identical boxes in your
room, each with mass m and height Dy. You stack
the boxes in a vertical pile. K/U T/I
(a) Determine the work done to raise the last box
to the top of the pile. Express your answer in
terms of the variables m, g, N, and Dy.
(b) Determine the gravitational potential energy,
in terms of m, g, N, and Dy, that is stored in the
entire pile.
9. A gallon of gas contains about 1.3 3 108 J of chemical
potential energy. Determine how many joules of
chemical potential energy are stored in each litre of
gas (3.79 L 5 1 gallon). Calculate the height that the
amount of chemical potential energy in 1 L of gas could
raise all the students in your class if it was all converted
to gravitational potential energy. You will have to make
assumptions about the mass of the students. State your
assumptions and show your calculations. T/I A
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4.4
Explore an Issue in Energy Generation
Skills Menu
• Defining the
Issue
• Researching
• Identifying
Alternatives
• Analyzing
• Defending a
Decision
• Communicating
• Evaluating
Gravitational Potential Energy and Hydroelectricity
Although new technology and innovative methods for generating electricity are
being developed, traditional methods remain important. One of these methods is
hydroelectric power, which uses the kinetic energy of moving water to produce electrical energy (Figure 1). Hydroelectric power relies on a renewable energy source and
is much cleaner to produce than power generated by burning fossil fuels.
Figure 1 The water moving through the Oldman hydroelectric dam in Alberta contains a tremendous
amount of kinetic energy.
As with any large-scale energy production method, however, hydroelectric power
has drawbacks. Many hydroelectric power plants use large dams and reservoirs,
which are expensive to build and can destroy surrounding ecosystems. Problems with
sediment buildup, evaporation of water from reservoirs, and the impact of climate
change all influence the production of hydroelectricity.
Delivering the electricity to consumers also poses problems. Placing the large
power lines required to deliver energy from a hydroelectric source to the people who
need it might not be feasible for economic and environmental reasons. Electricity
can be generated using water from a number of sources, but all of the methods used
present distinct benefits and challenges. Harnessing ocean wave and tidal energy, for
instance, is difficult without adversely affecting coastal areas and interrupting shipping lanes. Useful ocean currents may run far off the coast, making it expensive to
transfer the electricity generated to inland locations.
The Issue
In Canada, most electricity is generated at hydroelectric power plants. This technology has not expanded, however, since the 1970s. Some Canadians believe that the
country should increase its use of hydroelectricity. Other Canadians, however, feel
that the negative aspects of hydroelectricity are too great. Your role is to be a resident
of a community that must decide whether to fund a new hydroelectric power project.
Representatives of both sides will present their arguments at a local forum. You must
then vote on the project at the forum’s conclusion. You will prepare for this forum by
gathering information about the topics that are relevant to your community and the
members of various communities across Canada.
182 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 182
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Goal
To decide whether Canada should expand its use of hydroelectricity and present
evidence that supports your decision
research
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
A4.1
Contact your local providers of electric power to determine where the electricity used
by your community is generated. Research the environmental concerns about power
generation in your area, and the ways in which those concerns were resolved. Prepare
a summary of your findings, highlighting any issues or strategies that you believe
would be relevant if new hydroelectric plants were proposed for your area.
Choose one new technology related to modern hydroelectric power generation,
and research the costs and benefits associated with it, including possible environmental and social impacts. Your research might include
• run-of-the-river generating stations, such as the Beauharnois Power Plant
near Montréal
• tidal power plants, such as the Annapolis Tidal Station in Nova Scotia
WEB LINK
• technologies used in different locations around the world
Possible Solutions
Consider your perspective on the issues raised. What are the options available for
hydroelectric power in the future? What environmental and social outcomes would
result from each energy strategy? What improvements can you think of to increase
the capacity and efficiency of hydroelectric power? Think about
• advances in environmentally friendly construction methods that might be
used during plant construction
• new materials or methods that might minimize cost concerns
• increasing concerns related to traditional electricity generation methods
decision
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
A4.2
Which hydroelectric options would you support? Explain your decision, using your
summary and research findings.
Communicate
• Design a chart, electronic slide presentation, web page, blog post, or other
visual presentation that explains the pros and cons of each method.
• Prepare a map of Ontario or all of Canada that shows the current locations
of hydroelectric power plants. Select areas that you believe, based on your
research, might be good choices for development of new plants.
• Choose one location, and create a list of specific concerns that might trouble
people living in the area surrounding the site you have chosen.
Plan for Action
Take part in a debate on this issue with your classmates, as you
might in a community forum. Prepare five questions for each
representative in the forum. At the end of the forum, vote on
whether to build the plant in your community. Write a summary
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 183
of your decision to present to people or groups outside your
community who might be interested in your findings, including
news agencies, government entities, surrounding communities,
non-government energy groups, and environmental groups.
4.4 Explore an Issue in Energy Generation
183
4/26/12 11:16 AM
4.5
the law of conservation of Energy
Imagine the thrill of the riders as the roller coaster in Figure 1 moves up and around
the loops, over and over again. What do riders feel as they near the top of each loop?
What do they feel as they move down toward the ground again? What makes them
feel these sensations?
In this section, you will explore some of the physics related to roller coasters,
sports activities, and other movements you experience every day. You will read about
the exchange between gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy that occurs
when objects move.
Energy Transformations
Figure 1 Roller coasters offer both thrills
and a chance to learn about physics.
As a diver climbs the steps to the top of a diving platform, her gravitational potential
energy increases relative to the water surface. As she dives toward the water, her gravitational potential energy decreases. At the same time, her kinetic energy increases
as her downward speed builds. When she hits the water, her gravitational potential
energy relative to the water surface is zero, and her kinetic energy is at a maximum.
Although her gravitational potential energy decreases, that energy does not just
disappear. As her kinetic energy increases, it too does not just appear from nowhere.
The potential energy transforms into kinetic energy as the diver falls. Energy is
neither created nor destroyed; it simply changes form. In fact, the total mechanical
energy—the sum of kinetic and potential energy—remains constant. This important
law of nature is called the law of conservation of energy:
Law of Conservation of Energy
Energy is neither created nor destroyed. It can only change form.
The law of conservation of energy is one of the fundamental principles of physics.
To take into account apparent energy losses due to friction and other effects, the
statement above will be refined in the next section. You will use the law of conservation of energy as a tool for solving many problems.
Mini Investigation
various Energies of a roller Coaster
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
Skills: Predicting, Analyzing, Evaluating, Communicating
In this activity, you will analyze differences in energy at various
heights of a roller coaster car. A roller coaster car starts from
rest at point A, moves down the hill, and up and around the
loop, to point F (Figure 2). Assume that energy losses due to
friction are negligible and can be ignored. In this scenario, the
height of the roller coaster is the independent variable, and the
different types of energy are the dependent variables.
1. Create a table with the headings Height, Gravitational
Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy, and Total Energy.
2. Record the height values for the six labelled points
in Figure 2.
3. Calculate the potential, kinetic, and total mechanical energy
values for each of the six points, and record the values
in your table. Assume the mass of the roller coaster car
is 875 kg.
184
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 184
A5.5
A  74 m
D  56 m
E
33 m
C  15 m
F0m
Figure 2
B0m
4. Sketch a graph of energy versus height for the roller coaster.
Show each of the three energies (gravitational potential
energy, kinetic energy, and total energy) on the same graph,
but use different colours or line styles for each type.
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A. Describe and explain the shape of the total energy
graph. K/u T/I A
B. Compare the shapes of the graphs for gravitational potential
energy and kinetic energy. How do they relate to the total
energy graph? T/I A
C. Explain why it was necessary to know the height of
point A. How would the graph change if the height of
point A were greater? T/I A
D. Discuss how your graph would change if the mass of the
roller coaster car were greater. K/u T/I A
WEB LINK
The total mechanical energy of a moving roller coaster car is the same at every
point. That is, the sum of the gravitational energy and the kinetic energy remains
constant. The total initial energy, ET i, equals the total final energy, ET f :
ET i 5 ET f
For situations involving only gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy, the
equation can be written as
Eg i 1 Ek i 5 Eg f 1 Ek f
Knowing the energy of a roller coaster car at the start of the ride enables you to
determine the gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy at other points. The
following Tutorial examines how to use conservation of energy to solve problems
WEB LINK
involving motion.
Tutorial 1 Applying the Law of Conservation of Energy
Sample Problem 1: Making Connections between Gravitational Potential Energy and Kinetic Energy
A 67 kg snowboarder starts at the top of an icy (frictionless)
hill of vertical height 22 m with an initial speed of 15 m/s
(Figure 3).
(a) Calculate the snowboarder’s mechanical energy at the top of
the hill.
(b) Calculate the snowboarder’s speed at the midway point and
at the bottom of the hill.
(c) Describe the energy transformation that occurs as the
snowboarder moves down the hill.
Solution
(a) Given: m 5 67 kg; ∆y 5 22 m; vi 5 15 m/s
Required: ET
Analysis: Choose the bottom of the hill as the h 5 0
reference point. Then, set the gravitational potential energy
at the top of the hill equal to this amount.
1
DEg 5 mgDy; Ek 5 mv 2 ; ET 5 Eg 1 Ek
2
Solution: The change in gravitational potential energy from
the bottom of the hill to the top of the hill is
DEg 5 mgDy
v i = 15 m/s
Dyy = 22 m
Drawing not to scale
Figure 3
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 185
5 167 kg2 19.8 m/s22 122 m2
DEg 5 1.444 3 104 J 1two extra digits carried2
The kinetic energy at the top of the hill is
1
Ek 5 mv 2i
2
1
5 167 kg2 115 m/s2 2
2
Ek 5 7.537 3 103 J 1two extra digits carried2
4.5 The Law of Conservation of Energy
185
4/26/12 11:16 AM
The total mechanical energy at the top of the hill is then
ET 5 Eg 1 Ek
5 1.444 3 104 J 1 7.537 3 103 J
ET 5 2.198 3 104 J 1two extra digits carried2
Statement: The snowboarder’s mechanical energy at the top
of the hill, relative to the bottom of the hill, is 2.2 3 104 J.
(b) Given: m 5 67 kg; ∆ymid 5 11 m and ∆y bottom 5 0 m;
ET i 5 2.198 3 104 J
Required: v mid; v bottom
Analysis: Use the law of conservation of energy to relate the
initial and final energies:
Eg i 1 Ek i 5 Eg f 1 Ek f
In each case,
1
DEg 5 mgDy ; Ek 5 mv 2
2
Solution: The total mechanical energy at the midpoint and the
bottom of the hill will equal the total energy at the top of the
hill, 2.2 3 104 J. Since the hill bottom is the h 5 0 reference
point, the gravitational potential energy at the midpoint is
1
Ek mid 5 mv 2
2
2Ek mid
5 v2
m
2Ek mid
5v
Å m
v5
v 5 21 m/s
Next, perform the same calculations for the bottom of the hill.
Note that at the bottom of the hill the mechanical energy is all
kinetic energy.
Eg bottom 5 mgDy
5 167 kg2 19.8 m/s22 10 m2
Eg bottom 5 0 J
Ek bottom 5 ET 2 Eg bottom
5 2.198 3 104 J 2 0 J
Ek bottom 5 2.198 3 104 J 1two extra digits carried2
Now calculate her speed at the bottom of the hill:
vbottom 5
Eg 5 mgDy
22
5 167 kg2 19.8 m/s 111 m2
Eg 5 7.223 3 103 J 1two extra digits carried2
The kinetic energy is
Ek 5 ET 2 Eg
5 2.198 3 104 J 2 7.223 3 103 J
Ek 5 1.476 3 104 J
Then, calculate the speed at the midpoint.
2 11.476 3 104 J2
Å
67 kg
2 12.198 3 104 J2
Å
67 kg
5 26 m/s
5
vbottom
2Ek bottom
Å m
Statement: Halfway down the hill, the snowboarder’s speed
is 21 m/s. Her speed at the bottom of the hill is 26 m/s.
(c) As the snowboarder moves down the hill, her height above
the reference point decreases, reducing her gravitational
potential energy. Her speed, however, increases. The
gravitational potential energy continuously transforms into
kinetic energy until she reaches the bottom.
Sample Problem 2: Determining Maximum Height and Speed Using the Law of Conservation of Energy
Figure 4 shows a 0.45 kg bullfrog jumping with an initial speed
of 6.2 m/s at an angle of 49° above the horizontal. Assume that
energy losses due to air resistance are negligible and can be ignored.
s
m/
6.2
i
v=
Dyy = ?
Figure 4
(a) Calculate the maximum height of the bullfrog’s jump.
(b) Calculate the components of the bullfrog’s velocity when it
first reaches a height of 0.82 m.
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 186
(a) Given: m 5 0.45 kg; h i 5 0; vi 5 6.2 m/s; u 5 49°
Required: ∆y
1
Analysis: DEg 5 mgDy; Ek 5 mv 2; ET 5 Eg 1 Ek;
2
vx 5 vi cos u
49°
186
Solution
The bullfrog’s velocity in the horizontal direction does not
change, because no horizontal force acts on the frog. Since
the change in the horizontal velocity is zero, it has no effect on
the change in kinetic energy of the bullfrog. The kinetic energy
from the bullfrog’s vertical component of velocity decreases
and transforms into gravitational potential energy. You can
solve the problem by comparing just the vertical parts of the
kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.
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4/26/12 11:16 AM
Solution: The initial speed is 6.2 m/s. The initial horizontal
velocity is
vx 5 vi cos u
5 16.2 m/s2 cos 498
vx 5 4.07 m/s
At the high point of the jump, the vertical component of the
velocity is zero, but the horizontal component is still 4.07 m/s.
The speed at the high point is then 4.07 m/s. Using
conser vation of energy,
Ek i 1 Eg i 5 Ek f 1 Eg f
Eg i 2 Eg f 5 Ek f 2 Ek i
2DEg 5 DEk
Use this equation to solve for the change in height.
1
2mgDy 5 m 1v 2f 2 v 2i2
2
Dy 5 a
5a
v 2i 2 v 2f
b
2g
16.2 m/s2 2 2 14.07 m/s2 2
b
2 19.8 m/s22
Dy 5 1.1 m
Statement: The bullfrog reaches a maximum height of 1.1 m
above the ground.
(b) Given: yi 5 0; m 5 0.45 kg; vi 5 6.2 m/s; yf 5 0.82 m
Required: vx f; vy f
Analysis: Use the law of conservation of energy to relate the
initial and final energies.
Solution: The change in the gravitational potential energy is
DEg 5 mgDy
5 10.45 kg2 19.8 m/s22 10.82 m2
DEg 5 3.6 J
As in part (a), the horizontal speed of the bullfrog does not
change, so the only change to its kinetic energy comes from
a change in its vertical speed.
1
1
DEk 5 m 1v 2x f 1 v 2y f2 2 m 1v 2x i 1 v 2y i2
2
2
1
5 m 1v 2x f 1 v 2y f 2 v 2x i 2 v 2y i 2
2
1
DEk 5 m 1v 2y f 2 v 2y i2
2
The initial vertical speed is
vy i 5 vi sin u
5 16.2 m/s2 sin 498
vy i 5 4.68 m/s
Now use conservation of energy:
DEk 5 2DEg
1 2
1
mv 5 mv 2 2 DEg
2 yf 2 yi
Multiply both sides of the equation by 2, and divide both
sides by m.
2DEg
v 2y f 5 v 2y i 2
m
2DEg
vy f 5 v 2y i 2
Å
m
5
Å
14.68 m/s2 2 2
vy f 5 2.4 m/s
2 13.6 J2
0.45 kg
Statement: The bullfrog’s speed at a height of 0.82 m is 2.4 m/s.
Practice
1. A soccer player kicks a 0.43 kg soccer ball down a smooth (frictionless) hill 18 m high with
an initial speed of 7.4 m/s (Figure 5). T/I
(a) Calculate the ball’s speed as it reaches the bottom of the hill. [ans: 2.0 3 101 m/s]
(b) The soccer player stands at the same point on the hill and gives the ball a kick up
the hill at 4.2 m/s. The ball moves up the hill, comes to rest, and rolls back down the
hill. Determine the ball’s speed as it reaches the bottom of the hill. T/I [ans: 19 m/s]
2. A tennis player begins a serve by tossing a 57 g tennis ball straight up.
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 187
Dy = 18 m
T/I
(a) After leaving the player’s hand, the ball rises another 1.8 m. Calculate the speed of the
ball as it leaves the player’s hand. [ans: 5.9 m/s]
1
(b) On the next serve, the tennis player tosses the ball with the speed in (a). Determine
4
the ratio of the maximum rise of the ball after leaving the player’s hand after this toss
to the maximum rise in (a). [ans: 1:16]
NEL
vi = 7.4 m/s
Figure 5
4.5 The Law of Conservation of Energy
187
4/26/12 11:16 AM
Investigation
4.5.1
Energy and Pulleys (page 210)
The law of conservation of energy
applies to real-world mechanical
systems. In this controlled experiment
you will investigate this law.
isolated system a system that cannot
interact or exchange energy with external
systems; also called a closed system
open system a system that can interact
with another external system
Isolated and Open Systems
In the previous section, you learned about the conservation of mechanical energy.
Mechanical energy includes gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy.
However, the conservation of energy includes other forms of energy, such as thermal,
elastic, electrical, chemical, light, and sound. To understand transformations between
these forms of energy, it is important to know the distinction between an isolated and
an open system.
An isolated system is a system that cannot interact with any other system or
exchange energy with its surroundings. An object in an isolated system might
exchange energy with other objects within the system, but energy never moves into
or out of the system. The parts of the system are isolated from any influences outside
the system.
In reality, the universe itself is the only completely isolated system, but you
can define a system that has minor influence from its surroundings as an isolated
system. For example, you may consider a diver to be an isolated system if you
ignore influences such as air friction and the energy of vibrations in the diving
board.
An open system is a system that can interact with another external system. An
open system can exchange energy with its surroundings. In reality, a diver is an open
system that exchanges energy with the air, the diving board, the water, and other realworld systems. Physicists sometimes refer to an isolated system as a closed system to
contrast it with an open system. Many systems analyzed in this book can be modelled
as isolated systems. The concepts of isolated and open systems allow us to state the
law of conservation of energy more formally:
Law of Conservation of Energy
Energy is neither created nor destroyed in an isolated system. It can only
change form.
biochemical energy a type of chemical
potential energy stored in the cells
and other basic structures of biological
organisms
Figure 6 Some jellyfish transform
biochemical energy into light energy.
188 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 188
Biological Energy Transformations
It is difficult to imagine a second of the day without observing some type of
energy transformation. Each time you turn on a light, walk to class, or listen to
your favourite song, energy changes from one form to another. Energy conservation involves transformations between many types of energy. Many biologically
important energy transformations involve chemical energy. Biochemical energy is
the energy stored in the cells of organisms and is used to perform all life processes. Green plants produce biochemical energy during photosynthesis. Every
time you blink your eyes, raise your arm, or move muscles, you transform
biochemical energy stored in your body to mechanical energy that enables you
to move.
Biochemical energy can also change to forms other than mechanical energy. The
bioluminescent jellyfish in Figure 6 uses the transformation of biochemical energy
to light energy as a defence mechanism against predators. Electric eels transform
biochemical energy to electrical energy to stun their prey. During intense exercise,
the change of biochemical energy to thermal energy in your body causes you to feel
warm. In each of these transformations, total energy is conserved.
NEL
4/26/12 11:16 AM
Power
You learned that hydroelectric stations generate millions of kilowatts of power. The
terms power and kilowatt are probably familiar to you, but what do they actually
mean? Time enters into work–energy ideas through the concept of power, which
relates the rate of change in energy of a system over time. A man using a rope to lift
a crate does work on the crate as it moves from the floor to a height h (Figure 7).
The displacement changes the potential energy of the crate by an amount mgDy. This
energy comes from the man as he pulls on the other end of the rope and does an
amount of work W 5 mgDy on the rope.
If this work is expended during a time t, then the power P exerted by the man is
defined as
P5
W
t
power the rate of work done by a force
over time, or the rate at which the energy
of an open system changes
FT
m
The SI unit of power is the watt (W), named after James Watt (1736–1819), a
developer of the steam engine. One watt is equal to one joule per second. Note
that the symbol for watt is not italicized (W), but the variable used for work is an
italic W.
Notice that power is the rate at which work is done. Work is a way to transfer
energy from one system to another over time. As a result, power is also equal to the
energy output of a device per unit time.
In addition to mechanical energy, you can consider how other types of energy,
including chemical energy and electrical energy, are involved in conservation of
energy situations. The concept of power also applies to chemical and electrical processes and devices. There is a power output or input associated with many of the
electrical devices in your home. For example, a typical compact fluorescent lamp is
rated at 23 W, or 23 J/s. This rating means that the lamp consumes 23 J of electrical
energy for every second it is turned on. Likewise, electronic devices such as computers and DVD players also have a power rating. Table 1 lists the power output
and consumption of a number of common devices.
y
h
crate
Figure 7 The man produces power
as he lifts the crate.
Table 1 Typical Values for the Power Output or Consumption of Some
Common Appliances and Devices
Device
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 189
Power output or consumption (W)
portable DVD player
20
laptop computer
40
desktop computer
125
elite bicycle racer
400
automobile engine (small car)
7.5 3 104
automobile engine (race car)
5.2 3 105
4.5 The Law of Conservation of Energy 189
4/26/12 11:16 AM
The distinction between power consumption and power output is important. For
example, a fluorescent lamp consumes a certain amount of electrical energy (for
which you pay the utility company), and it outputs a certain amount of energy in the
form of visible light along with a certain amount of thermal energy.
The following Tutorial illustrates the definition of power as change in energy
over time.
Tutorial 2 Calculating Power
Sample Problem 1: Power as a Rate of Change in Kinetic Energy
A car accelerates from rest to a speed of 27.8 m/s in 7.7 s. The mass of the car is
1.1 3 103 kg. Ignoring friction, determine how much power the car requires.
Given: m 5 1.1 3 103 kg; v i 5 0 m/s; vf 5 27.8 m/s; t 5 7.7 s
Required: P
W
Analysis: Use the power equation, P 5 . Use the work–energy theorem to relate W
t
to the change in kinetic energy DEk.
Solution: The work done on the car equals its change in kinetic energy. The car starts
from rest, so the change in kinetic energy equals the final kinetic energy:
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about energy transformations and the
conservation of energy to the Unit Task
on page 270.
W 5 DEk
5 Ek f
1
5 mv 2f
2
1
5 11.1 3 103 kg2 127.8 m/s2 2
2
W 5 4.251 3 105 J 1two extra digits carried2
Therefore,
W
t
4.251 3 105 J
5
7.7 s
P 5 5.5 3 104 W
P5
Statement: The car requires 55 kW of power.
Practice
1. A firefighter climbs a ladder at a speed of 1.4 m/s. The ladder is 5.0 m long, and the
firefighter weighs 65 kg. T/I A
(a) Determine the firefighter's power output while climbing the ladder. [ans: 890 W]
(b) How long does it take her to climb the ladder? [ans: 3.6 s]
2. A Grand Prix race car accelerates to twice the speed of the car in Sample Problem 1, in
the same amount of time. Calculate the ratio of the power needed by the Grand Prix car
to the power needed by the car in Sample Problem 1. K/U T/I A [ans: 4:1]
3. Every year, the Calgary Tower hosts a foot race to the top of the tower. The vertical
distance travelled up the 802 steps is about 190 m, and a champion racer can make
the climb in less than 5.0 min. If a 62 kg racer completes the climb in 4 min 50 s,
determine his average power output during the race. T/I A [ans: 0.40 kW]
190 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 190
NEL
4/26/12 11:17 AM
4.5
Review
Summary
• The law of conservation of energy states that energy can neither be created
nor destroyed in an isolated system; it can only change form. This law is
useful for solving many physics problems involving motion.
• An isolated, or closed, system cannot exchange energy with its surroundings.
However, an open system can exchange energy with its surroundings.
• Power is the rate of work done during a time interval, or the rate at which the
energy of a system changes.
Questions
1. A child tosses a tennis ball straight up into the air
with an initial speed of 11 m/s. Ignore the height of
the child, and assume that air resistance is negligible. K/U
T/I
C
(a) Determine the maximum height that the ball
will reach.
(b) Sketch a graph of potential energy versus time
for the ball during its time in the air. Explain
why the graph has the shape that it does. Label
the minimum and maximum potential energy
values.
(c) On the same set of axes, sketch a graph of total
energy versus time and a graph of kinetic energy
versus time. Explain why they are shaped the
way that they are. Identify any maximum or
minimum values.
2. An apple falls from a branch to the ground below. K/U
(a) At what moment is the kinetic energy of the
apple greatest?
(b) At what moment is the gravitational potential
energy greatest?
3. A hockey puck slides along a level surface,
eventually coming to rest. K/U T/I
(a) Is the energy of the hockey puck conserved?
Explain your answer.
(b) Discuss what happens to the initial kinetic
energy of the puck.
4. (a) A skier of mass 110 kg travels down a
frictionless ski trail with a top elevation of
210 m. Calculate the work done on the skier
by gravity as the skier travels from the top
of the trail to the bottom.
(b) Calculate the speed of the skier when he reaches
the bottom of the ski trail. Assume he starts
from rest. T/I A
NEL
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 191
5. A 62 kg snowboarder is moving across a
horizontal ledge at 8.1 m/s when she encounters
a drop-off and becomes airborne. Ignore air
resistance. The snowboarder lands 3.7 m below
the drop-off. Calculate her speed at the moment
she hits the ground. T/I A
6. A dolphin is trying to jump through a hoop that is
fixed at a height of 3.5 m above the surface of her
pool. The dolphin leaves the water at an angle of
inclination of 40°. Determine the minimum speed
the dolphin will need when leaving the water in
order to reach the height of the hoop. T/I
7. A roller coaster car with mass 640 kg moves along
the track shown in Figure 8. Assume all friction is
negligible. K/U T/I A
A
B
∆y A  30.0 m
∆y B  15 m
C
Figure 8
(a) Is the mechanical energy of the roller coaster
conserved? Explain your answer.
(b) If the roller coaster starts from rest at point A,
what is its total mechanical energy at point A?
(c) What is the total mechanical energy at point B?
(d) Calculate the speed of the roller coaster when it
reaches points B and C.
(e) If the car starts with a speed of 12 m/s at point A,
calculate the speed of the roller coaster when it
reaches points B and C.
8. A 52 kg woman jogs up a hill in 24 s. Calculate
the power the woman exerts if the hill is 18 m
high. T/I A
4.5 The Law of Conservation of Energy 191
4/26/12 11:17 AM
4.6
Elastic Potential Energy and Simple
Harmonic Motion
Jumping on a trampoline is fun, but is it also work? Each time the student in Figure 1
moves downward, she has to bend her knees and push hard against the trampoline.
According to Newton’s third law of motion, the trampoline also exerts an equal force
in the opposite direction, pushing her upward.
What type of energy does the student jumping on the trampoline have? You know
that she has gravitational potential energy relative to the ground when she is in the
air above the trampoline. She also has kinetic energy because she is moving. Does she
have other types of energy?
As the girl pushes down on the trampoline, she stretches the elastic fabric and
springs of the trampoline. The downward force of her feet does work on the trampoline,
transferring energy to it. This energy temporarily becomes stored energy in the fabric
and the springs. We will explore the nature of this type of stored energy in this section.
Spring Forces
Figure 1 Jumping on a trampoline
requires transformations between kinetic
energy, gravitational potential energy,
and elastic potential energy.
One important type of potential energy is associated with springs and other elastic
objects. You are probably familiar with a simple spring, such as the tight coil of wire
shown in Figure 2. In its relaxed state, with no force applied to its end, the spring is at
rest, as shown in Figure 2(a). Suppose you pull on the spring with a force Fpull, causing
the spring to stretch to the right, as shown in Figure 2(b). When stretched, the spring
exerts a force Fspring to the left. Likewise, if you push on the spring with a force Fpush, it
compresses to the position shown in Figure 2(c). When compressed, the spring exerts
a force Fspring to the right. In both cases, Fspring is called the restorative force because it
tends to restore the spring to its natural length.
Fspring
Relaxed state: Fspring  0
Block is at x  0.
x
(a)
x0
Stretched:
x is positive.
Fpull
(b)
x
x0
Fspring
Fpush
x
x
(c)
Compressed:
x is negative.
x
x0
Figure 2 The force exerted by a spring is always opposite to the displacement of the end of the
spring. (a) When a spring is unstretched and uncompressed, the force exerted by the spring is zero.
(b) The spring is stretched by pulling it to the right, so the force exerted by the spring is to the left.
(c) The spring is compressed, and the force exerted by the spring is to the right.
Hooke’s law the amount of force exerted
by a spring is directly proportional to the
displacement of the spring
spring constant (k) the constant of
variation between the force exerted by an
ideal spring and the spring’s displacement
192 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 192
The amount of force exerted by a spring is proportional to the spring’s displacement.
This is Hooke’s law, named after Robert Hooke (1635–1703), who discovered the relationship in 1678. Hooke’s law for the force exerted by the spring is
>
>
F x 5 2kDx
>
In this equation, F x is the force exerted by the spring on whatever stretches it, and
>
Dx is the displacement of the spring from its unstretched, equilibrium position. The
constant of proportionality k is called the spring constant of the spring, and it corresponds to the stiffness of the spring. Springs that are stiff have a larger value for
k and require a larger force to extend or compress them. Springs that stretch easily
have smaller values of k. An essential feature of Hooke’s law is that the direction of
>
the spring force is> opposite to the direction of displacement> from equilibrium. If Dx
>
is upward, then F x is downward. If Dx is downward, then F x is upward.
NEL
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Mini Investigation
SpringInvestigation
Force
Mini
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Evaluating, Communicating
In this activity, you will explore the force exerted by a stretched
spring.
2. Attach a mass to the spring. Measure the displacement Dx,
and record your measurement in a data table.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; support stand with
desk clamp; extension spring; clamp for extension spring; mass
set (masses from 50 g to 200 g for a sensitive spring; masses
from 500 g to 2000 g for a stiff spring); ruler; soft material
1. Put on your eye protection. Set up the equipment as shown
in Figure 3, and place soft material below the spring.
support stand
clamp
string
extension
spring
mass
A5.5
Be careful not to let the masses fall on your hands or
feet. Do not let the springs overstretch.
3. Repeat Step 2 for the other masses. Remember to record
the masses you use.
4. For each measurement, calculate and record the force using
the equation Fg 5 mg.
5. Create a graph of Fg versus Dx. Draw a line of best fit.
A. Describe the relationship between Fg and Dx.
K/u
T/I
B. Calculate the slope of the line of best fit. What does this
slope represent? T/I A
C. Write the equation F 5 kDx for the equipment you used in
this investigation, where k is the slope of the line of best fit.
K/u
T/I
lab
bench
clamp
Figure 3
A spring that obeys Hooke’s law exactly is called an ideal spring, and no internal or
external friction acts on it. Although we have only discussed springs so far, Hooke’s
law applies to many elastic devices. In Tutorial 1, you will use Hooke’s law to predict
the effect of an applied force on a spring.
ideal spring any spring that obeys
Hooke’s law; it does not experience any
internal or external friction
Tutorial 1 Applying Hooke’s Law
The following Sample Problem examines how to determine the spring constant of a spring
and how to use the spring constant to predict the stretch of the spring when a mass is
attached to it.
Sample Problem 1: Determining and Applying the Spring Constant
A spring hangs at rest from a support. If you suspend a 0.46 kg
mass from the spring, its deflection is 7.9 cm (Figure 4, next page).
(a) Determine the spring constant.
(b) Calculate the displacement, in centimetres, of the same spring
when a 0.75 kg mass hangs from it instead.
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 193
(c) Suppose the 0.75 kg mass is pushed upward, so that it rises
past the spring’s unstretched position, compressing the
spring. Calculate the net force on the mass when the spring
is compressed 5.3 cm. Include a free-body diagram.
(d) Determine the acceleration of the mass at the position given
in (c) once it is released.
4.6 Elastic Potential Energy and Simple Harmonic Motion
193
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Solution
The displacement is in the downward direction.
(a) Given: m 5 0.46 kg; ∆x 5 7.9 cm 5 0.079 m
Required: k
Statement: The displacement of the spring is 13 cm [down].
kx
(c) Given: m 5 0.75 kg; k 5 57.1 N/m; Dx 5 5.3 cm 5 0.053 m
>
Required: F net
Analysis: The free-body diagram for the mass is shown in
Figure 5.
x 5.3 cm
x0
ΣF  0
∆x 7.9 cm
mg
mg
(b)
(a)
Figure 4 (a) Mass suspended from a vertical spring (b) FBD
Analysis: The force of gravity on the mass points down.
The restorative spring force on the mass points up because
the spring is stretched down. To calculate the total force,
subtract the magnitudes:
>
>
>
F g 5 mg 3 down 4 5 2mg 3 up 4 ; F x 5 2kDx 5 kDx 3 up 4
>
Since the mass is not accelerating, SF 5 0 according to
Newton’s second law.
>
Solution: SF 5 0
kDx 2 mg 5 0
mg
k5
Dx
10.46 kg2 19.8 m/s22
5
10.079 m2
k 5 57.1 N/m 1one extra digit carried2
Statement: The spring constant is 57 N/m.
(b) Given: m 5 0.75 kg; k 5 57.1 N/m
>
Required: Dx
Analysis: The force of gravity on the mass points down.
The spring force on the mass points up because the spring
is displaced down.
>
>
>
F g 5 mg 3 down 4 5 2mg 3 up 4 ; F x 5 2kDx 5 kDx 3 up 4
>
Since the mass is not accelerating, SF 5 0.
>
Solution: SF 5 0
kDx 2 mg 5 0
mg
Dx 5
k
10.75 kg2 19.8 m/s22
5
57.1 N/m
Dx 5 0.13 m
194
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 194
kx
x0
Figure 5
The force of gravity on the mass points down. The spring
force on the mass points down because the spring is
compressed upward.
>
>
>
F g 5 mg 3 down 4 , F x 5 2kDx 5 kDx 3 down 4
>
>
>
F net 5 F g 1 F x
>
>
>
Solution: F net 5 F g 1 F x
5 mg 3 down 4 1 kDx 3 down 4
5 10.75 kg2 19.8 m/s22 3down 4
1 157.1 N/m2 10.053 m2 3down 4
>
F net 5 10.4 N 3 down 4
Statement: The net force is 10 N [down] when the spring has
been compressed by 0.053 m.
>
(d) Given: F net 5 10.4 N [down]; m 5 0.75 kg
>
Required: a
>
>
Analysis: F net 5 ma
>
>
Solution: F net 5 ma
>
> F net
a5
m
10.4 N
3 down 4
5
0.75 kg
>
a 5 14 m/s2 3 down 4
Statement: The acceleration is 14 m/s2 [down] when the
spring is compressed 0.053 m. If the mass is moving
upward, the downward acceleration means that it is
slowing down due to the force of gravity and the elastic
force of the spring.
NEL
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Practice
1. (a) A 0.65 kg mass hangs at rest from a spring. The spring is stretched 0.44 m from its
equilibrium position. Determine the spring constant. [ans: 14 N/m]
(b) You remove the mass from the spring and attach a new mass to the spring. The new mass
stretches the spring 0.74 m from its equilibrium position. Determine the new mass. T/I [ans: 1.1 kg]
2. A 5.3 kg mass hangs vertically from a spring with spring constant 720 N/m. The mass is lifted
upward and released. Calculate the force and acceleration on the mass when the spring is
compressed by 0.36 m. T/I [ans: 310 N [down]; 59 m/s2 [down]]
Elastic Potential Energy
The student jumping on the trampoline in Figure 1 does work on the trampoline
every time she pushes down on it. As the student comes down from a jump and
hits the trampoline surface, she has kinetic energy. As the trampoline fabric and
springs stretch, she transfers her kinetic energy into potential energy stored in the
trampoline. Energy that is stored in objects that are compressed or stretched is called
elastic potential energy. This stored energy in the trampoline can be transferred back to
the student, giving her the kinetic energy she needs for her next upward jump.
Unlike gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy does not depend on
an object’s elevation. Instead, it depends on the amount of compression or stretching.
To determine the potential energy, we can calculate the change in kinetic energy of
a mass attached to a spring as the spring is compressed or stretched. The change in
kinetic energy equals the work done by the spring force. The work done by the spring
force can be determined from a graph of applied force versus displacement.
The area under a force–displacement graph for an ideal spring has the shape of a
triangle. The area of this triangle equals the work done on the spring by the applied
force. This applied force is equal but opposite to the spring force on an attached
object. Therefore, the work done on the spring to displace it will equal the negative of
the work done by the spring on the object as it is displaced.
Figure 6 shows a graph of the spring force on a mass attached to a spring as the
spring is stretched or compressed. The slope of the line equals 2k, following Hooke’s
law: the direction of the spring force is always opposite to the displacement. We can
interpret the area between the F versus x line and the x-axis for a given x value as the
total work done on the spring as the spring stretches or compresses by ∆x. This work
is the negative of the total work done by the spring.
elastic potential energy the potential
energy due to the stretching or
compressing of an elastic material
F spring
Fc kxc
maximum
force when
compressed
1
area xsFs
2
xs
xc
1
area xcFc
2
Fs kxs
x
maximum
force when
stretched
Figure 6 The work done by a variable force is equal to the area under the force–displacement
graph. This figure shows the force exerted by a spring for a given displacement, which is the
negative of the force applied to the spring to stretch it. For a spring, this area is a triangle. When the
spring is stretched, x 5 xs and W is the area of the triangle at the lower right. When the spring is
compressed, x 5 xc and W is the area of the triangle at the upper left. The work done by the spring
is negative, so the change in potential energy of an attached object is positive.
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 195
4.6 Elastic Potential Energy and Simple Harmonic Motion 195
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Since the area of a triangle equals one-half the base length times the height, the
work, W, done on a spring with a spring constant k is
1
W 5 Dx 1kDx2
2
1
W 5 k 1Dx2 2
2
The work done by the spring force is the negative of this amount, and is also the negative
of the change in potential energy. This means that the work done stretching or compressing
the spring is transformed into elastic potential energy. Remember that work is a scalar
quantity and thus directions can be ignored. We can equivalently write the equation as
1
Ee 5 k 1Dx 2 2
2
where Ee is the elastic potential energy.
As with all types of energy, elastic potential energy can be transformed to kinetic
energy, or to other types of potential energy. When the student jumps on the
trampoline, some of the energy transforms into kinetic energy and gravitational
potential energy. Some also transforms into the vibrational energy of the trampoline, sound energy, and thermal energy. The following Tutorial examines elastic
potential energy.
Tutorial 2 Calculating and Applying Elastic Potential Energy
The following Sample Problem shows how elastic potential energy can be calculated and applied
in simple situations.
Sample Problem 1: Calculate Elastic Potential Energy
A 42 kg teenager balances briefly on a pogo stick, causing the
spring in the stick to compress downward by 0.18 m. Determine
the elastic potential energy of the teenager.
Given: m 5 42 kg; Dx 5 0.18 m
Required: Ee
Analysis: The force of gravity on the teenager points down.
The spring force on the teenager points up because the
spring is compressed down.
>
F g 5 mg 3 down 4
>
>
F x 5 2kDx
>
F x 5 kDx 3 up 4
>
Since the teenager is not accelerating, SF 5 0.
Solution: Determine the spring constant:
>
SF 5 0
kDx 3 up 4 2 mg 3 down 4 5 0
mg
k5
Dx
142 kg2 19.8 m/s22
5
10.18 m2
k 5 2.29 3 103 N/m
Use the spring constant to determine the elastic potential energy:
1
Ee 5 k 1Dx2 2
2
1
5 12.29 3 103 N/m2 10.18 m2 2
2
Ee 5 37 J
Statement: The teenager on the pogo stick has 37 J of elastic
potential energy.
Practice
1. The teenager from Sample Problem 1 has a brother twice her mass. Calculate the ratio of his
elastic potential energy when balancing on the pogo stick to his sister’s. T/I [ans: 4:1]
2. A spring-loaded toy uses a compressed spring to fire a marble out of a tube. A force of 220 N
compresses the spring by 0.14 m. Calculate the elastic potential energy of the toy. T/I [ans: 15 J]
196 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 196
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4/26/12 11:17 AM
Periodic Motion
A person usually jumps more than one time on a trampoline or a pogo stick. Often a
person will jump up and down, over and over again. The motion usually changes slightly
with each jump, but suppose a jumper has regular motion so that the height and time for
each jump are always the same. Motion that repeats in this way is called periodic motion.
Simple Harmonic Motion
Suppose a block is connected to a spring and both are resting on a frictionless surface.
The block is at equilibrium when it is resting at its initial position, x 5 0, as shown in
Figure 7(a). In Figure 7(b), the spring is stretched to its maximum limit, or amplitude, A;
displacement, x 5 1A, is maximized and the block stops momentarily. The block’s
motion is then reversed as the spring pulls it back toward the equilibrium point
(Figure 7(c)). The block continues to move past the equilibrium point and stops when
the spring is fully compressed and negative displacement, x 5 2A, is maximized
(Figure 7(d)). The restorative force of the spring moves the system toward equilibrium, and the cycle continues.
Notice that the force exerted by the spring is not constant. As the spring approaches
its equilibrium point, the displacement, ∆x, decreases. Since Fx is proportional to the
magnitude of this displacement, Fx also decreases during this time.
k
v vmax
k
(a)
(equilibrium position)
x
(c)
v0
v0
x
x  A
x  A
(b)
v vmax
x
x0
amplitude (A) the maximum displacement
of a wave
x
(d)
Figure 7 A mass–spring system undergoing simple harmonic motion
The mass in Figure 7 will continue to move right and left between A and –A if both
the spring and surface are frictionless. This back-and-forth motion is an example of
simple harmonic motion. Simple harmonic motion (SHM) is back-and-forth, or periodic, motion in which the moving object experiences a force that is proportional and
opposite to the displacement. An object undergoing SHM is often referred to as a
WEB LINK
simple harmonic oscillator.
You can visualize back-and-forth motion that is similar to SHM by thinking about
a tennis ball hit from one side of the net to the other, over and over again. If the
players stand still in the same positions, and if they apply the same force to the ball
with each hit, the ball will continually have the same back-and-forth motion.
When describing SHM mathematically, picture a reference circle, like the CD shown
in Figure 8 on the next page. The mass attached to the spring in the figure vibrates
left and right with SHM. At the same time, the point shown on the CD rotates with
uniform circular motion. Suppose that the amplitude of the SHM equals the reference
point’s radius of revolution. What if the period of vibration for the SHM exactly equals
the period of rotation for the CD? Then, the x-coordinates of the mass and the point
on the CD will remain equal at all times. This means that the acceleration of the mass
is the same as the acceleration of the x-coordinate of the reference point at all times.
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simple harmonic motion periodic motion
in which the acceleration of the moving
object is proportional to its displacement
4.6 Elastic Potential Energy and Simple Harmonic Motion 197
4/26/12 11:17 AM
x
x
direction of
acceleration at
instant shown
mass
A
r
rotating CD
reference
point
direction of
rotation
Figure 8 The CD’s rotation period is the same as the mass’s oscillation period. The mass and the
reference point on the CD have the same x-coordinate at all times. The acceleration of the mass
and the acceleration in the x-direction of the reference point are also the same at all times.
When the reference point and the mass are at the point of maximum stretch in the
spring, the centripetal acceleration of the reference point ac is directed toward negative x. The acceleration of the x-coordinate at this moment is ac, so the acceleration
of the mass at this moment is also ac. This fact will allow us to calculate the period of
motion of the mass.
For an object with radius r in uniform circular motion with period T, the centripetal acceleration is
ac 5
4p2r
T2
We can rewrite this equation to solve for T:
T2 5
4p2r
ac
or T 5 2p
r
Å ac
Applying this result to SHM, let r 5 A (amplitude) for the reference circle. We then have
T 5 2p
A
Å ac
Next, we can use Hooke’s law and Newton’s second law to calculate the acceleration
of the mass. The equation
>
>
>
F x 5 2kDx 5 max
means that
>
kDx
>
ax 5 2
m
The ratio of the magnitude of the displacement to the magnitude of the acceleration is
Dx
m
5
ax
k
At the point of maximum stretch,
Dx
A
5
ax
ac
which means
m
A
5
ac
k
198 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 198
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If you substitute this result into the equation for the period, we obtain the equation
of the period of a mass on a spring:
m
T 5 2p
Åk
The period, T, of SHM is the amount of time for one cycle of motion. Period is measured in seconds. The inverse of T equals the number of cycles per second, or the
WEB LINK
frequency, f. The units of frequency are called hertz, and 1 Hz 5 1 cycle/s.
In Tutorial 3, you will use the equations for simple harmonic motion, period, and
frequency to solve problems.
Tutorial 3 Application of Period and Frequency
The following Sample Problem shows how to calculate the period and frequency of a diver
standing on a diving board.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating Period and Frequency
When a diving board bends, the restoring force due to the
board’s elastic properties obeys Hooke’s law for an elastic
material. Suppose a diver of mass 85 kg stands on a diving
board with spring constant 8.1 3 103 N/m. The mass of the
board is much smaller than the diver’s mass. Calculate the
period and frequency at which the board vibrates.
Given: m 5 85 kg; k 5 8.1 3 103 N/m
Required: f, T
Analysis: Use the equations for simple harmonic motion period
and frequency:
m
1
T 5 2p
and f 5
Åk
T
m
Solution: T 5 2p
Åk
85 kg
5 2p
Å 8.1 3 103 N/m
T 5 0.64 s
1
f5
T
1
5
0.64 s
f 5 1.6 Hz
Statement: The diving board will vibrate with a period of 0.64 s
and a frequency of 1.6 Hz.
Practice
1. A 105 kg swimmer stands on a diving board with a spring constant of 7.6 3 103 N/m.
Determine the period and frequency of the board vibrations. T/I [ans: 0.74 s; 1.4 Hz]
2. A car mounted on the springs in its suspension acts like a mass on a spring. How will the
frequency of oscillations change if passengers are added to the car? Will the frequency
increase, decrease, or stay the same? Explain your answer. K/U T/I A
Notice that the calculations in Tutorial 3 did not require you to identify how far the
diving board bent. The period and frequency depend only on the mass that exerts the
force and the spring constant of the elastic material.
You can identify numerous examples of SHM in everyday life (if you ignore friction). A child on a playground swing may swing back and forth at a regular rate.
Strings on guitars and violins vibrate when plucked. The planets move in periodic
orbits around the Sun. Automobiles use springs to provide a cushioning effect.
However, you do not experience long periods of SHM when riding in a car because
shock absorbers provide friction on the springs. We will explore the behaviour of
shock absorbers further in Section 4.7.
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4.6 Elastic Potential Energy and Simple Harmonic Motion 199
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4.6
Review
Summary
• Hooke’s law states that the force exerted by a spring (or, equivalently, the force
applied to a spring) is directly proportional to the spring’s displacement from
>
>
its rest equilibrium position, F 5 2kDx .
• The force exerted by a spring is a restorative force. It acts in the opposite
direction of the displacement to return the spring to its natural length.
• The constant of proportionality in Hooke’s law is the spring constant, k. The
spring constant is large when a spring is stiff and small when a spring is loose.
The spring constant is measured in newtons per metre.
• The energy stored in an object that is stretched, compressed, twisted, or bent
1
is called elastic potential energy, Ee 5 k 1Dx2 2.
2
• Simple harmonic motion (SHM) is periodic motion in which an object moves in
response to a force that is directly proportional and opposite to its displacement.
Questions
1. Spring A has a spring constant of 70 N/m, and
spring B has a spring constant of 50 N/m. Explain
which spring is more difficult to stretch. K/U
2. A force of 5 N is applied to a block attached to the
free end of a spring stretched from its relaxed length
by 10 mm. Determine the spring constant. T/I
3. Is the elastic potential energy stored in a spring greater
when the spring is stretched by 1.5 cm or when it is
compressed by 1.5 cm? Explain your answer. K/U C
4. Calculate the elastic potential energy stored in a spring
with a spring constant of 5.5 3 103 N/m when it
(a) stretches 2.0 cm
(b) compresses 3.0 cm K/U T/I
5. A 0.63 kg mass rests on top of a vertical spring with
spring constant 65 N/m. T/I
(a) When the mass sits at rest, determine the
distance that the spring is compressed from its
equilibrium position.
(b) The mass is held at the unstretched position
of the spring and released. Calculate the
acceleration of the mass after it falls 4.1 cm.
6. A 5.2 kg mass hung from a spring vibrates with a
period of 1.2 s. Calculate the spring constant. T/I
7. A spring has a spring constant of 1.5 3 103 N/m.
Determine the length that the spring should be
stretched to store 80.0 J of energy. T/I
8. Calculate the work done by a spring force acting
on a spring attached to a box, stretched from its
relaxed length by 15 mm. The spring constant of
the spring is 400.0 N/m. T/I
200 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 200
9. A mass–spring system undergoes SHM. The elastic
potential energy at maximum stretch is 7.50 J, the
mass is 0.20 kg, and the spring constant is 240 N/m.
Calculate the frequency and amplitude of oscillation. T/I
10. The springs in the suspension of a car with worn-out
shock absorbers will undergo SHM after hitting a
bump in the road. Suppose that a car with worn-out
shock absorbers has two identical rear axle springs
that each support 5.5 3 102 kg. After hitting a large
pothole, the rear end of the car vibrates through
six cycles in 4.4 s. Calculate the spring constant of
either spring. T/I A
11. Pyon pyon “flying shoes” were invented by Yoshiro
Nakamatsu of Japan (Figure 9). Research this
unique invention. Draw a diagram showing the
forces at work when the wearer takes a step. How
do you think the shoe’s designer incorporated
K/U
A
Hooke’s law into the shoe design?
Figure 9
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4.7
Springs and Conservation
of Energy
Most drivers try to avoid collisions, but not at a demolition derby like the one shown
in Figure 1. The point of a demolition derby is to crash your car into as many other
cars as possible. Each car tries to damage the other cars so much that they will stop
working. The harder the crash, the more damage you are likely to do. The last car
running is the winner.
Figure 1 In a demolition derby, the cars can be crashed, but the drivers must remain safe.
How can the drivers of demolition cars avoid serious injury? What types of
safety equipment do they use? Like most drivers, they wear seat belts to hold
themselves securely in their seat. They have shoulder straps to prevent lurching
forward. Padding inside the driver’s-side door might provide cushioning from side
impacts. Most cars on the road, however, have safety features that are missing or
unimportant in demolition cars. Cars you ride in probably have airbags to cushion
the passengers during a crash. They may have anti-lock brakes or other computercontrolled systems that act during emergency situations. In this section, you will
explore the physics behind safety equipment and other systems in which energy is
CAREER LINK
stored and transformed.
Conservation of Mechanical Energy
Systems that make a car safe use either springs or elastic materials, so they have elastic
potential energy. You have read about the conservation of energy in an isolated system.
The law of conservation of energy includes elastic potential energy: Energy is neither
created nor destroyed in an isolated system, but it can be transformed between kinetic
energy, gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and other forms of
energy. In this section, we will explore interactions of systems in which mechanical
energy is conserved; that is, the total amount of kinetic, gravitational potential, and
elastic potential energy remains constant. Energy losses due to effects such as friction,
air resistance, thermal energy, and sound can be ignored as negligible.
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Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you learn about
springs and conservation of energy to
the Unit Task on page 270.
4.7 Springs and Conservation of Energy 201
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Suppose, for example, a student jumps up from a diving board. Assuming air
friction is negligible, the mechanical energy of the diver will be conserved. Use the
diving board as the reference point, y 5 0, for measuring the gravitational potential
energy. At the maximum height h above the diving board, the diver has only gravitational potential energy equal to mgDy. He then starts to fall toward the board, gaining
kinetic energy because of his motion.
The diver’s distance above the reference point is decreasing, so his gravitational
potential energy is decreasing. His total mechanical energy does not change. Halfway
to the board, his gravitational potential energy has decreased by half, so it exactly
equals his kinetic energy. At the moment just before the diver hits the diving board,
the gravitational potential energy is zero, and he has kinetic energy that equals his
starting gravitational potential energy.
Conservation of mechanical energy still applies after the diver hits the diving
board. He applies a downward force on the board, displacing it a distance x. This work
transfers the diver’s kinetic energy to the board. The energy is stored in the board
as elastic potential energy. As the board dips down, the diver drops below y 5 0,
so his gravitational potential energy becomes negative. The total elastic potential
energy increases to offset the decrease in gravitational potential energy. In reality,
some energy is lost as friction, sound, and vibrations of the diving board. If we ignore
these effects, mechanical energy is conserved. You will apply the conservation of
mechanical energy in the following Tutorial.
Tutorial 1 Applying the Law of Conservation of Energy
In this Tutorial, we will analyze the transformations of gravitational potential, kinetic, and elastic
potential energies of various systems.
Sample Problem 1: Analyzing Energy Transformations
In this problem, you will model a collision and apply conservation
of energy to analyze the outcome. A model car of mass 5.0 kg
slides down a frictionless ramp into a spring with spring constant
k 5 4.9 kN/m (Figure 2).
Dy
k
Figure 2
(a) The spring experiences a maximum compression of 22 cm.
Determine the height of the initial release point.
(b) Calculate the speed of the model car when the spring has
been compressed 15 cm.
(c) Determine the maximum acceleration of the car after it hits
the spring.
Solution
(a) Given: m 5 5.0 kg; k 5 4.9 kN/m 5 4.9 3 103 N/m;
Dx 5 22 cm 5 0.22 m
Required: Dy
1
Analysis: DEg 5 mgDy ; Ee 5 k 1Dx2 2
2
202
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 202
Since energy is conserved, the change in potential energy
of the model car must equal the change in elastic potential
energy when the spring is compressed.
Solution: If we choose the bottom of the ramp to be the y 5 0
reference point, the car will have no gravitational potential energy
at the bottom of the ramp. The initial gravitational potential energy
has been converted into kinetic energy. When the spring is fully
compressed, the kinetic energy has been converted to elastic
potential energy. Therefore, the spring’s initial gravitational
potential energy must equal its final elastic potential energy:
Eg 5 Ee
1
mgDy 5 k 1Dx2 2
2
Dy 5
5
k 1Dx2 2
2 mg
14.9 3 103 N/m2 10.22 m2 2
2 15.0 kg2 19.8 m/s22
Dy 5 2.42 m 1one extra digit carried2
Statement: The initial height of the model car is 2.4 m.
(b) Given: m 5 5.0 kg; k 5 4.9 kN/m 5 4.9 3 103 N/m;
Dx 5 15 cm 5 0.15 m; Dy 5 2.42 m
Required: v
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1
1
Analysis: DEg 5 mgDy ; Ee 5 k 1Dx 2 2; Ek 5 mv 2
2
2
Since energy is conserved, the sum of the kinetic energy and
the elastic potential energy when the spring is compressed
must equal the initial gravitational potential energy.
Solution: The initial gravitational potential energy is
Eg 5 mgDy
5 15.0 kg2 19.8 m/s22 12.42 m2
Eg 5 119 J
When the spring is compressed to Dx 5 15 cm, the elastic
potential energy is
1
Ee 5 k 1Dx 2 2
2
1
5 14.9 3 103 N/m2 10.15 m2 2
2
Ee 5 55.1 J
The kinetic energy when x 5 15 cm must equal the
difference between the initial gravitational potential energy
and the final elastic potential energy:
Ek 5 Eg 2 Ee
5 119 J 2 55.1 J
Ek 5 63.9 J
Finally, use Ek to solve for v:
1 2
mv 5 Ek
2
2Ek
v2 5
m
v5
5
2Ek
Åm
2 163.9 J2
Å 5.0 kg
v 5 5.1 m/s
Statement: The speed of the model car when the spring is
compressed 15 cm is 5.1 m/s.
(c) Given: m 5 5.0 kg; k 5 4.9 kN/m 5 4.9 3 103 N/m;
Dx 5 22 cm 5 0.22 m
>
Required: a
>
> >
>
Analysis: F e 5 2kDx ; F net 5 ma
The maximum acceleration occurs when the maximum force
is acting, and this occurs when the spring is at the maximum
compression of 22 cm.
Solution: Combining Hooke’s law and Newton’s second
law gives
>
>
F net 5 F x
>
>
ma 5 2kDx
>
>
kDx
a52
m
14.9 3 103 N/m2 120.22 m2
5
5.0 kg
>
a 5 2.2 3 102 m/s2 3 toward ramp 4
Statement: The maximum acceleration of the model car is
2.2 3 102 m/s2 directed toward the ramp.
Sample Problem 2: Using Elastic Potential, Kinetic, and Gravitational Potential Energies
A 48 kg child bounces on a pogo stick. At the lowest point of one
bounce, the compressed spring in the stick has 120 J of elastic
potential energy as it compresses 0.19 m. Assume that the pogo
stick is light enough that we can ignore its mass.
(a)Determine the child’s maximum height during the jump
following the bounce.
(b) Determine the child’s maximum speed during the jump.
Solution
(a) Given: m 5 48 kg; Ee 5 120 J
Required: Dy
Eg 5 Ee
mgDy 5 Ee
Ee
Dy 5
mg
120 J
148 kg2 19.8 m/s22
Dy 5 0.26 m
5
Statement: The child rises 0.26 m from the lowest point of
the bounce.
(b) Given: m 5 48.5 kg; Ee 5 120 J; h 5 0.19 m
Analysis: DEg 5 mgDy
Required: v
Solution: Choose the lowest point of the bounce as the
y 5 0 reference point. At the maximum height, Dy, all
elastic potential energy has converted to gravitational
potential energy.
Analysis: The point of maximum speed is the point at which
the spring is at its equilibrium position. At this point, all of the
elastic potential energy has been converted to gravitational
potential energy and kinetic energy.
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4.7 Springs and Conservation of Energy 203
4/26/12 11:17 AM
1
DEg 5 mgDy ; Ek 5 mv 2
2
Solution: If we choose the lowest part of the bounce as the
y 5 0 reference point, then at the equilibrium position,
Eg 5 mgDy
5 148 kg2 19.8 m/s22 10.19 m2
Eg 5 89.4 J 1one extra digit carried2
Now solve for v:
1 2
mv 5 Ek
2
2Ek
v5
Åm
5
The kinetic energy is the difference between the initial elastic
potential energy and the gravitational potential energy:
2 130.6 J2
Å 48 kg
v 5 1.1 m/s
Statement: The child’s maximum speed is 1.1 m/s.
Ek 5 Ee 2 Eg
5 120 J 2 89.4 J
Ek 5 30.6 J 1one extra digit carried2
Sample Problem 3: A Block Pushed Up a Frictionless Ramp by a Spring
A block with a mass of 2.0 kg is held against a spring with spring
constant 250 N/m. The block compresses the spring 22 cm from
its equilibrium position. After the block is released, it travels
along a frictionless surface and then up a frictionless ramp. The
ramp’s angle of inclination is 30.08, as shown in Figure 3.
(a) Determine the elastic potential energy stored in the spring
before the mass is released.
(b) Calculate the speed of the block as it travels along the
horizontal surface.
(c) Determine how far along the ramp the block will travel before
it stops.
d
k 250 N/m
∆y
(b) Given: Ek 5 6.05 J; m 5 2.0 kg
Required: v
Analysis: As the block travels along the flat surface, all of
the elastic potential energy is converted to kinetic energy. Use
this to determine the speed of the block using the equation
1
for kinetic energy: E 5 mv 2.
2
1
Solution: E 5 mv 2
2
2E
5 v2
m
v5
u 30.0°
5
Figure 3
(a) Given: k 5 250 N/m; x 5 22 cm 5 0.22 m
Required: Ee
Analysis: Before the block is released, the entire mechanical
energy of the block–spring system is in the form of elastic
potential energy stored in the compressed spring. We can
use the given information to determine the amount of stored
1
energy, Ee 5 k 1Dx2 2.
2
Solution: Ee 5 1 k 1Dx2 2
2
1
5 1250 N/m2 10.22 m2 2
2
Ee 5 6.05 J 1one extra digit carried2
Statement: The elastic potential energy stored in the spring
before the mass is released is 6.0 J.
204
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 204
2E
Åm
2 16.05 J2
Å 12.0 kg2
v 5 2.46 m/s
Statement: The block will travel at a constant speed of
2.5 m/s along the frictionless horizontal surface.
(c) Given: Eg 5 6.05 J; m 5 2.0 kg; g 5 9.8 m/s2
Required: Dy, d
Analysis: As the block travels up the ramp, kinetic energy
is gradually converted to gravitational potential energy.
When the block reaches its maximum height, all energy
will be in potential form. Use this to determine the vertical
height attained, Dy, and then use trigonometry to calculate
the distance travelled along the ramp, d, as shown in
Figure 3.
Dy
Eg 5 mgDy;
5 sin u
d
Solution: Mechanical energy is conserved throughout this
problem because there are no energy losses due to friction.
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4/26/12 11:17 AM
The total potential energy at the top of the block’s path is
therefore 6.05 J.
Eg 5 mgDy
Dy 5
5
Eg
mg
6.05 J
12.0 kg2 19.8 m/s22
Dy 5 0.308 m
Rearrange this equation to express d in terms of Dy and u.
D y 5 d sin u
d5
5
Dy
sin u
0.308 m
sin 30.08
d 5 0.62 m
Statement: The block will travel a distance of 0.62 m, or 62 cm,
along the ramp.
Now use the sine ratio to determine how far along the ramp
the block travels, d.
Dy
5 sin u
d
Practice
1. A block slides down a ramp from a fixed height and collides with a spring, compressing the
spring until the block comes to rest. Compare the amount of compression in the case that the
ramp is frictionless to the case where the ramp is not frictionless. Explain your answer. K/U T/I
2. A 3.5 kg mass slides from a height of 2.7 m down a frictionless ramp into a spring. The
spring compresses 26 cm. Calculate the spring constant. T/I [ans: 2.7 3 103 N/m]
3. A 43 kg student jumps on a pogo stick with spring constant 3.7 kN/m. On one bounce, he
compresses the stick’s spring by 37 cm. Calculate the maximum height he reaches on the
following jump. T/I [ans: 0.60 m above the compressed point]
4. A 0.35 kg branch falls from a tree onto a trampoline. If the branch was initially 2.6 m above
the trampoline, and the trampoline compresses 0.14 m, calculate the spring constant of the
trampoline. T/I [ans: 9.6 3 102 N/m]
5. Consider the block in Sample Problem 3. Suppose that the mass of the block is doubled at the
top of its path of motion before returning down the frictionless ramp. K/U T/I
(a) Determine the speed of the block as it returns along the horizontal surface. [ans: 2.5 m/s]
(b) Does the block have the same kinetic energy as before along the horizontal surface?
Explain your answer.
(c) Will the block compress the spring twice as far as it did before? Explain your answer. If your
answer is no, determine the new value for x.
(d) Suppose the coefficient of friction of the ramp is 0.15. Does your answer to (c) change?
Explain your answer. If your answer is yes, determine the new value for x.
Perpetual Motion Machines
An ideal spring would never lose energy and would continue with SHM forever,
or as long as you did not disturb it. A machine that can continue to operate for an
unlimited amount of time without outside help is a perpetual motion machine. To be
a true perpetual motion machine, the machine must be able to run forever without
restarting or refuelling. A grandfather clock, for example, is not a perpetual motion
machine, since you must wind it up every now and then.
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perpetual motion machine a machine
that can operate forever without restarting
or refuelling
4.7 Springs and Conservation of Energy 205
4/26/12 11:17 AM
Figure 4 shows a device called Newton’s cradle. The leftmost ball has gravitational
potential energy with respect to the other balls. Once released, the ball will interact
with the other balls in such a way as to imitate perpetual motion. You will have the
opportunity to explore the physics behind Newton’s cradle in Chapter 5.
Investigation
4.7.1
Energy and Springs (page 211)
You have learned about the spring
constant and how the movement of
springs is related to the conservation
of energy. Now you are ready to
conduct an investigation to observe
the conservation of energy.
Figure 4 An ideal version of Newton’s cradle would be a perpetual motion machine because it
would never lose energy.
An ideal version of Newton’s cradle would never lose energy, and the cycle of
falling, colliding, and rising would continue forever. It would then be a perpetual
motion machine. Can you build such a machine?
The answer is no. In real-world machines, some mechanical energy will always be
lost from the system as thermal energy, sound energy, or other forms of energy. This
loss of energy can be useful. For example, the purpose of shock absorbers in cars, which
we mentioned in Section 4.6, is to use friction to stop the SHM of the car’s springs.
research This
Perpetual Motion Machines
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
Skills: Researching, Communicating
A4.1
Hobbyists and serious researchers alike have attempted to design perpetual motion
machines. They have not been successful, but some of their ideas have useful applications.
1. Choose one machine, such as an analog watch, a metronome, a flywheel,
or a child’s swing, that relies on ongoing, consistent motion to work properly.
2. Research the design principles that have been incorporated into modern versions
of the machine to make it work more efficiently.
A. What scientific principles explain how the machine operates?
A
B. How has the design of the machine been improved over time?
K/u
C. Have improvements been the result of the development of new materials,
new technology, or new scientific discoveries? T/I
D. Prepare a short presentation that summarizes your findings.
C
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Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
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Damped Harmonic Motion
So far, we have ignored the effect of friction on the motion of a simple harmonic
oscillator. The friction in a real periodic system is referred to as damping, and the
harmonic motion of a system affected by friction is called damped harmonic motion.
The presence of friction means that the mechanical energy of the system will be
transformed into thermal energy, and the system’s motion will not continue perpetually. We can classify damped motion into three categories: underdamped, overdamped, and critically damped (Figure 5).
damped harmonic motion periodic
motion affected by friction
y
(1) overdamped
(2) critically damped
(3) underdamped
0
t
displacement
of mass
y
0
Figure 5 When a damped oscillator is given
a non-zero displacement at t 5 0 and then
released, it can exhibit three different types
of behaviour: (1) overdamped, (2) critically
damped, and (3) underdamped.
Consider a pendulum. Curve 3 in Figure 5 shows how the displacement varies
with time when the damping is weak, that is, when there is only a small amount
of friction. This curve applies to any weakly damped harmonic oscillator. It
describes the back-and-forth swinging of a pendulum or the motion of a mass
attached to a spring on a horizontal surface when the surface is quite slippery.
The system still oscillates because the displacement alternates between positive
and negative values, but the amplitude of the oscillation gradually decreases with
time. The amplitude eventually goes to zero, but the system undergoes many
oscillations before damping brings it to rest. This type of motion is an underdamped oscillation.
When quite a bit of friction exists, the oscillator is overdamped. The resulting
displacement as a function of time in this case is shown as curve 1 in Figure 5. This
type of motion happens when the mass moves through a very thick fluid, like the
hydraulic fluid inside the closing mechanism on many doors. If you pull the mass of
an overdamped oscillator to one side and then release it, the mass moves extremely
slowly back to the equilibrium.
Critically damped motion falls in between the two extreme cases. In underdamped
motion, displacement always passes through zero—the equilibrium point—at least
once, and usually many times, before the system comes to rest. In contrast, an
overdamped system released from rest moves just to the equilibrium point, but not
beyond. In critically damped motion, displacement falls to zero as quickly as possible
without moving past the equilibrium position. Displacement as a function of time for
the critically damped case is illustrated by curve 2 in Figure 5.
These different categories of damping have different applications. For example,
a car’s shock absorbers provide damping for springs that support the car’s body
(Figure 6).
Shock absorbers enable the tires to move up and down over bumps in the road
without directly passing vibrations to the car’s body or passengers. When the car
hits a bump, the springs compress. To make the ride as comfortable as possible, the
shock absorbers critically damp the motion of the springs. The critically damped
motion means the body of the car returns to its original height as quickly as possible.
Worn-out shock absorbers lead to underdamped motion, and the car bounces up
and down more. Overdamped shock absorbers give a soft “spongy” ride with poor
CAREER LINK
steering response and handling.
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 207
shock absorber
coil spring
Figure 6 The shock absorbers on a car
serve to dampen its coil springs. The
goal is usually to have a car respond to
bumps in the road as a critically damped
oscillator.
4.7 Springs and Conservation of Energy 207
4/26/12 11:17 AM
4.7
Review
Summary
• For an isolated mass–spring system, the total mechanical energy—kinetic
energy, elastic potential energy, and gravitational potential energy—remains
constant.
• A perpetual motion machine is a machine that can operate forever without
restarting or refuelling.
• Damped harmonic motion is periodic motion in which friction causes a
decrease in the amplitude of motion and the total mechanical energy.
Questions
1. A mass hangs from a vertical spring and is initially
at rest. A person then pulls down on the mass,
stretching the spring. Does the total mechanical
energy of this system (the mass plus the spring)
increase, decrease, or stay the same? Explain. K/U
2. A mass rests against a spring on a horizontal,
frictionless table. The spring constant is 520 N/m,
and the mass is 4.5 kg. The mass is pushed against
the spring so that the spring is compressed by 0.35 m,
and then it is released. Determine the velocity of the
mass when it leaves the spring. T/I
3. A toy airplane ejects its 8.4 g pilot using a spring
with a spring constant of 5.2 3 102 N/m. The
spring is initially compressed 5.2 cm. T/I
(a) Calculate the elastic potential energy of the
compressed spring.
(b) Calculate the speed of the pilot as it ejects
upward from the airplane.
(c) Determine the maximum height that the pilot
will reach.
4. In a pinball game, a compressed spring with spring
constant 1.2 3 102 N/m fires an 82 g pinball. The
pinball first travels horizontally and then travels up
an inclined plane in the machine before coming to
rest. The ball rises up the ramp through a vertical
height of 3.4 cm. Determine the distance of the
spring’s compression. T/I
5. A bungee jumper of mass 75 kg is standing on
a platform 53 m above a river. The length of the
unstretched bungee cord is 11 m. The spring constant
of the cord is 65.5 N/m. Calculate the jumper’s speed
at 19 m below the bridge on the first fall. T/I
6. A spring with a spring constant of 5.0 N/m has a
0.25 kg box attached to one end such that the box is
hanging down from the string at rest. The box is then
pulled down another 14 cm from its rest position.
Calculate the maximum height, the maximum speed,
and the maximum acceleration of the box. T/I
208 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 208
7. A 0.22 kg block is dropped on a vertical spring
that has a spring constant of 280 N/m. The block
attached to the spring compresses it by 11 cm before
momentarily stopping. Determine the height from
which the block was dropped. T/I
8. A block of 1.0 kg with speed 1.0 m/s hits a spring
placed horizontally, as shown in Figure 7. The
spring constant is 1000.0 N/m. T/I
(a) Calculate the maximum compression of the
spring.
(b) How far will the block travel before coming to
rest? Assume that the surfaces are frictionless.
1.0 kg
Figure 7
9. A wooden box of mass 6.0 kg slides on a frictionless
tabletop with a speed of 3.0 m/s. It is brought to
rest by a compressing spring. The spring constant is
1250 N/m. T/I
(a) Calculate the maximum distance the spring is
compressed.
(b) Determine the speed and acceleration of the
block when the spring is compressed a distance
of 14 cm.
10. A tennis coach uses a machine to help with tennis
practice. The machine uses a compressed spring to
launch tennis balls. The spring constant is 440 N/m,
and the spring is initially compressed 45 cm. A 57 g
tennis ball leaves the machine horizontally at a height
of 1.2 m. Calculate the horizontal distance that the
tennis ball can travel before hitting the ground. T/I
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4/26/12 11:17 AM
chaptEr
4
Investigations
Investigation 4.2.1
controllED EXpErIMEnt
The work–Energy Theorem
The work–energy theorem states that the change in kinetic
energy of a system equals the work done on the system.
In this investigation, you will test the validity of the
work–energy theorem using a block pulled along a bench.
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
Testable Question
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
motion sensor
SKIllS MEnu
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
block
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
pulley
bench
A2.2
Does the work–energy theorem hold true as the applied
force is varied for a block being pulled along a surface?
hanging
mass
Hypothesis
Formulate a hypothesis based on the Testable Question.
variables
Preview the Experimental Design and Procedure, and identify
the independent, dependent, and controlled variables.
Experimental design
You will make measurements to determine the change in
energy of a block-and-mass system as gravity and friction
do work on it. Then, you will use your data to test the
validity of the work–energy theorem.
Equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
motion sensor
bench or table
block
scale
•
•
•
•
•
pulley
mass set with hanger
metre stick
string
box containing soft material
Procedure
1. Read through the Procedure for this investigation
and create a data table to record your results.
2. Record the mass of the block.
3. Put on your eye protection. Set up the investigation
as shown in Figure 1. Place a box containing soft
material below the hanging mass.
4. Choose initial and final points along the path of the
block. Measure and record the distance between the
points. This is the distance the mass will fall when
the block moves from the initial position to the final
position.
Take care that the mass does not fall on your hands or feet.
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 209
Figure 1
5. Place a 100 g mass on the hanger and let it drop.
Use the measurements from the motion sensor to
determine the acceleration of the block. Adjust the
amount of the loaded mass until the motion sensor
indicates that the block does not accelerate as it slides
across the bench. It may be difficult to achieve zero
acceleration with your set of masses, but come as
close as you can. You may have to add mass to the
block and then record the new mass of the block.
6. Draw a free-body diagram of the sliding block.
7. Solve for the force of friction between the block
and the bench in the case where the block does not
accelerate. Use your diagram as a guide.
8. Calculate the coefficient of kinetic friction, µK, between
the block and the bench using the equation for the
force of friction, your measurement from Step 5, and
your result from Step 7.
9. Add mass to the hanger so that you have more mass
than the special value you calculated in Step 5. Hold
the block at the initial position and let the masses
drop. Use the motion sensor to determine the speed
of the block at the final position.
10. Repeat Step 9 using three different masses. Record
your observations.
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) What type of relationship did you test in this
investigation? T/I
(b) What is the work done by gravity on just the block
as it moves from the initial position to the final
position? T/I
(c) What is the work done by gravity on the mass for a
general value of the mass m? T/I
Chapter 4 Investigations
209
4/26/12 11:17 AM
(d) What is the work done by gravity on the total
system? T/I
(e) Calculate the work done by gravity on the total
system for the actual values of m that you used,
using your answer from Question (d). T/I
(f) Calculate the work done by friction on the block as it
moves from its initial position to its final position using
the definition of work and your value of µK. T/I
(g) What is the total work done on the system by gravity
and friction for each value of m that you used?
Organize your results in a table. T/I C
(h) Use your measurements of the block’s speed and mass
and your values of m to calculate the change in kinetic
energy of the system for each value of m. T/I
Investigation 4.5.1
(i)
(j)
Answer the Testable Question. How does the work
done on the system compare to the change in kinetic
energy for each value of m? T/I
Suggest possible sources of error and recommend
ways to improve the accuracy of your results. T/I
Apply and Extend
(k) Imagine repeating a similar experiment but with
one major change. Instead of varying the value of
m, you hold m fixed and vary the distance between
the block’s initial and final positions. How do
you think the work done on the system and the
change in kinetic energy would compare in this
experiment? Explain your reasoning. T/I
controllED EXpErIMEnt
Energy and Pulleys
Conservation of energy allows you to make predictions
about the motion of different objects. In this investigation,
you will explore how energy changes from one form to
another as a falling mass pulls a cart along a ramp.
Testable Question
Is the mechanical energy of a real system conserved as its
initial potential energy changes?
Hypothesis
Use the law of conservation of energy to formulate a
hypothesis based on the Testable Question.
variables
Preview the Experimental Design and Procedure. Identify
the independent, dependent, and controlled variables.
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MEnu
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
Procedure
Part A: Horizontal Plane
1. Record the mass of the cart.
2. Put on your eye protection. Set up the equipment as
shown in Figure 1. Place a barrier between the cart
and the edge of the horizontal surface to prevent the
cart from falling off the table. Set a box containing
soft material below the mass.
motion sensor
Equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
•
210
eye protection
horizontal surface
motion sensor
cart
scale
pulley
•
•
•
•
•
•
mass
metre stick
blocks or books
barrier for the cart
box containing soft material
string
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 210
cart
pulley
plane
100 g
mass
Experimental design
You will use a motion sensor to measure the speed of a
cart while a falling mass pulls the cart along a horizontal
plane and down an inclined plane. You will use your
measurements to determine whether energy is conserved.
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Figure 1
3. Choose initial and final positions for the cart along
the horizontal surface. Measure and record the
distance between the positions.
4. Let the 100 g mass drop. Use the motion sensor to
measure the speed of the cart at the final position.
Take care that the mass does not fall on your hands or feet.
Part B: Inclined Plane
5. Use blocks or books to raise the height of the end of
the surface with the pulley 10 cm to 20 cm. Measure
the change in height of the cart between the initial
and final positions.
NEL
4/26/12 11:17 AM
6. Let the 100 g mass drop. Use the motion sensor to
measure the speed of the cart at the final position.
7. Raise the height of the end of the surface another
10 cm. Measure the new change in height of the cart
between the initial and final positions. Repeat Step 6.
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) What type of relationship between the variables did
you test in this investigation? T/I
(b) Use your data to calculate the initial and final kinetic
and potential energies of the cart and the mass for all
three trials. How do the initial and final total energies
compare in each case? T/I C
Investigation 4.7.1
In this investigation, you will use a mass hanging from a
spring to explore the conservation of energy.
Testable Question
To what extent is mechanical energy conserved during
cycles of simple harmonic motion (SHM) in a real
mass–spring system?
Hypothesis
Formulate a hypothesis based on the Testable Question.
variables
Preview the experimental design and procedure. Identify
the independent, dependent, and controlled variables.
Experimental design
You will use a motion sensor to measure the motion of a
mass–spring system as it moves through several cycles of
harmonic motion. You will calculate the total energy after
each cycle and determine whether energy is conserved.
Equipment and Materials
eye protection
motion sensor
support stand with desk clamp
extension spring
clamp for extension spring
mass set with hanger
metre stick
box containing soft material
Procedure
1. Determine the spring constant of your spring.
2. Set up the support stand and hang the spring from it.
Attach a mass to the other end of the spring. Position the
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 211
Apply and Extend
(e) Imagine doing the investigation with a block with no
wheels instead of a cart. Do you expect the difference
between the initial and final energy to increase, decrease,
or stay about the same? Explain. T/I
controllED EXpErIMEnt
Energy and Springs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
(c) If the initial and final values are not the same,
calculate the percent difference and explain what
might have happened to the missing energy. T/I
(d) Answer the Testable Question. T/I
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MEnu
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
motion sensor so that it measures the displacement of the
mass as it goes through SHM. Record the mass used.
3. Use the metre stick to measure the height of the mass
at the equilibrium position.
4. Let the mass fall from rest at the natural unstretched
position of the spring. Use the motion sensor to
measure the maximum displacement for each of
10 cycles. Record your results.
Take care that the mass does not fall on your hands or feet.
5. Repeat the previous step and record the
measurements for another 10 cycles.
Analyze and Evaluate
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
A5.5
(a) Use your measurement from Step 3 and the two
sets of data from the motion sensor to measure the
maximum displacement and the mass height at the
top and bottom of each cycle. Calculate the energy of
the system at the top and bottom of each cycle. T/I
(b) Explain what happens to the total energy of the
mass–spring system over time. T/I
(c) Make a graph of the total energy versus the time.
Show both sets of data on the same graph. T/I C
(d) Identify sources of error, and suggest a method for
improving the accuracy of your measurements. T/I
Apply and Extend
(e) Use your results above to estimate the speed of the
mass at the midpoint of each cycle. T/I
Chapter 4 Investigations
211
4/26/12 11:17 AM
chaptEr
4
SuMMAry
Summary Questions
1. Create a study guide for this chapter based on the
Key Concepts on page 162. For each point, create three
or four subpoints that provide further information,
relevant examples, explanatory diagrams, or general
equations.
2. Review the Starting Points questions on page 162.
Answer these questions using what you have learned
in this chapter. Compare your latest answers with
those that you wrote at the beginning of the chapter,
and note how your answers have changed.
vocabulary
work (p. 164)
joule (p. 165)
kinetic energy (p. 171)
work–energy theorem (p. 173)
gravitational potential
energy (p. 177)
biochemical energy (p. 188)
elastic potential energy (p. 195)
power (p. 189)
amplitude (p. 197)
law of conservation of
energy (pp. 184, 188)
Hooke’s law (p. 192)
simple harmonic motion (p. 197)
spring constant (p. 192)
perpetual motion machine (p. 205)
ideal spring (p. 193)
damped harmonic motion (p. 207)
isolated system (p. 188)
potential energy (p. 177)
open system (p. 188)
mechanical energy (p. 177)
CAREER PATHwAyS
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college diploma, a
B.Sc. degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or postgraduate degrees. This
graphic organizer shows a few pathways to careers related to topics covered in this chapter.
1. Select two careers related to Work and Energy that you find interesting. Research
the educational pathways you would need to follow to pursue these careers. What is
involved in the required educational programs? Prepare a brief report of your findings.
2. For one of the two careers that you chose above, describe the career, main duties
and responsibilities, working conditions, and setting. Also, outline how the career
benefits society and the environment.
SkILLS
HANDBOOk
A6
automotive designer
B.Sc.
M.Eng.
safety engineer
M.B.A.
12U Physics
theme park manager
electrical engineer
OSSD
11U Physics
B.Eng.
power plant engineer
mechanical engineer
college diploma
sustainable energy
technician
mechanical engineering
technologist
212
Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 212
CAREER LINK
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4/26/12 11:17 AM
CHAPTER
4
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. A force, F, is applied to an object with a displacement,
Δd. When does the equation W 5 FΔd equal the work
done by the force on the object? (4.1) K/U
(a) always
(b) when the force is in the same direction as the
displacement
(c) when the force is perpendicular to the
displacement
(d) when the force is at an angle of 458 to the
displacement
2. Suppose that a spacecraft of mass 5.4 3 103 kg at
rest in space fires its rockets to achieve a speed of
8.2 3 102 m/s. How much work has the fuel done
on the spacecraft? (4.2) K/U T/I A
(a) 2.2 3 106 J
(b) 1.8 3 109 J
(c) 3.6 3 109 J
(d) 9.8 3 1012 J
3. Which of the following statements correctly describes
the relationship between an object’s gravitational
potential energy and its height above the ground?
(4.3) K/U
(a) proportional to the square of the object’s height
above the ground
(b) directly proportional to the object’s height above
the ground
(c) inversely proportional to the object’s height above
the ground
(d) proportional to the square root of the object’s
height above the ground
4. What happens to the kinetic energy of a hockey puck
as it moves across the ice and is stopped by a hockey
stick? (4.5) K/U T/I
(a) The kinetic energy is dissipated due to friction
with the ice.
(b) The kinetic energy is dissipated due to air
resistance.
(c) The kinetic energy is absorbed in the collision
with the hockey stick.
(d) All of the above are true.
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
5. At a construction site, a constant force lifts a stack
of wooden boards, which has a mass of 565 kg, to
a height of 4.5 m in 13 s. The stack rises at a steady
pace. How much power is needed to move the stack
to this height? (4.5) K/U
(a) 1.9 3 102 W
(b) 1.6 3 103 W
(c) 1.9 3 103 W
(d) 1.6 3 104 W
6. If a mass of 0.65 kg attached to a vertical spring
stretches the spring 4.0 cm from its original
equilibrium position, what is the spring constant?
(4.6) K/U
(a) 0.27 N/m
(b) 16 N/m
(c) 60 N/m
(d) 160 N/m
7. Which of the following does not operate using the
conversion of elastic potential energy into other forms
of energy? (4.7) K/U A
(a) a slingshot
(b) a guitar
(c) a hinge
(d) a spring toy
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
8. Work is a vector quantity. (4.1) K/U
9. Work is always a positive quantity. (4.1) K/U
10. The kinetic energy of an object at rest is always zero.
(4.2) K/U
11. The amount of gravitational potential energy depends
on where the reference height y 5 0 is set. (4.3) K/U
12. The production of hydroelectricity provides clean energy
and creates no environmental concerns. (4.4) K/U
13. There are many examples of isolated systems in the
real world. (4.5) K/U
14. Gravitational potential energy increases as a
pendulum’s amplitude increases. (4.6) K/U
15. True perpetual motion is not possible due to the
damping effect of friction and air resistance. (4.7) K/U
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB LINK
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Chapter 4 Self-Quiz 213
4/26/12 11:17 AM
CHAPTER
4
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. A race car brakes and skids to a stop on the road.
Which statement best describes what happens?
(4.1) K/U
(a) The race car does work on the road.
(b) The friction of the road does negative work on
the race car.
(c) The race car and the road do equal work
on each other.
(d) Neither does work on the other.
2. A mover pushes a sofa across the floor of a van.
The mover applies 475 N of horizontal force to the
sofa and pushes it 1.2 m. The work done on the sofa
by the mover is
(a) 285 J
(b) 396 J
(c) 570 J
(d) Not enough information is given to answer the
question. (4.1) K/U
3. Two identical cars are racing against each other, as
shown in Figure 1. Neither car is able to pass the
other. Which of the following is true? (4.1) K/U
Figure 1
(a) Each car is limited by the motion of
the other.
(b) The cars are doing no work on each other.
(c) The cars are doing equal and non-zero work on
each other.
(d) The cars are doing non-equal work on
each other.
214 Chapter 4 • Work and Energy
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 214
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
4. Two identical marbles are dropped in a classroom.
Marble A is dropped from 1.00 m, and marble B is
dropped from 0.50 m. Compare the kinetic energies
of the two marbles just before they strike the ground.
(4.2) K/U
(a) Marble A has the same kinetic energy as
marble B.
(b) Marble A has 1.4 times as much kinetic energy as
marble B.
(c) Marble A has 2.0 times as much kinetic energy as
marble B.
(d) Marble A has 4.0 times as much kinetic energy as
marble B.
5. A 0.30 kg soccer ball is released from the top of a
10 m building. The ball strikes the ground with a
speed of 12 m/s. Use the conservation of energy to
determine the energy lost due to the work done by
air resistance. (4.3) K/U A
(a) 7.8 J
(b) 13.2 J
(c) 21.6 J
(d) 29.4 J
6. Which of the following prevents Earth and the Moon
from being an isolated system? (4.5) K/U
(a) the gravitational attraction of the Sun
(b) the gravitational attraction of Saturn
(c) the gravitational attraction of Pluto
(d) all of the above
7. Which of the following cannot be described using
simple harmonic motion? (4.6) K/U
(a) a playground swing swinging through
a small angle
(b) a DVD spinning in a DVD player
(c) the pendulum of a grandfather clock
(d) a guitar string vibrating
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
8. All moving objects have kinetic energy. (4.2) K/U
9. If you push as hard as you can on a brick wall for 1 h,
and the wall does not move, you have done no work
on the wall. (4.2) K/U
10. The gravitational potential energy of an object 5 m
above the ground in Ontario is the same as an identical
object 5 m above the ground on the Moon. (4.3) K/U
11. The joule (J) is the SI unit for three quantities: work,
energy, and power. (4.3) K/U
NEL
4/26/12 11:17 AM
12. A marble is shot from a slingshot on a planet with no
atmosphere. At any given moment, before the marble
hits the ground, the sum of the kinetic energy and the
gravitational potential energy is constant. (4.5) K/U
13. The farther you pull a spring beyond its equilibrium
point, the more work you do on it. (4.6) K/U
14. In an oscillating spring, the elastic potential energy
when the spring is completely compressed is equal to
the kinetic energy when the spring is fully extended
(Figure 2). (4.7) K/U
fully extended
completely
compressed
(a)
20. Explain, in your own words, how work repre­sents a
relationship between forces and energy. (4.2) K/U
(b)
Figure 2
Understanding
15. A car stuck in a snow bank is spinning its wheels and
unable to move either forward or backward. Discuss
whether work is being performed by
(a) the car
(b) the snow bank (4.1) K/U
16. Give two examples in which a non-zero force acts on
an object, but the total work done by that force
is zero. (4.1) K/U
17. Is it possible to do work on an object if the object
does not move? (4.1) K/U
18. A car is parked on a hill. The gravitational force on the
car is 9.31 3 103 N straight downward, and the angle of
the hill is 4.00° from the horizontal (Figure 3). The car’s
brakes fail, and the car slides 30.0 m downhill. (4.1) K/U
car slides 30.0 m
9.31
103 N
4.00°
Figure 3
(a) Calculate the component of the gravitational
force that acts parallel to the car’s motion.
(b) Calculate the work done on the car by gravity as
the car slides.
NEL
8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 215
19. A spy, code-named 001, uses a pulley to lower
another spy, code-named 002, on a harness down
from the roof of a building at a constant speed.
The mass of spy 002 is 65 kg, and the building
is 100.0 m high. (4.1, 4.2, 4.3) K/U
(a) Calculate the work done on spy 002 by spy 001.
(b) Calculate the work done on spy 002 by the force
of gravity.
(c) Calculate spy 002’s kinetic energy when she is
lowered at a speed of 2.5 m/s down the side
of the building.
(d) Determine the change in spy 002’s gravitational
potential energy when she reaches the ground.
21. A sprinter with a mass of 68 kg is running at a
speed of 5.8 m/s. In a burst of speed to win the race,
she increases her speed to 6.9 m/s. Determine the
work that the sprinter does to increase her speed.
(4.2) K/U
22. In a curling match, a 20.0 kg stone (Figure 4) with an
initial speed of 2.0 m/s glides to a stop after 30.0 m.
Determine the work done on the stone by friction.
(4.2) K/U
Figure 4
23. A diver with a mass of 60.0 kg dives from a board
10.0 m above the surface of the pool. Calculate the
diver’s change in gravitational potential energy
during his dive. (4.3) K/U
24. A grocery store employee lifts a case of cereal
from the floor to a shelf 1.2 m high. The gravitational
potential energy of the case increases by 5.8 J.
Calculate the mass of the case. (4.3) K/U
25. Explain why, when choosing a site for a hydroelectric
plant, both the height of the waterfall and the volume
of water are important. (4.4) T/I
Chapter 4 Review 215
4/26/12 11:18 AM
26. An extension that increases the height of the top
of a hydroelectric dam is constructed (Figure 5).
How does this extension affect the amount of
energy produced by the plant? Explain your
answer. (4.4) T/I A
36. For maximum speed, why does it make sense for an
arrow to be as light as possible? (4.7) T/I A
37. A table tennis ball is launched horizontally from a
compressed spring. Use algebraic reasoning to express
the table tennis ball’s initial speed, v, in terms of the
compression distance of the spring, Δx; the spring
constant, k; and the mass of the ball, m. (4.7) T/I
38. When a force is exerted on a stationary object, such
as a wall, and the object’s kinetic energy does not
change, what can you conclude about the work done
on the object by the force? Explain your answer.
(4.2) T/I A
Analysis and Application
Figure 5
27. In a graphic organizer of your choosing, compare and
contrast work and power. Include characteristics and
examples of each. (4.5) K/U C
28. An egg rolls off a countertop that is 1.2 m high. The
egg has a mass of 55 g. Calculate the gravitational
potential energy (relative to the floor) of the egg
before it falls. (4.5) K/U
29. Every second at Niagara Falls, 5.7 3 105 kg of water
falls an average distance of 21 m. Determine the
power generated by this process. (4.5) K/U A
30. Describe an everyday object that converts between
three different types of energy. (4.5) K/U A
31. Consider two diving boards made of the same material,
one long and one short. Which do you think has a larger
spring constant? Explain your reasoning. (4.6) T/I A
32. Interpret, in your own words, the meaning of the
spring constant k in Hooke’s law. (4.6) C
33. Compare the simple harmonic motion of two
identical masses oscillating up and down on springs
with different spring constants, k. (4.6) K/U C
34. Consider two different masses oscillating on springs
with the same spring constant. Describe how the
simple harmonic motion of the masses will differ.
(4.6) T/I
35. To give an arrow maximum speed, explain why an
archer should release it when the bowstring is pulled
back as far as possible. (4.7) T/I
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 216
39. A rope at an angle of 18.58 above the horizontal
provides a tension force of 11.8 N to pull a toboggan
along a smooth, horizontal surface. The rope does
214 J of work. Calculate how far the toboggan
moves. (4.1) T/I A
40. Suppose you are on a merry-go-round and you let go,
and then fly off. Has centripetal force done work on
you? Explain why or why not. (4.1) T/I A
41. Periodic comets travel in elliptical orbits around the
Sun (Figure 6). Copy Figure 6 into your notebook.
(4.1) T/I C A
comet
Sun
comet
path
Drawing not to scale
Figure 6
(a) On your drawing, show the points at which the
Sun does positive, negative, or zero work on the
comet.
(b) Describe what happens as the comet approaches
the Sun.
(c) Describe what happens as the comet moves away
from the Sun.
42. Using the definition of work done by a constant force
in the same direction as displacement, W 5 F∆d, use
dimensional analysis to verify that the units match
1
those of kinetic energy, Ek 5 mv 2. (4.2) K/U T/I A
2
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4/26/12 11:18 AM
43. A motorcycle has broken down (Figure 7), and to get
the motor to start, you must push the motorcycle with
a constant force so that it attains a speed of 10 km/h
over a distance of 10 m. You try to stand directly
behind the motorcycle and push, but it is difficult to
keep your arms exactly parallel to the ground. Draw
a graph of how much force you must use as the angle
your arms make with the ground increases to 0°, 15°,
30°, 45°, 60°, and 75°. What happens as the angle
increases? (4.2) T/I C A
75°
Figure 7
44. A spacecraft needs to tow four loads from one side of a
space station to the other. The masses of the loads are
1000 kg, 2000 kg, 3000 kg, and 4000 kg. Each load will
be moved with a constant force at a speed of 10 m/s for
a distance of 1 km. Draw a scatter plot graph showing
how the force the spacecraft must apply varies with the
mass of the load it is towing. (4.2) T/I C A
45. For the spacecraft described in Question 44, suppose it
is towing four new loads, each with a mass of 2000 kg.
Each new load is to be towed the 1 km distance, but
it will tow each load at a different speed. The towing
speeds are 10 m/s, 15 m/s, 20 m/s, and 25 m/s. Sketch
a graph showing how the force the spacecraft applies
will vary depending on the speed it must achieve.
(4.2) T/I C A
46. A frictionless merry-go-round is given an initial push
and allowed to spin. A student stands at the edge,
holding tight to a railing. For each of the following,
state whether the variable is constant or changing,
and explain your answer. (4.2) T/I A
(a) student’s velocity
(b) student’s speed
(c) student’s kinetic energy
47. In the expression Eg 5 mgDy, we assume that we are
dealing with objects close to Earth’s surface. When we
move farther from Earth’s surface, what happens to
the value of g? (4.3) T/I A
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48. (a) The same object weighs less on the Moon than
on Earth. How can you change the expression
for gravitational potential energy, Eg 5 mgDy,
for an object near the Moon’s surface instead
of Earth’s surface?
(b) Suppose that you are able to conduct investigations
on the Moon. List the steps required to use known
masses to determine the acceleration due to
gravity on the Moon. (4.3) T/I A
49. One hydroelectric plant, X, has an elevated reservoir
twice as high as that of another plant, Y. (4.5) T/I A
(a) If they both release water at the same rate, how
many times as much power does the plant with
the higher reservoir generate?
(b) If plant Y now releases water twice as quickly as
plant X does, how do the two plants compare in
terms of power production?
50. At a post office, a package of mass 1.3 kg is pushed
down a slanted chute with an initial speed of 1.8 m/s.
The upper end of the chute is 4.0 m above the floor.
When it reaches the floor, the package has a speed
of 0.9 m/s. Determine the energy lost through air
resistance and friction with the chute. (4.5) T/I A
51. Two water balloons of the same mass are dropped:
a red balloon from height h and a blue balloon from
one-quarter that height. Neglecting air resistance,
compare the speeds of the two balloons when they
reach the ground. (4.5) K/U A
52. Explain why it is just as important for a pole vaulter
(Figure 8) to improve his speed, as it is to improve
his arm strength and vaulting form. (4.5) T/I A
Figure 8
Chapter 4 Review 217
4/26/12 11:18 AM
53. A snowboarder with a mass of 57 kg starts from rest
at the top of a frictionless slope at a height of 45 m.
She follows the frictionless path shown in Figure 9.
Calculate her speed at the second peak. (4.5) T/I A
45 m
25 m
Figure 9
54. An amusement park uses large compressible springs
to stop cars at the end of a ride. Assume the springs
are ideal, with no weight, mass, or damping losses.
The combined mass of the car and passengers
averages 450 kg, and the cars make contact with the
spring at a speed of 3.5 m/s. Determine the minimum
spring constant to bring the car and its riders to a
stop in 2.0 m. (4.5) T/I A
55. A soccer player kicks the ball in a parabolic arc to
the opposite goal. The ball leaves the player’s foot at a
speed of 27 m/s, making an angle of 20.0° above the
horizontal. The mass of the ball is 0.43 kg. (4.5) T/I A
(a) Determine the maximum height of the ball’s
trajectory.
(b) Determine the ball’s speed as it hits the ground
again. (Neglect air resistance.)
56. A 55 kg student bounces up from a trampoline with
a speed of 5.4 m/s. (4.5) K/U A
(a) Determine the work done on the student by
the force of gravity when she is 1.3 m above the
trampoline.
(b) Determine her speed at 1.3 m above the
trampoline.
(c) Has she reached her maximum height? Explain
your answer.
57. Suppose you set a spring with spring constant
4.5 N/m into damped harmonic motion at noon,
measuring its maximum displacement from
equilibrium to be 0.75 m. When you return 15 min
later, the spring is still oscillating, but its maximum
displacement has decreased to 0.5 m. (4.7) T/I
(a) Determine how much energy the system
has lost.
(b) What is the power loss of the system?
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8160_CH04_p158-219.indd 218
58. A ball is attached to a vertical spring with a spring
constant of 6.0 N/m. It is held at the equilibrium
position of the spring and then released. It falls
0.40 m and then bounces back up again. Calculate
the mass of the ball. (4.7) T/I
59. A ball of mass 0.50 kg is attached to a horizontal
spring. The spring is compressed 0.25 m from its
equilibrium and then released. The ball undergoes
simple harmonic motion, achieving a maximum
speed of 1.5 m/s. (4.7) T/I A
(a) Determine the spring constant.
(b) Calculate the speed of the ball when the spring is
halfway to its equilibrium point.
(c) When the ball is halfway to its equilibrium point,
what fraction of its energy has been converted
from elastic potential energy to kinetic energy?
60. Two objects of different masses are suspended from
two springs that have the same spring constant. The
heavier of the two objects will extend its spring farther
beyond the equilibrium point. Why? (4.7) T/I A
61. A bungee jumper leaps from a high bridge. Draw a
sketch of the jumper as he falls and as he bounces
back up to show when each of the following three
quantities is increasing or decreasing:
(a) gravitational potential energy
(b) elastic potential energy
(c) kinetic energy (4.7) T/I C A
62. Name a type of energy other than kinetic, gravitational,
or elastic potential energy. Give an example of a
transformation involving it and one of the three
given energy forms. (4.5) T/I A
63. To demonstrate automotive safety, a group of
engineers measures how long it takes to stop a car
with increasing initial speeds. A constant braking
force is used throughout. Their data are shown in
Table 1. (4.5) T/I C A
Table 1 Data for Automotive Safety
Initial speed (km/h)
Stopping distance (m)
15
5
30
18
45
40
60
68
(a) Plot the data in Table 1 in a graph of stopping
distance versus initial speed.
(b) Use the concepts of work and energy to explain
why the graph is non-linear.
(c) Discuss how these data can help people drive
more safely.
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4/26/12 11:18 AM
Evaluation
Reflect on Your Learning
64. Give an example of a situation where more than one
force is exerted on an object. For each force, specify
whether or not it does work on the object. (4.1) T/I A
65. Using your knowledge of physics principles, speculate
how Earth’s life forms might be different if Earth were
(a) less massive (the force of gravity would be less)
(b) more massive (the force of gravity would be
more) (4.3) T/I A
66. Analyze, in terms of various types of energy, how a
spring toy is able to step down the stairs (Figure 10).
(4.6) T/I A
69. What did you find most surprising in this chapter?
What did you find the most difficult to understand?
How can you learn more about the surprising or
difficult topics? C
70. You learned about different sources of commercial
energy, such as hydroelectric power. Do you have a
better understanding of how we use different energy
sources in our daily lives, and the pros and cons of
each? Explain why or why not. C
71. What topics in this chapter are you still unsure
of? Describe two ways you can improve your
understanding of these topics. C
72. How can you apply the concepts you learned in this
chapter to aspects of your daily life? C
Research
Figure 10
67. Use concepts from this chapter to explain why
roller coasters always start with a very high hill.
(4.5) T/I A
68. All cars have a hard shell. Older cars, however, often
have harder frames and are less likely to crumple in
a collision than cars built today. Use concepts from
this chapter to argue why a car that is more likely to
crumple is safer for passengers. (4.7) T/I A
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WEB LINK
73. You can use a pendulum to measure the force of
gravity at a specific location. This force varies by as
much as 5 % in various places on Earth. Pendulums
have been used by scientists (and clockmakers)
for centuries. Research how pendulums have been
used by various scientists throughout history to
study gravity and the orbital motion of the planets.
Prepare a report or brochure that describes your
research and its relevance to today’s understanding
of gravity. T/I C A
74. Choose two hydroelectric plants in Canada and
research their history, operation, and efficiency. In
a graphic organizer of your choice, compare their
advantages and disadvantages. T/I C A
75. Select one common amusement park ride, other
than a roller coaster. Research the design of the ride
and create a presentation, such as a poster, display
board, or slide show, that shows the forces and
energies associated with the motion of the ride. Your
presentation should include a detailed technical
drawing or labelled photograph showing the forces
acting on the riders at a minimum of three points in
the ride. T/I C A
Chapter 4 Review 219
4/26/12 11:18 AM
CHAPTER
5
Momentum and Collisions
How Is Momentum Related to Sports Safety?
KEY CONCEPTS
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• define momentum and impulse
• solve problems involving
collisions and explosions using
conservation of momentum in
one and two dimensions
• distinguish between elastic and
inelastic collisions
• analyze the results of head-on
and glancing collisions using
conservation of momentum
• identify and describe
technological applications of
momentum and conservation
of momentum, and analyze
their impact on society
and the environment
High-energy sports are exciting, and they also provide a great opportunity to
see physics in action. Checks in hockey or lacrosse, tackles in football, and
kicks and blocks in karate all demonstrate the properties of collisions. Two
objects that collide exchange energy, whether they are stick and puck or ball,
player and turf, or foot and pad.
The development of better equipment means athletes can move faster, jump
higher, and hit harder than ever before. However, more excitement means
more safety risk. Fortunately, new technology also means engineers can build
better safety equipment.
Athletes in all sports must be protected against injuries such as concussions. A hit to the body that causes an athlete’s head to jerk fast enough can
damage the brain. Studies show that receiving a concussion at a young age
puts an athlete at risk for other health issues later in life. Studies also show
that receiving one concussion puts an athlete at higher risk for receiving
another.
Advances in sports technology help protect athletes by allowing engineers
to design better helmets and pads, and can also allow the athletes to train in
new ways that help them avoid injuries.
As you study this chapter, think about the following questions. What sports
or exciting activities interest you? What safety risks do these activities have?
By studying momentum and collisions, you can learn about how to minimize
risk and increase safety in these and many other activities.
STARTING pOInTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later,
applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. Have you ever heard the term momentum used in
conversation? Was it referring to a physical concept or
an abstract one, such as “the momentum of the game
shifted”? Based on your prior knowledge, what do you
think momentum is?
220
Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 220
2. Why might a test car colliding with a wall produce
a greater average net force than a tennis ball
colliding with the same wall at twice the speed of
the car?
3. Suppose you are watching a football tackle in slow
motion. Describe what you see, step by step, as the
tackle proceeds from initial contact to its finish.
NEL
4/27/12 2:36 PM
Mini Investigation
Keep On Rolling
Skills: Predicting, Controlling Variables, Performing, Observing, Analyzing
In this Mini Investigation, you will explore how adding or
subtracting mass affects the speed of a dynamics cart moving
down an inclined plane.
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; inclined plane with
barrier; dynamics cart; stopwatch; ruler or metre stick; mass
1. Set up a slightly inclined plane so that the slope of the
plane is just enough to overcome the frictional forces on the
dynamics cart after it starts moving. The cart should move at
a relatively constant speed after you nudge it down the ramp.
2. Put on your eye protection. Determine the base speed by
timing the cart’s descent down the ramp for three trials.
Average the result. This is the base speed.
3. Predict what will happen to the cart’s speed after you
carefully add a mass to the moving cart midway down the
ramp. Perform this step and record your observations.
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SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.1
4. Repeat Step 3 two more times. Record your observations,
and then average the results of your three trials.
5. Add a mass to the dynamics cart at the top of the inclined
plane. Predict what will happen to the cart’s speed after
you carefully remove the mass from the moving cart
midway down the ramp. Perform this step three times
and record your observations.
A. Describe the change in speed of the cart in Steps 3
to 5. K/U
B. Could the change in the normal force and its effect on
friction between the cart and the plane be enough to
account for the changes in speed? Explain. K/U T/I A
C. What is the primary reason for the changes in speed that
you observed? K/U T/I A
Introduction
221
4/27/12 2:36 PM
5.1
Figure 1 When you hit a ball with a bat,
the resulting collision has an effect on
both the ball and the bat.
>
linear momentum (p ) a quantity that
describes the motion of an object travelling
in a straight line as the product of its mass
and velocity
Momentum and Impulse
Objects in motion are a big part of everyday life. It is important that we understand
how to put objects in motion, how to change their direction, and how to bring them
to a stop. These changes in motion often occur as a result of collisions between two
or more objects. A collision between a baseball and a bat, for example, brings about
a sudden change in velocity of the ball but also has an effect on the bat (Figure 1).
A collision between a car and a tree can have negative impacts for both; however, a
well-designed collision between the driver and an airbag can save a life.
Why does a puck propelled by a slap shot travel faster than a puck propelled by a
wrist shot? How do modern tennis racquets allow today’s players to hit the ball with
much greater speed than was possible with older wooden racquets? Why do golf
courses have to be lengthened from time to time to remain challenging? The concepts
of momentum and impulse will help you understand the science of collisions and
CAREER LINK
answer these questions.
Momentum
Two variables, velocity and acceleration, describe the motion of a single object. An
additional quantity, linear momentum, is useful for dealing with a collection of
>
>
objects. The linear momentum, p , of a single object of mass m moving with velocity v is
>
>
p 5 mv
Note that for the rest of this section, the term momentum refers to linear momentum.
>
The momentum p of an object is directly proportional to the object’s velocity, so the
>
momentum vector is along the same direction as the velocity. Note also that p is
proportional to the mass of the object. In the following Tutorial, you will learn more
about how to calculate momentum.
Tutorial 1 Calculating Momentum
>
>
The following Sample Problem shows you how to use the equation p 5 mv to calculate the
momentum of an object.
Sample Problem 1: The Vector Nature of Momentum
(a) Calculate the momentum of a 2.5 kg rabbit travelling with a
velocity of 2.0 m/s [E].
(b) Calculate the momentum of a 5.0 kg groundhog travelling
with a velocity of 1.0 m/s [S].
(c) Compare the momentum and kinetic energies of the rabbit
and the groundhog.
>
Given: mrabbit 5 2.5 kg; v rabbit 5 2.0 m/s [E]; mgroundhog 5 5.0 kg;
>
v groundhog 5 1.0 m/s [S]
>
>
Required: p rabbit; Ek rabbit; p groundhog; Ek groundhog
1
>
>
Analysis: p 5 mv ; Ek 5 mv 2
2
Solution:
>
>
(a)
p 5 mv
>
prabbit 5 12.5 kg2 12.0 m/s 3 E 42
>
prabbit 5 5.0 kg # m/s 3 E 4
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Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 222
(b)
>
>
p 5 mv
>
pgroundhog 5 15.0 kg2 11.0 m/s 3 S 42
>
pgroundhog 5 5.0 kg # m/s 3 S 4
(c) For the rabbit:
1
Ek 5 mv 2
2
1
Ek rabbit 5 12.5 kg2 12.0 m/s2 2
2
Ek rabbit 5 5.0 J
For the groundhog:
1
Ek groundhog 5 15.0 kg2 11.0 m/s2 2
2
Ek groundhog 5 2.5 J
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4/27/12 2:37 PM
Statement:
(a) The momentum of the rabbit is 5.0 kg·m/s [E].
(b) The momentum of the groundhog is 5.0 kg·m/s [S].
(c) The momenta of the two animals are equal in magnitude
but in different directions. Although the momenta of the
rabbit and the groundhog are of the same magnitude,
the kinetic energy, Ek, of the rabbit is twice that of the
groundhog. Note that, unlike momentum, kinetic energy
is a scalar quantity and does not have a direction.
Practice
1. Calculate the momentum and kinetic energy of a hockey puck with a mass of 160 g travelling
with a velocity of 40.0 m/s [E]. K/U T/I A [ans: 6.4 kg·m/s; 130 J]
2. Compare the momentum of a bowling ball with a mass of 6.2 kg travelling with a velocity
of 1.6 m/s [E] to that of a hockey puck with a mass of 160 g travelling with a velocity of
40.0 m/s [E]. What is the difference in their momenta? T/I A [ans: 3.5 kg·m/s]
Impulse
A golf ball resting on a tee has mass but zero velocity. Its momentum, therefore, is
zero. Although the golfer may not think of it in these terms, the goal is to use the golf
club to change the momentum of the ball. If the golfer is successful, the golf ball will
fly through the air with considerable momentum an instant after colliding with the
golf club. What happens during this transition?
Newton’s first law states that the velocity of an object is constant unless acted on by
an external force. So, in the absence of an external force, an object with constant mass
must also have constant linear momentum. If a net force is applied to the object,
its velocity
will change and, therefore, its momentum will also change. Consider a
>
force, F , acting on a golf
a mass of 45 g. You can use linear momentum and
> ball with
>
Newton’s second law, F 5 ma , to calculate the change in momentum.
>
The object’s acceleration, a , is related to the change in the velocity according to
>
> Dv
>
a5
. Suppose that the object has an initial velocity vi just before the force is
Dt
>
applied, and a final velocity vf after a time Dt.
>
>
F 5 ma
>
Dv
5m
Dt
>
>
>
vf 2 vi
F5m
Dt
>
>
From the definition of momentum, the initial momentum of the object is pi 5 mvi
>
>
and the final momentum is pf 5 mvf . Rearrange the previous equation and then
substitute these expressions.
>
>
>
F Dt 5 m 1vf 2 vi2
>
>
5 mvf 2 mvi
>
>
5 pf 2 pi
>
>
F Dt 5 Dp
>
The product F Dt is called the impulse and is the change in the momentum of an object:
>
>
F Dt 5 Dp
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8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 223
impulse the product of force and time
that acts on an object to produce a change
in momentum
5.1 Momentum and Impulse 223
4/27/12 2:37 PM
Impulse is a vector; its direction is the same as the direction of the total force on
the object. You can see from this equation that applying a large force for a short time
could produce the same change in momentum as applying a smaller force for a longer
time. Dimensional analysis shows that the SI units for impulse (newton seconds, or N?s)
are the same as the units for momentum (kg?m/s):
m
d 3s 4
s2
m
3 N # s 4 5 ckg # 2 d 3 s 4
s
m
3 N # s 4 5 ckg # d
s
3 N # s 4 5 ckg #
Impulse in Sports
Figure 2 A modern tennis racquet can
transfer a greater impulse to a tennis
ball than older wooden racquets.
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you learn about
momentum and impulse to the Unit
Task on page 270.
How do modern tennis racquets allow players to hit the ball with much greater speed
than was possible with older wooden racquets (Figure 2)? You can investigate this
using the equations for momentum and impulse. Assume the mass of the tennis ball
is still the same; if its velocity is greater, its momentum must also be greater. So the
tennis player is providing a greater impulse, or change in momentum, to the ball.
Assuming also that the force the player uses does not change, then the change in
impulse can only come from a change in Dt. For the most part, the greater speeds
are the result of new materials and designs that allow more contact time between the
ball and the racquet.
Impulse and Force–Time Graphs
In situations where the force applied to an object varies over time, you can use a
force–time graph to estimate the impulse. A force–time graph shows force as a
function of time during a collision within a time interval Dt. Figure 3 shows the
force–time graph of a struck tennis ball. The area under the force–time graph is
equal to the impulse, because this area represents the product of force and time over
the course of the collision.
One way to estimate impulse from the force–time graph is to count the number of
squares and partial squares under the variable force–time graph, as shown in Figure 3(a).
The total will represent the area under the curve, and therefore the impulse due to the
applied force. Another way is to consider the average force exerted on the ball over the
duration of the collision. A constant average force will produce a horizontal straightline graph, as shown in Figure 3(b). Note that the rectangular area under this graph is
approximately equal to the area under the variable force–time graph found by counting
squares. In many situations it is easier to estimate the impulse produced by a variable
force by assuming a constant average force acting over the same time interval.
F (N)
F (N)
average
force
0
(a)
t (s)
t (s)
0
(b)
t
Figure 3 (a) A variable force–time graph and (b) its corresponding constant average force–time graph.
The area under the curve is equal to approximately 30 square units, which corresponds to 30 N·s.
In the following Tutorial, you will learn how to calculate impulse and use force–
time graphs.
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Tutorial 2 Calculating Impulse
The Sample Problems in this Tutorial demonstrate various ways to calculate impulse.
Sample Problem 1: Impulse as a Change in Momentum
A 0.160 kg puck is travelling at 5.0 m/s [N]. A slapshot produces
a collision that lasts for 0.0020 s and gives the puck a velocity of
40.0 m/s [S].
(a) Calculate the impulse imparted by the hockey stick.
(b) Determine the average force applied by the stick to the puck.
Solution
>
>
(a) Given: m 5 0.160 kg; vi 5 5.0 m/s [N]; vf 5 40.0 m/s [S]
>
Required: Dp
>
>
>
Analysis: Dp 5 m 1vf 2 vi2
>
>
>
Solution: Dp 5 m 1vf 2 vi2
5 0.160 kg 3 40 m/s 3 S 4 2 5 m/s 3 N 4 4
5 0.160 kg 3 40 m/s 3 S 4 2 125 m/s 3 S 42 4
5 0.160 kg 140 m/s 3 S 4 1 5 m/s 3 S 42
5 0.160 kg 145 m/s 3 S 42
5 7.2 kg # m/s 3 S 4
>
Dp 5 7.2 N # s 3 S 4
Statement: The impulse imparted by the hockey stick
is 7.2 N?s [S].
>
(b) Given: Dt 5 0.0020 s; Dp 5 7.2 N?s [S]
>
Required: F
>
>
Analysis: F Dt 5 Dp
>
> Dp
F5
Dt
>
> Dp
Solution: F 5
Dt
7.2 N # s 3 S 4
5
0.0020 s
>
F 5 3600 N 3 S 4
Statement: The average force applied by the stick to the puck
is 3.6 3 103 N [S].
Sample Problem 2: Impulse as the Product of Force and Time
A volleyball player starts a serve by throwing the ball vertically
upward. The 260 g volleyball comes to rest at its maximum
height. The server then hits it and exerts an average horizontal
force of magnitude 6.5 N on the ball.
(a) Determine the speed of the ball after the player hits it if the
average force is exerted on the ball for 615 ms.
(b) On the next serve, the volleyball player hits the ball with
the same amount of horizontal force, but the time interval
is 875 ms. Determine the speed of the ball.
Solution
>
(a) G
iven: m 5 260 g 5 0.260 kg; F 5 6.5 N;
Dta 5 615 ms 5 0.615 s
>
Required: vf
>
>
Analysis: F Dt 5 Dp
>
>
>
Dp 5 m 1vf 2 vi2
>
>
>
F Dt 5 m 1vf 2 vi2
>
F Dt
>
>
vf 5
1 vi
m
>
F Dt
>
>
1 vi
Solution: vf 5
m
m
6.5 kg # 2 10.615 s2
s
5
1 0 m/s
0.260 kg
>
vf 5 15 m/s
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Statement: The speed of the volleyball when the force is
exerted for 615 ms is 15 m/s.
>
(b) Given: m 5 260 g 5 0.260 kg; F 5 6.5 N;
Dtb 5 875 ms 5 0.875 s
>
Required: vf
>
Analysis: Use the same equation for vf we derived in (a),
substituting the different time interval:
>
F Dt
>
>
1 vi
vf 5
m
>
F Dt
>
>
Solution: vf 5
1 vi
m
m
6.5 kg # 2 10.875 s2
s
5
1 0 m/s
0.260 kg
>
vf 5 22 m/s
Statement: The speed of the volleyball when the force is
exerted for 875 ms is 22 m/s. (Note: By following through
on the serve, the player increases the time interval of the
applied force, resulting in a faster serve.)
5.1 Momentum and Impulse 225
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Sample Problem 3: Impulse as Area under a Force–Time Curve
Two figure skaters approach each other in a straight line. They
meet hand to hand and then push off in opposite directions. The
increase and decrease of force are both linear, which produces
a force–time curve that is in the shape of a triangle. The force–
time curve for this interaction is shown in Figure 4. Determine
the impulse for this interaction.
20
F (N [E])
15
Analysis: Determine the impulse by calculating the area under
the force–time curve of the collision. Use the equation for the area
>
1
of a triangle: A 5 bh; A 5 F Dt .
2
>
1
Solution: F Dt 5 bh
2
1
5 12.5 s2 120.0 N2
2
>
F Dt 5 25 N # s
Statement: The impulse of the interaction of the two skaters is
25 N?s away from each other.
10
5
0
0.5
1.0 1.5
t (s)
2.0
2.5
Figure 4
Given: Force–time graph of the skaters’ interaction
>
Required: F Dt
Practice
1. A hockey player passes a puck with an average force of 250 N. The hockey stick is in contact
with the puck for 0.0030 s, and the mass of the puck is 180 g. The puck is not moving before
the player passes it. T/I A
(a) Determine the impulse imparted by the hockey stick. [ans: 0.75 kg·m/s [forward]]
(b) Calculate the velocity of the puck as a result of this collision. [ans: 4.2 m/s [forward]]
2. A hockey player collides with a wall, and then pushes away from it. The collision occurs
over 2.9 s and the average force applied by the player in the collision is 468 N. Draw a
force–time graph similar to the one in Figure 3(b) and use it to determine the impulse
of the collision. T/I C [ans: 1400 N·s [away from the wall]]
As you have seen, the concepts of linear momentum and impulse are relevant to an
understanding of motion in sports and in the design of improved sports gear. You can
also apply the concepts of momentum and impulse in many other areas, ranging from
the analysis of motor vehicle collisions to the motion of rockets. You will learn more
CAREER LINK
about applications of momentum and impulse later in the chapter.
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5.1
Review
Summary
• Linear momentum is the product of an object’s mass and its velocity, expressed
>
>
in units of kilograms times metres per second (kg?m/s): p 5 mv .
• Impulse is the change in momentum caused by the application of a force over
>
>
a time interval, expressed in units of newton seconds (N?s): F Dt 5 Dp .
• The magnitude of an impulse can be found by measuring the area under a
force–time curve.
Questions
1. Calculate the momentum of each of the following: K/U
(a) a male moose of mass 4.25 3 102 kg running
at 6.9 m/s [N]
(b) a city bus of mass 9.97 3 103 kg moving at
5 km/h [forward]
(c) a flying squirrel of mass 995 g gliding at
16 m/s [S]
2. In your own words, describe what impulse is. K/U C
3. A bicycle and rider have a combined mass of
79.3 kg and a momentum of 2.16 3 103 kg?m/s [W].
Determine the velocity of the bicycle. K/U
4. A projectile travelling at 9.0 3 102 m/s [W] has a
momentum of 4.5 kg?m/s [W]. What is the mass of
the projectile? K/U
5. A downhill skier travelling at a constant velocity
of 29.5 m/s [forward] has a momentum of
2.31 3 103 kg?m/s [forward]. Determine the
mass of the skier. T/I
6. Explain how increasing the time interval over which
a force is applied can affect performance in sports.
Use a sport not discussed in this section in your
answer. K/U A
7. A teacher drops a tennis ball and a basketball from
the same height onto the floor. The force from
the floor produces an impulse on each ball. If the
basketball is heavier than the tennis ball, which
impulse is larger? Explain your answer. T/I C A
8. A hockey player passes a puck that is initially at
rest. The force exerted by the stick on the puck is
1100.0 N [forward], and the stick is in contact with
the puck for 5.0 ms. T/I
(a) Determine the impulse imparted by the stick to
the puck.
(b) If the puck has a mass of 0.12 kg, calculate
the speed of the puck just after it leaves the
hockey stick.
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9. You accidentally drop a cellphone, which has a mass
of 225 g, from a height of 74 cm. T/I A
(a) Calculate the cellphone’s momentum at the
moment of impact with the sidewalk.
(b) If the cellphone lands on a grassy lawn, is its
momentum less, the same, or greater? Explain
your answer.
10. A rubber ball with a mass of 0.25 kg is dropped
from a height of 1.5 m onto the floor. Just after
bouncing from the floor, the ball has a velocity of
4.0 m/s [up]. T/I
(a) Determine the impulse imparted by the floor to
the ball.
(b) If the average force of the floor on the ball is
18 N [up], for how long is the ball in contact
with the floor?
11. An archer shoots an arrow with a mass of 0.030 kg.
The arrow leaves the bow with a horizontal velocity
of 88 m/s. T/I
(a) Determine the impulse imparted to the arrow.
(b) If the arrow is in contact with the bowstring
for 0.015 s after the archer releases, what is the
approximate average force of the bowstring on
the arrow?
12. A tennis player hits a serve at a speed of 63 m/s [W],
and the opponent returns the 0.057 kg tennis ball to
the server with a speed of 41 m/s [E]. T/I
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the impulse
imparted to the ball by the opponent.
(b) Calculate the approximate average force on the
ball if the opponent’s racquet is in contact with
the ball for 0.023 s.
5.1 Momentum and Impulse 227
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5.2
Conservation of Momentum
in One Dimension
Success in the sport of curling relies on momentum and impulse. A player must accelerate a curling stone to a precise velocity to collide with an opponent’s stone so that
both end up in the desired location (Figure 1). The same is true in billiards. You must
not only control where the target ball will go, but also where the cue ball will travel.
Likewise, a football player receiving a pass, a tennis player delivering a serve, and a
lacrosse player attempting a pass must all be in control of momentum and impulse.
In this section, you will examine what happens when two bodies interact such
that momentum is exchanged. You will also examine a new aspect of momentum by
considering what happens when an impulse is generated from within a single object,
such as a rocket taking off, to create the motion of two independent masses, each with
its own momentum.
Figure 1 Curling requires a firm
understanding of momentum and impulse
to control the movement of the stones.
collision the impact of one body with
another
The Law of Conservation of Momentum
You may recall that the concept of a system plays an important role in discussions
of energy and the law of conservation of energy. You can also apply ideas about
momentum and impulse to the motion of a system of objects by examining a collision,
where two or more objects come together. When two objects collide, they create an
associated collision force. In the case of two hockey pucks or two billiard balls, this
collision force is a normal (contact) force.
WEB LINK
Consider a system of two colliding objects, as shown in Figure 2.
1
m1v i1
m2v i2
2
collision
Figure 2 When two objects collide, the total momentum just after the collision is equal to the total
momentum just before the collision.
>
>
Let F 21 be the force exerted by object 2 on object 1 and F 12 be the force exerted by
object 1 on object 2. These forces are an action–reaction pair, so according to
> Newton’s
>
third law, they must be equal in magnitude and opposite in direction: F 21 5 2F
> 12.
If this collision takes place over a time interval Dt, the impulse of object 1 is F 21Dt.
Since the impulse equals the change in momentum of object 1,
>
>
F 21Dt 5 Dp1
and
>
>
>
Dp1 5 pf1 2 pi1
Substituting gives
>
>
>
F 21Dt 5 pf1 2 pi1
>
>
Here, pi1 is the initial momentum of object 1 just before the collision and pf1 is its
final momentum just after the collision. Likewise, the impulse imparted to object 2 is
>
F 12Dt, which equals the change in the momentum of object 2:
>
>
F 12Dt 5 Dp2
>
>
>
Dp2 5 pf2 2 pi2
>
>
>
F 12Dt 5 pf2 2 pi2
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>
>
Since F 21 5 2F 12 and the interaction times Dt are the same, the impulse imparted
to object 1 is equal in magnitude but opposite in sign to the impulse imparted to
object 2:
>
>
F21Dt 5 2F 12Dt
>
>
m 1a1 5 2m 2a2
>
>
m 1Dv1 5 2m 2Dv2
>
>
>
>
m 1 1vf1 2 vi12 5 2m 2 1vf2 2 vi2 2
>
>
>
>
m 1vf1 2 m 1vi1 5 2m 2vf2 1 m 2vi2
>
>
>
>
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 m1vf1 1 m2vf2
This equation summarizes the law of conservation of momentum for two colliding
objects:
Law of Conservation of Momentum
When two objects collide in an isolated system, the collision does not
change the total momentum of the two objects. Whatever momentum
is lost by one object in the collision is gained by the other. The total
momentum of the system is conserved.
The law of conservation of momentum applies not only to isolated systems of
two objects, but also to complex systems. For example, you can easily see how the
momentum of the cue ball in a billiards game is transferred to the other balls in
the system during the opening break. Momentum is always conserved, whether the
colliding objects bounce off one another, as with billiard balls, or remain together,
as in the case of a football player who catches a pass.
Interactions within a System
You have explored the momentum of an object as the product of its mass, m, and its
>
velocity, v . You have also examined how the application of a force over a specified
period of time, an impulse, can change the momentum of an object. You have seen
how to derive the equation describing the conservation of motion in an isolated
system. In the remainder of this section, you will read more about the concepts of
momentum and impulse within an isolated system. Two general categories of interactions exist within a system: collisions and explosions.
Investigation
5.2.1
Conservation of Momentum in One
Dimension (page 258)
Now that you understand conservation
of momentum, perform Investigation
5.2.1 to see how a collision between
two objects in one dimension affects
the momentum of each object.
Collisions
Momentum is conserved in a system when two or more objects come together in
a collision. Examples of a collision are a cue ball hitting another billiard ball, a car
rear-ending another car, and one lacrosse player delivering a body check to another.
Explosions
Momentum is also conserved in systems when an object or a collection of objects
breaks apart in an explosion. Fireworks provide vivid images of explosions that
give us a feel for the masses and velocities of the many individual objects involved.
Accounting for the masses and velocities of all the elements is a challenging task.
Other examples of explosions may be less obvious. A force used to send an arrow
flying affects the momentum of the arrow and the momentum of the bow and
archer. Similarly, a squid gains momentum by ejecting water that possesses its own
momentum. The same principle is used to put spacecraft into orbit. The following
Tutorial illustrates how the law of conservation of momentum can be used to predict
CAREER LINK
the outcome of a collision or explosion.
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explosion a situation in which a single
object or group of objects breaks apart
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Tutorial 1 Applying the Law of Conservation of Momentum
The Sample Problems in this Tutorial apply the law of conservation of momentum to problems
involving collisions or explosions in one dimension.
Sample Problem 1: Collision Analysis
A hockey player of mass 97 kg skating with a velocity of
9.2 m/s [S] collides head-on with a defence player of mass
105 kg travelling with a velocity of 6.5 m/s [N]. An instant after
impact, the two skate together in the same direction. Calculate
the final velocity of the two hockey players.
>
Given: m1 5 97 kg; v1 5 9.2 m/s [S]; m2 5 105 kg;
>
v2 5 6.5 m/s [N]
>
Required: vf
Analysis: The players stick together after the collision, so they
can be treated as a single object having mass m1 1 m2, velocity
vf, and momentum pf.
>
>
p f 5 1m 1 1 m2 2 v f
>
pf
>
vf 5
1m1 1 m2 2
By conservation of momentum,
>
>
>
pf 5 p1 1 p2
First determine the total momentum before the collision and then
use this result to calculate the velocity of the two players after
the collision.
>
>
>
Solution: pf 5 p1 1 p2
5 197 kg2 19.2 m/s 3 S 42 1 1105 kg2 16.5 m/s 3 N 42
5 197 kg2 19.2 m/s 3 S 42 2 1105 kg2 16.5 m/s 3 S 42
5 892 kg # m/s 3 S 4 2 682 kg # m/s 3 S 4
>
pf 5 210 kg # m/s 3 S 4
>
pf
>
vf 5
1m1 1 m2 2
210 kg # m/s 3 S 4
1202 kg2
>
vf 5 1.0 m/s 3 S 4
5
Statement: After the collision, the two skaters will be travelling
at 1.0 m/s [S].
Sample Problem 2: Explosion Analysis
In a science fiction novel, a large asteroid is approaching Earth.
Scientists decide to use explosive devices to blow the asteroid
into two equal halves before impact with Earth. The asteroid has
a mass of 2.4 3 109 kg. For each half to safely miss Earth, an
explosion must cause each to travel a minimum of 8.0 3 106 m
at a right angle away from Earth within 24 h (Figure 3). Assume
this is a one-dimensional problem. The magnitude of the impulse
applied to each fragment is the same, but the halves are directed
in opposite directions.
1.2 109 kg
Earth
(a) Calculate the momentum of each part of the asteroid after
the explosion.
(b) Determine the impulse delivered to each part by the
explosion.
Solution
(a) Given: m 5 2.4 3 109 kg; v 5 8.0 3 106 m/24 h
>
Required: p
>
>
Analysis: p 5 mv . Since the total mass of the asteroid is
2.4 3 109 kg, the mass of each half is 1.2 3 109 kg. Use this
mass to calculate the momentum. First, convert the speed to
metres per second.
8.0 3 106 m
8.0 3 106 m
1h
1 min
5
3
3
24 h
24 h
60 min
60 s
5 92.6 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
>
>
Solution: p 5 mv
5 11.2 3 109 kg2 192.6 m/s2
>
p 5 1.111 3 1011 kg # m/s 1two extra digits carried2
m = 2.4 109 kg
Statement: The momentum of each part of the asteroid is
1.1 3 1011 kg·m/s.
9
1.2 10 kg
Figure 3
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(b) G
iven: m 5 2.4 3 109 kg; v 5 8.0 3 106 m/24 h 5 92.6 m/s;
>
p 5 1.111 3 1011 kg·m/s
>
Required: Dp
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Analysis: The original momentum of each half of the asteroid
is zero. So the change in momentum for each half is
>
Dp 5 1.1 3 1011 kg·m/s
>
Solution: Dp 5 1.1 3 1011 kg # m/s
>
Dp 5 1.1 3 1011 N # s
The impulse for the other fragment is 1.1 3 1011 N?s in the
opposite direction.
Statement: The explosion will deliver an impulse of
magnitude 1.1 3 1011 N?s to each fragment in the directions
shown in Figure 3.
Practice
1. A 1350 kg car travelling at 72 km/h [S] collides with a slow-moving car of mass 1650 kg, also
initially travelling south. After the collision, the velocity of the two cars together is 24 km/h [S].
Determine the initial velocity at which the second car was travelling. T/I [ans: 15 km/h [N]]
2. After shooting a 28 g arrow with an initial velocity of 92 m/s [forward], an archer standing on
a frictionless surface travels in the opposite direction at a speed of 0.039 m/s. Calculate the
combined mass of the archer and the bow. T/I A [ans: 6.6 3 101 kg]
You can demonstrate conservation of momentum experimentally by creating
systems that minimize the influence of external forces, such as friction. For example, air
pucks interacting on a cushion of air near motion sensors provide a means for carefully
measuring the initial and final velocities of two objects after a collision.
Keep in mind that while momentum is always conserved in an isolated system,
real-life systems are subject to many outside influences, such as friction and other
complicated forces, which can make detecting conservation of momentum difficult.
For example, if you jump on Earth, it does move, even if you cannot sense the movement. Momentum is conserved when you jump, but because of the huge mass of
Earth, the change in its velocity is quite small.
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about conservation of momentum to
the Unit Task on page 270.
Rocket Propulsion
Momentum is conserved when a rocket engine burns fuel and expels a continuous
stream of gases at an extremely high velocity (Figure 4). In this explosion, the
expanding gases act against the rocket, propelling the rocket forward. In the vacuum
of deep space, where gravity is negligible, it is possible to achieve a nearly perfectly
isolated system, free from the influences of friction and gravity, providing ideal conditions for the study of momentum. The study of rocket propulsion is complicated,
however, because the mass of the rocket changes continuously as the rocket burns fuel.
For this reason, a detailed study of rocket propulsion requires knowledge of calculus,
so we will not discuss it here. However, it may be something you wish to explore if
CAREER LINK
you have already studied calculus or plan to do so in the future.
Figure 4 The momentum of combusted
gases ejected from the rocket is balanced
by the forward momentum of the rocket.
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5.2
Review
Summary
• For any interaction involving a system that experiences no external forces, the
total momentum before the interaction is equal to the total momentum after
the interaction.
• During an interaction between two objects in a system that experiences
no external forces, the change in momentum of one object is equal in
magnitude but opposite in direction to the change in momentum of the
>
>
>
>
other object: m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vf2.
• Interactions within a system can be categorized as collisions, in which two
or more objects come together, or explosions, in which a single object or
collection of objects separates.
Questions
1. Identify the conditions required for the total
momentum of a system to be conserved. K/U
2. A 55 kg student stands on a 4.6 kg surfboard moving
at 2.0 m/s [E]. The student then walks with a velocity
of 1.9 m/s [E] relative to the surfboard. Determine
the resulting velocity of the surfboard, relative to the
water. Neglect friction. T/I
3. Two stationary hockey players push each other so
that they move in opposite directions. One player
has a mass of 35.6 kg and a speed of 2.42 m/s. What
is the mass of the other player if her speed is 3.25 m/s?
Neglect friction. T/I
4. A baseball pitcher with a mass of 80 kg is initially
standing at rest on extremely slippery artificial turf.
He then throws a baseball with a mass of 0.14 kg
with a horizontal velocity of 50 m/s. Determine the
recoil velocity of the pitcher. T/I
5. Consider a collision in one dimension that
involves two objects of masses 4.5 kg and 6.2 kg.
The larger mass is initially at rest, and the smaller
mass has an initial velocity of 16 m/s [E]. The
final velocity of the larger object is 10.0 m/s [E].
Calculate the final velocity of the smaller object
after the collision. T/I
6. Two objects of masses m and 3m undergo a
collision in one dimension. The lighter object is
moving at three times the speed of the heavier
object. Describe what happens to their speeds after
the collision. Explain your reasoning. Assume that
the lighter mass is moving to the right. K/U T/I C A
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8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 232
7. An object of mass m1 5 2.5 kg has a onedimensional collision with another object of mass
m2 5 7.5 kg, as shown in Figure 5. Their initial
speeds along x are v1 5 16.0 m/s and v2 5 215 m/s.
The two objects stick together after the collision.
Calculate the velocity after the collision. T/I
v i1 6.0 m/s
v i2 15 m/s
m1 2.5 kg
m2 7.5 kg
(a)
vf ?
m12 10 kg
(b)
Figure 5
8. An astronaut on a spacewalk outside the
International Space Station (ISS) has a safety
equipment failure that leaves her floating in space
just out of reach of the station airlock. Fortunately,
she is still holding a tool bag. Explain how she can
use the tool bag and conservation of momentum to
return safely to the ISS. K/U T/I A
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Collisions
5.3
If you have ever been to an amusement park, chances are you have ridden in the
bumper cars, where the objective is for you and your friends to crash into one another
(Figure 1). In Section 5.2, you learned about two types of interactions within a
system—collisions and explosions. In this section, you will learn more about different
types of collisions, as well as what happens to the energy of systems when a collision
occurs. How can you use what you have learned about linear momentum and kinetic
energy to understand what happens when two bumper cars collide and bounce apart,
and what happens when they collide and stay together?
Figure 1 Momentum and kinetic energy can help explain what happens to the directions and
speeds of objects when they collide with one another.
Elastic and Inelastic Collisions
In Section 5.2, you learned how to analyze a system of two objects. The total
momentum of the objects before a collision is equal to the total momentum of the
objects after the collision. In this section, you will apply the law of conservation of
momentum to analyze several different types of collisions. In general, a collision
changes the velocities of the objects involved. The final velocities (those found just
after the collision) are different from the initial velocities (from just before the collision). Since the kinetic energy of an object depends on its speed, the kinetic energy
of the object also changes as a result of the collision. Collisions fall into two general
types, depending on what happens to the total kinetic energy of the entire system:
elastic and inelastic collisions.
Elastic Collisions
In an elastic collision, the system’s kinetic energy is conserved. That is, the total kinetic
energy of the two objects after the collision is equal to the total kinetic energy of the
two objects before the collision. This is called conservation of kinetic energy. The term
elastic can help you understand how and why a collision affects the kinetic energy.
For example, an extremely elastic ball (such as a rubber ball) is compressed during a
collision, and this compression stores energy in the ball just as energy is stored in
a compressed spring. In an ideal rubber ball, all of this potential energy is turned
back into kinetic energy when the ball decompresses (springs back) at the end of
the collision.
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elastic collision a collision in which
momentum and kinetic energy are
conserved
conservation of kinetic energy the total
kinetic energy of two objects before a
collision is equal to the total kinetic energy
of the two objects after the collision
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Figure 2 shows two rubber balls before and after an elastic collision.
after collision
before collision
v i1
v i2
m1
v f1
m2
v f2
m1
m2
Figure 2 In elastic collisions, both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved.
Inelastic Collisions
inelastic collision a collision in which
momentum is conserved, but kinetic
energy is not conserved
In contrast to elastic collisions, inelastic collisions are collisions in which some kinetic
energy is lost. The kinetic energy is transformed into other forms, such as thermal
energy or sound energy. Consider a collision involving a ball composed of soft putty
or clay. The ball will not spring back at the end of the collision. Energy is absorbed,
causing the kinetic energy after the collision to be less than the kinetic energy before
the collision. The collision, therefore, is inelastic.
In summary,
• In an elastic collision, both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved.
• In an inelastic collision, momentum is conserved, but kinetic energy is not
conserved.
Note that in both types of collisions, momentum is conserved. The total energy is
WEB LINK
also conserved in both cases, even if the kinetic energy is not.
Mini Investigation
newton’s
Cradle
Mini
Investigation
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
In this investigation, you will explore the concept of conservation
of momentum in collisions using a Newton’s cradle (Figure 3).
A2.1
2. Pull back one of the spheres at the end and release.
Observe how momentum is transferred from one end of
the cradle to the other.
3. Explore what happens when you change the initial setup.
For example, try changing the number of active spheres by
holding up one of the end spheres during the investigation.
You can also try moving one of the middle spheres out of the
way of the collisions.
A. What happened during Step 2? How did your results change
when you modified the setup in Step 3? T/I A
B. Do the collisions appear to conserve momentum? Explain
your answer. K/U C
C. Do the collisions appear to conserve kinetic energy? Explain
your answer. K/U C
Figure 3
Equipment and Materials: Newton’s cradle
1. Set up the Newton’s cradle. Make sure all of the metal
spheres are correctly aligned.
234
Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 234
D. Does the device as a whole appear to conserve mechanical
energy? If not, identify some reasons for the energy loss.
K/U
T/I
C
A
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Perfectly Elastic Collisions and
Perfectly Inelastic Collisions
A perfectly elastic collision is an idealized situation where friction and other external
forces are negligible, and therefore momentum and kinetic energy are perfectly conserved. On the other hand, a perfectly inelastic collision is one in which the two objects
in a collision stick together after the collision so that the objects have the same final
velocity. Perfectly elastic and perfectly inelastic collisions occur in isolated systems in
which the effects of friction and other external forces are negligible. Perfectly elastic and
perfectly inelastic collisions are extremely rare in the world around us, and represent
idealized cases. Most real collisions fall somewhere between these two extreme situations. However, it is useful to consider perfectly elastic and perfectly inelastic collisions
as ideal examples of Newton’s laws. As you do this, be mindful of external forces that
may additionally affect the systems.
perfectly elastic collision an ideal
collision in which external forces are
minimized to the point where momentum
and kinetic energy are perfectly conserved
perfectly inelastic collision an ideal
collision in which two objects stick
together perfectly so they have the same
final velocity; in this situation, momentum
is perfectly conserved, but kinetic energy
is not conserved
Perfectly Elastic Collisions
By applying some basic assumptions, you can use collisions with billiard balls, bumper
cars, and asteroid–planet systems as reasonable examples of perfectly elastic collisions.
In perfectly elastic collisions, both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved:
>
>
>
>
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 m1vf1 1 m2vf2
1
1
1
1
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 5 m1v 2f1 1 m2v 2f2
2
2
2
2
In one-dimensional collisions, each vector can point in only one of two ways.
Designate directions in a way that is convenient for solving a particular problem. For
example, you may choose to assign right as positive and left as negative. Then you can
express the vectors using only their magnitudes, understanding that a negative value
implies a left direction. In Tutorial 1, you will use these equations to explore perfectly
elastic collisions in one dimension.
Tutorial 1 Perfectly Elastic Collisions in One Dimension
In the following Sample Problem, you will use conservation of momentum and kinetic energy to
analyze a perfectly elastic collision.
Sample Problem 1: Analyzing Perfectly Elastic Collisions
Suppose you have two balls with different masses involved in
a perfectly elastic collision. Ball 1, with mass m1 5 0.26 kg
travelling at a velocity v1 5 1.3 m/s [right], collides head-on with
stationary ball 2, which has a mass of m2 5 0.15 kg. Determine
the final velocities of both balls after the collision.
>
Given: m1 5 0.26 kg; vi1 5 1.3 m/s [right]; m2 5 0.15 kg;
>
vi2 5 0 m/s
> >
Required: vf1, vf2
Analysis: The collision is perfectly elastic, which means that
kinetic energy is conserved. Apply conservation of momentum
and conservation of kinetic energy to construct and solve a
linear-quadratic system of two equations in two unknowns.
First use the conservation of momentum equation to express
the final velocity of ball 1 in terms of the final velocity of ball 2.
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8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 235
Then substitute the resulting equation into the conservation
of kinetic energy equation to solve for the final velocity of
ball 2. Use the result to solve for the final velocity of ball 1.
This is a one-dimensional problem, so omit the vector
notation for velocities, recognizing that positive values
indicate motion to the right and negative values indicate
motion to the left.
>
Solution: First use conservation of momentum to solve for vf1 in
>
terms of vf2:
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 m1vf1 1 m2vf2
>
Isolate the term containing vf1on the left side of the equation.
Since vi2 5 0, the equation becomes
m1vf1 5 m1vi1 2 m2vf2
5.3 Collisions 235
4/27/12 2:37 PM
Divide both sides by m1:
m2
vf1 5 vi1 2 vf2
m1
0.15 kg
5 1.3 m/s 2
v
0.26 kg f2
vf1 5 1.3 m/s 2 0.58vf2
Express the quadratic equation in standard form:
0 5 20.39 m/s vf2 1 0.24v 2f2
Solve by common factoring:
(Equation 1)
The conservation of kinetic energy equation can be simplified by
multiplying both sides of the equation by 2 and noting that vi2 5 0:
1
1
1
1
2a m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 b 5 2a m1v 2f1 1 m2v 2f2 b
2
2
2
2
m1v 2i1
5
m1v 2f1
1
m2v 2f2
(Equation 2)
Substitute Equation 1 and the given values into Equation 2:
(0.26 kg)(1.3 m/s)2 5 (0.26 kg)(1.3 m/s 2 0.58vf2)2
1 (0.15 kg)v 2f2
Expand and simplify both sides of the equation:
2
2
2
2
0.439 kg?m /s 5 (0.26 kg)(1.69 m /s 2 1.51 m/s vf2
1 0.34v 2f2 ) 1 (0.15 kg)v 2f2
0.439 kg?m2/s2 5 0.439 kg?m2/s2 2 0.39 kg?m/s vf2
1 0.088 kg v 2f2 1 (0.15 kg)v 2f2
0.439 kg?m2/s2 5 0.439 kg?m2/s2 2 0.39 kg?m/s vf2
1 0.24 kg v 2f2
0 5 (20.39 m/s 1 0.24vf2 )vf2
The factor of vf2 means the equation has a solution vf2 5 0 m/s.
This solution describes the system before the collision. The
equation has a second solution describing the system after
the collision:
0.24vf2 2 0.39 m/s 5 0
0.39 m/s
vf2 5
0.24
vf2 5 1.63 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
Substitute this value into Equation 1 and calculate the final
velocity of ball 1:
vf1 5 1.3 m/s 2 0.58vf2
5 1.3 m/s 2 10.582 11.63 m/s2
vf1 5 0.35 m/s
Statement: The second ball has a final velocity of
1.6 m/s [right] and the first ball has a final velocity of
0.35 m/s [right].
0 5 20.39 m/s vf2 1 0.24v 2f2
Practice
1. Two balls collide in a perfectly elastic collision. Ball 1 has mass 3.5 kg and is initially
travelling at a velocity of 5.4 m/s [right]. It collides head-on with stationary ball 2 with
mass 4.8 kg. Determine the final velocity of ball 2. T/I [ans: 4.6 m/s [right]]
2. A curling stone with initial speed v1 collides head-on with a second, stationary stone of identical
mass m. Calculate the final speeds of the two curling stones. K/U T/I A [ans: vf 5 0; vf 5 v1]
1
2
The analysis and solution used above apply to the special case of a perfectly
elastic collision where one body is initially at rest. A more general case of perfectly
elastic collisions involves two bodies that are already in motion before the collision.
Collisions of this type will be explored in greater depth later in this chapter.
Perfectly Inelastic Collisions
The simplest type of inelastic collision is a perfectly inelastic collision, in which
two objects stick together after the collision so that the objects have the same final
velocity. If the colliding objects bounce, it is not a perfectly inelastic collision. A
good example of a perfectly inelastic collision is one in which two cars lock bumpers.
Figure 4 on the next page shows two cars coasting on a straight road in one dimen>
>
sion with velocities vi1 and vi2. The cars collide and lock bumpers, and they have the
>
same velocity vf after the collision. The cars are moving in a horizontal direction,
x, and if they are coasting, there are no external forces on the cars in this direction.
Therefore, the total momentum along x is conserved.
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Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 236
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before collision
vi1
vi2
after collision
vf
x
(a)
x
(b)
Figure 4 In an inelastic collision, only momentum is conserved. (a) Velocities just before
>
a one-dimensional collision. (b) After the collision the cars travel with vf.
The condition for conservation of momentum along x is
>
>
>
>
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vf2
>
In this case, there is only one unknown, the final velocity vf , since the two velocities are
>
the same when the two objects stick together. Solving the above equation for vf gives
>
>
>
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 1m 1 1 m 22 vf
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you learn about
collisions to the Unit Task on page 270.
>
>
m1 v i 1 1 m2 v i 2
>
vf 5
m1 1 m2
This equation relates the final velocity of two objects in a perfectly inelastic collision
to their masses and their initial velocities. You will apply this equation in Tutorial 2.
Tutorial 2 Perfectly Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension
In these Sample Problems, you will calculate the final velocities of two vehicles after a
one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision.
Sample Problem 1: Applying the Conservation of Momentum
to a One-Dimensional Perfectly Inelastic Collision
Two cars, a sports utility vehicle (SUV) of mass 2500 kg and
a compact model of mass 1200 kg, are coasting at a constant
velocity along a straight road. Their initial velocities are
40.0 m/s [W] and 10.0 m/s [W], respectively, so the SUV is
catching up to the compact car. When they collide, the cars lock
bumpers. Assume no external forces exist along the direction of
travel, and the total momentum along x is conserved. Determine
the velocity of the cars just after the collision.
>
Given: m1 5 2500 kg; vi1 5 40.0 m/s [W]; m2 5 1200 kg;
>
vi2 5 10.0 m/s [W]
>
Required: vf1
Solution:
>
>
m1 v i 1 1 m2 v i 2
>
vf 5
m1 1 m2
5
5
12500 kg2 140.0 m/s 3 W 42 1 11200 kg2 110.0 m/s 3 W 42
2500 kg 1 1200 kg
1100 000 kg # m/s 3 W 42 1 112 000 kg # m/s 3 W 42
3700 kg
>
vf 5 3.0 3 101 m/s 3 W 4
Statement: The final velocity of the cars is 3.0 3 101 m/s [W].
Analysis: The cars stick together after the collision, so this is
an example of a perfectly inelastic collision. In this system,
both vehicles >are moving
> in the same direction (west).
m1 v i 1 1 m2 v i 2
>
Use vf 5
to calculate the final velocity.
m1 1 m2
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5.3 Collisions 237
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Sample Problem 2: Applying Conservation of Momentum and Energy
in a One-Dimensional Perfectly Inelastic Collision
A child with a mass of 22 kg runs at a horizontal velocity of 4.2 m/s
[forward] and jumps onto a stationary rope swing of mass 2.6 kg.
The child “sticks” on the rope swing and swings forward.
(a) Determine the horizontal velocity of the child plus the swing
just after impact.
(b) How high do the child and swing rise?
Solution
(a) G
iven: Let m1 and vi1 represent the mass and initial velocity
of the child, and m2 and vi2 represent the mass and initial
>
velocity of the swing. m1 5 22 kg; vi1 5 4.2 m/s [forward];
>
m2 5 2.6 kg; vi2 5 0 m/s
>
Required: vf
>
>
m1 v i 1 1 m2 v i 2
>
Analysis: Use vf 5
to determine the final
m1 1 m2
velocity just after the child collides with the swing.
>
>
m1 v i 1 1 m2 v i 2
>
Solution: vf 5
m1 1 m2
5
5
Practice
Statement: The child and rope swing have a final velocity of
3.8 m/s [forward] just after the collision.
>
(b) Given: m1 5 22 kg; m2 5 2.6 kg; vf 5 3.76 m/s
Required: Dy
Analysis: Conservation of energy requires that the
initial kinetic energy of the child and swing transform to
gravitational potential energy at the highest point of the
swing: Ek 5 mgDy.
Solution:
1
>
1m 1 m22 1vf2 2 5 1m1 1 m22 gDy
2 1
>
1 vf2 2
Dy 5
2g
5
5
122 kg2 14.2 m/s2 1 12.6 kg2 10 m/s2
22 kg 1 2.6 kg
192.4 kg # m/s2 1 10 kg # m/s2
24.6 kg
>
vf 5 3.76 m/s 3 forward 4 1one extra digit carried2
Ek 5 mgDy
13.76 m/s2 2
2 19.8 m/s22
13.762 2 m2 /s2
2 19.8 m/s22
Dy 5 0.72 m
Statement: The child and rope swing will rise to 0.72 m
above the initial height.
1. A child rolls a 4.0 kg ball with a speed of 6.0 m/s toward a 2.0 kg ball that is stationary.
The two balls stick together after the collision. What is their velocity immediately after the
perfectly inelastic collision? K/U A [ans: 4.0 m/s [forward]]
2. In a scene in an action film, a car with a mass of 2200 kg, travelling at 60.0 km/h [E],
collides with a car of mass 1300 kg that is travelling at 30.0 km/h [E], and the two cars
lock bumpers. T/I A
(a) Calculate the velocity of the vehicles immediately after the perfectly inelastic collision.
[ans: 14 m/s [E]]
(b) Calculate the total momentum of the two cars before and after the collision. [ans: 4.8 3 104 kg·m/s]
(c) Determine the decrease in kinetic energy during the collision. [ans: 2.8 3 104 J]
3. A 66 kg snowboarder slides down a hill 25 m high and has a perfectly inelastic collision with
an initially stationary 72 kg skier at the bottom of the hill. Friction is negligible. Calculate the
speed of each person after the collision. K/U A [ans: 11 m/s]
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Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
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5.3
Review
Summary
• In an isolated system, the total momentum of the system is conserved for all
elastic, inelastic, perfectly elastic, and perfectly inelastic collisions:
>
>
>
>
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vf2
• In a perfectly elastic collision, total kinetic energy is conserved:
1
1
1
1
m 1v 2i1 1 m 2v 2i2 5 m 1v 2f1 1 m 2v 2f2
2
2
2
2
• In an inelastic collision, the total kinetic energy is not conserved, although
total energy is always conserved.
Questions
1. Two boxes are on an icy, frictionless, horizontal
surface. You push one box, which collides with the
other. If the boxes stick together after the collision,
which of the following is conserved in the collision?
Explain your reasoning. K/U
(a) momentum
(b) kinetic energy
2. An 85 kg skateboarder takes a running jump onto
his skateboard, which has a mass of 8.0 kg and is
initially at rest. After he lands on the skateboard,
the speed of the board plus the skateboarder is
3.0 m/s. Determine the speed of the skateboarder
just before he landed on the skateboard. T/I
3. A student puts two dynamics carts with a speed
bumper between them on a track and presses them
together. The total mass of the carts is 3.0 kg. Once
the student releases them, the carts spring apart and
roll away from each other. One cart has a mass of
2.0 kg and a final velocity of 2.5 m/s [S]. Calculate
the final velocity of the other cart. T/I
4. Two people are riding inner tubes on an ice-covered
(frictionless) lake. The first person has a mass of
85 kg and is travelling with a speed of 6.5 m/s. He
collides head-on with the second person with a
mass of 120 kg who is initially at rest. They bounce
apart after the perfectly elastic collision. The final
velocity of the first person is 1.1 m/s in the opposite
direction to his initial direction. K/U T/I C A
(a) Are momentum and kinetic energy conserved
for this system? Explain your answer.
(b) Determine the final velocity of the second person.
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8160_CH05_p220-239.indd 239
5. Two skaters are studying collisions on an ice-covered
(frictionless) lake. Skater 1 has a mass of 95 kg and
is initially travelling with a speed of 5.0 m/s, and
skater 2 has a mass of 130 kg and is initially at rest.
Skater 1 then collides with skater 2, and they lock
arms and travel away together. K/U T/I
(a) Does the system undergo an elastic collision or
an inelastic collision? Explain your answer.
(b) Solve for the final velocity of the two skaters.
6. Two cars of equal mass (1250 kg) collide head-on
in a perfectly inelastic collision. Just before the
collision, one car is travelling with a velocity of
12 m/s [E] and the other at 12 m/s [W]. Determine
the velocity of each car after the collision. A T/I
7. A moving object collides with a stationary object.
If the collision is perfectly elastic, is it possible for
both objects to be at rest after the collision? Explain
your answer. K/U C A
8. A truck of mass 1.3 3 104 kg, travelling at
9.0 3 101 km/h [N], collides with a car of mass
1.1 3 103 kg, travelling at 3.0 3 101 km/h [N].
The collision is perfectly inelastic. T/I A
(a) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the
velocity of the vehicles immediately after the
collision.
(b) Calculate the total kinetic energy before and
after the collision described in (a).
(c) Determine the decrease in kinetic energy
during the collision.
5.3 Collisions 239
4/27/12 2:37 PM
5.4
Head-on Elastic Collisions
In previous sections, you read about systems involving elastic and inelastic collisions.
You applied the law of conservation of momentum and the law of conservation of
kinetic energy to solve problems. You also read about the ideal cases of the perfectly
elastic and perfectly inelastic collisions, and learned that in both cases momentum
is conserved. You discovered that kinetic energy is conserved in the case of perfectly
elastic collisions, but not inelastic collisions. In this section, you will examine in
greater detail situations involving perfectly elastic collisions in one dimension. You
will calculate the final velocities of two objects after an elastic collision in one dimension with equations for special cases. Once again, we consider near-perfectly elastic
collisions in one dimension (Figure 1).
Figure 1 Gliders on an air track
can undergo elastic collisions in
one dimension.
head-on elastic collision an impact in
which two objects approach each other
from opposite directions; momentum
and kinetic energy are conserved after
the collision
Perfectly Elastic Head-on Collisions
in One Dimension
In a one-dimensional head-on elastic collision, two objects approach each other from
opposite directions and collide. In such collisions, both momentum and kinetic
energy are conserved. You can derive expressions for the final velocities of two objects
in a head-on collision in terms of the initial velocities and the objects’ masses.
Suppose an object of mass m1 travels with initial velocity vi1 and collides head-on
with an object of mass m2 travelling at velocity vi2. If we assume a one-dimensional
collision, we can omit the vector notation for velocities, and instead use positive and
negative values to identify motion in one direction or the opposite direction. We
begin the analysis with the conservation of momentum:
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vf2
(Equation 1)
Rewrite Equation 1 by bringing all the terms with m1 to one side and all the terms
with m2 to the other side, and common factoring the m coefficients:
m 1vi1 2 m 1vf1 5 m 2vf2 2 m 2vi2
m 1 1vi1 2 vf12 5 m 2 1vf2 2 vi2 2
(Equation 2)
Since this is an elastic collision, conservation of total kinetic energy can be applied:
1
1
1
1
m 1v 2i1 1 m 2v 2i2 5 m 1v 2f1 1 m 2v 2f2
2
2
2
2
Multiply both sides of the equation by 2 to clear the fractions:
1
1
1
1
2
2
2 a m 1v 2i1 1 m 2v 2i2 b 5 2 a m 1v f1 1 m 2v f2 b
2
2
2
2
m 1v 2i1 1 m 2v 2i2 5 m 1v 2f1 1 m 2v 2f2
Collect m1 terms on the left side and m2 terms on the right side and divide out the
common factors.
m 1v 2i1 2 m 1v 2f1 5 m 2v 2f2 2 m 2v 2i2
m 1 1v 2i1 2 v 2f1 2 5 m 2 1v 2f2 2 v i22 2
Factor both sides using the difference of squares:
m 1 1vi1 2 vf1 2 1vi1 1 vf1 2 5 m 2 1vf2 2 vi2 2 1vf2 1 vi2 2
(Equation 3)
Divide Equation 3 by Equation 2:
m 1 1vi1 2 vf12 1vi1 1 vf1 2
5
m 2 1vf2 2 vi2 2 1vf2 1 vi22
m 2 1vf2 2 vi2 2
m 1 1vi1 2 vf12
vi1 1 vf1 5 vf2 1 vi2
240 Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p240-257.indd 240
(Equation 4)
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Rearranging Equation 4 to isolate vf2 on the left gives
vf2 5 vi1 1 vf1 2 vi2
(Equation 5)
Substitute Equation 5 into Equation 1 to express vf1 in terms of the masses and their
initial speeds:
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2 1vi1 1 vf1 2 vi2 2
m 1vi1 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vi1 1 m 2vf1 2 m 2vi2
Collect the vf1 terms on the right side of the equation and terms involving initial velocities on the left side, then collect like terms and divide out common
m coefficients:
m 1vi1 2 m 2vi1 1 m 2vi2 1 m 2vi2 5 m 1vf1 1 m 2vf1
1m 1 2 m 22 vi1 1 2m 2vi2 5 1m 1 1 m 22 vf1
Divide both sides by m 1 1 m 2 to isolate vf1:
m1 2 m2 >
2m2
>
>
vf1 5 a
b v i1 1 a
b v i2
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2
This equation expresses the final velocity of the first object in terms of the masses
and initial velocities of the two objects. Similarly, we can rearrange Equation 4 to
isolate vf1 on the left:
vf1 5 vf2 1 vi2 2 vi1
(Equation 6)
To derive a similar equation for vf2, follow the above steps for vf1, starting with substituting Equation 6 into Equation 1, and ending by dividing both sides by m1 1 m2
and isolating vf2 on the left side:
m2 2 m1 >
2m1
>
>
vf2 5 a
bvi2 1 a
bvi1
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2
This equation expresses the final velocity of the second object in terms of the
>
masses and initial velocities of the two objects. Note that the equation for vf2 is the
>
same as the equation for vf1 if you interchange all the 1 and 2 subscripts. It is important to note that these equations hold true only for perfectly elastic collisions in one
dimension.
In some cases, one of the objects is initially at rest. For instance, if v2 is initially
zero, the equations above simplify to
m1 2 m2 >
>
vf1 5 a
bv
m1 1 m2 i 1
>
vf2 5 a
2m1
>
bvi1
m1 1 m2
In Tutorial 1, you will use these velocity relationships as an alternative way of analyzing some head-on elastic collisions. As you do Tutorial 1, compare these methods
WEB LINK
to the methods used in Section 5.3.
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Tutorial 1 Analyzing Head-on Elastic Collisions
In these Sample Problems, you will use the relative velocity relationships derived above to solve
problems related to head-on elastic collisions in one dimension.
Sample Problem 1: Head-on Elastic Collision with One Object at Rest in One Dimension
Consider an elastic head-on collision between two balls of
different masses, as shown in Figure 2. The mass of ball 1 is
1.2 kg, and its velocity is 7.2 m/s [W]. The mass of ball 2 is 3.6 kg,
and ball 2 is initially at rest. Determine the final velocity of each
ball after the collision.
vi2
0 m/s
vi1
7.2 m/s [W]
m2
m1
Figure 2
>
Given: m1 5 1.2 kg; vi1 5 7.2 m/s 3 W 4 ; m2 5 3.6 kg;
>
vi2 5 0 m/s
> >
Required: vf1; vf2
Analysis: Since one of the objects is initially at rest in the head-on
elastic collision, use the simplified equations:
m1 2 m2 >
>
vf1 5 a
bv
m1 1 m2 i 1
>
vf2 5 a
2m1
>
bv
m1 1 m2 i 1
Solution: Let the negative x-direction represent west.
For ball 1,
m1 2 m2 >
>
vf1 5 a
bv
m1 1 m2 i 1
5a
1.2 kg 2 3.6 kg
b 127.2 m/s2
1.2 kg 1 3.6 kg
5 3.6 m/s
>
vf1 5 3.6 m/s 3 E 4
For ball 2,
>
vf2 5 a
5a
2m1
>
bv
m1 1 m2 i 1
2 11.2 kg2
b 127.2 m/s2
1.2 kg 1 3.6 kg
5 23.6 m/s
>
vf2 5 3.6 m/s 3 W 4
Statement: The final velocity of ball 1 is 3.6 m/s [E]. The final
velocity of ball 2 is 3.6 m/s [W].
Sample Problem 2: Head-on Elastic Collision with Both Objects Moving in One Dimension
In a bumper car ride, bumper car 1 has a total mass of 350 kg
and is initially moving at 4.0 m/s [E]. In a head-on completely
elastic collision, bumper car 1 hits bumper car 2. The total mass
of bumper car 2 is 250 kg, and it is moving at 2.0 m/s [W].
Calculate the final velocity of each bumper car immediately after
the collision.
Given: Let east be positive and west be negative; m1 5 350 kg;
>
vi1 5 4.0 m/s [E] 5 1 4.0 m/s; m2 5 250 kg;
>
vi25 2.0 m/s [W] 5 22.0 m/s
> >
Required: vf1; vf2
m1 2 m2 >
2m2
>
>
Analysis: vf1 5 a
bvi1 1 a
bv
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2 i 2
m2 2 m1 >
2m1
>
>
vf2 5 a
bvi2 1 a
bv
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2 i 1
m1 2 m2 >
2m2
>
>
Solution: vf1 5 a
bvi1 1 a
bvi2
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2
5a
350 kg 2 250 kg
b 14.0 m/s2
350 kg 1 250 kg
1a
2 1250 kg2
b 122.0 m/s2
350 kg 1 250 kg
5 21.0 m/s
>
vf1 5 1.0 m/s 3 W 4
m2 2 m1 >
2m1
>
>
vf2 5 a
bvi2 1 a
bv
m1 1 m2
m1 1 m2 i 1
5a
250 kg 2 350 kg
b 122.0 m/s2
350 kg 1 250 kg
1a
2 1350 kg2
b 14.0 m/s2
350 kg 1 250 kg
5 5.0 m/s
>
vf2 5 5.0 m/s 3 E 4
Statement: The final velocity of bumper car 1 is 1.0 m/s [W].
The final velocity of bumper car 2 is 5.0 m/s [E].
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Practice
1. A ball of mass 80.0 g is moving at 7.0 m/s [W] when it undergoes a head-on elastic collision
with a stationary ball of mass 60.0 g. Assume the collision is one-dimensional. Calculate the
velocity of each ball after the collision. T/I [ans: 1.0 m/s [W]; 8.0 m/s [W]]
2. Cart 1 has a mass of 1.5 kg and is moving on a track at 36.5 cm/s [E] toward cart 2. The mass
of cart 2 is 5 kg, and it is moving toward cart 1 at 42.8 cm/s [W]. The carts collide. The
collision is cushioned by a Hooke’s law spring, making it an elastic head-on collision. Calculate
the final velocity of each cart after the collision. T/I [ans: cart 1: 90 cm/s [W]; cart 2: 6 cm/s [W]]
Special Cases
Using these new equations for head-on elastic collisions in one dimension, special cases
of collisions, such as objects of equal mass, produce some interesting results.
Case 1: Objects Have the Same Mass
The first case we consider is when the objects that are colliding have the same mass,
so let m1 5 m2 5 m.
m2m >
2m
>
>
v f1 5 a
bvi1 1 a
bvi2
m1m
m1m
0 >
2m >
5 a bvi1 1 a bvi2
2m
2m
2m >
5 a bvi2
2m
>
>
v f1 5 v i2
m2m >
2m
>
>
v f2 5 a
bvi2 1 a
bv
m1m
m 1 m i1
0 >
2m >
5 a bvi2 1 a bvi1
2m
2m
2m >
5 a bvi1
2m
>
>
v f2 5 v i1
In other words, when two objects with the same mass undergo a head-on elastic collision in one dimension, they exchange velocities almost as if they pass through each other.
Case 2: A Lighter Object Colliding with a Much Heavier,
Stationary Object
Our second case deals with situations in which the mass of one of the objects is much
greater than the mass of the other object, and the heavier object is stationary. For
example, if object 2 is stationary and has a much greater mass, then since m2 is much
greater than m1, you can consider m1 to be approximately zero, or negligible. So
m1 2 m2 >
>
v f1 5 a
bv
m 1 1 m 2 i1
0 2 m2 >
La
bv
0 1 m 2 i1
>
>
vf1 L 2vi1
>
v f2 5 a
2m 1
>
bv
m 1 1 m 2 i1
2 102
>
La
bvi1
0 1 m2
>
vf2 L 0
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Investigation
5.4.1
Head-on Elastic Collisions
(page 259)
Now that you have an understanding
of how head-on elastic collisions
work, perform Investigation 5.4.1
to study these types of collisions in
greater detail.
In other words, if an object collides with a stationary, much heavier object, the
velocity of the light object is reversed, and the heavier object stays at rest. To put
this scenario into perspective, consider a collision between a table tennis ball and
a stationary transport truck: the transport truck will not move and the table tennis
ball will bounce back with the same speed. You will explore more special cases in the
questions at the end of Section 5.4.
Conservation of Mechanical Energy
You have discovered what happens to momentum in head-on elastic collisions. What
do you suppose happens to the conservation of total mechanical energy during elastic
collisions? One of the two gliders in Figure 3 has been fitted with a spring bumper.
When the two gliders collide head-on in an elastic collision, the bounce is not immediate. If you viewed the collision in slow motion, you would see the bumper compress
initially and then spring back to its original shape. During the compression, some of
the kinetic energy of the moving gliders is converted into elastic potential energy.
This potential energy is converted back into kinetic energy during the rebound.
spring
bumper
v1
v2
Figure 3 When the two gliders collide, the duration of the collision is greater than it would be
without the spring bumper on one of the gliders.
If the compression of the spring bumper during the collision is x, then the law of
conservation of energy states:
1
1
1
1
1
m 1v 2i1 1 m 2v 2i2 5 m 1v 2f1 1 m 2v 2f2 1 kx 2
2
2
2
2
2
Mechanical energy (J)
This equation and the graph in Figure 4 both show that as the spring compresses,
the elastic energy increases and the total kinetic energy of the two carts decreases.
The total mechanical energy, however, stays constant. As the compression decreases,
the elastic energy decreases and the total kinetic energy increases. The total mechanical energy still remains constant.
0
total mechanical
energy
total kinetic
energy
total elastic
potential energy
Time (s)
Figure 4 In this graph of total mechanical energy versus time, you can see how the total mechanical
energy, the total kinetic energy, and the total elastic potential energy relate to each other throughout
the collision.
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To determine the maximum compression of the spring during the collision, use
the fact that when the two gliders collide they have the same velocity at that point.
If they did not have the same velocity at maximum compression, then one would
be catching up to the other or pulling away from the other. Therefore, at maximum
compression (closest approach), the two objects must have the same velocity, vf. The
equation above then reduces to the following:
1
1
1
1
m v 2 1 m v 2 5 1m 1 m 22 v 2f 1 kx 2
2 1 i1 2 2 i2 2 1
2
In Tutorial 2, you will apply the conservation of mechanical energy to problems
involving the physics of spring carts.
Tutorial 2 Applying Conservation of Mechanical Energy
In the following Sample Problem, you will apply the conservation of mechanical energy to
solve collision problems.
Sample Problem 1: Two-Cart Spring System
Dynamics cart 1 has a mass of 1.8 kg and is moving with a velocity of 4.0 m/s [right] along
a frictionless track. Dynamics cart 2 has a mass of 2.2 kg and is moving at 6.0 m/s [left].
The carts collide in a head-on elastic collision cushioned by a spring with spring constant
k 5 8.0 3 104 N/m (Figure 5).
(a) Determine the compression of the spring, in centimetres, during the collision when
cart 2 is moving at 4.0 m/s [left].
(b) Calculate the maximum compression of the spring, in centimetres.
k
cart 1
cart 2
x
Figure 5
Solution
>
>
(a) G
iven: m1 5 1.8 kg; vi1 5 4.0 m/s 3 right 4 ; m2 5 2.2 kg; vi2 5 6.0 m/s 3 left 4 ;
>
vf2 5 4.0 m/s 3 left 4 ; k 5 8.0 3 104 N/m
Required: x
Analysis: Use the conservation of momentum to determine the velocity of cart 1
during the collision, when cart 2 is moving 4.0 m/s [left]. Then apply the conservation
of mechanical energy to determine the compression of the spring at this particular
moment during the collision. Consider right to be positive and left to be negative, and
omit the vector notation.
Solution: Begin with the conservation of momentum equation.
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 m1vf1 1 m2vf2
Rearrange this equation to express the final velocity of cart 1 in terms of the other
given values.
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 2 m2vf2 5 m1vf1
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 2 m2vf2
m1
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5 vf1
5.4 Head-on Elastic Collisions 245
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Substitute the given values and solve.
vf1 5
5
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 2 m2vf2
m1
11.8 kg2 14.0 m/s2 1 12.2 kg2 126.0 m/s2 2 12.2 kg2 124.0 m/s2
1.8 kg
vf1 5 1.56 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
Cart 1 is moving 1.6 m/s [right] when cart 2 is moving 4.0 m/s [left].
Now use the conservation of mechanical energy to determine the compression of
the spring, x.
1
1
1
1
1
m v 2 1 m v 2 5 m v 2 1 m v 2 1 kx 2
2 1 i1 2 2 i2 2 1 f1 2 2 f2 2
Multiply both sides of the equation by 2 to clear the fractions, and then isolate the
term containing x on one side of the equation.
1
1
1
1
1
2a m1v 2i 1 m2v 2i 2 m1v 2f 2 m2v 2f b 5 2a kx b
2
2
2
2
2
Divide both sides by k and then take the square root of both sides.
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 m1v 2f1 2 m2v 2f2
k
5
kx 2
k
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 m1v 2f1 2 m2v 2f2
5x
Å
k
Substitute the known values to determine the compression of the spring when cart 2
is moving 4.0 m/s [left].
x5
x5
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 m1v 2f1 2 m2v 2f2
Å
Å
k
11.8 kg2 14.0 m/s2 2 1 12.2 kg2 126.0 m/s2 2 2 11.8 kg2 11.56 m/s2 2 2 12.2 kg2 14.0 m/s2 2
8.0 3 104 N/m
x 5 2.9 3 1022 m
Statement: The compression of the spring is 2.9 cm during the collision, when cart 2
is moving 4.0 m/s [left].
>
>
(b) G
iven: m1 5 1.8 kg; vi1 5 4.0 m/s 3 right 4 ; m2 5 2.2 kg; vi2 5 6.0 m/s 3 left 4 ;
k 5 8.0 3 104 N/m
Required: x
Analysis: At the beginning of the collision, as the carts come together and the
spring is being compressed, cart 1 is moving faster than cart 2. Toward the end of
the collision, as the carts separate and the spring is being released, cart 2 will be
moving faster than cart 1. At the point of maximum compression of the spring, the two
carts will have the same velocity, vf. Use the conservation of momentum equation to
determine this velocity. Then apply the conservation of mechanical energy to calculate
the maximum compression of the spring.
Solution: m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 m1vf 1 m2vf
Factor out the common factor vf.
m1vi1 1 m2vi2 5 1m1 1 m22 vf
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Divide both sides by m1 1 m2 to isolate vf.
m1vi1 1 m2vi2
m1 1 m2
5 vf
Substitute the given values to calculate the velocity of both carts at maximum
compression.
vf 5
m1vi1 1 m2vi2
m1 1 m2
11.8 kg2 114.0 m/s2 1 12.2 kg2 126.0 m/s2
1.8 kg 1 2.2 kg
vf 5 21.5 m/s
5
Now use the law of conservation of mechanical energy to determine the maximum
compression of the spring. Clear the fractions first, and then isolate x.
1
1
1
1
2a m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 b 5 2a 1m1 1 m22 v 2f 1 kx 2 b
2
2
2
2
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 1m1 1 m22 v 2f 5 kx 2
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 1m1 1 m22 v 2f
5x
Å
k
Substitute the known values and solve for the maximum compression of the spring.
x5
5
m1v 2i1 1 m2v 2i2 2 1m1 1 m22 v 2f
Å
k
11.8 kg2 14.0 m/s2 2 1 12.2 kg2 126.0 m/s2 2 2 11.8 kg 1 2.2 kg2 121.5 m/s2 2
Å
8.0 3 104 N/m
x 5 3.5 3 1022 m
Statement: The maximum compression of the spring is 3.5 cm.
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you learn about
head-on elastic collisions and
conservation of mechanical energy
to the Unit Task on page 270.
Practice
1. A 1.2 kg glider moving at 3.0 m/s [right] undergoes an elastic head-on collision with
a glider of equal mass moving at 3.0 m/s [left]. The collision is cushioned by a spring
whose spring constant, k, is 6.0 3 104 N/m. T/I A
(a) Determine the compression in the spring when the second glider is moving at
1.5 m/s [right]. [ans: 1.6 cm]
(b) Calculate the maximum compression of the spring. [ans: 1.9 cm]
2. A student designs a new amusement park ride that involves a type of bumper car
that has a spring on the front to cushion collisions. To test the bumper, the student
attaches one spring to the front of a single car. In a collision, car 1 with total mass
4.4 3 102 kg is moving at 3.0 m/s [E] toward car 2 with total mass 4.0 3 102 kg
moving at 3.3 m/s [W]. During the collision, the spring compresses a maximum of
44 cm. Determine the spring constant. T/I [ans: 4.3 3 104 N/m]
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5.4
Review
Summary
• In a perfectly elastic head-on collision in one dimension, momentum and
kinetic energy are conserved.
• Using the law of conservation of momentum and the law of conservation of
kinetic energy, we can derive equations to determine the final velocities of
two objects in a perfectly elastic head-on collision in one dimension:
>
>
>
>
>
m 2 m
2m
m 2 m >
2m
vf1 5 1 m 11 1 m 22 2 vi1 1 1 m 1 1 2m 2 2 vi2 and vf2 5 1 m 21 1 m 12 2 vi2 1 1 m 1 1 1m 2 2 vi1.
>
>
>
>
>
m 2 m
2m
• In cases where v2 is initially zero, vf1 5 1 m 11 1 m 22 2 vi1 and vf2 5 1 m 1 1 1m 2 2 vi1.
• In cases where the masses of the colliding objects are identical,
>
>
>
>
vf1 5 vi2 and vf2 5 vi1.
• In cases in which one mass is significantly larger than the other mass, and the
>
>
>
larger mass is stationary, vf1 L 2vi1 and vf2 L 0.
• During a head-on collision in one dimension, the kinetic energy of the
moving masses is converted into elastic potential energy, and then back into
kinetic energy during the rebound. Total mechanical energy is conserved
throughout the collision.
Questions
1. Is it possible for two moving masses to undergo
an elastic head-on collision and both be at rest
immediately after the collision? Is it possible for an
inelastic collision? Explain your reasoning. K/U
2. In curling, you will often see one curling stone hit
another and come to rest while the stationary stone
moves away from the one-dimensional collision.
Explain how this can happen. K/U
3. The particles in Figure 6 undergo an elastic
collision in one dimension. Particle 1 has mass
1.5 g and particle 2 has mass 3.5 g. Their velocities
>
before the collision are vi1 5 12 m/s 3 right 4 and
>
vi2 5 7.5 m/s 3 left 4 . Determine the velocity of the
two particles after the collision. K/U T/I A
x
m1
m2
Figure 6
4. Two chunks of space debris collide head-on in an
elastic collision. One piece of debris has a mass of
2.67 kg. The other chunk has a mass of 5.83 kg. After
the collision, both chunks move in the direction of
the second chunk’s initial velocity with speeds of
185 m/s for the smaller chunk and 172 m/s for the
larger. What are the initial velocities of the two
chunks? K/U T/I
5. Dynamics cart 1 has a mass of 0.84 kg and is
initially moving at 4.2 m/s [right]. Cart 1 undergoes
an elastic head-on collision with dynamics cart 2.
248 Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
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The mass of cart 2 is 0.48 kg, and cart 2 is initially
moving at 2.4 m/s [left]. The collision is cushioned
by a spring with spring constant 8.0 3 103 N/m. T/I
(a) Calculate the final velocity of each cart after
they completely separate.
(b) Determine the compression of the spring
during the collision at the moment when cart 1
is moving at 3.0 m/s [right].
(c) Determine the maximum compression of
the spring.
6. Ball 1 has a mass of 2.0 kg and is suspended with a 3.0 m
rope from a post so that the ball is stationary. Ball 2 has
a mass of 4.0 kg and is tied to another rope. The second
rope also measures 3.0 m but is held at a 60.0° angle, as
shown in Figure 7. When ball 2 is released, it collides,
head-on, with ball 1 in an elastic collision. T/I
(a) Calculate the speed of each ball immediately
after the first collision.
(b) Calculate the maximum height of each ball
after the first collision.
3.0 m
2
60.0°
3.0 m
4.0 kg
1
2.0 kg
Figure 7
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Collisions in Two Dimensions:
Glancing Collisions
So far, you have read about collisions in one dimension. In this section, you will
examine collisions in two dimensions. In Figure 1, the player is lining up the shot
so that the cue ball (the white ball) will hit another billiard ball at an angle, directing
it toward the corner pocket. What component of the cue ball’s momentum will be
transferred to the target ball if the shot is successful?
The laws of conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy will apply
just as they did for one-dimensional interactions. However, to calculate momentum
for two-dimensional problems, consider the x-components and y-components of
force and motion independently.
5.5
Figure 1 Billiards requires players to
master the use of glancing collisions.
Mini Investigation
glancing
Collisions
Mini
Investigation
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
a2.1
Equipment and Materials: eye protection; air table; 2 pucks;
marbles; billiard balls
3. Repeat this process, but vary the angles of collision and
the initial speed of the first puck. Observe the changes in
the speeds of the pucks and the directions of their final
velocities.
1. Put on your eye protection. Set up an air table with two
pucks.
4. Try the same investigation using different objects, such as
marbles or billiard balls.
In this investigation, you will model glancing collisions to observe
and analyze how they work.
When you unplug the air table, pull the plug and not the
cord. Wear closed-toe shoes to protect your feet in case
the puck flies off the table. Push the objects lightly and
cautiously.
A. How does the speed of the second puck compare to
the initial speed of the first puck as you vary the angle
of collision? K/u T/I a
B. How did using marbles or billiard balls affect the changes in
direction and velocity? How was this different from using the
pucks? Briefly summarize your observations. T/I a
2. Push the first puck toward the second to cause a gentle
head-on collision. Observe the changes in the speeds of the
pucks after the collision.
Components of momentum
Dealing with collisions in two dimensions involves the same basic ideas as dealing
with collisions in one dimension. Now, however, the final velocity of each object
involves two unknowns: the two components of the velocity vector. For objects in
motion in two dimensions, the change in momentum for each component can be
considered independently:
>
>
SF x Dt 5 Dpx
>
>
SF y Dt 5 Dpy
Similarly, the conservation of momentum equation can be expressed in terms of
horizontal and vertical components:
>
>
>
>
pi1x 1 pi2x 5 pf1x 1 pf2x
>
>
>
>
pi1y 1 pi2y 5 pf1y 1 pf2y
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5.5 Collisions in Two Dimensions: Glancing Collisions
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glancing collision a collision in which
the first object, after an impact with the
second object, travels at an angle to the
direction it was originally travelling
Consider the collision of two billiard balls shown in Figure 2. In this shot, the cue
ball (1) will collide with the target ball (2), initially at rest, sending it at an angle f
toward the corner pocket, and the cue ball will continue travelling at an angle u
from its original direction of travel. Both objects are travelling at an angle to the
directions of their original courses. This type of collision is called a glancing collision.
In the following Tutorial, we use components to analyze the physics of a glancing
collision.
v f2
y
v f2y
x
1
Investigation
5.5.1
Conservation of Momentum
in Two Directions (page 260)
After learning about the physics
of glancing collisions, perform
Investigation 5.5.1 to explore how
momentum is conserved in collisions
that occur in two dimensions.
2
f
v f2x
at rest
2
v1x ?
v f1x
1
u
v f1y
v f1
(b)
(a)
Figure 2 A cue ball striking another ball at an angle causes both balls to change direction.
Tutorial 1 Analysis of Glancing Collisions
In these Sample Problems, you will apply conservation of momentum in two dimensions.
Sample Problem 1: Analysis of a Glancing Collision
>
The object stone acquires a velocity vf2 5 0.42 m/s at an
angle of f 5 30.0° from the original direction of motion
of the thrown stone. Determine the initial velocity of the
thrown stone.
In a game of curling, a collision occurs between two stones
of equal mass. The object stone is initially at rest. After
the collision, the stone that is thrown has a speed of
0.56 m/s in some direction, represented by u in Figure 3.
before the collision
after the collision
p f 1y p f 1 sin u
v f1
y
v i1
u
x
f
m1
m2
(a)
(b)
p f 2y p f 2 sin f
p f 1x p f 1 cos u
x
p f 2x p f 2 cos f
v f2
Figure 3 (a) The curling stone collides with the object stone in a glancing collision. (b) Both curling
stones move off in different directions. We can analyze their final velocities to determine the initial
velocity of the thrown curling stone.
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>
>
>
Given: m1 5 m2; vi2 5 0 m/s; vf15 0.56 m/s; vf2 5 0.42 m/s;
f 5 30.0°
>
Required: vi1
Analysis: Choose a coordinate system to identify directions:
let positive x be to the right and negative x be to the left.
Let positive y be up and negative y be down.
Apply conservation of momentum independently in the
x-direction and the y-direction. Begin by applying conservation
of momentum in the y-direction to determine the direction of
the final velocity of the thrown stone. Then apply conservation
of momentum in the x-direction to calculate the initial velocity of
the thrown stone.
Solution: In the y-direction, the total momentum before and after
the collision is zero.
pTiy 5 pTfy 5 0
Therefore, after the collision:
mvf1y 1 mvf2y 5 0
Divide both sides by m and substitute the vertical component of
each velocity vector. Note that the vertical component of the first
stone’s velocity is directed up, so its value is positive, whereas
the vertical component of the second stone’s velocity is directed
down, so its value is negative.
m 1vf1y 1 vf2y 2
m
0
5
m
vf1 sin u 2 vf2 sin f 5 0
Rearrange this equation to isolate sin u.
vf1 sin u 5 vf2 sin f
sin u 5
vf2 sin f
vf1
Substitute the given values and solve for sin u.
sin u 5
10.42 m/s2 1 sin 3082
10.56 m/s2
sin u 5 0.375
Apply the inverse sine to both sides to solve for u.
u 5 sin210.375
u 5 22.08 1one extra digit carried2
The first stone is travelling at an angle of 22° above the
horizontal after the collision.
Now use conservation of momentum in the x-direction to
solve for the initial speed of the thrown stone.
pTix 5 pTfx
Note that the object stone is at rest before the collision, so its
initial momentum is zero.
mvi1x 1 mvi2x 5 mvf1x 1 mvf2x
Divide both sides of the equation by m.
mvi1x
m
5
m 1vf1x 1 vf2x 2
m
vi1x 5 vf1x 1 vf2x
Substitute the known values for the final horizontal velocity
components of the stones. Note that all vectors are directed to
the right, so all velocities are positive.
vi1x 5 vf1 cos u 1 vf2 cos f
5 10.56 cos 22.082 m/s 1 10.42 cos 3082 m/s
5 0.519 m/s 1 0.364 m/s 1one extra digit carried2
vi1x 5 0.88 m/s
Statement: The initial velocity of the thrown stone is
0.88 m/s [right].
Sample Problem 2: Inelastic Glancing Collisions
Two cross-country skiers are skiing to a crossing of horizontal
trails in the woods as shown in Figure 4. Skier 1 is travelling
east and has a mass of 84 kg. Skier 2 is travelling north
and has a mass of 72 kg. Both skiers are travelling with
an initial speed of 5.1 m/s. One of the skiers forgets to
look, resulting in a right-angle collision with the skis locked
together after the collision. Calculate the final velocity of
the two skiers.
North
v fy
v i1
vf
v fx
m1
East
v i2
Figure 4
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m2
5.5 Collisions in Two Dimensions: Glancing Collisions 251
4/27/12 2:33 PM
Given: inelastic collision; m1 5 84 kg; m2 5 72 kg;
>
>
vi1 5 5.1 m/s [E]; vi2 5 5.1 m/s [N]
>
Required: vf
Analysis: According to the law of conservation of momentum,
>
>
pTi 5 pTf. Since the initial velocities are at right angles to
each other, as shown in Figure 5, you can calculate the total
velocity and momentum using the Pythagorean theorem and
trigonometry:
p1
p 2 5 p 21 1 p 22, and tan u 5 a b
p2
north
p
p1
p2
p2
The magnitude of the total momentum can be calculated by
applying the Pythagorean theorem:
p 2 5 p 21 1 p 22
p 5 "p 21 1 p 22
5
Å
a428
kg # m 2
kg # m 2
b 1 a367
b
s
s
p 5 564 kg # m/s 1one extra digit carried2
The direction can be determined by applying the tangent ratio:
p1
tan u 5 a b
p2
p1
u 5 tan21 a b
p2
kg # m
s
5 tan21 ±
≤
kg # m
367
s
428
O
p1
east
Figure 5
Solution: The first skier’s momentum is
>
>
p 1 5 m1 v 1
m
b 3E 4
s
>
p1 5 428 kg # m/s 3 E 4 1one extra digit carried2
5 184 kg2 a5.1
The second skier’s momentum is
>
>
p 2 5 m2 v 2
m
5 172 kg2 a5.1 b 3 N 4
s
>
p2 5 367 kg # m/s 3 N 4 1one extra digit carried2
u 5 498
The direction of the two skiers is [N 49° E].
Conservation of momentum tells us that the final total momentum
of the skiers must equal this initial momentum. Since the collision
is perfectly inelastic, both skiers have the same final velocity:
>
>
>
pf 5 m1vf1 1 m2vf2
>
5 1m1 1 m2 2 v f
>
pf
>
vf 5
m1 1 m2
kg # m
s
3 N 498 E 4
5
84 kg 1 72 kg
564
>
vf 5 3.6 m/s 3 N 498 E 4
Statement: After the collision, the skiers are travelling together
with a velocity of 3.6 m/s [N 49° E].
Practice
1. Two freight trains have a completely inelastic collision at a track crossing. Engine 1 has
a mass of 1.4 3 104 kg and is initially travelling at 45 km/h [N]. Engine 2 has a mass of
1.5 3 104 kg and is initially travelling at 53 km/h [W]. Calculate the final velocity. T/I A
[ans: 9.7 m/s [N 52° W ]
2. A star of mass 2 3 1030 kg moving with a velocity of 2 3 104 m/s [E] collides with a second
star of mass 5 3 1030 kg moving with a velocity of 3 3 104 m/s at a right angle to the path
of the first star. If the two join together, what is their common velocity? T/I A [ans: 2 3 104 m/s
[158 to the initial path of the second star]]
252 Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
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5.5
Review
Summary
• The laws of conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic
energy for collisions in two dimensions are the same as they are for onedimensional collisions.
• Momentum is conserved for elastic and inelastic collisions.
• Kinetic energy is conserved only in elastic collisions.
• The fact that momentum is a vector quantity means that problems involving
two-dimensional collisions can be solved by independently analyzing the
x-components and y-components.
Questions
1. Two balls of equal mass undergo a collision (see
Figure 6). Ball 1 is initially travelling horizontally with
a speed of 10.0 m/s, and ball 2 is initially at rest.
After the collision, ball 1 moves away with a velocity
of 4.7 m/s at an angle of u 5 60.0° from its original
path and ball 2 moves away at an unknown angle f.
Determine the magnitude and direction of velocity
of ball 2 after the collision. K/u T/I
1
v i2 0 m/s
v i1 10.0 m/s
2
(a)
2
1
v f2 ?
f
u 60.0°
v f1 4.7 m/s
(b)
Figure 6
2. A hockey puck of mass 0.16 kg, sliding on a nearly
frictionless surface of ice with a velocity of 2.0 m/s [E],
strikes a second puck at rest with a mass of 0.17 kg.
The first puck has a velocity of 1.5 m/s [N 31° E]
after the collision. Determine the velocity of the
second puck after the collision. T/I a
3. Two hockey pucks of equal mass approach each other.
Puck 1 has an initial velocity of 20.0 m/s [S 45° E],
and puck 2 has an initial velocity of 15 m/s [S 45° W].
After the collision, the first puck is moving with a
velocity of 10.0 m/s [S 45° W]. K/u T/I C
(a) Determine the final velocity of the second puck.
(b) Is this collision elastic, perfectly inelastic, or
(non-perfectly) inelastic? Explain your reasoning.
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4. An automobile collides with a truck at an intersection.
The car, of mass 1.4 3 103 kg, is travelling at 32 km/h [S];
the truck has a mass of 2.6 3 104 kg and is travelling
at 48 km/h [E]. The collision is perfectly inelastic.
Determine their velocity just after the collision. T/I
5. Two balls of equal mass m undergo a collision.
One ball is initially stationary. After the collision,
the velocities of the balls make angles of 25.5°
and 245.9° relative to the original direction of
motion of the moving ball. T/I C
(a) Draw and label a diagram to show the balls before
and after the collision. Label the angles u and f.
(b) Calculate the final speeds of the balls if the
initial ball had a speed of 3.63 m/s.
6. A carbon-14 nucleus, initially at rest, undergoes
a nuclear reaction known as beta decay. The
nucleus emits two particles horizontally: one with
momentum 7.8 3 10221 kg.m/s [E] and another
with momentum 3.5 3 10221 kg.m/s [S]. T/I a
(a) Calculate the direction of the motion of the
nucleus immediately following the reaction.
(b) Determine the final momentum of the nucleus.
(c) The mass of the residual carbon-14 nucleus is
2.3 3 10226 kg. Determine its final velocity.
7. A neutron of mass 1.7 3 10227 kg, travelling at
2.2 km/s, hits a stationary helium nucleus of mass
6.6 3 10227 kg. After the collision, the velocity
of the helium nucleus is 0.53 km/s at 52° to the
original direction of motion of the neutron.
Determine the final velocity of the neutron. T/I
8. Your classmate makes the following statement:
“For a head-on elastic collision between two objects
of equal mass, the after-collision velocities of the
objects are at right angles to each other.” Evaluate
the accuracy of this statement. K/u T/I a
5.5 Collisions in Two Dimensions: Glancing Collisions
253
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5.6
Explore Applications of Momentum
SKILLS mEnu
• Researching
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
• Identifying
Alternatives
Staying Safe at Every Speed
According to Transport Canada, almost 3000 people per year die in traffic accidents
in Canada. This number is high, but it is only half the rate of traffic fatalities that
occurred in the 1970s. Many factors have cut the number of fatalities, but advances
in vehicle safety devices have played a huge role. In fact, Transport Canada reports
that seat belts save 1000 Canadian lives per year.
Motor vehicle safety devices either help prevent accidents or help protect us in an
accident. Anti-lock brakes give the driver more control over the vehicle when stopping suddenly, helping to avoid surprises on the road. Active head restraints cushion
a passenger’s head in a rear-end collision, avoiding damage to the neck (Figure 1).
Figure 1 Active head restraints protect a passenger’s head and neck during low-impact rear-end
collisions.
Scientists and engineers design safety devices by analyzing the transfer of energy
and momentum in collisions. Years of collision data provide information on how long
it takes to stop a car and how much force a human body can tolerate. We know more
about how the parts of a vehicle will bend or break during a collision, and how a passenger’s body will respond. Armed with data, technicians can try to improve devices
and build new ones to efficiently and safely absorb energy and momentum.
Seat belts, for instance, work by holding the passenger to the seat. This simple
action means that the passenger will slow down with the car, reducing the chance of
injury. Active head restraints work by narrowing the space between the passenger’s
head and the headrest, reducing the chance of whiplash, an injury caused by jerking
the neck back quickly.
The application
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
a4
Transport Canada requires motor vehicles to have seat belts. Vehicle makers add
many other devices as standard features, such as airbags. Other devices are only
optional, such as electronic stability control. Drivers can choose to have these features
installed at an additional cost.
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Although we would always like to drive the safest car possible, sometimes the
cost of a device does not seem worth paying for. Consumers have to make careful
decisions on safety when purchasing a new car or an old car without modern
devices. Understanding more about how safety devices work and how they keep us
safe can help us make a good decision.
Your Goal
To communicate information about an automobile safety device to your family using
the concepts of energy and momentum
Research
Suppose that a family friend plans to buy a new car. Choose one motor vehicle safety
device (other than seat belts). Prepare a presentation to help your friend decide
whether to have this device installed in the new car. Conduct library or Internet
research to learn about your chosen safety device. Be sure to investigate the following:
• how the device works
•how the device applies the concepts of energy and momentum to help prevent
a collision or to protect you in a collision
• the costs of installing the device
• statistics or estimates of accidents prevented or lives saved by the device
• limitations or problems with the device
WEB LINK
• continuing research to improve the device
Summarize
Summarize your research:
•
•
•
•
How does the device keep you safe?
What technology does the device use?
How does the device use principles of energy and momentum?
CAREER LINK
What research is being undertaken to improve the device?
Communicate
Prepare a presentation of your findings that will help the average person decide
whether to install the device in a vehicle. Present your findings in a slide presentation,
video, poster, blog, website, or other format of your choice.
Plan for Action
Many schools and school districts purchase new vehicles, including school buses. Plan
a presentation of your findings to the school board or parent–teacher association that
will convince them to install or not install the device on future vehicles. Be sure to
compare the cost of installing the device to the cost of damage to vehicles and harm
to passengers.
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5.6 Explore Applications of Momentum 255
4/27/12 2:34 PM
Physics JOURNAL
5.7
momentum and the neutrino
abSTraCT
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
a3
Neutrinos, which are subatomic particles that do not carry an electric
charge, were first predicted by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to account for
missing energy and momentum in nuclear reactions. This theory began
a search for the elusive particle, which could not be detected at the time.
Neutrinos are produced in nuclear reactions in the Sun and on Earth.
Predictions about the number of neutrinos produced by the Sun helped
to explain how the Sun works and revealed secrets about particle physics.
Most modern neutrino detectors lie deep underground to avoid noise from
cosmic radiation.
First Hints
Wolfgang Pauli first predicted the existence of neutrinos
in 1930. Pauli needed a way to account for missing energy
and momentum from certain radioactive decays of atomic
nuclei, called beta decay. Experiments at the time seemed
to show that beta decay did not conserve energy or
momentum. So Pauli suggested that a new particle, which
had so far escaped detection, was responsible for carrying
off the missing energy and momentum.
Pauli originally called his new particle the neutron, but the
same name was being used by other scientists to describe the
much more massive particles found in the nuclei of atoms.
The name of the still-unproven particle eventually changed to
neutrino, or “little neutral one,” after the suggestion of Italian
physicist Enrico Fermi. Fermi developed Pauli’s suggestion of
a missing particle into a full theory of beta decay in 1933.
The prediction of the neutrino solved the problem of
conservation of energy and momentum during beta decay.
However, it proved difficult to actually detect a neutrino
and measure its properties. Physicists did not know whether
neutrinos had mass or not, but it was obvious that these particles rarely interacted with matter. How could they detect
a neutrino if it rarely interacted with other charges or magnets? Over time, researchers found sophisticated methods
for detecting neutrinos. Today, several experiments around
the world test the neutrino’s properties.
had predicted. The problem of the missing neutrinos was a
challenge for models of the Sun’s interior and the accepted
theories of particle physics.
In the early 2000s, researchers at the Sudbury Neutrino
Observatory (SNO), 2 km below ground near Sudbury,
Ontario, found the missing neutrinos (Figure 1). The
neutrino originally hypothesized by Pauli to explain beta
decay was only one of three types of neutrinos. These
are now called electron neutrinos, muon neutrinos, and
tau neutrinos. The Sun produces the first type, electron
neutrinos, the only type that the older experiments could
detect.
missing neutrinos
Calculations of the number of neutrinos produced by nuclear
reactions in the Sun indicated that billions of neutrinos
should be passing through each square centimetre of Earth’s
surface each second. Despite this fact, the first neutrinos were
not actually detected in particle experiments until 1956. The
first naturally produced neutrinos were discovered in 1965 in
experiments in gold mines in Africa and India.
However, as neutrino detectors improved, scientists
detected far fewer neutrinos from the Sun than calculations
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Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p240-257.indd 256
Figure 1 The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector sits 2 km
underground near Sudbury, Ontario.
SNO, however, could detect all three types, and the total
number of all neutrinos detected equalled the predicted
total number produced by the Sun. This discovery verified
the theory of neutrino oscillations, which predicted that a
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4/27/12 2:34 PM
neutrino of one type can transform into either of the other
two types and back again. During their journey from the
Sun to Earth, the electron neutrinos produced in solar
nuclear reactions transform into muon and tau neutrinos.
The earlier detectors did not detect the transformed neutrinos, but SNO did.
This discovery supported the theory that neutrinos have
mass. Fermi’s original theory of beta decay assumed that
neutrinos did not have mass, but the theory of neutrino oscillations predicts that the oscillations between types of neutrino
can only happen if they do have mass. The theory also predicts
that the rate at which the oscillations between types occurs
depends on the mass, so researchers can measure the neutrino
mass by measuring the oscillation rate. The quest to pin down
the mass of the neutrino continues today.
Modern Neutrino Observatories
Today, laboratories used to measure neutrinos are often
built deep underground, for example, SNO, SuperKamiokande in caverns on the island of Honshu, Japan,
and IceCube under the Antarctic ice (Figure 2). The
surrounding material shields detectors from the cosmic
rays—high-energy particles from space—that would hide
the neutrino signal.
Even in its subterranean location, the SNO detector
used heavy water to increase the likelihood of neutrino
interaction. Heavy water has extra neutrons that interact
with the neutrinos in a process similar to the reverse of
beta decay. (Although hydrogen has no neutrons, heavy
water is composed of oxygen and deuterium, which
has one neutron.) A very small percentage of neutrinos
interact with the heavy water, but they were enough
to help researchers detect the missing solar neutrinos.
Although the SNO detector no longer operates, neutrino
research continues in the Sudbury mine at SNOLAB.
Figure 2 The IceCube Neutrino Observatory experiment consists of
an array of over 5000 small detectors each buried over 2 km deep
under the frozen Antarctic ice. In this photo, one of the small detectors
is lowered down a narrow channel in the ice to its final position.
Further Reading
Bahcall, J. (2004). Solving the mystery of the missing neutrinos. Nobel Foundation.
Learned, J., and S. Pakvasa (2005). A neutrino timeline.
Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of
Hawaii at Manoa.
Siegel, E. (2010). Starts with a bang! The story of the
neutrino. ScienceBlogs.
WEB LINK
5.7
Questions
1. What is a neutrino? What scientific observations
led to its prediction? K/U
2. Studying neutrinos helped to explain how our
Sun works but led to changes in theories of
particle physics. How is this process consistent
with the scientific process? How can details
about a theory be adjusted without undermining
other discoveries made through the theory’s
predictions? T/I C
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3. Explain how the theory of neutrino oscillations helps
to explain the missing electron neutrinos from the
Sun. K/U
4. Building large detectors underground can have an
impact on the environment around the detector
site. Do you think the knowledge we gain from
studying neutrinos is worth the environmental
impact? Explain your reasoning. C
5.7 Physics Journal: Momentum and the Neutrino 257
4/27/12 2:34 PM
CHAPTER
5
Investigations
Investigation 5.2.1
CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
Conservation of Momentum
in One Dimension
In this controlled experiment, you will explore inelastic
collisions in order to test the law of conservation of
momentum in one dimension. You will use two dynamics
carts, each loaded with various masses, configured to
collide in a nearly perfect inelastic manner.
Testable question
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.2
How does a collision between two objects in one dimension
in an isolated system affect the momentum of each object?
Hypothesis
Read through the experimental design and the procedure
for this investigation. Then formulate a hypothesis based
on the Testable Question. Your hypothesis should include
predictions and reasons for your predictions.
Variables
Consider which factor you will control and which factors
will change in response. Then identify all dependent
(responding) and independent (manipulated) variables.
Experimental Design
This will be a controlled experiment. You will explore
inelastic collisions to test the conservation of momentum
in one dimension, using dynamics carts and motion
sensors or tickertape timers.
Equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
2 dynamics carts with magnets and Velcro tabs
1 cart track
masses of varying sizes from 2 g to 500 g
motion sensors or tickertape timers
Procedure
1. Create a data table in which to record your observations.
Put on your eye protection. Set up your track on
a level surface. Place a cart at rest on the track to
be sure it does not move. Make adjustments to the
levelling feet of the track if necessary.
Wear closed-toe shoes to protect your feet from falling
masses. To unplug the sensors or timers, pull the plug
and not the cord. Use caution when pushing the carts.
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Chapter 5 • Momentum and Collisions
8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 258
SKIllS MENU
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
2. Place one cart in the middle of the track and the
other cart at the far end. The magnets of the carts
should face each other so that the carts stick
together when they collide. Place the same amount
of mass in each cart. Secure the masses to the carts.
3. If you are using a dynamics track, place the motion
sensors at the ends of the track so that each will
record the speed of one of the carts. You will need
to take one measurement for the initial velocity of
the first cart, and another for the carts once they
are attached.
4. Start the motion sensors. Give the cart at the end
of the track an initial velocity toward the cart in
the middle using a gentle push.
5. Record the velocities of each cart from the motion
sensor in a data table. Be sure to select a direction
for positive and negative, and record the velocities
properly according to the direction you chose. Also
record the total masses of the loaded carts. Use the
mass and velocity to calculate the momentum in
each case.
6. Repeat Steps 2 through 5 at least once, changing
the size of the masses in the carts but keeping them
equal. Complete a separate table for the new trial.
7. Repeat Steps 2 through 5 at least twice, using unequal
masses in the carts each time. Complete a separate
table for each trial.
Analyze and Evaluate
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5.5
(a) According to your data:
(i) What was the total momentum before and after
each collision?
(ii) How did the velocity change in each trial?
(iii) How did this change in velocity affect the change
in momentum?
(iv) Explain why you need to compare changes in
momentum rather than changes in velocity
during a collision. T/I C A
(b) Did you observe any trends in the momentum?
Was momentum conserved better in certain types
of interactions? Explain. T/I A
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4/27/12 2:31 PM
(c) To what extent was momentum conserved in your
investigation? Express your answer as percentage
losses. Explain how some momentum might have
been lost. T/I A
(d) How might your results have been affected if you had not
balanced the dynamics track carefully before starting? T/I
Apply and Extend
(e) Design a method to measure an unknown mass
placed on top of one of the carts. Use your method to
measure the masses of several objects, and check your
results with an accurate scale. Describe the accuracy
of your results. T/I A
Investigation 5.4.1
CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT
Head-on Elastic Collisions
In this investigation you will explore head-on elastic
collisions using dynamics carts in order to test the law
of conservation of momentum and the conservation of
kinetic energy. You will investigate cases in which one
object is initially at rest and cases in which both objects are
in motion. You will also investigate special cases in which
one mass is much greater than the other. Alternatively, you
can use a computer simulation to conduct this experiment
(see Procedure: Part B).
Testable questions
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.2
• Is momentum conserved in an elastic collision if one
of the objects is at rest before the collision?
• Is momentum conserved in an elastic collision if both
of the objects are moving before the collision?
• What effect do mass and velocity have on
the momentum of objects in head-on elastic
collisions?
• What effect do mass and velocity have on the kinetic
energy of objects in head-on elastic collisions?
Hypothesis
Read through the Procedure for this investigation. Formulate
a hypothesis based on the Testable Questions. Consider each
of the cases in which the speed and the mass vary.
Variables
Identify and record all dependent and independent
variables.
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8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 259
(f) Consider a situation in which you are the driver
of a car stopped at a red light and you see a car of
similar mass approaching rapidly from behind. Use
the results of your experiment to discuss possible
strategies for reducing the impact of the impending
collision. For example, should you take your foot off
the brake? Should you accelerate forward? T/I A
(g) Suppose you are riding a skateboard along a narrow
path and realize that you are about to have a head-on
collision with another skateboarder of similar mass
approaching from the opposite end of the path. Use the
results of your experiment to describe your best strategy
for minimizing injuries from the collision. Assume that
jumping off the skateboard is not an option. T/I A
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MENU
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Experimental Design
In this controlled experiment, you will explore head-on
elastic collisions to test the conservation of momentum in
one dimension and the conservation of kinetic energy.
Equipment and Materials
•
•
•
•
•
eye protection
2 dynamics carts
1 cart track
masses of varying sizes from 2 g to 500 g
motion sensors or tickertape timers
Wear closed-toe shoes to protect your feet from falling
masses. To unplug the sensors or timers, pull the plug
and not the cord. Use caution when pushing the carts.
Procedure
Part A: Dynamics Cart Experiment
1. Read through the procedure and create a data table in
which to record your observations.
2. Put on your eye protection. Set up your track on a
level surface. Place a cart at rest on the track to be
sure it does not move. Make adjustments to the track
if necessary.
3. Place one cart in the middle of the track and the
other cart at the far end. Place the same amount of
mass in each cart.
Chapter 5 Investigations
259
4/27/12 2:31 PM
4. If you are using a dynamics track, place the motion
sensors at the ends of the track. The sensors must record
the velocity of each cart before and after the collision.
5. Predict whether momentum and kinetic energy will
be conserved if a cart in motion strikes a cart at rest.
6. Start the motion sensors. Give the cart at the end of the
track an initial velocity toward the cart in the middle.
7. Record the velocities of each cart in your data table.
Choose a direction for positive and negative velocity.
Also record the total mass of each cart. Use the mass
and velocity to calculate the momentum and kinetic
energy in each case.
8. Repeat Steps 3 through 7, but this time start both carts
at the ends of the track, and give both an initial velocity
toward each other. Before you start, predict whether
momentum and kinetic energy will be conserved.
9. Repeat Steps 3 through 7, with the mass for the first
cart much larger than the mass for the second cart.
10. Repeat Steps 3 through 7, with the mass for the first cart
much smaller than the mass for the second cart.
Part B: Simulation
1. Go to the Nelson Science website.
2. Run the simulation. Follow the Procedure in Part A.
3. Record the velocities of each cart in a data table.
Choose a direction for positive and negative. Also
record the masses you added to each cart. Use the
mass and velocity to calculate the momentum and
kinetic energy in each case.
WEB LINK
Investigation 5.5.1
You read about the dynamics of collisions in two
dimensions in Section 5.5. In this controlled experiment,
you will design an experiment to explore conservation of
momentum in two-dimensional collisions. Alternatively,
you can use a computer simulation to conduct this
experiment (see Procedure: Part B).
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8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 260
A5.5
(a) Based on this investigation, what can you conclude
about the following cases? In each case, explain how
your data support your conclusion. T/I
(i) Is momentum conserved when one of the carts is
at rest?
(ii) Is momentum conserved when both of the carts
are moving?
(iii) Is kinetic energy conserved when one of the carts
is at rest?
(iv) Is kinetic energy conserved when both of the
carts are moving?
(v) Are momentum and kinetic energy conserved
when one mass is much larger than the other?
(b) Were the predictions you made before each of your
measurements correct? Explain. T/I C
(c) How do you think your results would have differed if
the carts had stuck together after the collision? T/I
(d) Do you think the data collected in this investigation
might have been affected by the experimental setup
or the method of measurement? Explain. T/I C
Apply and Extend
(e) Section 5.4 showed the derivation of the following
velocity formulas for a head-on elastic collision in
which one object is initially at rest:
vf1 5 a
m1 2 m2
bv
m 1 1 m 2 i1
vf2 5 a
2m 1
bv
m 1 1 m 2 i1
Insert the data you collected for each trial into these
equations to analyze your results. You may wish to use
a spreadsheet or graphing calculator to carry out the
calculations. T/I A
(f) Describe how one or more of the results you obtained
in this investigation apply to a situation in everyday
life. Address the topics of mass, velocity, momentum,
and kinetic energy in your answer. T/I A
CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT
Conservation of Momentum
in Two Dimensions
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
Analyze and Evaluate
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MENU
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Testable questions
• Is momentum conserved in all collisions in two
dimensions?
• How can conservation of momentum be
demonstrated in a glancing collision?
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4/27/12 2:31 PM
Hypothesis
Read the Testable Questions, Experimental Design, and
Procedure for this investigation. Formulate a hypothesis
about the testable questions that addresses the concept
of conservation of momentum in two dimensions. Your
hypothesis should include a prediction and a reason for
the prediction.
Variables
Identify and record all dependent and independent
variables. You might need to change these variables as
you are designing your experiment.
Experimental Design
You will work in teams to design an experiment to test the
conservation of momentum in two dimensions. Include
in your design some method of making and analyzing a
video of the motion of objects during a two-dimensional
collision. Consider which objects will move, and how they
will collide. How will you record and analyze the motion?
One possibility is to use a flip camera to record the motion
and use a computer media player to analyze the motion
you recorded. You might instead choose to use an online
simulation of the motion.
Equipment and Materials
Possible equipment and materials:
• eye protection
• air table
• strobe lights
• digital camera
• 2 pucks
• 2 launchers
Wear closed-toe shoes to protect your feet from falling pucks.
Make sure others do not crowd the air table. To unplug the
strobes or air table, pull the plug and not the cord. Do not
look straight into the strobe lights. Strobe lighting can trigger
seizures in people with certain medical conditions.
Procedure
Part A: Air Table Experiment
1. Decide how many trials (at least three) you will
include in your investigation to test whether
momentum is conserved in two-dimensional
collisions. Create one or more data tables based on the
dependent and independent variables you identified
for your investigation. Predict how the angle at which
objects collide and the mass of the objects will vary
in the trials. Write a description of your procedures
and draw a diagram of your design setup. Include
all necessary safety precautions. Ask your teacher to
approve your plans.
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2. Put on your eye protection. Set up the design for
your experiment. If you are using a strobe light,
conduct the experiment in the dark. Make sure
everyone in the classroom is ready before your
teacher dims the lights.
3. Practise launching the objects and operating the
camera before conducting your experiments. Be
careful not to launch the objects so hard that they
leave the table.
4. If you are using a strobe light, the strobes should be
set to flash 10 times per second (600 rpm).
5. Conduct your experiment and record your data.
Part B: Simulation
1. Go to the Nelson Science website.
2. Decide how many trials (at least three) you will include
in your investigation to test whether momentum is
conserved in two-dimensional collisions.
3. Create one or more data tables based on the
dependent and independent variables you identified
for your investigation. Write a description of your
procedures and draw a diagram of the simulation.
Ask your teacher to approve your plans.
4. Predict how the angle at which objects collide and the
mass of the objects will vary in the trials.
5. Run the simulation and record your data.
WEB LINK
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) What type of relationship was being tested in this
investigation? K/U T/I
(b) How can you use your data to determine to what
extent momentum is conserved in a two-dimensional
interaction? In your answer, explain why you must
consider the perpendicular vector components of the
collisions. T/I
(c) What effect did changing the angle of the collision
have on your results? T/I
(d) Is it possible to predict the path of each object after
a collision if you know only the initial masses and
velocities? If not, what additional information do you
need to make these predictions? T/I
Apply and Extend
(e) How can you apply the results of this investigation
to improve your chances of causing a billiard ball
at rest to move into a pocket of the billiards table if
the cue ball strikes the ball at rest with a glancing
collision? T/I A
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CHAPTER
5
SUMMArY
Summary questions
each question. Discuss the answers that you would
change and explain your reasoning. As you work,
create a graphic organizer that summarizes what you
learned. Share your results with the class. Compare
these results to those of other groups. In what areas
did you have misconceptions before studying the
concepts presented in the chapter?
1. Read the Key Concepts on page 220. For each point,
create a list of related key terms and equations. Create
a one-page learning aid that summarizes one of the
Key Concepts, using images and important definitions.
2. Look back at the Starting Points questions on page 220.
Working in pairs, review the answers you gave for
Vocabulary
linear momentum (p. 222)
conservation of kinetic energy
(p. 233)
perfectly inelastic collision (p. 235)
impulse (p. 223)
law of conservation of momentum
(p. 229)
collision (p. 228)
explosion (p. 229)
inelastic collision (p. 234)
glancing collision (p. 250)
elastic collision (p. 233)
perfectly elastic collision (p. 235)
head-on elastic collision (p. 240)
CAREER PATHWAYS
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college diploma,
a B.Sc. degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or postgraduate degrees.
This graphic organizer shows a few pathways to careers mentioned in this chapter.
1. Select two careers related to momentum and collisions that you find interesting.
Research the educational pathways you would need to follow to pursue these
careers. What is involved in the required educational programs? Prepare a brief
report of your findings.
2. For one of the two careers that you chose, describe the career, main duties and
responsibilities, working conditions, and setting. Also outline how the career
benefits society and the environment.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
B.Ed
physical education teacher
M.P.T.
physiotherapist
A6
B.H.K.
kinesiologist
B.Sc.
automotive safety designer
12U Physics
OSSD
11U Physics
sports engineer
B.Eng.
aeronautics engineer
accident
reconstructionist
physiotherapy assistant
college diploma
personal trainer
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CAREER LINK
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CHAPTER
5
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Which of the following has the greatest magnitude of
momentum? (5.1) K/U T/I
(a) a 60 kg skier travelling at 80 km/h
(b) a jumbo jet with a mass of 408 233 kg taxiing on
the runway at 3 km/h
(c) a 1 kg object ejected from an airplane with a
speed of 960 km/h relative to the ground
(d) a proton with a mass of 1.67 3 10227 kg travelling
at 99.995 % of the speed of light (3.0 3 108 m/s)
2. Suppose two billiard balls, A and B, with the same
mass undergo a head-on elastic collision. Ball A was
initially stationary. Which of the following outcomes
is possible following the collision? (5.2) K/U
(a) One ball is moving and one is stationary.
(b) Both balls are moving.
(c) Both balls are stationary.
(d) All of the above outcomes are possible.
3. Which of the following uses conservation of
momentum to move? (5.2) K/U T/I
(a) a rocket being launched out of Earth’s atmosphere
(b) a squid taking in water and expelling it in one
direction
(c) a balloon deflating and flying around the room
(d) all of the above
4. A cannon with a mass of 346 kg shoots a 12 kg
cannonball at a speed of 126 m/s. At what speed
does the machine recoil? (5.2) K/U T/I
(a) 2.2 m/s
(b) 4.4 m/s
(c) 8.7 m/s
(d) 1.5 3 102 m/s
5. Which of the following collisions can be treated as
most elastic? (5.3) K/U T/I A
(a) A chef throws a piece of spaghetti against the wall
to test whether it is done.
(b) In a game of marbles, the shooter marble strikes
two smaller marbles.
(c) An egg rolls off the counter and hits the kitchen
floor.
(d) A meteorite strikes the Moon and creates a crater.
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. In a perfectly elastic collision, a small marble collides with
a stationary marble three times its mass. What percentage
of the small marble’s kinetic energy is transferred to the
stationary marble after the collision? (5.4) K/U
(a) 25 %
(b) 50 %
(c) 75 %
(d) 100 %
7. An asteroid moves through deep space and suddenly
breaks into two pieces of equal mass. The two pieces
fly off at a right angle to each other. What can you
conclude? (5.5) K/U
(a) The pieces have equal final speed.
(b) The pieces both travel at 45° to the original
direction of the asteroid.
(c) The pieces have equal kinetic energy.
(d) All of the above are true.
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
8. Momentum is a scalar quantity. (5.1) K/U
9. When a collision occurs between two objects, the
vector sum of the momenta changes. (5.1) K/U
10. All collisions conserve momentum and can be
distinguished on the basis of whether they also
conserve kinetic energy. (5.2) K/U
11. During a hockey game, a stationary goalie stops a
puck. If we know his kinetic energy after the save,
we can determine the initial kinetic energy of
the puck. (5.2) K/U T/I
12. When two bodies travelling toward each other at the
same speed collide, the resultant velocity of each body
is different. (5.2) K/U
13. In reality, collisions between heavy objects can only
be approximately elastic. (5.3) K/U
14. A curling stone hits a wall at a right angle and rebounds
with a final speed that is nearly equal to its initial
speed. Its final path will almost be the mirror image
of its initial path. (5.5) K/U T/I A
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB LINK
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CHAPTER
CHAPTER
13
5
Summary
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Suppose object A has greater momentum than object B.
Which of the following can you conclude? (5.1) K/U
(a) Object A has a greater mass than object B.
(b) Object A has a greater velocity than object B.
(c) Object A has greater kinetic energy than object B.
(d) None of the above is necessarily true.
2. A 61 kg gymnast falls vertically from a jump onto a
trampoline. Her speed as she hits the trampoline is
5.2 m/s, and she comes to a stop in 0.20 s. What is
the average magnitude of the force exerted on the
gymnast by the trampoline? (5.1) K/U
(a) 6.1 N
(b) 305 N
(c) 610 N
(d) 1600 N
3. A ball with a mass of 0.5 kg, initially at rest, is struck
with a bat and acquires a velocity of 4.0 m/s. What
is the magnitude of the change in momentum of the
ball? (5.2) K/U
(a) 0.5 kg?m/s
PATHWAYS
2.0 kg?m/s
(b)CAREER
(c) 2.5 kg?m/s
(d) 10.0 kg?m/s
4. Two tennis balls undergo a head-on elastic collision.
Under which of these initial conditions is it impossible
for both balls to be moving in the same direction after
the collision? (5.4) K/U T/I
(a) The lighter ball is stationary and the heavier ball
is in motion.
(b) The two balls have the same mass and are initially
moving in the same direction, and they collide
because the faster-moving ball overtakes the
slower-moving one.
(c) The two balls have the same mass and only one
is moving.
(d) none of the above
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
5. You can determine the average force exerted on an
object during a collision if you know only the object’s
momentum before and after the collision. (5.1) K/U
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8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 264
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. When an acorn falls and hits the ground, Earth’s
response is imperceptible. (5.2) K/U A
7. In an inelastic collision only momentum is
conserved. (5.3) K/U
8. When two objects undergo a perfectly elastic head-on
collision, each object will always have a final velocity
equal to the initial velocity of the other object.
(5.4) K/U T/I
9. A head-on collision is a collision in which the initial
and the final velocities of colliding masses lie in the
same line. (5.4) K/U
10. In glancing collisions in two dimensions, momentum
is no longer conserved. (5.5) K/U
11. Scientists can detect neutrinos using conservation of
momentum. (5.7) K/U
Understanding
12. Verify, using the definition of momentum, that the
units for momentum are the same as those for force
multiplied by time. (5.1) K/U
13. Two friends in a hurry to go picnicking decide to
stand outside a window, holding a cloth to catch
a watermelon tossed out the window by a third
friend. Explain why a stretchy cloth is less likely to
tear than an inflexible cloth when the watermelon
hits it. (5.1) K/U T/I A
14. Two construction workers use different hammers
to pound in nails. Both swing their hammers with
the same speed, and the duration of both hammers’
collisions with the nails is equal. However, one worker
seems to achieve more force than the other. Offer a
possible explanation. (5.1) K/U T/I A
15. A 57 g tennis ball approaches a player horizontally
at a speed of 6.0 m/s. The player hits the ball
with a racquet in a collision that lasts 4.0 ms. To
return the ball with a horizontal speed of 7.0 m/s,
how much average force must the player apply?
(5.1) K/U A
16. A car with a mass of 1100 kg is travelling at a speed
of 33 m/s. Determine the magnitude of the total
momentum. (5.1) T/I
17. When a meteor enters Earth’s atmosphere, it slows
down. Explain why this does not violate conservation
of momentum. (5.2) K/U T/I A
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18. In each of the following situations, explain why
conservation of momentum appears to fail. These
are not isolated systems. (5.2) K/U A
(a) On a stretch of gravel, two race cars collide and
come to a stop.
(b) In a flowing river, a stick repeatedly bumps
the shore.
(c) A bus slows down, picks up a passenger, and
speeds back up again.
19. A cup is sliding over a frictionless table while a waiter
pours water into it from above. Describe what will
happen to the cup’s speed. (5.2) K/U T/I A
20. A bobsled team rides a sled across a horizontal
runway of ice. Describe what happens to the
sled’s speed as the sledders jump off the sled.
(5.2) K/U T/I A
21. Two tennis balls of equal mass are moving in
directions opposite to each other. The tennis balls
are travelling with equal speed when they collide
head-on. You can assume that this collision is
perfectly elastic. Describe in your own words what
happens after the tennis balls collide. (5.2) T/I C A
22. Using conservation of momentum, explain whether
the following situation is possible: Two objects collide
head-on with equal and opposite velocities. When
they rebound, the velocity of each object is doubled.
(5.2) T/I
23. Two soccer players collide head-on and are stopped.
If the mass of one player is 1.2 times the mass of the
other player, what can you conclude about their initial
speeds? (5.3) K/U
24. Classify the following collisions as elastic, inelastic, or
perfectly inelastic. (5.3) K/U T/I A
(a) A child throws a lump of modelling clay against a
refrigerator. It rebounds, but a part of it sticks.
(b) Two electrons collide in a cyclotron.
(c) A ball is thrown into jelly.
(d) Two marbles bounce off each other after colliding.
25. The data in Table 1 represent the given information
for a head-on elastic collision in one dimension.
Determine the final velocities for each row. (5.4) T/I
Table 1
(a) m1 5 25 kg
v1 5 6.0 m/s [E] m2 5 15 kg
v2 5 0 m/s
(b) m1 5 12 kg
v1 5 8.0 m/s [E] m2 5 22 kg
v2 5 2.0 m/s [E]
(c) m1 5 150 kg v1 5 2.0 m/s [N] m2 5 240 kg v2 5 3.0 m/s [S]
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26. Hockey player 1 is travelling at a velocity of 12 m/s [N]
and hockey player 2 is travelling at a velocity of
18 m/s [S] when they collide head-on. After colliding,
the hockey players hang on to each other and slide
along the ice with a velocity of 4.0 m/s [S]. If hockey
player 1 weighs 120 kg, calculate how much hockey
player 2 weighs. (5.4) K/U T/I
27. In a demonstration in physics class, a 1.2 kg
dynamics cart starts from rest at the top of a ramp.
The ramp is 2.4 m above the ground. The cart
then rolls down to the bottom of the ramp, where
it collides with a stationary 1.4 kg dynamics cart.
Assume that an elastic head-on collision occurs.
Calculate the speed of each cart just after the
collision. (5.4) T/I
28. A 1.2 kg cart slides eastward down a frictionless
ramp from a height of 1.8 m and then onto a
horizontal surface where it has a head-on elastic
collision with a stationary 2.0 kg cart cushioned
by an ideal Hooke’s law spring. The maximum
compression of the spring during the collision is
2.0 cm. (5.4) T/I
(a) Determine the spring constant.
(b) Calculate the velocity of each cart just after the
collision.
(c) After the collision, the 1.2 kg cart rebounds
up the ramp. Determine the maximum height
reached by the cart.
29. Two people on inner tubes collide head-on on a
frictionless surface of ice. The first inner tube and
its rider have a total mass of 81 kg, and the second
inner tube with rider has a total mass of 93 kg. The
final velocities of the two inner tubes, including the
riders, are 1.7 m/s [N] and 1.1 m/s [S], respectively.
(5.4) T/I A
(a) Determine the initial velocities of the inner
tubes.
(b) Determine the total kinetic energy of the inner
tubes and riders.
(c) Determine the total momentum of the inner
tubes and riders.
30. A sailboat with a mass of 240 kg glides at a speed
of 4.3 m/s on frictionless ice, runs aground on
mud, and comes to a stop after 3 s. Determine the
average force of friction exerted by the mud on
the boat. (5.1) K/U A
31. Two balls of different masses and equal speeds
undergo a head-on elastic collision. If the balls are
moving in opposite directions after the collision,
how can you determine from the outcome of the
collision which object has a greater mass? (5.4) K/U
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4/27/12 2:31 PM
32. A curling stone travelling at 5.0 m/s collides
with a stationary stone of the same mass.
Following the collision, the two stones travel
at angles of 17° and 38° in opposite directions
with respect to the initial motion of the first
stone. (5.5) K/U T/I C
(a) Draw a diagram of the stones’ motion.
(b) Calculate the speed of each stone after the
collision.
33. During a spacewalk, three astronauts wearing
jetpacks approach each other at equal speeds along
lines equally spaced by an angle of 120° (Figure 1).
As the astronauts approach each other, they take each
other’s hands. If the astronauts come to rest after
colliding, what conclusion can you draw? (5.5) T/I
120°
120°
120°
36. For each of the following collisions, calculate the force
exerted on the object. (5.1) K/U T/I C A
(a) A baseball with a mass of 0.152 kg hits a cement
wall. Immediately before the collision, the
baseball is travelling horizontally at 35 m/s.
The collision lasts 1.6 ms. Immediately after the
collision, the baseball is travelling horizontally
away from the wall at 29 m/s.
(b) A squash ball with a mass of 0.125 kg collides
horizontally with a cement wall at a speed of
25 m/s. The collision lasts for 0.25 s. Immediately
after the collision, the squash ball travels
horizontally away from the wall at 23 m/s.
(c) In a forensics test, a metal projectile with a mass
of 0.06 kg collides horizontally with a cement wall
at a speed of 340 m/s. The collision lasts 0.1 ms.
Immediately after the collision, the projectile
travels horizontally away from the wall at 3 m/s.
37. Ball 1 of mass 0.1 kg makes an elastic head-on
collision with ball 2 of unknown mass that is initially
at rest. If ball 1 rebounds at one-third of its original
speed, determine the mass of ball 2. (5.1) K/U C A
38. At the circus, a human cannon is used to convert the
potential energy of the performer to kinetic energy
(Figure 2). To achieve maximum height, the organizers
are debating whether to use a lighter performer with
higher speed, or a heavier performer with less speed.
Explain which they should choose. (5.1) K/U T/I C
Figure 1
Analysis and Application
34. (a) If two objects with non-zero mass and non-zero
velocity have equal momentum and equal
kinetic energy, what can you conclude about
their velocities?
(b) Can you draw any conclusion about their masses?
Explain your answer. (5.1) K/U T/I A
35. Draw three different graphs of force applied to an
object over a time interval so that in each graph, the
impulse is the same. (5.1) K/U T/I C
Figure 2
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39. Suppose a watermelon with a mass of 2.0 kg undergoes
a head-on elastic collision on a frictionless counter
with a grapefruit with a mass of 0.8 kg. If the total
kinetic energy of the system is 10.5 J and the total
momentum is 7.5 kg·m/s, determine the possible
initial and final velocities for the watermelon and
the grapefruit. (5.4) K/U A
40. A team of four 63 kg bobsledders push their sled,
which has a mass of 210 kg when empty. They start
to push their sled over a flat frictionless surface at an
initial speed of 3.0 m/s. One by one, at intervals of
2.0 s, each bobsledder sprints forward at a speed of
2.0 m/s faster than the sled’s current speed and then
jumps in. (5.2) K/U T/I A
(a) Determine the sled’s final speed once all of the
sledders are in.
(b) Determine the sled’s final momentum once all of
the sledders are in.
41. A force acts on a 2.4 kg object with the magnitude
shown in Figure 3 as a function of time. (5.1) K/U C A
2.0
F (N)
1.5
1.0
0.5
0
0.5
1.0
1.5 2.0
t (s)
2.5
3.0
Figure 3
(a) Determine the impulse imparted by the force on
the object.
(b) Determine the final velocity of the object if it
had an initial velocity of 14 m/s in the negative
direction.
42. A frog leaps at a constant horizontal speed from a
lily pad to an adjacent lily pad. The lily pads have the
same mass and are initially stationary on a frictionless
surface. When the frog has completed the leap, both
lily pads are moving. (5.2) K/U T/I
(a) What are the directions of the lily pads’ motion?
(b) Which lily pad has a higher speed? Explain why.
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43. A rocket in deep space with an initial velocity of
12 km/s [forward] sheds its rear stages, which
represent two-thirds of its mass. The rear stages travel
with a velocity of 10.0 km/s [backward]. The remaining
rocket continues in the initial direction of motion.
Calculate the rocket’s velocity after shedding the rear
stages. (5.2) K/U T/I A
44. Two 0.3 kg gliders collide elastically on a frictionless
track. Prior to the collision, their total kinetic energy
is 0.52 J and their total momentum is 0.12 kg·m/s
[left] along the track. Calculate the final velocities of
the gliders. (5.2) K/U T/I A
45. A boy is at rest on a sheet of flat frictionless ice.
He throws a snowball of mass 0.02 kg at a speed of
18 m/s in a horizontal direction. If his mass is 75 kg,
how fast will the recoil make him drift on the ice?
(5.2) K/U A
46. (a) In Question 45, what is the total kinetic energy
(i) before the boy throws the snowball?
(ii) after the boy throws the snowball?
(b) Why are your answers in (a) different?
(c)Where did the difference in kinetic energy
come from? (5.3) T/I A
47. Suppose a circus selects a performer of mass 78 kg
to be shot from the human cannon with a kinetic
energy of 1.2 3 105 J. On his way out of the cannon,
the performer holds his arm ahead of him to punch
a stationary beach ball of mass 40.0 g balanced on a
post. The beach ball flies out in the direction of the
performer’s motion, and the performer’s speed is
reduced by 0.1 m/s. (5.3) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the speed of the beach ball after the
collision?
(b) If the collision of the performer’s fist with the
beach ball lasts for 5 ms, how much average force
did he exert on the ball?
(c) What is the performer’s final speed?
(d) Could you have answered (a) and (b) without
determining the performer’s final speed? Explain.
48. On a frictionless sheet of ice, an 810 kg adult moose
skids toward a stationary baby moose at a speed of
5.2 m/s, and they collide and continue together in the
same direction. The final velocity of the adult moose
and baby moose system is 4.85 m/s. Determine the
mass of the baby moose. (5.3) K/U A
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49. A block of ice of mass 50.0 g slides along a
frictionless, frozen lake at a speed of 0.30 m/s.
It collides with a 100.0 g block of ice that is sliding
in the same direction at 0.25 m/s (Figure 4). The two
blocks stick together. (5.3) K/U A
(a) How fast are the two blocks moving after the
collision?
(b) How much kinetic energy is lost?
v i2
v i1
x
(a)
vf
x
(b)
Figure 4
50. Using your answer from Question 48, suppose
that the adult moose again approaches at 5.2 m/s.
This time, after the two collide, the baby moose’s
final velocity is 8.0 m/s in the direction of the adult
moose’s original motion. What is the adult moose’s
final velocity? (5.4) K/U A
51. Two equal-mass hockey pucks undergo a glancing
collision. Puck 1 is initially at rest and is struck
by puck 2 travelling at a velocity of 13 m/s [E].
Puck 1 travels at an angle of [E 18° N] after the
collision. Puck 2 travels at an angle of [E 4° S].
Determine the final velocity of each puck. (5.5) K/U A
52. In a 1500 kg car, 1.3 m of its front section is designed
to crumple in an accident, protecting the driver and
passengers. Suppose the car is travelling at 32 m/s
and comes to a stop while uniformly slowing down
over 1.3 m. (5.6) T/I A
(a) What is the duration of the collision?
(b) What is the average force exerted on the car?
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Evaluation
53. Give two examples of collisions in open systems.
For each example, define the open system and
explain how to expand an open system to be
closed. (5.1) T/I C A
54. Consider a perfectly elastic head-on collision between
two objects of equal mass m. (5.2) T/I C A
(a) Use algebraic reasoning to prove that conservation
of kinetic energy can be expressed as v 21 1 v 22 5 C,
where C is a constant and v1 and v2 represent the
speeds of the objects at any time other than the
instant of the collision.
(b) Similarly, show that conservation of momentum
can be expressed as v1 + v2 5 C9, where C9 is
another constant.
(c) Graph these two equations on the same set of
axes for v1 versus v2.
(d) At how many points do the graphs intersect?
What do the intersections represent?
55. Suppose that a bowling ball collides elastically with a
row of stationary bowling balls all of the same mass.
All the bowling balls are confined to move only along
the gutter beside the lane in a bowling alley. Prove
that after the collision only one ball can be in motion.
Use the laws of conservation of momentum and
conservation of energy (kinetic energy) to support
your answer. (5.2) T/I C A
56. Two objects undergo an elastic head-on collision in
one dimension, with one object initially at rest and
the other moving at 12 m/s [E]. Make a prediction for
each scenario below, explaining your reasoning. Then
calculate the velocity of each object after the collision
for each situation. (5.4) K/U T/I A
(a) The moving object is twice the mass of the
stationary object.
(b) The stationary object is twice the mass of the
moving object.
(c) The moving object is 106 times the mass of the
stationary object.
(d) The stationary object is 106 times the mass of the
moving object.
57. Suppose that two objects undergo a perfectly elastic
collision. The first object, with an initial velocity of vi,
is much more massive than the second object, which
is initially at rest. (5.4) T/I C
(a) Predict what the final velocities will be after the
collision.
(b) Use the final velocity equations to determine the
approximate final velocities of both masses.
(c) Compare these results with your predictions.
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4/27/12 2:31 PM
Reflect on Your Learning
58. What did you find most surprising in this chapter,
and what did you find most interesting? T/I C
59. (a) Do you feel that you could explain momentum
to a fellow student who has not taken physics?
Discuss your answer with a classmate.
(b) Does anything about momentum and conservation
of momentum still confuse you? T/I C
Research
WEB LINK
60. Research Newton’s cradle, which was named after
Sir Isaac Newton. Explore how the device works and
observe what factors are being conserved. T/I C A
61. A Galilean cannon demonstrates the conservation
of momentum. Research the Galilean cannon. In
a short oral presentation, describe how you could
use a basketball and a tennis ball to demonstrate the
principle behind this device. T/I C A
62. While landing on the ground, skydivers and
paratroopers always keep their knees bent (Figure 5).
Research and write a report on how the various
laws of conservation work in this case. If possible,
speak with a professional in this field and highlight
the safety measures that skydivers and paratroopers
should take while landing. T/I C A
Figure 5
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8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 269
63. Research the standard spacing and height of 10-pin
bowling pins and the standard radius of bowling
balls. Discuss in a one-page report how the game
would be easier or more difficult if these standards
were changed. Would it be possible to knock down
all the pins with one shot? At what point would it
become inevitable? T/I C A
64. Research the length of crumple zones in cars. How
should the length of the crumple zone vary with the
mass of the car? Research what parameters are varied
in crash tests and what information is contained in
crash test ratings. Write up your findings in a short
report. K/U T/I C A
65. Principles of momentum play a part in the safe
demolition of buildings. As modern buildings
become larger and taller and urban areas become
more densely populated, methods of safe building
demolition must improve. Research methods of
building demolition and how the methods have
evolved. Prepare a multimedia report that includes
video examples of demolition techniques. Include
your thoughts on practical ways to improve
demolition technology. K/U T/I C A
66. Use the concept of momentum to explain how
child car seats help protect children riding in motor
vehicles. Describe some ways that the design of
standard child car seats or the materials used in them
might be improved. K/U T/I C A
67. Research the history of crash test dummies and
summarize the impact their use has had on motor
vehicle safety research. Why are crash test dummies
used? What impact have innovations in crash test
dummy design and use had on traffic accident
injuries? K/U T/I C A
68. In the Unit Task on page 270, you may choose to
design a Rube Goldberg machine. Research Rube
Goldberg machines and write a short summary of
your findings. Include the following information in
your summary: T/I C A
(a) What was Rube Goldberg’s educational
background and career pathway? Did his
education and the jobs he held have an impact
on his designs?
(b) Describe two of Rube Goldberg’s designs and
identify any physics principles at work.
(c) Discuss how Rube Goldberg’s machines have
had an impact on society.
Chapter 5 Review 269
4/27/12 2:31 PM
UNIT
2
UNIT TASK
Applications of Energy and Momentum in Engineering Design
When engineers and technicians develop new
technologies, they must carefully analyze how their
devices use energy and momentum. For example, safety
technologies such as airbags and bicycle helmets must
protect us from the forces in collisions. To do that, the
safety devices need to transform energy and absorb
momentum so that we do not.
Machines work by transforming energy and
redirecting momentum. For example, a solar-powered
car first transforms solar energy into electrical energy
in its solar cells, and then transforms electrical energy
into mechanical energy in its motor to run the car.
Engineers design crumple zones, seat belts, and airbags
to redirect momentum in collisions and protect
CAREER LINK
passengers.
The Task
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A1.2
In this Unit Task, you will perform one of two tasks. You
will either design a new safety device that transforms
energy and absorbs momentum to protect a fragile object,
such as an egg, or you will design a Rube Goldberg
machine, which is a machine that completes a simple
task in a complicated way (Figure 1). Consider how your
device uses the concepts you have studied in this unit.
Read through the questions at the end of the Task to help
you plan your procedure and presentation.
Review safety and design rules before you begin. You
must use all tools safely, and you must test your design in
a safe and controlled manner.
Use equipment you are comfortable with. Have your teacher
approve your design plans before you execute them,
and seek permission before you use any tools in the lab.
Consider all necessary safety precautions before building.
Option 1: Egg-Drop Protector Device
Your task is to design and build a container that will
protect an egg from breaking when it is dropped from a
height of 2 m, or another height as determined by your
teacher. For this project, you will need an egg and simple
materials for construction, such as
• paper
• polystyrene foam
• tape
• tissue
• packing supplies
• cotton balls
Analyze how your design uses principles of energy and
momentum to complete the task successfully. Test your
design and make improvements based on the results.
270
Unit 2 • Energy and Momentum
8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 270
Finally, demonstrate the functionality of your design
to the class. Prepare a presentation to describe the
usefulness of your final design and the process you
followed to create it.
Option 2: rube Goldberg Machine
Your task is to design and build a Rube Goldberg machine.
Rube Goldberg was a cartoonist in the early twentieth
century who used his engineering talents to point out, in
a humorous way, how people often like to do things the
hard way. You can physically construct your machine or use
simulation software to design it. If you build your machine
consider all necessary safety precautions. If you use a
simulation it must be of real (not imaginary) equipment and
materials. Materials you may wish to use could include:
• wood
• tape
• nails
• string
• cardboard
• wire
• recycled plastic or
• eye protection
metal containers
Figure 1 Rube Goldberg machines are complicated devices
built to perform simple tasks.
Analyze how the machine’s operation relies on the principles of energy and momentum. Prepare a presentation to
describe the purpose of your design and the process you
followed to create it.
Analyze and Evaluate
Option 1
(a) Which physics principles did you use to design your
container? K/U A
(b) Calculate the energy and momentum of your egg
when its container hits the ground. T/I A
NEL
4/27/12 2:31 PM
(c) Describe what happened to the momentum and
energy of the egg during its fall. Calculate the relative
gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy, elastic
potential energy, and momentum at both the top and
the bottom of the drop. K/U T/I C A
(d) What safety measures did you follow while designing
and testing your container? C A
(e) Describe your testing procedure. T/I C A
(f) Describe the changes you made to the design after
testing your container. T/I C
(g) List problems that you encountered while designing
the container, and describe how you overcame
them. T/I C A
(h) Compare your design to the designs of other students.
What types of features did the successful designs have
in common? T/I C A
(i) Create a flow chart or other graphic organizer of the
process you followed to design and build your container.
Did your final design successfully protect the egg? If you
had to do this task again, how would you change the
process? How would you change the design? T/I C A
Option 2
(j) Which physics principles did you use to design your
machine? K/U A
(k) Describe the purpose of your machine. C A
(l) Estimate the cost of building a permanent, fully
functional version of your machine. You may have to
do some research. T/I
(m) List the sequence of energy transformations in the
operation of your machine. K/U T/I A
(n) Analyze the exchange of momentum for one to three
key collisions that occurred in your machine. Estimate
the gravitational potential energy, kinetic energy,
elastic potential energy, and momentum at each of
these key points. K/U T/I A
(o) Compare your design to the design of other students.
Which machines were the most successful at
accomplishing their tasks? Why do you think they
were successful? T/I C A
(p) Describe the design process that you followed. Did
your machine work? Which parts worked well, and
which did not? If you had to do this task again, how
would you change the process? T/I C A
Apply and Extend
Option 1
(q) Describe how to extend your design to protect larger
objects, including parts of the human body, from
damage during a collision. C A
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(r) Assess the environmental impact of your design.
Explain what you could do to reduce the negative
impact of your device. T/I C A
Option 2
(s) Consider the costs that you estimated in Step (l).
Based on your research, how might you reduce some
of these costs? C A
(t) Describe how to adapt your machine for a second use
by making the fewest changes possible. C A
(u) Assess the environmental impact of your design.
Explain what you could do to reduce the negative
impact of your device. T/I C A
Assessment Checklist
Your completed Unit Task will be assessed according
to the following criteria:
Knowledge/Understanding
■
✓ Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of work, energy,
and momentum.
■
✓ Demonstrate knowledge of conservation of energy
and momentum.
■
✓ Demonstrate safety skills in the laboratory.
Thinking/Investigation
■
✓ Investigate relationships between conservation of energy
and momentum in real-life and imagined collisions.
■
✓ Analyze conservation of energy and momentum in
interactions and collisions.
■
✓ Develop a plan for designing a safety device or
complicated machine.
■
✓ Improve the design of an egg-drop container or Rube
Goldberg machine.
■
✓ Construct a successful egg-drop container or Rube
Goldberg machine.
✓
■ Evaluate the success of your design.
■
✓ Evaluate and improve your design process.
Communication
■
✓ Communicate your design, procedure, and modifications
in the form of a flow chart or other graphic organizer.
■
✓ Demonstrate and explain the functionality and design of
the device in a presentation.
✓
■ Communicate the results of your design clearly and concisely.
Application
■
✓ Propose alternative uses for your device and describe the
impact on society of your device.
■
✓ Assess the cost and environmental impact of your design.
Unit 2 Task 271
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UNIT
2
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. A weightlifter lifts a 200 kg mass over his head,
and then sets it back on the floor where it
started. Which of the following statements is
true? (4.1) K/U
(a) The weightlifter did positive work on the mass.
(b) The weightlifter did negative work on the mass.
(c) The weightlifter did zero net work on the mass.
(d) The mass did work on the weightlifter.
2. The units of energy can be written as
(a) J
(b) N·m
(c) kg·m/s2
(d) kg·m/s (4.1) K/U
3. A large water tank is filled by pumping water from
a reservoir below using electric pumps. About
3.2 3 106 kg of the water is lifted 79 m in 12 min.
How much work is done by the pumps? (4.1) K/U T/I A
(a) 6.4 3 105 J
(b) 3.2 3 106 J
(c) 3.0 3 107 J
(d) 2.4 3 109 J
4. How much power is produced by the pumps in
Question 3? (4.5) K/U T/I A
(a) 6.0 3 105 W
(b) 3.4 3 106 W
(c) 2.9 3 107 W
(d) 2.3 3 109 W
5. A 10.0 kg toy airplane starts from rest and speeds
up to 5.0 m/s in 3.0 s. What work is done by the
airplane’s motor, assuming the work done by friction
is negligible? (4.2) K/U
(a) 0 J
(b) 25 J
(c) 42 J
(d) 130 J
6. A girl can produce 710 W of power over small
intervals of time. If the girl’s mass is 42 kg, how many
seconds will it take her to climb a flight of stairs that
is 12 m high? (4.3) K/U A
(a) 7.0 s
(b) 1.3 s
(c) 4.5 s
(d) 5.2 s
272 Unit 2 • Energy and Momentum
8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 272
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
Communication
C
A
Application
7. The roller coaster car in Figure 1 is at point A. At which
point is its potential energy with respect to the ground
greater than it is at point A? (4.3) K/U A
(a) B
(b) C
(c) D
(d) E
B
A
C
D
E
Figure 1
8. In Question 7, if the total of the kinetic energy and
potential energy at point A is 100 000 J, then what
is the total energy at point C (assuming no friction
forces)? (4.5) K/U T/I A
(a) more than 100 000 J
(b) exactly 100 000 J
(c) less than 100 000 J
(d) none of the above
9. A 5900 kg airplane flies at 220 m/s at an altitude of
1600 m. What is the total gravitational potential energy of
the airplane with respect to the ground? (4.5) K/U T/I A
(a) 3.0 3 107 J
(b) 5.9 3 107 J
(c) 6.0 3 108 J
(d) 9.3 3 107 J
10. If a boy throws a 2.0 kg stone straight up into the air
with a speed of 12 m/s just over the edge of a cliff that
looms 55 m above the ocean, at what speed does the
stone hit the water? (4.5) K/U T/I A
(a) 35 m/s
(b) 98 m/s
(c) 130 m/s
(d) 210 m/s
11. A student is bouncing on a trampoline. When does
she have maximum speed? (4.7) K/U T/I A
(a) at the top of her motion, above the trampoline
(b) halfway down
(c) as she is depressing the trampoline surface
(d) as she just leaves the flat trampoline surface
NEL
4/27/12 2:31 PM
12. Which of the following is an application of simple
harmonic motion? (4.7) K/U T/I A
(a) a rubber ball bouncing on the ground
(b) the pendulum on a grandfather clock
(c) a person jumping on a trampoline
(d) a swimmer swimming laps
13. A hockey player taps the hockey puck during a game.
The puck does not go very fast because
(a) the force was large and the time of contact was long
(b) the force was large and the time of contact was short
(c) the force was small and the time of contact was short
(d) the force was small and the time of contact was
long (5.1) K/U T/I A
14. An egg falling on a wood floor will break, but an
egg falling from the same height onto a pillow
will not break. What is the difference in these
situations? (5.1) T/I A
(a) The pillow delivers a small force over a long time
to stop the egg.
(b) The pillow delivers less impulse in stopping the egg.
(c) The wood floor delivers a small force over a long
time.
(d) The pillow delivers more impulse in stopping
the egg.
15. Tripling the speed of an object has what result on its
momentum? (5.1) T/I A
(a) multiplying it by 2
(b) multiplying it by 3
(c) multiplying it by 4
(d) multiplying it by 9
16. An 82 kg hockey forward carries the puck at 2.5 m/s [N].
A 110 kg defender moves at 1.2 m/s [S] and delivers a
check to the forward. The players slide across the ice
together after the check. Calculate their final velocity.
(5.3) T/I A
(a) 0.13 m/s [S]
(b) 0.23 m/s [S]
(c) 0.38 m/s [N]
(d) 0.32 m/s [N]
17. In the grocery store, Marie stops her cart in an aisle.
Gerard gives his cart, twice the mass of Marie’s cart, a
push and the cart heads toward Marie’s, at a speed of
3 m/s. The carts collide and move off together with a
common speed. What is the final speed of the carts, and
in which direction do the carts move with respect to the
original direction of Gerard’s cart? (5. 3) K/U T/I
(a) 2 m/s, in the opposite direction to Gerard’s cart
(b) 3 m/s, in the opposite direction to Gerard’s cart
(c) 3 m/s, in the same direction as Gerard’s cart
(d) 2 m/s, in the same direction as Gerard’s cart
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18. Two marbles of the same mass collide head-on. The
first marble moves at 11 cm/s to the right. The second
marble moves at 18 cm/s to the left. After the collision,
the first marble moves at 16 cm/s to the left. What is
the velocity of the second marble? (5.4) T/I A
(a) 9.0 cm/s [right]
(b) 16 cm/s [left]
(c) 23 cm/s [right]
(d) 11 cm/s [left]
19. A 71 kg boy and a 43 kg girl, both wearing skates, face
each other at rest on a skating rink. The boy pushes the
girl eastward with a speed of 4.6 m/s. Ignoring friction,
determine the velocity of the boy. (5.4) T/I A
(a) 2.8 m/s [W]
(b) 2.8 m/s [E]
(c) 3.3 m/s [W]
(d) 3.3 m/s [E]
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
20. Energy is a scalar quantity. (4.1) K/U
21. The unit of both work and energy is the joule. (4.1) K/U
22. Excluding any energy losses due to friction, the net
work done on an object is equal to the change in
kinetic energy of that object. (4.1) K/U
23. Friction does positive work on a baseball player
sliding into home plate. (4.1) K/U T/I A
24. The energy contained in gasoline is referred to as
kinetic energy. (4.3) K/U
25. Energy and power are different words that have the
same meaning. (4.5) K/U
26. A diver has 800 J of kinetic energy as he hits the water
if he has 500 J of potential energy and 300 J of kinetic
energy at one instant in his dive. (4.5) T/I A
27. Baseball players follow through on their swings because
it increases the impulse delivered to the ball. (5.1) T/I
28. In any collision, momentum is conserved. (5.2) K/U
29. When two objects collide in a perfectly elastic collision,
kinetic energy is conserved but momentum is not.
(5.3) K/U
30. The total momentum of two bumper cars before
a collision is the same as the momentum after the
collision. (5.3) K/U T/I A
31. In a perfectly elastic two-body head-on collision, the
objects collide and travel in the reverse direction with
twice their original speed. (5.4) K/U
32. If two billiard balls of equal mass travelling at equal
but opposite initial velocities collide in a glancing
collision, their final velocities will also be equal but
opposite. (5.5) K/U
Unit 2 Self-Quiz 273
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UNIT
2
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. A worker lifts a box upward from the floor and then
carries it across the warehouse. When is he doing
work? (4.1) K/U
(a) while lifting the box from the floor
(b) while carrying the box across the warehouse
(c) while standing in place with the box
(d) at no time during the process
2. The equivalent to 1 J is
(a) 1 kg∙m/s2
(b) 1 kg∙m2/s
(c) 1 kg∙m2/s2
(d) 1 kg∙m/s (4.1) K/U
3. A car of mass 1.0 3 103 kg travels forward at 12 m/s.
How much distance is required to completely stop the
car using only a soft braking force of 720 N? (4.1) T/I
(a) 50 m
(b) 100 m
(c) 200 m
(d) 500 m
4. The car in Question 3 doubles its speed. What
happens to its kinetic energy? (4.2) K/U
(a) The kinetic energy stays the same.
(b) The kinetic energy doubles.
(c) The kinetic energy triples.
(d) The kinetic energy quadruples.
5. A grocer is stocking items on a store shelf. She lifts
a box of detergent from the floor and stacks it on
top of another box of detergent that is resting on the
shelf. At which point is the second box of detergent’s
gravitational potential energy greatest relative to the
ground? (4.3) K/U
(a) when the box is at rest on the ground
(b) when the top of the box reaches the shelf height
(c) when the bottom of the box reaches the shelf height
(d) when the bottom of the box is set on top of the
box resting on the shelf
274 Unit 2 • Energy and Momentum
8160_CH05_p258-281.indd 274
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. A cart at the farmer’s market is loaded with potatoes and
pulled at constant speed up a ramp to the top of a hill. If
the mass of the loaded cart is 3.0 kg and the top of the
hill has a height of 0.45 m, then what is the potential
energy of the loaded cart at the top of the hill? (4.3) K/U
(a) 1.3 J
(b) 0.13 J
(c) 13 J
(d) 130 J
7. A cheetah cub is resting on a tree branch 20.0 m
above the ground. The cub has a mass of 6.0 kg. How
much gravitational potential energy does the cheetah
cub have relative to the ground? (4.3) K/U
(a) 12 J
(b) 120 J
(c) 1200 J
(d) 12 000 J
8. A baseball player drops the ball from his glove. At
what moment is the ball’s kinetic energy the greatest?
(4.3) K/U
(a) when the baseball player is holding the ball
(b) just before the ball hits the ground
(c) at the ball’s highest point before beginning to fall
(d) the moment the ball leaves the baseball player’s
glove
9. Which of the following will increase the kinetic
energy of a hammer as it strikes the head of a
nail? (4.5) K/U
(a) using a hammer with greater mass
(b) swinging the hammer with a greater downward
velocity
(c) lifting the hammer to a greater height before
swinging it down
(d) all of the above
10. Which of the following represents a way to calculate
power? (4.5) K/U
(a) Power equals work divided by time.
(b) Power equals work divided by kinetic energy.
(c) Power equals time divided by work.
(d) Power equals mass divided by time.
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11. The driver of a car applies her brakes. What happens
to the car’s kinetic energy as it comes to rest? (4.5) K/U
(a) It is transformed into potential energy.
(b) It is transformed into thermal energy and sound
energy.
(c) It is completely lost.
(d) It becomes power.
12. A skier maintains a constant speed as she descends a
mountain slope. Which of the following best describes
the energy transfer during this process? (4.5) K/U
(a) Kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy.
(b) Thermal energy is transformed into kinetic energy.
(c) Potential energy is transformed into thermal energy.
(d) Thermal energy is transformed into potential energy.
13. Two students of different masses run a 50 m sprint.
They finish in the same amount of time. Which student
produces more power during the sprint? (4.5) K/U
(a) the student with less mass
(b) the student with more mass
(c) the student who took longer strides
(d) Both students produce the same power.
14. A hand-held candy dispenser ejects small candy pieces
using a spring. The candy is placed in the dispenser and
the spring is compressed. When a button is pushed,
the candy flies forward. Which of the following best
accounts for the candy’s motion? (4.6) K/U
(a) The potential energy stored in the spring is
converted to work, which then becomes the
kinetic energy of the candy.
(b) The kinetic energy of the compressed spring is
converted to the potential energy of the candy.
(c) The simple harmonic motion of the spring
becomes the kinetic energy of the candy.
(d) The simple harmonic motion of the spring
transfers potential energy to the candy.
15. A mass attached to an ideal spring oscillates on a
horizontal frictionless surface. The velocity of the
mass is greatest when
(a) the displacement is at a maximum
(b) the kinetic energy is at a minimum
(c) the mass is at the equilibrium position
(d) the spring force is at a maximum (4.6) K/U
16. What shape is the force–displacement graph for an
ideal spring? (4.6) K/U
(a) parabolic
(b) linear
(c) exponential
(d) none of the above
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17. For a spring-powered candy dispenser, which of
the following correctly expresses the relationship of
the candy’s speed to the compression distance of the
spring? (4.7) K/U
(a) The speed is proportional to the square root of
the compression distance of the spring.
(b) The speed is directly proportional to the
compression distance of the spring.
(c) The speed is inversely proportional to the
compression distance of the spring.
(d) The speed is proportional to the square of the
compression distance of the spring.
18. An archer stores 150 J of potential energy in a bow as he
pulls back the string. The 0.30 kg arrow leaves the bow
with an initial speed of 30 m/s. How much energy was
lost to vibrations and deformation of the bow? (4.7) K/U
(a) 0 J
(b) 15 J
(c) 30 J
(d) 50 J
19. The system comprising a block of mass m and a
spring with spring constant k forms a damped
oscillator. As energy is transferred to thermal energy,
the mechanical energy of the system
(a) increases
(b) decreases
(c) does not change
(d) oscillates in value (4.7) K/U
20. In a high school hockey game, two players of the
same mass are at rest. One player pushes the other
away. What is true about their velocities? (5.3) K/U
(a) They are equal and in the same direction.
(b) They are equal but in opposite directions.
(c) The player who pushes has twice the speed of the
other player, but in the opposite direction.
(d) The player who got pushed has twice the speed of
the other player, but in the opposite direction.
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
21. Gravity does positive work on a mountaineer as she
climbs up the side of a cliff. (4.1) K/U
22. If an object has no velocity, it has no kinetic energy.
(4.2) K/U
23. Power is the rate at which work is done. (4.4) K/U
24. At a hydroelectric power plant, the gravitational
potential energy of water can be transformed into
kinetic energy. (4.5) K/U
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25. A diver jumps from a diving board. If the work done
by air resistance is negligible, at any given moment
until she enters the water the sum of her kinetic
energy and her gravitational potential energy is not
constant. (4.5) K/U
26. In a classic gravity-driven roller coaster, the initial
hilltop must be the highest. (4.5) K/U A
27. As you expand a spring, the force necessary to
continue pulling it apart decreases. (4.6) K/U
28. As a particle moves in circular motion about the
origin, the x-component of the particle’s displacement
is an example of simple harmonic motion. (4.6) K/U
29. The spring constant, k, is measured in joules. (4.6) K/U
30. A child jumping on a trampoline causes energy
transformations between kinetic energy, gravitational
potential energy, and elastic potential energy. (4.6) K/U
31. The minus sign in the equation for Hooke’s law,
F 5 2kx, indicates that the spring force is always
directed opposite to the spring’s displacement. (4.6) K/U
32. A ball bouncing up and down due to gravity is in
simple harmonic motion. (4.6) K/U A
33. Both gravitational potential energy and elastic potential
energy depend on an object’s elevation. (4.6) K/U
34. A mass oscillating vertically on a spring can have
three types of energy: kinetic, gravitational potential,
and elastic potential. (4.6) K/U A
35. The amplitude in simple harmonic motion is the
magnitude of the displacement of the particle in one
direction only. (4.6) K/U A
36. A larger spring constant means a weaker pull or push
of the spring for a given displacement. (4.7) K/U A
Understanding
37. Would you do the same work to lift a 2 kg box
vertically through 1.5 m on the Moon as you would
to lift it on Earth? Explain. (4.1) K/U T/I
38. A box slides down an inclined plane, increasing in
speed. Does the normal force do any work on the
box? Explain. (4.1) K/U T/I
39. A push is applied to an object, and the object
undergoes a displacement. However, the object’s
speed does not increase. What can you conclude
about the system? (4.1) K/U T/I
40. A horizontal force of 50 N is needed to push a 500 kg
piano across a floor. How much work is done by the
force in displacing the piano 20 m? (4.1) K/U
41. To gain height on a playground swing, a child raises
and lowers his legs at just the right moment. Discuss
the energy transformations as the child swings
gradually higher and higher. (4.2) T/I C A
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42. A weightlifter is able to lift 250 kg through 2.1 m in
2.4 s. Determine his power output. (4.2) K/U
43. A swimmer experiences a horizontal reaction force from
the blocks to her feet at the start of a race. What will
the work done on the blocks and change in energy
be? (4.2) K/U T/I
44. A 41 kg block is uniformly slowed by a friction force
of 5.0 N. The block travels 29 m before coming to
rest. (4.2) K/U
(a) Calculate the work done by friction.
(b) Calculate the initial speed of the block.
45. A compact car has a fuel economy of 12 km/L.
A mid-sized car has a fuel economy of 7 km/L.
Explain, using energy concepts, why there is a
difference in fuel economy. (4.2) K/U T/I
46. (a) A 150 kg wrecking ball is lifted to a height of 25 m.
Determine the gravitational potential energy of
the wrecking ball with respect to the ground. (4.3)
(b) If the wrecking ball is dropped to the ground,
neglecting air resistance, what is the kinetic
energy of the ball on impact? (4.5) K/U T/I
47. A 91 000 kg airplane is flying at 980 km/h at a height
of 12 km. Determine its total energy (kinetic plus
gravitational potential). Assume g = 9.8 m/s2. (4.3) K/U
48. From what vertical height should a 3.6 g marble be
dropped so that it hits a rubber mat with a speed of
6.5 m/s? (4.3) T/I
49. A rock climber with a mass of 110 kg slips and falls
12 m before safely reaching the end of his rope. (4.3) T/I
(a) Determine the change in his potential energy
during the fall.
(b) Determine the climber’s speed when the rope
stops his fall. What assumption do you need
to make?
50. A rubber ball is thrown upward. As it rises, gravity
does negative work on it. Describe what happens to
the kinetic energy of the ball. (4.5) K/U T/I
51. Consider two springs: one is a suspension spring on
a car (Figure 1); the other is a spring on the screen
door of a house. Which do you think has a larger
spring constant? Explain your answer. (4.6) T/I A
Figure 1 Car suspension spring
52. A spring is used to project a 0.021 kg ball into the air.
If the spring constant is 160 N/m and if the spring is
compressed 0.13 m, determine the height to which
the ball rises. (4.7) K/U T/I
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53. A soccer player intends to use his chest to control a
ball kicked by another player. (5.1) T/I
(a) He first uses his chest to redirect the kicked ball
directly upward to a maximum height of 3.0 m
above his chest. The mass of the ball is 0.43 kg.
Calculate the momentum of the ball when it strikes
the player’s chest after falling from this height.
(b) The player then uses his chest to bounce the ball
straight upward again. If the impact of the ball with
the player’s chest lasts for 0.2 s, and he imparts an
average force of 31 N [up], calculate the speed of
the ball after this second collision.
54. A bungee jumper with a mass of 78 kg, tied to a 39 m
cord, jumps off the Sault Ste. Marie bridge from a
height of 69 m. She falls to 6.0 m above the ground
before the cord brings her momentarily to rest.
Calculate the impulse exerted on the jumper by the
cord as it stretches. (5.1) T/I
55. Figure 2 shows the graph of the force of a toy
car crashing into a brick wall. Determine the
impulse. (5.1) T/I A
61. A 46 kg hockey player accelerates from rest at 3.4 m/s2
for 2.7 s and then has a perfectly inelastic collision
with a stationary 56 kg player. Friction is negligible.
What is the speed of each hockey player immediately
after the collision? (5.3) T/I
62. Two objects of masses m1 5 1.5 kg and m2 5 3.5 kg
undergo a one-dimensional head-on collision as
shown in Figure 3. Their initial velocities along x
are vi1 5 12 m/s and vi2 5 27.5 m/s. The two objects
stick together after the perfectly inelastic collision.
(5.3) T/I A
m1
m2
5.0
F (N [S])
4.0
Figure 3
3.0
(a) Calculate the velocity after the collision.
(b) Determine how much kinetic energy is lost
in the collision.
2.0
1.0
0
10
20
t (ms)
30
40
Figure 2
56. How did concepts of energy and momentum play a
part in the discovery of the neutrino? (5.7) K/U A
57. A grapefruit is tossed across a room. Ignoring air
friction, describe what happens to the horizontal
component of the linear momentum. (5.2) K/U
58. A wet snowball collides with a stationary parked car.
Is this an example of an inelastic collision? Why or
why not? (5.3) K/U
59. (a) Give an example of a collision in everyday life
where one of the objects is at rest after the collision.
(b) Give an example of a collision where both objects
are at rest after the collision. (5.3) K/U
60. In a movie stunt, two cars collide head on and lock
bumpers on an icy, frictionless road. Car 1 has a mass
of 1850 kg and an initial velocity of 26 m/s [E]. Car 2
has a mass of 1200 kg. The velocity of the cars after
the collision is 6.5 m/s [E]. Determine the initial
velocity of car 2. (5.3) T/I
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Analysis and Application
63. A child pulls a sled through the snow a distance of
12 m by applying a force of 480 N at an angle of 21°
with the horizontal. Calculate the work he does,
assuming no friction. (4.1) T/I A
64. A father pushes a stroller 200.0 m through the park
with a force of 0.25 N. Ignoring friction, how much
work has he done on the stroller? (4.1) T/I A
65. A gardener pushes a lawnmower with a force of
magnitude 9.3 N. If this force does 87 J of work on
the lawnmower while pushing it 11 m across level
ground, determine the angle between the applied
force and the horizontal. (4.1) K/U T/I
66. A 1200 kg car travels at 25 m/s. The brakes are
applied and the car slows down at −8.0 m/s2. How far
does the car travel before it stops? (4.1) T/I A
67. A force of 52 N acts on a wooden block at an angle of
13° from the horizontal. The block moves a horizontal
distance of 3.8 m. Calculate the work done by the
applied force. (4.1) T/I A
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68. Calculate the work done by an applied force to lift
an 18 kg box 5.1 m vertically at a constant speed.
(4.1) K/U T/I A
69. A 73 kg skier moving at 4.2 m/s encounters a
hill inclined at 10° to the horizontal. She coasts up
the hill until she comes to rest. Friction is negligible.
Determine the distance up the hill (not vertical
distance) the skier slides before stopping. (4.2) T/I
70. A 2.0 kg stone is dropped from 10.0 m above the
ground. Ignoring air resistance, determine the stone’s
speed when it hits the ground. (4.3) T/I
71. A pole vaulter uses a pole to jump to a height of
4.0 m at a high school track event. At this height,
the pole vaulter’s potential energy is 2.7 kJ and
he has zero velocity. Calculate the mass of the
pole vaulter. (4.3) T/I
72. Is it possible for a rubber ball to be dropped
from shoulder height and then bounce to a
height above your head? Explain your answer.
(4.3) K/U T/I A
73. A baseball is thrown from a cliff 41 m high with an
initial velocity of 22 m/s at an angle of 37° above the
horizontal. (4.3) K/U T/I
(a) Determine the speed of the ball just before it hits
the ground.
(b) How does your answer change if the angle of
elevation changes to 60°?
74. A 55 kg snowboarder practises in a hemispherical
half-pipe with radius 4.0 m (Figure 4). Assume the
half-pipe sides are frictionless. Determine
(a) the potential energy of the snowboarder at the
top of the half-pipe
(b) the kinetic energy of the snowboarder at the
bottom of the half-pipe
(c) the potential and kinetic energy of the
snowboarder at a point C if point C is 2.0 m
above the half-pipe bottom (4.5) T/I A
4.0 m
Figure 4
75. When a meteorite collides with the Moon, surface
material at the impact site melts. Explain why.
(4.5) T/I C A
76. A fire hose directs a stream of water at a rate of
20 kg/s and with a speed of 30 m/s against a flat plate
of metal. Calculate the force required to hold the plate
in place. (4.5) T/I
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77. A girl and her bicycle have a total mass of 39 kg. At
the top of a hill, the girl’s speed is 3.4 m/s. The hill is
11 m high and 11 m long horizontally (not along the
slope). If the force of friction as she rides down the
hill is 22 N, determine her speed at the bottom.
(4.5) K/U T/I
78. The water in the Niagara River at the top of Niagara
Falls is held by a dam (Figure 5). Describe the
transformation of the water’s energy as it drops over
the falls. (4.5) K/U A
Figure 5
79. A 60 g golf ball is dropped from a height of 2.0 m and
rebounds to 1.5 m. Determine how much energy is
lost. (4.5) K/U T/I A
80. A skier starts at the top of a frictionless slope and
pushes off with a speed of 2.0 m/s. The elevation
of the slope is 45 m. She skis down the slope to a
valley with elevation 0.0 m and then glides to the
peak of an adjacent slope that is at an elevation of
31 m. Calculate her speed at the second peak.
(4.5) T/I A
81. A baseball player bats a baseball so that it travels in
a parabolic arc. The player bats the ball near ground
level and the ball leaves the bat at a speed of 45 m/s,
making an angle of 35° above the horizontal. The
mass of the baseball is 0.25 kg. (4.5) T/I A
(a) Calculate the maximum height of its trajectory.
(b) What is its speed as it hits the ground again?
(Neglect air resistance.)
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82. A 1990 kg rocket sled on horizontal frictionless rails
is loaded with 102 kg of propellant. It exhausts the
propellant in a burn of 25 s. The rocket starts at rest;
it moves with a speed of 240 m/s after the burn.
(4.5) T/I A
(a) Determine the impulse experienced by the rocket
sled.
(b) Calculate the average force experienced by the
rocket during the burn.
83. A baseball with a mass of 0.2 kg reaches home plate
at a speed of 40 m/s and is batted straight back to the
pitcher at a speed of 60 m/s. (4.5) T/I
(a) Determine the impulse experienced by the ball.
(b) Calculate the magnitude of the change in the
ball’s momentum.
84. A 100.0 kg hockey player moves east at a speed of
5.0 m/s and collides with a 130 kg opponent moving
west at 3.0 m/s. The collision is perfectly inelastic.
Find the velocity of the two players immediately after
the collision. (5.4) T/I A
85. A neutron in a nuclear reactor moves at 1.0 3 106 m/s
and makes an elastic head-on collision with a carbon
atom initially at rest. The mass of the carbon atom
is 12 times the mass of the neutron. Determine the
fraction of the neutron’s kinetic energy transferred to
the carbon atom. (5.3) T/I A
86. A paintball gun launches a paintball off a cliff at an
angle of elevation of 45°. The cliff is 165 m high. The
paintball is initially moving at 180 m/s. Calculate the
speed of the paintball as it hits the ground. (4.5) T/I
87. Figure 6 shows a roller coaster car at rest on the track
at the top of a hill that is 15 m high. The car has a mass
of 10.0 kg. It begins to move and reaches a speed of
10.0 m/s at the top of the second hill, point A, on the
track. Calculate the height of hill A. (4.5) T/I
A
15 m
∆y
88. A spring is stretched 0.62 m from equilibrium by a
force of 199 N. (4.6) T/I
(a) Determine the spring constant.
(b) Calculate the magnitude of the force required to
stretch the spring 0.25 m from equilibrium.
(c) Determine the work done on the spring to stretch
it 0.25 m from equilibrium.
(d) Determine the work done on the spring to
compress it 0.50 m from equilibrium.
89. Give one example in which the damping of vibrations is
(a) useful
(b) not useful (4.7) C A
90. A 9.1 g ball is hit into a 98 g block of clay at rest on
a level surface. After impact, the block slides 8.0 m
before coming to rest. If the coefficient of friction is
0.60, determine the speed of the ball before impact.
(4.7) T/I
91. Engineers perform a crash test with a minivan and a
compact car. The mass of the minivan is 8.0 3 102 kg,
and the mass of the compact car is 560 kg. The minivan
was moving north, and the compact car was moving
east. After the collision, the two cars crumpled together
and moved at 15 m/s [N 30° E]. Determine the initial
velocity of each vehicle. (5.5) T/I
92. You drop a ball toward Earth. (5.2) K/U T/I A
(a) What is the direction of the gravitational force
exerted by Earth on the ball?
(b) What is the direction of the gravitational force
exerted by the ball on Earth?
(c) Which exerts the greater force?
(d) If Earth and the ball are initially stationary, how
does Earth move after the ball drops?
(e) If somebody in China drops an identical ball at
exactly the same instant from the same height,
how does that modify your answers? State your
assumptions.
93. While clearing off the surface of a frozen lake for an
ice rink, a worker strikes an ice chunk with a shovel,
causing the chunk to shatter into two fragments. The
fragments slide across the frozen surface in opposite
directions. The speed of the first fragment, with a mass
of 2.2 kg, is 1.2 m/s. The mass of the second fragment
is 3.3 kg. Determine the speed of the second fragment.
(5.2) T/I A
Figure 6
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279
4/27/12 2:31 PM
Evaluation
94. A 25.6 kg child pulls a 4.81 kg toboggan up a hill
inclined at 25.7° to the horizontal. The vertical height of
the hill is 27.3 m. Friction is negligible. (4.1) T/I A
(a) Determine how much work the child must do on
the toboggan to pull it at a constant velocity up
the hill.
(b) Now suppose that the hill is inclined at an angle
of 19.6° but the vertical height is still 27.3 m.
What conclusion can you make?
95. If during a physical process the only forces acting on a
moving object are friction and a normal force, what must
be assumed about the object’s kinetic energy? (4.5) T/I
96. Summarize the design and operation of a roller coaster
in terms of conservation of mechanical energy. Include
answers to the following questions. (4.5) K/U T/I A
(a) What happens to the speed of the car as it reaches
the top of a hill?
(b) What happens to the speed of the car as it goes
down the hill? Explain.
97. (a) Earth travels in an elliptical orbit around the
Sun. When closer to the Sun, Earth moves more
quickly. In terms of Earth’s gravitational potential
and kinetic energy in relation to the Sun, explain
why Earth moves faster when closer to the Sun.
(b) Does Earth have more total energy in relation
to the Sun when it is closer or farther away?
Explain. (4.5) K/U T/I C A
98. A gymnast with a mass of 105 kg stands on the edge
of a springboard. The spring constant is k 5 7600 N/m.
Calculate the period and frequency of the board’s
vibrations when she jumps. (4.6) T/I A
99. A student measures the amount of stretch of
an elastic band under increasing applied forces
(Table 1). (4.7) T/I C A
(a) Graph these data on a force–stretch-distance
graph.
(b) Use the graph to determine the average spring
constant of the elastic band in newtons per metre.
100. Explain how knowledge of vibrations and damping
is useful to an automotive engineer when designing
cars. (4.7) K/U T/I C A
101. During a tennis match, a pro player hits a serve at
53 m/s. Determine the work done on the 61 g ball to
achieve that speed. (4.7) K/U T/I A
102. When a ball collides with a stationary clay block,
and the block moves off in the direction of the ball,
momentum and total energy are conserved, but
mechanical energy is not conserved. Explain how this
is possible. (5.1) K/U T/I C A
Reflect on Your Learning
103. What did you find most surprising in this unit?
What did you find most difficult to understand?
How can you learn more about the surprising or
difficult topics? C
104. Describe the connections between force, work,
energy, and momentum. K/U C
105. (a) How can you relate Hooke’s law to everyday
applications?
(b) Describe the limit to which something elastic
can stretch. K/U C
106. What are the practical applications of understanding
the law of conservation of energy? K/U C
Research
WEB LINK
107. An important task in automobile accident
reconstruction is the analysis of skid marks. The
data on a car’s tires and the road surface can help a
reconstruction engineer make a good estimate of a car’s
speed just before the driver hit the brakes. Research
accident reconstruction engineering and discuss how
the simple idea of friction is used to get a basic idea
about what happened in an accident. Alternatively,
perform Internet research to determine the skills
required to become an accident reconstruction
engineer. Briefly summarize your findings in a format
of your choosing. K/U T/I C A
Table 1 Stretch and Force of
an Elastic Band
Stretch (cm)
Force (N)
5
0.7
10
1.6
15
2.5
20
3.4
25
4
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108. Swings and trapezes (Figure 7) are examples of one
of the classic problems of physics: the pendulum.
Hanging a mass and making it swing may be
very simple, but the pendulum is an example of a
complicated system called a non-linear oscillator.
The application of conservation of energy allows us
to obtain some important details about the nonlinear oscillator. Research the pendulum and write
a brief report that summarizes the speeds at various
points in the cycle, including at the bottom and at the
extreme ends. K/U T/I C A
111. Research wind power from modern windmills.
Compare the energy production with solar and other
energy sources. T/I C A
112. A torsion test measures the strength of any material
against maximum bending. It is an extremely
common test used in material mechanics to measure
how much bend a certain material can withstand
before cracking. Research and write a brief report
on how Hooke’s law plays a part in conducting this
test. K/U T/I C A
113. Research Newton’s original statement of his second
law of motion, in terms of momentum and force.
Give the equation expressing this relationship.
K/U
Figure 7
109. Research photoelectric solar energy. Discuss the
energy output of solar panels. How large an area of
land must be covered in solar panels to provide all the
electrical needs of Canada? K/U T/I C A
110. Research reflective solar energy as used in the power
station in the French Pyrenees and the research station
in California (Figure 8). How much energy is produced
at these stations? How many cities could these plants
supply with electrical energy? K/U T/I C A
Figure 8
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T/I
C
A
114. Research airbags. Describe the beneficial effects of
airbags used to cushion passengers from collision
with the dashboard or steering wheel of a car during
an accident. In your description, use the concepts of
impulse and momentum. Determine the projected
number of lives saved in Canada every year by these
safety devices. K/U T/I C A
115. Research the “impulse engine” for use in space travel.
Discuss with a classmate the principle of how it works
and summarize your findings. K/U T/I C A
116. Compare the transformation of energy in Canada’s
hydroelectric power plants to that of power
plants using fossil fuels. Create a list of pros and
cons associated with each system. Based on your
research, which generation method is more energy
efficient? Should Ontario invest in hydroelectric
power plants or fossil fuel generation? Support your
reasoning with evidence. K/U C A
117. Research bioluminescent organisms. What advances in
human technology have been made possible through
the study of bioluminescence in microorganisms, plants,
fungi (Figure 9), and insects? K/U C A
Figure 9
Unit 2 Review 281
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UNIT
3
Gravitational, Electric, and Magnetic Fields
oVerall
eXpecTaTIons
• analyze the operation of technologies
that use gravitational, electric,
or magnetic fields, and assess
the technologies’ social and
environmental impact
• investigate, in qualitative and
quantitative terms, gravitational,
electric, and magnetic fields, and
solve related problems
• demonstrate an understanding of
the concepts, properties, principles,
and laws related to gravitational,
electric, and magnetic fields and
their interactions with matter
BIG IDeas
• Gravitational, electric, and magnetic
forces act on matter from a distance.
• Gravitational, electric, and
magnetic fields share many similar
properties.
• The behaviour of matter in
gravitational, electric, and
magnetic fields can be described
mathematically.
• Technological systems that involve
gravitational, electric, and magnetic
fields can have an effect on society
and the environment.
UNIT TASK PrEVIEW
In this Unit Task, you will analyze a technological system, such
as an underwater vehicle navigation system, that uses one or
more types of fields. You will examine the effects of gravitational,
electric, and magnetic fields on the system. You will assess the
impact of this system on society and on the environment.
The Unit Task is described in detail on page 422. As you
work through the unit, look for Unit Task Bookmarks to see how
information in the section relates to the Unit Task.
282
Unit 3 • Gravitational, Electric, and Magnetic Fields
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Focus on STSE
The International Space Station
The weather reports you rely on to plan events depend on artificial satellites. So do
cellphones, Global Positioning System (GPS) units, and many other electronic devices that
are common to modern living. Scientists must calculate where to put these satellites so
that they remain in orbit around Earth. These calculations require an understanding of
gravitational fields. The satellite must achieve the correct velocity so that Earth’s gravitational pull keeps it in orbit at a specific height above Earth’s surface. The precise velocity
depends on the altitude above Earth where the satellite will orbit. Scientists and engineers
use their knowledge of gravity to calculate a flight plan for the satellite’s launch.
Once the satellite is in orbit, the engineers and scientists on the ground (ground control) adjust its motion to make the orbit as circular as possible. Ground control uses radio
signals to communicate with the satellite. Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic
radiation, which means that an understanding of electric and magnetic fields is also
essential to the successful launching and operation of satellites.
The International Space Station (ISS) is a research satellite built through the cooperative efforts of many countries. Earth’s gravitational field keeps the ISS in orbit. In addition,
much of the technology in the ISS involves electric and magnetic fields. The robotic arms,
computers, circuitry, and measurement instruments use both electric and magnetic fields
to operate; the station is shielded from the solar wind by Earth’s own magnetic field.
Onboard the ISS, scientists conduct experiments on the effects of gravitational, electric,
and magnetic fields and investigate scientific ideas that may prove useful for various
applications, from pharmaceuticals to space exploration itself. Some of these experiments might involve testing new technologies for future satellites. For example, scientists
are developing groups of microsatellites the size of volleyballs that fly in formation. Due
to their small size, these microsatellites are efficient to launch and versatile in design.
ISS scientists have also conducted studies in biotechnology. Perhaps you have read
about salmonella outbreaks in the news. Identifying how salmonella bacteria function in
space and studying proteins that regulate the genes involved in their reproduction have
helped researchers develop a vaccine to curb this sometimes deadly source of food
poisoning.
Questions
1. How do satellites directly affect your life?
2. What do you think happens to the force of gravity as the astronauts move from
Earth up to the ISS?
3. How is Earth’s magnetic field helpful to the ISS?
4. How is the communication between the ground and the ISS a good example of
using both electric and magnetic fields?
5. Suppose an astronaut brings a compass into space. Where do you think the needle
will point as the astronaut moves farther and farther from Earth? Will the compass
stop working at some point?
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unit
3
Are you ready?
Concepts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
force terminology
principles of electromagnetism
the electrical nature of matter
different methods of charging
law of electric charges
law of magnetic poles
magnetic and gravitational fields
Concepts Review
1. Can you make a magnet that can be turned on and off?
Explain your reasoning. K/U A
2. Why do electronic devices (computers, radios,
televisions) get dusty more rapidly than wooden
furniture? T/I A
3. Give an example of a medical technology that uses
magnetic fields to take images of the human
body. K/U A
4. What is a force field? K/U
5. (a) Explain in your own words how an object can
become electrically charged.
(b) Compare and contrast positively charged objects,
negatively charged objects, and neutral objects.
(c) What would you observe if a negatively charged
object was placed near a positively charged object?
(d) What would you observe if two negatively charged
objects were brought near each other? K/U
6. Explain in your own words the difference between
conductors and insulators. K/U
7. (a) Give an example of how the Bohr–Rutherford atom
is similar to the solar system.
(b) Give an example of how the Bohr–Rutherford atom
is different from the solar system. K/U A
8. In a short paragraph, summarize what you know about
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and how it works.
Include in your paragraph a description of the positive
impacts of MRI and some of the issues surrounding its
use in Canada. K/U C
9. Give an example of an everyday device whose
operation can be disrupted by the presence of
electromagnetic fields. K/U A
284 Unit 3 • Gravitational, Electric, and Magnetic Fields
8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 284
Skills
•
•
•
•
•
communicating in writing and diagrams
designing an experimental procedure
applying scientific theories and models
calculating the effects of gravitational fields
applying the right-hand rule for a straight conductor
10. (a) Use what you know about magnetic fields to
explain how magnetic levitation trains (Figure 1)
can hover above the tracks.
(b) Coils along the sides of the tracks for magnetic
levitation trains constantly alternate polarity. Use
what you know about magnets to explain how this
can cause the train to move. K/U C A
Figure 1
11. Summarize the right-hand rule for
(a) a straight conductor
(b) a solenoid or coiled conductor
(c) force on a current-carrying conductor in an
external magnetic field K/U C
12. List three properties of magnetic field lines. K/U
13. Computer hard drives use electromagnetism to
operate. How would placing the following devices near
the hard drive affect the data stored on it? K/U A
(a) a battery not connected to anything
(b) a battery connected to a solenoid
(c) a permanent magnet
(d) a piece of iron
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4/27/12 8:59 AM
14. (a) In your own words, define gravitational field
strength.
(b) What happens to the strength of Earth’s
gravitational field as you move away from the
surface of Earth?
(c) Is the gravitational field strength the same at
Earth’s equator and the poles? Explain. K/u
15. What is the difference between mass and weight? K/u A
16. Would you weigh less on the Moon than on Earth?
Explain your answer. K/u A
17. A student says that the force of gravity is zero for
astronauts on board the International Space Station and
that this explains why they appear weightless. Do you
agree with this student? Explain your answer. K/u
18. What makes more sense for an astronaut to use on the
ISS—a pencil or a ballpoint pen? Why? K/u A
19. If a friend told you about a tourist attraction in another
province where the force of gravity was repulsive
instead of attractive, would you believe him or her?
Why or why not? T/I
20. (a) In which direction is the acceleration due to gravity?
(b) Is the direction always the same, or does it depend
on whether the object is moving up or down?
Explain your answer. K/u
Skills review
21. Describe how to determine the direction of current in
a wire given the direction of the magnetic field. K/u
22. (a) Describe an experimental procedure that you could
use to give an object an electrical charge.
(b) Describe an experiment that tests the interaction of
two charged objects.
(c) Describe using words or diagrams how you could
use a positively charged object to attract a neutral
object. K/u
23. (a) Draw a diagram of the magnetic field surrounding
a wire with a current in it.
(b) How would the magnetic field change if the current
in the wire were increased?
(c) Suppose that the wire is now bent into a loop, as in
Figure 2. Draw a diagram of its magnetic field.
24. Figure 3 shows two opposite magnetic poles. What
happens when you try to move them together? K/u T/I
N
S
N
S
Figure 3
25. Figure 4 shows conductors with the current moving into
and out of the page. Copy the diagrams in Figure 4 into
your notebook, and draw the direction of the magnetic
field lines. K/u C
Figure 4
26. (a) What is the acceleration due to gravity of an apple
falling from a tree on Earth (neglecting
air resistance)?
(b) What is the acceleration due to gravity of a
barbell falling from an exercise machine on Earth
(neglecting air resistance)?
(c) What effect does mass have on the acceleration due
to gravity?
(d) What is the relationship between air resistance and
the speed of a falling object? K/u T/I
27. (a) Draw the field lines of Earth’s magnetic field.
(b) At various points along Earth’s magnetic field lines,
draw arrows indicating the direction of the force a
compass needle would experience. K/u C A
28. (a) Draw a simple diagram of Earth, showing arrows
indicating the magnitude and direction of the
force any object would experience due to Earth’s
gravitational field.
(b) How are the magnetic field lines different from the
gravitational field lines? K/u T/I C
CAREER PATHWAYS PrEVIEW
Throughout this unit, you will see Career Links. Go to the Nelson
Science website to find information about careers related to
Gravitational, Electric, and Magnetic Fields. On the Chapter Summary
page at the end of each chapter, you will find a Career Pathways
feature that shows you the educational requirements of the careers.
There are also some career-related questions for you to research.
Figure 2
(d) Explain why your diagrams from (a) and (c) describe
the construction of an electromagnet. K/u T/I C
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Are You Ready?
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4/27/12 8:59 AM
chapTer
6
Gravitational Fields
What Effect does Gravity Have on objects That
Are not near the Surface of Earth?
keY concepTs
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• describe key properties of fields
• describe specific properties of
Earth’s gravitational field
• solve problems related to
circular motion and universal
gravitation
• analyze planetary orbits and solve
problems based on orbiting bodies
• assess the impact on society
and the environment of
technologies such as satellites
that use gravitational fields
• compare gravity as understood
through Newtonian mechanics
to gravity as understood through
general relativity
• describe black holes and
dark matter
• model the trajectory of a
Your everyday experience confirms that gravity affects objects here on Earth.
However, gravitational fields exist anywhere and everywhere, whether near
Earth’s surface or very far away from Earth. Wherever there is mass, there
will be a gravitational field. Moreover, multiple masses within the same
system create complex gravitational effects. Our solar system is a perfect
example of this.
In 2004, the MESSENGER spacecraft was launched from Earth, heading
for its destination in orbit around Mercury. It arrived seven years later, in
2011. MESSENGER owed its journey to the various gravitational forces it
encountered along the way. Scientists designed its path so the spacecraft
could pick up energy and shift direction through its interactions with planetary gravitational fields. MESSENGER’s path looped once by Earth, twice
by Venus, and three times by Mercury before settling into orbit.
MESSENGER’s route minimized the amount of energy it had to transform
using rocket propellant. To follow a direct line to Mercury, MESSENGER
would have needed to overcome strong forces that would have pulled it off
course. Although longer, MESSENGER’s path was more efficient because
gravitational forces accelerated MESSENGER at just the right time to position
it for the next phase of its trip.
The planets’ orbits—and MESSENGER’s path across them—represent an
extreme example of gravitational fields and forces. In this chapter, you will
explore gravity and gravitational effects through some fundamental models
and systems, including gravitational fields, gravitational forces between two
masses, and masses orbiting around larger bodies.
rocket at varying altitudes and
use the data to derive G, the
gravitational constant
• use simulation software to
explore orbital properties of
multi-body systems and to
design a solar system
STARTING PoInTS
Answer the following questions using your current
knowledge. You will have a chance to revisit these questions
later, applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. What role do gravitational fields play in spacecraft launches?
3. What happens to the gravitational field strength on the
object when it is very far from Earth?
4. How do gravitational fields affect the orbits of planets,
moons, and other bodies?
2. What happens to the strength of the gravitational field
acting on an object as the object gets farther from Earth?
286
Chapter 6 • Gravitational Fields
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Mini Investigation
Artificial Gravity
Skills: Planning, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
Astronauts experience the forces of simulated gravity inside
spaceships and space stations. In this investigation, you will
place a ball in a bucket and then move the bucket in uniform
circular motion to simulate the forces felt by an astronaut in
a rotating spaceship.
Perform this investigation outdoors and away from
windows. While swinging the bucket, be sure to be
a safe distance away from other people.
Equipment and Materials: plastic bucket with a strong
handle; tennis ball; metre stick; stopwatch
1. Measure the distance from the base of the bucket to the
shoulder of the person who will be swinging the bucket.
The person’s shoulder is the centre of revolution.
2. Place the tennis ball in the bucket.
3. Have the person swing the bucket back and forth like a
pendulum, increasing the distance of the swing each time.
4. After the bucket has been swung in an approximately
180° arc, swing the bucket in a complete vertical circle
at a high, constant speed.
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SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5.2
5. While the bucket is being swung in a complete circle, have
another group member, standing a safe distance away,
use the stopwatch to determine the time for five complete
revolutions of the bucket moving at a constant speed.
6. Slow the swing down to the minimum speed needed to
keep the ball inside the bucket.
7. Record the time for five complete revolutions of the
bucket while it is moving at the slowest speed possible.
A. Draw a system diagram and a free-body diagram for the
ball at the top of its loop in Steps 4 and 5. T/I C A
B. Assuming that the bucket is moving in completely
uniform circular motion, calculate the speed of the bucket
at the top of the loop in Steps 4 and 5. Use this speed to
calculate the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of
the ball at the top of the loop. T/I A
C. Determine the ratio of the apparent weight of the ball at
the top of the loop to its weight on Earth. T/I A
D. Repeat A, B, and C for the values you recorded in Steps 6
and 7. T/I A
E. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of this model of
artificial gravity. T/I C
Introduction
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6.1
Newtonian Gravitation
Early in the formation of our galaxy, tiny gravitational effects between particles began
to draw matter together into slightly denser configurations. Those, in turn, exerted
even greater gravitational forces, resulting in more mass joining the newly forming
structures. Eventually, those repetitive and continuous gravitational effects formed
and shaped our Milky Way galaxy, as depicted in Figure 1. The same process of
gravitational attraction—on different scales—accounts for the overall structure of the
entire universe, despite being the weakest of the four fundamental forces.
Gravity accounts for how the planets in our solar system move and orbit around
the Sun. By the late 1700s, scientists had identified all the inner terrestrial planets as
well as the gas giants, Jupiter and Saturn. Then, British astronomer William Herschel
(1738–1822) used observations of the relative movements of the stars to determine
that a presumed “star” was actually an additional planet. The new planet was Uranus.
Scientists then observed that Uranus’s path was anomalous. It seemed to respond to
the pull of another distant but unknown body. Using mathematical analysis, scientists
predicted where the unknown body would have to be and began searching for it. In
CAREER LINK
1846, scientists discovered the planet Neptune (Figure 2).
Figure 2 Scientists discovered Neptune by
observing its gravitational effects on Uranus.
Figure 1 Our galaxy, the Milky Way, was
shaped by gravitational forces, depicted here
in an artist’s conception.
Universal Gravitation
The force that causes Uranus to wobble slightly in its orbit is gravity—the same force
that causes Earth and the other planets to revolve around the Sun. Sir Isaac Newton,
whose laws of motion provide the foundation of our study of mechanics, used known
data about the solar system to describe the system of physical laws that govern the
movement of celestial bodies around the Sun. Through this inquiry, he formulated
the universal law of gravitation.
Universal Law of Gravitation
There is a gravitational attraction between any two objects. If the objects have masses m1 and
m2 and their centres are separated by a distance r, the magnitude of the gravitational force on
either object is directly proportional to the product of m1 and m2 and inversely proportional to
the square of r:
gravitational constant a constant that
appears in the universal law of gravitation;
the constant is written as G and has a
value of 6.67 3 10211 N # m2 /kg2
288 Chapter 6 • Gravitational Fields
8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 288
Fg 5
Gm1m2
r2
G is a constant of nature called the gravitational constant, which is equal to
6.67 3 10211 N # m2/kg2.
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4/27/12 8:59 AM
Newton’s law of gravitation plays a key role in physics for two reasons. First, his
work showed for the first time that the laws of physics apply to all objects. The same
force that causes a leaf to fall from a tree also keeps planets in orbit around the Sun.
This fact had a profound effect on how people viewed the universe. Second, the law
provided us with an equation to calculate and understand the motions of a wide
variety of celestial objects, including planets, moons, and comets.
The gravitational force is always attractive (Figure 3). Every mass attracts every
other mass. Therefore, the direction of the force of gravity on one mass (mass 1) due to
a second mass (mass 2) points from the centre of mass 1 toward the centre of mass 2.
The magnitude of the gravitational force exerted by mass 1 on mass 2 is equal
to the magnitude of the gravitational force exerted by mass 2 on mass 1. Since the
forces are both attractive, this result is precisely what we would expect from Newton’s
>
>
third law (F 1 on 2 5 2F 2 on 1). The two gravitational forces are an action–reaction pair
because they are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction and they act on different members of the pair of objects.
Another important feature of the universal law of gravitation is that the force
follows the inverse-square law. The inverse-square law is a mathematical relationship between variables in which one variable is proportional to the inverse of the
square of the other variable. When applied to gravitational forces, this relationship means that the force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance
1
between the mass centres, or F ~ 2 . In other words, the force of attraction drops
r
quickly as the two objects move farther apart. No matter how large the distance
between the mass centres, however, they will still experience a gravitational force.
Every massive object in the universe exerts a force of attraction on every other
massive object.
If both objects have a small mass compared to the distance between their centres,
they will experience a small gravitational force. For the force to be noticeable, at
least one of the objects must have a large mass relative to the distance between the
object centres.
m2
Fg
Fg
r
m1
Figure 3 The gravitational force
between two point masses m1 and
m2 that are separated by a distance
r is given in the universal law of
gravitation.
inverse-square law a mathematical
relationship in which one variable is
proportional to the inverse of the square
of another variable; the law applies to
gravitational forces and other phenomena,
such as electric field strength and
sound intensity
The Value of g
On Earth, we can calculate the acceleration due to the force of gravity, g, from
the universal law of gravitation. Near Earth’s surface, g has an approximate value
of 9.8 m/s2. The precise value of g, however, decreases with increasing height
above Earth’s surface based on the inverse-square law (Table 1). The value of g
also varies on the surface of Earth because the surface varies in distance from the
centre of Earth.
Calculating the Force of Gravity
The first measurement of the gravitational constant G was carried out in 1798 in a
famous experiment by Henry Cavendish (1731−1810). Cavendish wanted to measure
the gravitational force between two objects on Earth using two large lead spheres.
He needed to use spheres with a very small distance between them or he would have
found the gravitational force nearly impossible to observe. Cavendish arranged two
large spheres of mass m1 in a dumbbell configuration and suspended them from their
centre point by a thin wire fibre, as shown in Figure 4 on the next page. He placed
another pair of large spheres with mass m2 close to the suspended masses.
The gravitational forces between the pairs of masses, m1 and m2, caused the dumbbell to rotate. As the fibre twisted, tension in the fibre caused a force resisting the
twist that increased as the rotation increased. At a certain angle, this twisting force
balanced the gravitational force. By carefully measuring the angle u, Cavendish could
determine the force on the dumbbell, as well as the separation of the spheres. By also
measuring the masses of the spheres and inserting the values into the universal law
of gravitation, Cavendish could measure G.
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8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 289
Table 1 Gravity versus Distance
from Earth’s Surface
Altitude (km)
g (m/s2)
1 000
7.33
2 000
5.68
3 000
4.53
4 000
3.70
5 000
3.08
6 000
2.60
7 000
2.23
8 000
1.93
9 000
1.69
10 000
1.49
50 000
0.13
6.1 Newtonian Gravitation 289
4/27/12 8:59 AM
light source
mirror
fibre
r
m2
q
m1
m1
m2
q
Figure 4 Cavendish used an apparatus like this one to measure the force of gravity between
terrestrial objects. The amount that the light is deflected from its original path gives an indication
of the angle of rotation u.
Investigation
6.1.1
Universal Gravitation (page 308)
You have learned the basic
information about the universal law
of gravitation. This investigation will
give you an opportunity to verify this
law through an observational study.
Through this method, Cavendish measured the value of G: 6.67 3 10211 N # m2/kg2.
The constant G has this combination of units because it gives a gravitational force in
newtons. When you multiply the units of G by two masses in kilograms and divide
by the square of a distance in metres, you will be left with newtons. Following his
calculation of G, Cavendish was able to calculate the mass of Earth. In fact, all masses
of planetary bodies can be determined by using the universal law of gravitation.
Although Cavendish conducted his experiment more than 200 years ago, his design
still forms the basis for experimental studies of gravitation today. Tutorial 1 shows
how to calculate the force of gravity between two spherical masses, as well as how to
calculate the mass of a celestial body.
Tutorial 1 Calculating the Force of Gravity
The following Sample Problems involve the force of gravity.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Force of Gravity between Two Ordinary Masses
The centres of two uniformly dense spheres are separated by
50.0 cm. Each sphere has a mass of 2.00 kg.
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the gravitational force of attraction
between the two spheres.
(b) How much of an effect will this force have on the two spheres?
Gm1m2
r2
5
a6.67 3 10211
Fg 5 1.07 3 1029 N
Solution
(a) G
iven: G 5 6.67 3 10211 N·m2/kg2; r 5 50.0 cm 5 0.500 m;
m1 5 m2 5 2.00 kg
Required: Fg
Analysis: Fg 5
Solution: Fg 5
Gm1m2
r2
N # m2
b 12.00 kg2 12.00 kg2
kg2
10.500 m2 2
Statement: The magnitude of the gravitational force of
attraction between the two spheres is 1.07 3 1029 N.
(b) T he gravitational force of attraction between the two
spheres (1.07 3 1029 N) is too small to have any
noticeable effect on the motion of these two spheres
under normal circumstances.
Sample Problem 2: Calculating the Force of Gravity and Solving for Mass
Eris, a dwarf planet, is the ninth most massive body orbiting the
Sun. It is more massive than Pluto and three times farther away
from the Sun. Eris is estimated to have a radius of approximately
1200 km. Acceleration due to gravity on Eris differs from the
value of g on Earth. In this three-part problem, you will explore
the force of gravity on the surface of Eris.
290 Chapter 6 • Gravitational Fields
8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 290
(a) Suppose that an astronaut stands on Eris and drops a rock
from a height of 0.30 m. The rock takes 0.87 s to reach the
surface. Calculate the value of g on Eris.
(b) Calculate the mass of Eris.
(c) Suppose that an astronaut stands on Eris and drops a rock
from a height of 2.50 m. Calculate how long it would take the
rock to reach the surface.
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4/27/12 8:59 AM
Solution
(a) Given: Dd 5 0.30 m; vi 5 0 m/s; Dt 5 0.87 s
Required: gEris
Analysis: Near the surface of Eris, the gravitational
acceleration will be approximately constant, like it is near the
surface of Earth. We can determine the value of gEris by using
the equation for the motion of an object falling under constant
>
1>
>
acceleration: Dd 5 viDt 1 aDt 2. Since vi 5 0, the equation
> 1> 2 2
simplifies to Dd 5 aDt .
2
For this problem, a 5 gEris. Choose up as positive, so down is
negative.
> 1>
Solution: Dd 5 a Dt 2
2
>
> 2Dd
a5
Dt 2
>
2 120.30 m2
g Eris 5
10.87 s2 2
>
g Eris 5 20.7927 m/s2 1two extra digits carried2
Statement: The value of g on Eris is 0.79 m/s2.
(b) G
iven: gEris 5 0.7927 m/s2; G 5 6.67 3 10211 N·m2/kg2;
r 5 1200 km 5 1.2 3 106 m
Required: mEris
Analysis: Use the equations for the force of gravity, Fg 5 mg,
Gm1m2
and the universal law of gravitation, Fg 5
.
r2
Solution: Equate these two expressions for the gravitational
GmrockmEris
force on the rock, Fg 5 mrockgEris and Fg 5
, and
r2
use 1 N 5 1 kg # m/s2.
Fg 5 Fg
GmrockmEris
mrockgEris 5
r2
gErisr 2
mEris 5
G
m
b 11.2 3 106 m2 2
s2
5
kg # m m2
6.67 3 10211 2 # 2
s
kg
22
mEris 5 1.7 3 10 kg
a0.7927
Statement: The mass of Eris is 1.7 3 1022 kg.
(c) Given: Dd 5 2.50 m; vi 5 0 m/s; a 5 gEris 5 0.7927 m/s2
Required: Dt
Analysis: Since the value of gEris is known, we can use the
>
1>
>
equation Dd 5 viDt 1 aDt 2 to determine the time it would
2
take the rock to reach the surface. Since vi 5 0, the equation
> 1>
simplifies to Dd 5 aDt 2. Choose up as positive, so down
2
is negative.
> 1>
Solution: Dd 5 aDt 2
2
>
2Dd
2
Dt 5 >
a >
2Dd
Dt 5
>
Å a
2 122.50 m2
5
m
20.7927 2
ã
s
Dt 5 2.5 s
Statement: It would take the rock 2.5 s to fall 2.50 m.
Sample Problem 3: Calculating the Force of Gravity in a Three-Body System
Figure 5 shows three large, spherical asteroids in space,
which are arranged at the corners of a right triangle ABC.
Asteroid A has a mass of 1.0 3 1020 kg. Asteroid B has a mass
of 2.0 3 1020 kg and is 50 million kilometres (5.0 3 1010 m)
from asteroid A. Asteroid C has a mass of 4.0 3 1020 kg
and is 25 million kilometres (2.5 3 1010 m) away from asteroid A
along the other side of the triangle.
(a) Determine the net force on asteroid A from asteroids B and C.
y
N
B
rAB
(b) Determine the net force on asteroid B from asteroid C.
A
x
rAC
C
Figure 5
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6.1 Newtonian Gravitation 291
4/27/12 8:59 AM
Solution
(a) Given: mA 5 1.0 3 1020 kg; mB 5 2.0 3 1020 kg;
mC 5 4.0 3 1020 kg; rAB 5 5.0 3 1010 m; rAC 5 2.5 3 1010 m
>
Required: F net A
Analysis: The force of gravity on mass m1 due to mass m2
Gm1m2
is Fg 5
directed from the centre of m1 toward the
r2
centre of m2. The force on asteroid A from asteroid B will be
along side AB, and the force on asteroid A from asteroid C
will be along side AC of triangle ABC. So, use the Pythagorean
theorem to determine the magnitude of the net force on
2
2
asteroid A from asteroids B and C, Fnet A 5 "FAB
1 FAC
,
and use trigonometry to calculate the angle that the net force
FAB
makes with side AC: u 5 tan21 a b.
FAC
Solution: Calculate the force on asteroid A due to asteroid B,
FAB.
GmAmB
FAB 5 2
rAB
5
N#m
b 11.0 3 1020 kg2 12.0 3 1020 kg2
kg2
2
a6.67 3 10211
15.0 3 1010 m2 2
8
FAB 5 5.336 3 10 N 1two extra digits carried2
Calculate the force on asteroid A due to asteroid C, FAC.
FAC 5
5
GmAmC
a6.67 3 10211
N # m2
b 11.0 3 1020 kg2 14.0 3 1020 kg2
kg2
12.5 3 1010 m2 2
FAC 5 4.269 3 109 N 1two extra digits carried2
>
>
>
F net A is the vector sum of F AB and F AC. Since the force vectors lie
along the sides of a right triangle, we can use the Pythagorean
theorem to calculate the magnitude of the net force on
asteroid A, Fnet A.
Fnet A 5
Analysis: Use the Pythagorean theorem to determine
the distance between asteroid B and asteroid C,
2
2
rBC 5 "r AB
1 r AC
. Then use the universal law of gravitation,
Gm1m2
Fg 5
, directed from the centre of m1 toward the
r2
centre of m2. The force will act along the hypotenuse of
triangle ABC, so the angle that the force makes with side AB
rAC
is given by u 5 tan21 a b.
rAB
Solution: Calculate the distance between asteroid B and
asteroid C.
2
2
1 r AC
rBC 5 "r AB
5 " 15.0 3 1010 m2 2 1 12.5 3 1010 m2 2
rBC 5 5.590 3 1010 m 1two extra digits carried2
Calculate the magnitude of the gravitational force between
asteroid B and asteroid C.
FBC 5
5
GmBmC
r 2BC
a6.67 3 10211
FBC 5 1.7 3 109 N
r 2AC
"FAB2
(b) Given: mB 5 2.0 3 1020 kg; mC 5 4.0 3 1020 kg;
rAB 5 5.0 3 1010 m; rAC 5 2.5 3 1010 m
>
Required: F BC
1
FAC2
N # m2
b 12.0 3 1020 kg2 14.0 3 1020 kg2
kg2
15.590 3 1010 m2 2
As Figure 5 indicates, the net force on asteroid B due to
asteroid C acts along side BC. Calculate the angle that this
force makes with side AB.
rAC
u 5 tan21 a b
rAB
2.5 3 1010 m
5 tan21 a
b
5.0 3 1010 m
u 5 278
Statement: The force on asteroid B due to asteroid C is
1.7 3 109 N [S 27° E], directed toward asteroid B.
5 " 15.336 3 108 N2 2 1 14.269 3 109 N2 2
Fnet A 5 4.3 3 109 N
Now calculate the angle that the net force on asteroid A
makes with side AC.
FAB
b
FAC
5.336 3 108 N
5 tan21 a
b
4.269 3 109 N
u 5 7.18
u 5 tan21 a
Statement: The net force on asteroid A from asteroids B and C
is 4.3 3109 N [E 7.1° N], directed toward asteroid A.
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Practice
1. Two spherical asteroids have masses as follows: m1 5 1.0 3 1020 kg and
m2 5 3.0 3 1020 kg. The magnitude of the force of attraction between the two asteroids
is 2.2 3 109 N. Calculate the distance between the two asteroids. T/I [ans: 3.0 3 1010 m]
2. Jupiter has a mass of 1.9 3 1027 kg and a mean radius at the equator of 7.0 3 107 m.
Calculate the magnitude of g on Jupiter, if it were a perfect sphere with that radius.
T/I
[ans: 26 m/s2]
3. Uniform spheres A, B, and C have the following masses and centre-to-centre distances:
mA 5 40.0 kg, mB 5 60.0 kg, and mC 5 80.0 kg; rAB 5 0.50 m and rBC 5 0.75 m. If the
only forces acting on B are the gravitational forces due to A and C, determine the net force
acting on B with the spheres arranged as in Figures 6(a) and (b). T/I [ans: (a) 7.1 3 10–8 N [left];
(b) 8.6 3 10–7 N [W 42° S] ]
B
A
rAB
B
A
rAB
C
E
rBC
(a)
N
rBC
C
(b)
Figure 6
Gravitational Fields
The universal law of gravitation tells us that at any point in space surrounding a massive object, such as Earth, we can calculate the gravitational force on a second object
sitting at that point in space. Earth has a mean radius of approximately 6380 km.
So an object that is 10 km above Earth’s surface, or 6390 km from Earth’s centre, will
have the same gravitational attraction to Earth no matter which land mass or ocean
it is positioned above. A vector exists at every point in space surrounding the central
object, pointing toward it and depending on the object’s mass and the distance from
its centre (Figure 7). The gravitational field of the central object can be represented by
this collection of vectors. A gravitational field exerts forces on objects with mass. The
gravitational field strength is the force of attraction per unit mass of an object placed in
a gravitational field, and it equals the gravitational force on the object divided by the
object’s mass. On Earth, the gravitational field strength is approximately 9.8 N/kg.
Notice that this has the same magnitude as the acceleration due to gravity on Earth’s
surface, and thus has the same symbol, g.
gravitational field a collection of
vectors, one at each point in space, that
determines the magnitude and direction
of the gravitational force
gravitational field strength the
magnitude of the gravitational field vector
at a point in space
gravitational force vectors
Figure 7 Earth’s gravitational field strength diminishes with increasing distance from the planet’s centre.
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mperson
mperson
rE
rE
mEarth
mEarth
(a)
(b)
Figure 8 If we approximate Earth as
a sphere, we can assume that the
gravitational force that Earth exerts on a
person or an object is equal to the force
experienced if all the mass were located
at Earth’s centre.
For spherical objects, the strength of the gravitational field at a distance from
the surface is the same whether the mass actually fills its volume or sits at a point
in the centre. We can therefore use the gravitational force equation as though all of
the object’s mass were located at its centre; this is why we measure centre-to-centre
distances (Figure 8).
To calculate the gravitational field strength as a function of a central spherical
mass, we combine the universal law of gravitation with Newton’s second law. Let us
calculate the acceleration due to gravity g on a small mass mobject near the surface of
a spherical planet of mass mplanet and radius r.
Fg 5 Fg
m objectg 5
g5
Gm planetm object
r2
Gm planet
r2
We can apply this formula to other planets and stars by substituting the appropriate values for mplanet and r. The value of g depends on the mass of the central body,
the distance from that body’s centre, and the gravitational constant, G. An object’s
acceleration due to gravity does not depend on its own mass. Tutorial 2 shows how
to calculate the gravitational field strength on other planets.
Tutorial 2 Solving Problems Related to Gravitational Field Strength
In the following Sample Problem, you will learn how to calculate the gravitational field strength.
Sample Problem 1: Determining the Gravitational Field Strength
(a) Calculate the magnitude of the gravitational field strength
on the surface of Saturn, assuming that it is perfectly
spherical with a radius of 6.03 3 107 m. The mass of
Saturn is 5.69 3 1026 kg.
(b)Determine the ratio of Saturn’s gravitational field strength to
Earth’s gravitational field strength (9.8 N/kg).
Solution
(a) Given: G 5 6.67 3 10211 N·m2/kg2;
mSaturn 5 5.69 3 1026 kg; r 5 6.03 3 107 m
Required: gSaturn
Analysis: gSaturn 5
GmSaturn
r2
Solution:
gSaturn 5
GmSaturn
(b) Given: gSaturn 5 10.438 N/kg; gEarth 5 9.8 N/kg
Required: gSaturn : gEarth
Analysis:
Calculate
gSaturn
.
gEarth
Solution:
gSaturn
5
gEarth
N
kg
N
9.8
kg
10.438
gSaturn
5 1.1
gEarth
Statement: The ratio of Saturn’s gravitational field strength to
Earth’s gravitational field strength is 1.1:1.
r2
N ?m2
b 15.69 3 1026 kg2
kg2
5
16.03 3 107 m2 2
5 10.438 N/kg 1two extra digits carried2
a6.67 3 10211
gSaturn
Statement: The gravitational field strength on the surface of
Saturn is 10.4 N/kg.
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Practice
1. The radius of a typical white dwarf star is just a little larger than the radius of Earth, but a typical
white dwarf has a mass that is similar to the Sun’s mass. Calculate the surface gravitational
field strength of a white dwarf with a radius of 7.0 3 106 m and a mass of 1.2 3 1030 kg.
Compare this to the surface gravitational field strength of Earth. T/I A [ans: 1.6 3 106 N/kg]
2. Suppose that Saturn expanded until its radius doubled, while its mass stayed the same.
Determine the gravitational field strength on the new surface relative to the old surface.
T/I
1
[ans: g Saturn]
4
Tutorial 2 demonstrates that the gravitational field strength on the surface of
Saturn is only slightly greater than the gravitational field strength on the surface of
Earth. Each planet in our solar system has a different gravitational field strength that
depends on the radius and the mass of the planet. Table 2 lists the relative values for
all the planets in our solar system.
Table 2 Surface Gravitational Field Strength of the Planets in the Solar System
Planet
Value of gplanet relative to Earth
Value of g (N/kg)
Mercury
0.38
3.7
Venus
0.90
8.8
Earth
1.00
9.8
Mars
0.38
3.7
Jupiter
2.53
24.8
Saturn
1.06
10.4
Uranus
0.90
8.8
Neptune
1.14
11.2
research This
Gravitational Field Maps and unmanned underwater Vehicles
Skills: Researching, Analyzing, Communicating
Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) navigate underwater
without a human driver to conduct searches, collect images, or
recover submerged materials. Some UUVs are operated remotely
by a human pilot, and others operate independently. To ensure
that UUVs stay on course, gravitational field maps are used to
correct errors in UUV navigation systems.
1. Research UUVs (also called autonomous underwater
vehicles, or AUVs), and locate several examples of both
human-operated and independent UUVs.
2. Research gravitational field maps and how they work. Find
one example of a visualization of gravitational field data.
3. Research the factors that affect gravitational fields and why
and how the fields can vary.
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A4.1
4. Determine how gravitational field maps are used to correct
UUV navigation systems.
A. Explain in your own words how a gravitational field map
works, how it is created, and how it is used. T/I A
B. Draw a diagram highlighting the design features and
functions of two UUV examples. K/u C
C. Create a one-page report or short presentation outlining how
gravitational field maps are used to correct UUV navigation
systems. K/u C A
WEB LINK
6.1 Newtonian Gravitation
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6.1
Review
Summary
• The universal law of gravitation states that the force of gravitational attraction
between any two objects is directly proportional to the product of the masses
of the objects and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between
Gm 1m 2
their centres: Fg 5
.
r2
• The gravitational constant, G 5 6.67 3 10−11 N·m2/kg2, was first determined
experimentally by Henry Cavendish in 1798.
• The gravitational field can be represented by a vector at each point in space.
A gravitational field exerts forces on objects with mass. The gravitational
field strength at a distance r from a body of mass m equals the magnitude
Gm
of gravitational acceleration at that distance: g 5 2 .
r
Questions
1. At what altitude above Earth would your weight be
one-half your weight on the surface? Use Earth’s
radius, rE, as the unit. T/I A
2. In a hydrogen atom, a proton and an electron are
5.3 3 10−11 m apart. Calculate the magnitude of the
gravitational attraction between the proton and the
electron. The mass of a proton is 1.67 3 10−27 kg, and
the mass of an electron is 9.11 3 10−31 kg. T/I A
3. Two objects are a distance r apart. The distance r
increases by a factor of 4. K/U
(a) Does the gravitational force between the objects
increase or decrease? Explain your answer.
(b) By what factor does the gravitational force
between the objects change?
4. A satellite of mass 225 kg is located 8.62 3 106 m
above Earth’s surface. T/I A
(a) Determine the magnitude and direction of the
gravitational force. (Hint: The values for Earth’s
mass and radius can be found in Appendix B.)
(b) Determine the magnitude and direction of the
resulting acceleration of the satellite.
5. On the surface of Titan, a moon of Saturn,
the gravitational field strength has a magnitude
of 1.3 N/kg. Titan’s mass is 1.3 3 1023 kg. What is
Titan’s radius? T/I A
6. Earth’s gravitational field strength at the surface is
9.80 N/kg. Determine the distance, as a multiple
of Earth’s radius, rE, above Earth’s surface at which
the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity is
3.20 N/kg. T/I A
7. Calculate the gravitational field strength of the Sun
at a distance of 1.5 3 1011 m from its centre (Earth’s
distance). T/I
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8. The gravitational field strength between two objects
is the sum of two vectors pointing in opposite
directions. Somewhere between the objects, the
vectors will cancel, and the total force will be zero.
Determine the location of zero force as a fraction of
the distance r between the centres of two objects
of mass m1 and m2. T/I A
9. A 537 kg satellite orbits Earth with a speed of
4.3 km/s at a distance of 2.5 3 107 m from Earth’s
centre. K/U T/I
(a) Calculate the acceleration of the satellite.
(b) Calculate the gravitational force on the satellite.
10. Calculate the value of Mercury’s surface gravitational
field strength, and compare your answer to the value
provided in Table 2 on page 295. K/U
11. The gravitational field strength is 5.3 N/kg at
the location of a 620 kg satellite in orbit around
Earth. K/U T/I
(a) Calculate the satellite’s altitude. (Hint: The values
for Earth’s mass and radius can be found in
Appendix B.)
(b) Determine the gravitational force on the satellite.
12. Through experimentation, Henry Cavendish was
able to determine the value of the gravitational
constant. Explain how to use his result together with
astronomical data on the motion of the Moon to
determine the mass of Earth. T/I C A
13. Determine the location between two objects with
masses equal to Earth’s mass and the Moon’s mass
where you could place a third mass so that it would
experience a net gravitational force of zero. T/I A
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6.2
orbits
RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 are Earth-observation satellites designed and
commissioned by the Canadian Space Agency. These “eyes in the skies” peer down
from orbit, capturing images and data that help scientists monitor environmental
changes and the planet’s natural resources. Examples of satellite monitoring include
detecting oil spills, tracking ice movements, identifying ships at sea, and monitoring
natural disasters. Figure 1 shows an image of RADARSAT-2.
Figure 1 RADARSAT-2 uses
sophisticated microwave-based
radar to collect images of Earth
day and night, even through
cloud cover.
Satellites and Space Stations
A satellite is an object or a body that revolves around another body that usually has
much more mass than the satellite. For example, the planets are natural satellites
revolving around the Sun. Planetary moons, including Earth’s moon, are natural satellites, too. Artificial satellites, on the other hand, are human-made objects that orbit
CAREER LINK
Earth or other bodies in the solar system.
RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 are examples of artificial satellites. Another wellknown example of artificial satellites is the network of 24 satellites that make up the Global
Positioning System (GPS). By coordinating several signals at once, as shown in Figure 2,
the system can locate an object on Earth’s surface to within 15 m of its actual position.
S1
(a)
S1
S2
(b)
satellite an object or a body that revolves
around another body due to gravitational
attraction
artificial satellite an object that has been
intentionally placed by humans into orbit
around Earth or another body; referred to
as “artificial” to distinguish from natural
satellites such as the Moon
S1
S3
S2
(c)
Figure 2 GPS satellites can determine the location of an object, in this case a boat. (a) The data
from one satellite will show that the location is somewhere along the circumference of a circle.
(b) Two satellites consulted simultaneously will refine the location to one of two intersection spots.
(c) With three satellites consulted simultaneously, the intersection of three circles will give the
location of the boat to within 15 m of its actual position.
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space station a spacecraft in which
people live and work
Figure 3 The International Space
Station is an orbiting spacecraft in
which astronauts live and work in space.
The boat shown in Figure 2 on the previous page has a computer-controlled GPS
receiver that detects signals from three satellites simultaneously. The system calculates
distances based on signal speeds and transmission times. A single satellite can identify
the boat’s location somewhere along the circumference of a circle. Two simultaneous
satellite signals can pinpoint the location at one of two intersecting spots where two
circles intersect. With a third satellite—and therefore three intersecting circles—the
boat’s location can be pinpointed. This is referred to as triangulation.
Another example of an artificial satellite in Earth orbit is a space station, a spacecraft in which people live and work. An example is the International Space Station
(ISS), shown in Figure 3. The ISS is a permanent orbiting laboratory that supports
many different research projects. In the process, scientists are also able to study
human responses to space travel and “zero” gravity or, more accurately, microgravity:
1 3 10–6 times the value of g. A microgravity environment is present when any object
is in free fall. So when you dive from a dive tower into a swimming pool, you are
in microgravity until you hit the water. Similarly, astronauts aboard the ISS are in a
constant state of free fall and are thus in a microgravity environment. It is important
to note the difference between microgravity and the gravitational field strength, since
the value of g at the altitude of the ISS is approximately 8.7 N/kg. Clearly, there is
still a significant gravitational force at that altitude and it is incorrect to say that the
astronauts are in zero gravity. A gravitational force of approximately zero would only
occur if you were extremely far away from any mass.
The knowledge gained from research by orbiting space stations enables scientists to design spacecraft that can safely transport people through space and
perform experiments in microgravity environments. These microgravity experiCAREER LINK
ments can lead to breakthroughs in medicine and chemistry.
Mini Investigation
Exploring
Gravity and Orbits
Mini
Investigation
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
In this investigation, you will use a simulation to create and
explore different configurations of orbiting bodies. Move the
planets, moons, or the Sun to see how the orbital paths change.
Change the sizes of the objects and the distances between
them. Explore the variations that occur as the force of gravity
is changed or when gravity is removed from the model.
Equipment and Materials: computer with Internet access
1. Go to the Nelson Science website.
2. Load the supporting software, if necessary.
3. Select the option to view the Sun, Earth, and Moon and the
options to show Gravity Force and the Path.
4. Play the simulation and allow Earth to complete one full
revolution around the Sun.
5. Pause the simulation.
6. Using the slider bar, increase the size of the Sun and start
the simulation again. Observe the motion of Earth and the
Moon around the Sun for one full revolution.
7. Pause the simulation again. Return the Sun to its original
size and then increase the size of Earth.
A. What happens to the orbit of Earth when you increase the
size of the Sun? T/I A
B. What happens to the Moon when you increase the size
of the Sun? What happens when you increase the size of
Earth? T/I A
C. What happens to Earth’s orbit when you increase the size of
Earth? T/I A
D. The MESSENGER probe mentioned at the beginning
of this chapter made use of several gravity assists
to reach Mercury without using too much of its own
energy. This method is also known as a gravitational
slingshot. It works by using the gravity of a celestial
body to accelerate, slow down, or redirect the path of
a spacecraft. Gravity assists can save fuel, time, and
expense. Try to design a system of orbiting elements
within the simulation that demonstrates this effect.
K/U
T/I
C
A
WEB LINK
8. Start the simulation again and observe Earth’s revolution.
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Satellites in Circular Orbits
When Newton developed the idea of universal gravitation, he also theorized that the
same force that pulls objects to Earth also keeps the Moon in its orbit. One difference,
of course, is that the Moon does not hit Earth’s surface. The Moon orbits Earth at a
distance from Earth’s centre—called the orbital radius. The orbit of the Moon about
Earth is another example of centripetal motion, which you studied in Chapter 3.
The force of gravity on the Moon due to Earth is a centripetal force that pulls the
Moon toward Earth’s centre. As the Moon orbits Earth, the Moon has velocity perpendicular to the radius vector. Without gravity, the Moon would fly off in a straight
line. Without its orbital velocity, however, the force of gravity would pull the Moon
straight to Earth’s surface. The orbital motion of the Moon depends on both the centripetal force due to gravity and the Moon’s orbital velocity.
The Moon’s orbit, similar to the orbits of the planets around the Sun, is actually
elliptical. We can closely approximate the orbits, however, by assuming that they
are circular. This approximation is useful for most problem-solving purposes. To
analyze the motion of a satellite in uniform circular motion, combine Newton’s law
of universal gravitation with the mathematical expression describing centripetal
acceleration. Using the universal law of gravitation from Section 6.1, we can say that
the gravitational field strength of Earth with mass mE at the location of a satellite at
height r above Earth’s centre is
g5
orbital radius the distance between the
centre of a satellite and the centre of its
parent body
Gm E
r2
Recall from Chapter 3 that the formula for centripetal acceleration based on the
orbiting object’s speed v is
ac 5
v2
r
For a satellite in a circular orbit, the gravitational force provides the centripetal
force. Combining the above two equations gives
ac 5 g
Gm E
v2
5 2
r
r
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about orbits and satellites to the Unit
Task on page 422.
Solving for the speed of the satellite and using only the positive square root gives
v5
GmE
Å r
This equation holds for an orbiting body in a central gravitational field. If a satellite
orbits around any other large body with mass m, we can replace the mass of Earth in
this equation and generalize it to
v5
Gm
Å r
This equation indicates that the speed of a satellite depends on its orbital radius
and is independent of the satellite’s own mass. For a satellite to maintain an orbit of
radius r, its speed v must be constant.
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geosynchronous orbit the orbit around
Earth of an object with an orbital speed
matching the rate of Earth’s rotation;
the period of such an orbit is exactly
one Earth day
A communications satellite in geosynchronous orbit—that is, a satellite orbiting
Earth with a speed matching that of Earth’s own rotation—is an example of an artificial satellite with a constant orbital radius (Figure 4). The orbital period, represented
by the symbol T, is the time it takes an object to complete one orbit around another
object. A geosynchronous satellite’s orbital speed leads to an orbital period that
exactly matches Earth’s rotational period. To an observer on Earth, the satellite will
appear to travel through the same point in the sky every 24 h. A geostationary orbit is
a type of geosynchronous orbit in which the satellite orbits directly over the equator.
To an observer on Earth, a geostationary satellite will appear to remain fixed in the
CAREER LINK
same point in the sky at all times.
radius
force of
gravity
orbit
Figure 4 A satellite with a geosynchronous orbit travels at the same speed as Earth’s rotation.
Its orbital period is one Earth day.
In the following Tutorial you will explore how you can use the equation for orbital
speed in problem solving.
Tutorial 1 Solving Problems Relating to Circular Orbits
The Sample Problems in this Tutorial show how to determine the properties of an object
in a circular orbit within a gravitational field around a larger object.
Sample Problem 1: Calculating the Speed and Orbital Period of a Satellite
The International Space Station (ISS) orbits Earth at an altitude of about 350 km above
Earth’s surface.
(a) Determine the speed needed by the ISS to maintain its orbit.
(b) Determine the orbital period of the ISS in minutes.
Solution
(a) G
iven: G 5 6.67 3 10211 N·m2/kg2; mE 5 5.98 3 1024 kg; rE 5 6.38 3 106 m;
hISS 5 350 km 5 3.5 3 105 m
Required: v
GmE
Analysis: v 5
; r 5 rE 1 hISS 5 6.73 3 106 m
Å r
Solution: v 5
5
GmE
Å r
ï
° 6.67 3 10211
m# 2
m
s2
¢ 15.98 3 1024 kg2
kg2
kg #
6.73 3 106 m
v 5 7.698 3 103 m/s 1two extra digits carried2
Statement: The ISS requires a speed of 7.7 3 103 m/s to maintain its orbit.
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(b) Given: v 5 7.698 3 103 m/s; r 5 6.73 3 106 m
Required: T
Analysis: The distance travelled in one period is 2pr. The orbital period, T, is the time
it takes for the space station to travel this distance, so it is the distance divided by the
2pr
speed, T 5
.
v
Solution:
2pr
v
2p 16.73 3 106 m2
1 min
5
3
m
60 s
7.698 3 103
s
T 5 92 min
T5
Statement: The ISS has an orbital period of 92 min.
Sample Problem 2: Calculating the Speeds of Planets around the Sun
Determine the speeds of Venus and Earth as they orbit the Sun. The Sun’s mass is
1.99 3 1030 kg. Venus has an orbital radius of 1.08 3 1011 m, and Earth has an orbital
radius of 1.49 3 1011 m.
Given: G 5 6.67 3 10–11 N·m2/kg2; mS 5 1.99 3 1030 kg; rV 5 1.08 3 1011 m;
rE 5 1.49 3 1011 m
Required: vV; vE
Analysis: v 5
Solution:
vV 5
5
Gm
Å r
GmS
Å rV
ï
m# 2
m
s2
¢ 11.99 3 1030 kg2
kg2
kg #
° 6.67 3 10211
1.08 3 1011 m
vV 5 3.51 3 104 m/s
vE 5
5
GmS
Å rE
ï
m# 2
m
s2
¢ 11.99 3 1030 kg2
kg2
kg #
° 6.67 3 10211
1.49 3 1011 m
4
vE 5 2.98 3 10 m/s
Statement: Venus orbits the Sun at a speed of 3.51 3 104 m/s, and Earth orbits the Sun
at a speed of 2.98 3 104 m/s.
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Practice
1. Astronomers have determined that a black hole sits at the centre of galaxy
M87 (Figure 5). Observations show matter at a distance of 5.34 3 1017 m from
the black hole and travelling at speeds of 7.5 3 105 m/s. Calculate the mass of
the black hole, assuming the matter being observed moves in a circular orbit
around it. T/I A [ans: 4.5 3 1039 kg]
Figure 5
Investigation
6.2.1
Design a Solar System (page 309)
With what you have learned
about orbits and the movement
of planetary bodies, you are
ready to take the next step. This
investigation will give you an
opportunity to create your own solar
system with a sun, several planets,
and moons.
2. Mars orbits the Sun in a nearly circular orbit of radius 2.28 3 1011 m. The mass
of Mars is 6.42 3 1023 kg. Mars experiences a gravitational force from the Sun of
magnitude 1.63 3 1021 N. Calculate the speed of Mars and the period of revolution
for Mars in terms of Earth years. T/I A [ans: 2.41 3 104 m/s; 1.90 Earth years]
3. Calculate the speed of a satellite in a circular orbit 600.0 km above Earth’s surface.
Determine the orbital period of the satellite to two significant digits. T/I A
[ans: 7.56 3 103 m/s; 97 min]
4. Satellites can orbit the Moon very close to the Moon’s surface because the Moon has
no atmosphere to slow the satellite through air resistance. Determine the speed of a
satellite that orbits the Moon just 25 m above the surface. (Hint: Refer to Appendix B
for radius and mass data for the Moon.) T/I A [ans: 1.7 3 103 m/s]
research This
Space Junk
Skills: Researching, Analyzing, Communicating
Space junk is debris from artificial objects orbiting Earth. It
is just one example of how beneficial technology can have
unwanted environmental effects. In this activity, you will research
space junk and discover how an orbiting body can go from being
a functioning satellite to being space junk.
1. Research the mechanisms that satellites have to maintain
speed and orbital radius.
2. Research methods of dealing with different forms of space junk.
3. Explore one story of space junk that catches your interest.
A. Review this chapter’s formulas pertaining to the relationship
between orbital speed and orbital radius. Describe effects
that could make a satellite slow down in its orbit and slip
into a lower orbit. C A
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A4.1
B. Describe what happens when a satellite drifts so low
that it enters Earth’s atmosphere. C A
C. Are there any ways to avoid creating space
junk? T/I C
D. Are there any effective ways to get rid of existing
space junk? C A
E. Compose an email to a friend describing what space
junk is. Include the interesting example you researched
in Step 3. C
WEB LINK
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6.2
Review
Summary
• Satellites can be natural, such as moons around planets, or artificial, such as
the RADARSAT satellites and the International Space Station.
• The speed, v, of a satellite in uniform circular motion around a central body
depends on the mass of the central body, m, and the radius of the orbit, r:
v5
Gm
Å r
• For a given orbital radius, a satellite in circular orbit has a constant speed.
Questions
1. What is the difference between natural and artificial
satellites? Give an example of each. K/U
2. Explain what microgravity is. K/U
3. Explain in your own words how GPS satellites
work. K/U
4. (a) What is a geosynchronous orbit?
(b) How does a satellite in geosynchronous orbit
appear to an observer on Earth?
(c) How does a satellite in geostationary orbit
appear to an observer on Earth? K/U C
5. Calculate the orbital radius of a satellite in
geosynchronous orbit. K/U T/I A
6. Neptune orbits the Sun in 164.5 Earth years in
an approximately circular orbit at a radius of
4.5 3 109 km. T/I A
(a) Determine the orbital speed of Neptune.
(b) Determine the mass of the Sun.
7. Saturn makes one complete orbit of the Sun every
29 Earth years with a speed of 9.69 km/s. Calculate
the radius of the orbit of Saturn. Assume a circular
orbit. T/I A
8. The region of the solar system between Mars and
Jupiter, called the Asteroid Belt, contains many
asteroids that orbit the Sun. Consider an asteroid in
a circular orbit of radius 5.03 3 1011 m. T/I A
(a) Calculate the speed of the asteroid around
the Sun.
(b) Calculate the period of the orbit in years.
9. In recent years, astronomers have discovered
that a number of nearby stars have planets of
their own, called exoplanets. A newly discovered
exoplanet orbits a star with our Sun’s mass
(1.99 3 1030 kg) in a circular orbit with an orbital
radius of 4.05 3 1012 m. What is the orbital speed
of the exoplanet in kilometres per hour? T/I A
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10. The orbital radius of one exoplanet is 4.03 3 1011 m,
with a period of 1100 Earth days. Calculate the mass
of the star around which the exoplanet revolves. T/I A
11. Phobos (Figure 6), one of Mars’s moons, has
an elliptical orbit around Mars with an orbital
radius that varies between 9200 km and 9500 km.
Calculate the orbital period of Phobos in Earth days,
assuming a circular orbit of radius 9.38 3 106 m.
The mass of Mars is 6.42 3 1023 kg. T/I A
Figure 6
12. Determine the speed of a satellite, in kilometres per
hour, that is in a geosynchronous orbit about Earth.
(Hint: Use the equation for the speed of an object
in circular motion and equate that to the speed of
a satellite in orbit around a central body. Rearrange
the equation to solve for the radius. Use the radius
to calculate the speed.) K/U T/I A
13. (a) Calculate the orbital speeds of the planets
Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars using the
solar system data in Appendix B.
(b) What can you conclude about the speed of the
planets in orbit farther from the Sun? T/I A
14. Scientists wish to place a geosynchronous satellite
near a moon at an altitude of 410 km. The mass of
the moon is 7.36 3 1022 kg and it has a radius of
1.74 3 106 m. Calculate the velocity and the period
of the satellite. T/I A
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6.3
Explore Applications of Gravitational Fields
Skills Menu
• Researching
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
• Identifying
Alternatives
Satellites
Orbiting high above Earth, satellites peer down, collecting data about the oceans, ice,
land, the environment, and the atmosphere. One of the primary and most well-known
functions of satellites is Earth imaging. This includes environmental monitoring,
geological observations, mapping missions, forestry observations, and coastal and
ocean tracking. Satellites also serve in communications systems and for the Global
Positioning System.
Other satellites peer up rather than down. The Hubble Space Telescope is in orbit
around Earth, but its job is to look outward toward the universe rather than down
to the planet.
At any given time, thousands of satellites orbit Earth. Their orbital altitude determines
their orbital speed. A satellite’s orbital speed relative to Earth’s rotational period will determine its ground coverage pattern and the frequency of its passing over a particular region.
The Application
Nearly 70 % of Earth’s fresh water is in the Antarctic region, so environmental and
climate changes there have a strong effect on worldwide sea levels and water systems.
RADARSAT-1 has been collecting data and images from Antarctica since 1997, through
the Antarctic Mapping Mission project (Figure 1). The goals of the mission include
testing for effects of global warming and monitoring human impacts on Antarctica.
Figure 1 This RADARSAT image, compiled from satellite imaging, shows how the Shirase Glacier
in Antarctica has changed over the decades. The blue represents the 1997 coastline, the yellow
represents the coastline in the mid-1970s, and the green represents the coastline in 1962.
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Climate change research is just one of many applications of satellites. In addition,
Earth-imaging satellites are used for weather tracking and naval support, search and
rescue, media broadcasting, and scientific studies. Satellites are crucial for our navigation and communications systems, and they also have military applications.
Your Goal
To become informed about satellite usage and to communicate this information to
your peers
Research
Choose one application of satellites that interests you. Explore your chosen topic
using the following points as a guide:
• review data or imagery captured by the satellite
• explore the purpose of the satellite
• investigate the way in which this particular satellite uses Earth’s gravitational
field to obtain the placement and frequency of orbit required to do its job
correctly
• identify how the satellite collects, uses, and shares data and images
• examine how the data the satellite collects affects society and the environment
• include a summary of research findings and any open questions raised by the
data the satellite makes available
• include both the positive and negative effects of the functions that the satellite
WEB LINK
performs
Summarize
Summarize your research on your chosen topic. Outline some related questions
scientists are currently studying, and suggest a new one. Use these questions to summarize your research:
• How is Earth’s gravitational field used to obtain the desired orbit of the
satellite?
• How does the satellite collect, use, or share data?
• In what ways does the satellite’s operation affect society and the environment?
• Has the satellite provided any new or useful information to researchers?
• Has information collected by this satellite raised any new questions for
researchers?
Unit TASK BOOKMARK
You can apply what you have learned
about satellites to the Unit Task on
page 422.
Communicate
Prepare a presentation that includes a summary of your research. You may wish to
include images of the satellite you are presenting and some images or data the satellite
provides. Identify the sources you have used. Take questions from your audience after
your presentation, and be prepared to encourage discussion.
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Physics JOURNAL
6.4
General relativity
ABSTrACT
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A3
According to Newtonian physics, gravity is an attractive force between two objects.
This conception of gravity is powerful and effective: it accurately describes and predicts physical effects and applies not only to objects on Earth, but also to the Moon,
the motions of the planets, and more.
General relativity explains falling bodies and orbiting masses, too, but through
a very different perspective. The theory of general relativity explains gravity in
terms of the geometry of space and time. This way of seeing the universe has led to
breakthrough ideas such as black holes, gravitational lenses, and other mysterious
phenomena.
Einstein’s Mental laboratory
Albert Einstein (1879−1955), a theoretical physicist often
regarded as the father of modern physics, developed the
general theory of relativity. The general theory of relativity
explains gravitational effects through an advanced form
of geometry. In 1905, while working as a patent clerk in
Switzerland, Einstein completed his doctoral degree and
published four highly influential research papers. Einstein’s
laboratory was mostly in his mind. He developed and
shaped his theories through “what-if ” style mental exercises
called thought experiments. One of Einstein’s most-quoted
lines is, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.”
Due to the success of Einstein’s methods, thought experiments
are considered valid scientific studies today.
a
g
From newtonian Gravitation
to General relativity
Einstein’s breakthrough idea that led to the theory of general relativity was that there is no experiment that observers
can perform to distinguish whether acceleration occurs
because of a gravitational force or because their reference
frame is accelerating, as shown in Figure 1.
For example, there would be no way to test (by, say,
dropping or tossing balls or any other experiment that
involves applications of Newton’s laws) whether an observer
is standing on Earth and therefore under the influence of
Earth’s gravitational field or whether the observer is standing
on a spaceship accelerating at 9.8 m/s2. In both cases, the
observer experiences the same effects. Einstein called this
relation the “principle of equivalence.”
Einstein created brilliant thought experiments to study
the principle of equivalence. His results led him to create a
theory of gravity based on an advanced version of geometry.
This theory, now called general relativity, deals with the curvature of space-time in the universe (Figure 2). It has several
differences from Newton’s theory of gravity.
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(a)
(b)
Figure 1 Einstein’s theory states that there is no physical difference
between (a) an accelerating frame of reference and (b) a frame of
reference in a gravitational field.
Figure 2 Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity deals with the
curvature and other geometric features of space-time.
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One important difference is that gravity has a “speed
limit” in general relativity. In Newton’s theory, a change in
the position of a mass in one part of the universe instantly
changes its gravitational field in all other parts of the universe. In general relativity, changes in the gravitational field
travel at the speed of light but no faster.
These changes can travel across the universe as gravitational waves. A pair of stars locked in orbit around each
other lose energy by emitting gravitational waves. The loss
of energy means that the two stars fall toward each other and
eventually collide or tear each other apart. A pair of stars,
or a binary system, in orbit in Newton’s theory would continue to circle each other with no changes. Measurements
of changes in orbits of binary systems currently provide the
most accurate experimental tests of general relativity.
Another important difference is that general relativity
predicts that gravity affects light. Light does not have mass, so
Newton’s theory predicts that light experiences no force and
exerts no force. In general relativity, the gravitational field
can bend the path of light. For example, light travelling from
a distant galaxy past a very massive object, such as a galaxy
cluster, will bend and deflect around the object. This effect,
called gravitational lensing (Figure 3), causes an observer on
the other side of the massive object to see multiple, distorted
images of the original light source. Gravitational lensing can
create two or more images: a bright ring called an Einstein
ring, partial rings, or other patterns.
One of the most mysterious predictions made by general
relativity is the existence of black holes. Black holes are regions
in space where the gravitational field is so strong that nothing,
including light, can escape from the region after travelling
into it. Black holes form as one possible product of the end of
a star’s life. We cannot directly see black holes, since no light
can escape from one. Scientists, however, can detect black
holes by studying the behaviour of objects near the suspected
black hole. As material gets pulled into a black hole, the material emits X-rays and other particles that can be detected and
analyzed on Earth. Black holes are so mysterious, in fact, that
not even general relativity completely explains what happens
to the material after it travels into the black hole.
What Is Next?
Although general relativity answers many questions about
our universe, it currently faces a tough challenge. Very large
objects in the universe, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters,
and the universe as a whole do not behave exactly the way
general relativity predicts. The orbital speed of objects at the
edges of galaxies, for instance, should depend on the mass
collected in the inner regions of the galaxy. Astronomers
have found that the actual speeds of stars and dust in many
galaxies are much faster than they would expect from the
amount of mass that they can observe in the galaxies.
One solution to this challenge is that some exotic form of
matter that we have never before detected exists in the universe.
Physicists refer to this unknown matter as dark matter, since we
do not directly see it. Another solution is that we have to modify
the theory of general relativity so that the theory gives the correct description of the universe’s behaviour. Either solution will
change the way we think about gravity and the universe.
Further Reading
Figure 3 A massive object, such as a galaxy cluster, acts as a
gravitational lens. Light from a distant star passes on both sides of
the galaxy. An observer sees two separate images of the star.
6.4
8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 307
WEB LINK
Questions
1. Explain what Einstein meant by his principle of
equivalence. K/U C
2. Describe some of the differences between Einstein’s
and Newton’s theories about gravity. K/U C
3. A person standing on Earth drops a ball. At the
same time, a person standing at the bottom of a
spaceship accelerating at 9.8 m/s2, in the absence
of any significant field in deep space, drops a ball.
What would these people observe? T/I A
NEL
Guéron, E. (2009). Surprises from general relativity: “Swimming”
in spacetime. Scientific American, August 2009, p. 34.
Einstein, A. (1952). The principle of relativity. New York,
NY; Dover.
Schutz, B. (2004). Gravity from the ground up. New York,
NY: Cambridge University Press.
4. Explain why black holes are so difficult for scientists
to study. K/U C A
5. Research general relativity and problems with the
theory. Identify two possible solutions to problems
with general relativity and the behaviour of galaxies.
Do the solutions seem plausible to you? Why or
T/I
C
A
why not?
WEB LINK
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chapTer
6
Investigations
Investigation 6.1.1
oBserVaTIonal sTuDY
universal Gravitation
Using models is an important aspect of scientists’ work in
addition to traditional experiments. In this investigation,
you will model the trajectory of a rocket at varying altitudes.
You will build a set of data points, plot a curve, and
determine the slope of the curve. Finally, you will use your
data and analysis to derive G, the gravitational constant.
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
SKIllS MEnu
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Table 1 The Gravitational Force for a Sampling of Rocket Heights
Gravitational
force (N)
Height above Earth’s
surface (m)
Purpose
2.70 3 107
0
To determine the value of the gravitational constant, G
2.32 3 107
500 000
Equipment and Materials
2.02 3 107
1 000 000
1.56 3 107
2 000 000
1.25 3 107
3 000 000
1.02 3 107
4 000 000
8.47 3 106
5 000 000
7.16 3 106
6 000 000
6.13 3 106
7 000 000
5.30 3 106
8 000 000
4.64 3 106
9 000 000
4.09 3 106
10 000 000
1.57 3 106
20 000 000
8.28 3 105
30 000 000
5.09 3 105
40 000 000
3.45 3 105
50 000 000
2.49 3 105
60 000 000
1.88 3 105
70 000 000
Analyze and Evaluate
1.47 3 105
80 000 000
(a) How did your first graph differ from your second
graph? T/I A
(b) To what does the slope of the second graph
correspond? T/I A
(c) Describe in your own words how you used the data in
the table to determine G. T/I C A
(d) What answer did you calculate for G? The current
accepted value for G is 6.67 3 10211 Nm2/kg2.
Evaluate the procedure you used to calculate G. Were
you able to come up with the correct value? T/I C
1.18 3 105
90 000 000
9.68 3 104
100 000 000
• calculator
• graph paper and/or graphing calculator or software
Procedure
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A5.5
6
1. A rocket with a mass of 2.75 3 10 kg rises from Earth’s
surface. Table 1 shows its height and the gravitational
force on the rocket at various points along its
trajectory. Use the data in the table to create a graph
of gravitational force as a function of distance from
the centre of Earth. (Hint: The rocket’s height above
the surface is not the same as its distance from Earth’s
centre. Use the empty column in the data table to
determine the rocket’s height including Earth’s radius.)
Note that distance should go on the x-axis of the graph.
2. Briefly describe the graph’s shape.
3. Create a data table showing gravitational force versus
1
, where r is Earth’s radius, 6.38 3 106 m, plus the
r2
height of the rocket. Earth’s mass is 5.98 3 1024 kg.
If graphing software is available, do an inverse-square
curve fit. Record the constants involved.
4. Determine the slope of the graph you created in Step 3.
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Chapter 6 • Gravitational Fields
8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 308
Height including
Earth’s radius (m)
Apply and Extend
(e) Jupiter is much larger and more massive than
Earth. Explain how you think your graphs would
appear if you conducted this study on Jupiter.
What would happen to the value of G? Explain
your answer. T/I C A
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4/27/12 9:00 AM
Investigation 6.2.1
oBserVaTIonal sTuDY
design a Solar System
Solar systems share many characteristics. For example,
most of the mass in a solar system is located in the star.
The planets that orbit it are relatively small in comparison.
You can determine the speed on a moon by first
considering the planet at rest and then applying what you
learned about relative motion from Chapter 1.
Simulation software allows you to create a wide range
of orbital scenarios, observe the gravitational interactions,
reset the parameters, and repeat the process over and over.
In this investigation, you will use simulation software to
explore orbital properties of multi-body systems and then
design your own solar system. By applying the concepts
and formulas you learned in this chapter, you will describe
and quantify the orbits you have created.
Purpose
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.4
To understand the dynamics of a solar system by analyzing
orbital scenarios
Equipment and Materials
• access to Internet resources
Procedure
1. Go the Nelson Science website.
2. Consult the simulation software for this investigation
and begin exploring possible scenarios, including
options for the number of masses and the position
and velocity of each.
3. Try at least 20 different scenarios, varying the starting
conditions and keeping track of the results in a data
table. Be sure to explore all of the preset examples to
see a range of possible results.
4. Try a scenario with a sun and one planet, and change
the magnitude of the velocity. At some point along
the changing velocity scale, observe if there is a shift
in how the two objects interact. Experiment with
different velocity magnitudes and directions. Record
your observations.
5. Design a solar system that includes a sun and several
planets. At least one planet should have an orbiting
moon.
6. For the solar system you designed, provide and solve
the equations that describe the orbital path for each
element, based on the mass around which each object
is orbiting.
SKIllS MEnu
• Questioning
• Researching
• Hypothesizing
• Predicting
• Planning
• Controlling
Variables
• Performing
• Observing
• Analyzing
• Evaluating
• Communicating
Analyze and Evaluate
(a) What happens in the simulation when you have a sun
and a planet, but the planet has no velocity? T/I
(b) What happens when there is a sun and one planet,
and the planet’s velocity vector points away from the
sun? T/I A
(c) Explain why you can ignore the masses of other
planets when considering a planet’s speed, but you
cannot ignore those effects when calculating the speed
of a planet’s moon. T/I C
(d) How can you set up a stable three-body orbit? K/u T/I
(e) Experiment with complex configurations of three,
four, or more objects to determine whether you can
find one that combines short-period and long-period
orbits. Describe your results. T/I C A
(f) Use the values in Table 1 as your initial setup for
a four-body orbital model on the simulation site.
Describe your observations. T/I C A
Table 1 Orbit Simulation Settings for a Four-Body Configuration
Position
Object
Mass
x
Velocity
y
x
y
1
200
0
0
0
21
2
10
142
0
0
140
3
0.001
166
0
0
74
4
0.001
284
0
0
2133
Apply and Extend
(g) How do you think simulations like these can lead
to new understanding of complex systems? Why do
you think scientists use simulations to run virtual
experiments? Explain your answer. T/I A
(h) In the virtual environment, why do you think you
might have to choose between accuracy and speed
of modelling? Explain your reasoning. T/I A
(i) If you were creating a new simulation environment to
test gravitational effects, what would you add, change,
or enhance? Explain your reasoning. T/I A
WEB LINK
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chapTer
6
SuMMAry
Summary Questions
1. Create a concept map or other graphic organizer for
this chapter based on the Key Concepts found on
page 286. For each point, create three or four subpoints
that provide further information, relevant examples,
explanatory diagrams, or general equations.
2. Look back at the Starting Points questions on page 286.
Answer these questions using what you have learned
in this chapter. Compare your latest answers with the
answers that you wrote at the beginning of the chapter.
Note how your answers may have changed.
3. Design a graphic organizer or create a storyboard
mapping the relationship between the universal
law of gravitation, circular orbits, and centripetal
acceleration. Include a description or a storyboard
frame about how our conception of gravity was
expanded by general relativity.
Vocabulary
universal law of gravitation (p. 288)
gravitational field (p. 293)
artificial satellite (p. 297)
orbital radius (p. 299)
gravitational constant (p. 288)
gravitational field strength (p. 293)
space station (p. 298)
geosynchronous orbit (p. 300)
inverse-square law (p. 289)
satellite (p. 297)
CAREER PATHWAyS
Grade 12 Physics can lead to a wide range of careers. Some require a college diploma, a B.Sc.
degree, or work experience. Others require specialized or postgraduate degrees. This graphic
organizer shows a few pathways to careers related to topics covered in this chapter.
1. Identify at least three careers related to understanding gravitational fields; launching
objects through gravitational fields; solving equations of orbital mechanics;
designing, maintaining, and using satellite systems; and understanding and
modelling large-scale universal gravitation.
2. Choose one of these careers and create a graphic organizer similar to the one
below mapping two possible education and career pathways that would help
you achieve that career goal.
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A6
astronaut
B.Sc.
M.Sc.
aeronautics engineer
12U Physics
Ph.D.
astronomer
rocket scientist
B.Eng.
OSSD
aerospace engineer
11U Physics
robotics technician
college diploma
satellite repair technician
CAREER LINK
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CHAPTER
6
Self-quiz
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. The gravitational force between two spherical
masses is Fg. Which of the following would increase
the gravitational force between the objects to
16Fg? (6.1) K/U
(a) increasing the distance by a factor of 4
(b) increasing the distance by a factor of 16
(c) increasing the mass of one object by a factor
of 4
(d) increasing the mass of both objects by a factor
of 4
2. For a given mass, m, and a given distance, d,
separating you and the object, which of the following
would exert a stronger gravitational force on you?
(6.1) K/U
(a) an object of mass 7m a distance 15d away
(b) an object of mass 9m a distance 5d away
(c) an object of mass 8m a distance 3d away
(d) an object of mass 12m a distance 4d away
3. What is the gravitational force between an object
of mass 3.6 3102 kg and a second object of mass
4.3 3 103 kg when the distance between their centres
is 53 m? (6.1) T/I
(a) 3.7 3 10–8 N
(b) 1.9 3 10–6 N
(c) 5.4 3 10–3 N
(d) 2.9 3 10–1 N
4. Suppose a planet has half the mass of Earth but
the same radius. An astronaut stands on the surface
of the planet and drops a rock from a height of
2.4 m. How much longer does it take the rock to
hit the ground on that planet than it would on
Earth? (6.1) T/I A
(a) 1.2 times longer
(b) "2 times longer
(c) 2 times longer
(d) 4.8 times longer
5. A satellite is in a circular orbit around Earth
at an altitude of 650 km. What orbital speed must
the satellite maintain to stay in orbit at this altitude?
(6.2) T/I
(a) 5.7 3 103 m/s
(b) 7.5 3 103 m/s
(c) 2.5 3 104 m/s
(d) 7.9 3 104 m/s
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8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 311
T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
6. Mars has a mass of 6.42 3 1023 kg and a radius of
3.4 3 106 m. What orbital speed must a satellite
maintain to stay in a circular orbit at an altitude of
3.80 3 105 m above the surface of Mars? (6.2) T/I
(a) 3.0 3 103 m/s
(b) 3.4 3 103 m/s
(c) 8.3 3 103 m/s
(d) 1.1 3 104 m/s
7. Which of the following is true about both dark matter
and black holes? (6.4) K/U
(a) They are massless.
(b) They do not have a gravitational field.
(c) They cannot be seen directly.
(d) They exist only outside our galaxy.
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
8. The strength of the gravitational field at any given
distance around a 2 kg object is twice the strength
of the field around a 1 kg object at the same distance.
(6.1) K/U
9. The strength of Earth’s gravitational field is
inversely proportional to the distance from Earth’s
centre. (6.1) K/U
10. The gravitational constant G is the same for all
objects. (6.1) K/U
11. The gravitational force between two 500 kg objects
is twice the gravitational force between two 250 kg
objects. (6.1) T/I
12. If a satellite is moving in a circular orbit, its period is
directly proportional to its speed. (6.2) K/U
13. If the speed of a satellite in a circular orbit doubles,
its orbital radius decreases by one half. (6.2) K/U
14. Satellites have only positive impacts on society and
the environment. (6.3) K/U
15. Both Newton’s and Einstein’s theories of gravity
predict that gravity has a speed limit. (6.4) K/U
Go to Nelson Science for an online self-quiz.
WEB LINK
Chapter 6 Self-Quiz 311
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CHAPTER
6
Review
K/U
Knowledge/Understanding
Knowledge
For each question, select the best answer from the four
alternatives.
1. Which of the following best describes the strength of the
gravitational force on Earth due to your mass? (6.1) K/U
(a) It is zero as long as you are standing on Earth’s
surface.
(b) It is much greater than Earth’s gravitational force
on you because Earth’s mass is so great.
(c) It is equal to the magnitude of the force that
Earth exerts on you.
(d) It is negligible compared to the force of gravity
on you because your mass is so small when
compared to Earth’s mass.
2. The gravitational force on a small rock sitting on
a 20 m–high cliff on Earth is Fg. How does the
gravitational force on the rock change if a hiker
picks up the rock and carries it to a 200 m–high
cliff? (6.1) K/U
(a) It will decrease by an insignificant amount.
(b) It will decrease by about one-tenth.
(c) It will decrease by about one-fourth.
(d) It will decrease by about one-half.
3. What major obstacle did Henry Cavendish face when
measuring the gravitational force between two objects
on Earth? (6.1) K/U
(a) The masses required had to be very small.
(b) The gravitational force between the two masses
was very small.
(c) The distance between the two masses had to be
extremely large.
(d) The gravitational force between the two masses
was extremely large.
4. Ball A, with mass m, is a distance d from ball B,
which has a mass of 3m. At which of the following
distances is the gravitational attraction of the balls on
each other equal? (6.1) K/U
d
(a)
9
d
(b)
3
2d
(c)
3
(d) any separation distance
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T/I
Thinking/Investigation
C
Communication
A
Application
5. Spherical planet A has mass m and radius r. Spherical
m
planet B has mass and radius 2r. How does the
2
gravitational field strength at the surface of planet B
compare to the gravitational field strength at the surface
of planet A? (6.1) K/U
(a) It is the same as planet A.
(b) It is twice that of planet A.
(c) It is half that of planet A.
(d) It is one-eighth that of planet A.
6. Two satellites are orbiting a planet at the same height
above its surface. The mass of satellite A is m, and the
mass of satellite B is 2m. What can you conclude about
the planet’s gravitational force on the satellites? (6.2) K/U
(a) The planet’s gravitational force on both satellites
is the same.
(b) The planet’s gravitational force on satellite B is
half the gravitational force on satellite A.
(c) The planet’s gravitational force on satellite B is
twice the gravitational force on satellite A.
(d) The planet’s gravitational force on satellite B is
four times the gravitational force on satellite A.
7. How does a planet’s gravity help keep a satellite in a
circular orbit? (6.2) K/U
(a) It pulls the satellite in the same direction as its
motion.
(b) It pulls the satellite at an angle of 30° to its
direction of motion.
(c) It pulls the satellite at an angle of 60° to its
direction of motion.
(d) It pulls the satellite at an angle of 90° to its
direction of motion.
8. To pinpoint the location of your vehicle within 15 m
using a Global Positioning System (GPS), how many
satellites’ signals must interact? (6.2) K/U
(a) 1
(b) 2
(c) 3
(d) 4
9. Which of the following conditions are necessary to
place a satellite in geosynchronous orbit? (6.2) K/U
(a) a varying orbital velocity so that it maintains a
constant position
(b) a varying orbital radius so that it maintains a
constant height above Earth
(c) a constant period that is equal to the orbital
speed of Earth about the Sun
(d) a constant period that matches the revolution rate
of Earth about its axis
NEL
4/27/12 9:00 AM
10. The period of a satellite is independent of
(a) its own mass
(b) the mass of the planet it orbits
(c) the value of the gravitational constant
(d) the orbital radius (6.2) K/U
Indicate whether each statement is true or false. If you think
the statement is false, rewrite it to make it true.
11. The gravitational constant, G, near the Moon is
different than G near Earth. (6.1) K/U
12. The gravitational field around Earth at a fixed
distance from its centre would be the same if Earth
had half the radius but the same mass. (6.1) K/U
13. A book is surrounded by its own gravitational field.
(6.1) K/U
14. Unlike most satellites, a geosynchronous satellite has
a fixed position and does not orbit Earth. (6.2) K/U
15. In order for a satellite to stay in a uniform circular
orbit, its speed must be constant. (6.2) K/U
16. The velocity of a satellite in uniform circular motion
depends on the satellite’s mass. (6.2) K/U
17. Satellites are useful for communication, astronomical
observations, and atmospheric studies. (6.3) K/U
18. According to the theory of general relativity, gravity has
no effect on light because light has no mass. (6.4) K/U
19. Gravitational lensing occurs when the gravitational
field changes the direction of motion of a massive
object. (6.4) T/I
Match each term on the left with the most appropriate
description on the right.
20. (a) satellite
(b) artificial
satellite
(c) space station
(i) a spacecraft in which people
live and work
(ii) an object or body that revolves
around another body
(iii) an object that has been
intentionally placed by humans
into orbit around Earth or
another body (6.2) K/U
Understanding
21. The gravitational force is inversely proportional to
1
the square of the separation of two masses: Fg ~ 2 .
r
Earth’s gravitational pull on an object is defined as the
object’s weight. Explain why the weight of any object
on Earth is not infinite, even though the distance
between the object and Earth is zero. (6.1) T/I A
22. An Internet site states that the value of g on Earth is
9.806 65 N/kg. Is this figure accurate for all places on
Earth? Why or why not? (6.1) K/U T/I C
23. Relate the universal law of gravitation to Newton’s
third law of motion. (6.1) K/U C
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24. Henry Cavendish conducted experiments to measure
the force of gravity between two objects on Earth. In a
short paragraph, summarize Cavendish’s experimental
setup and results. (6.1) K/U C
25. Explain why you do not feel the gravitational force
between you and a car 5 m away, even though a car’s
mass is so great that you cannot lift it. (6.1) T/I
26. Every object is surrounded by a gravitational field.
(6.1) K/U C
(a) The unit of the gravitational field strength g is
newtons per kilogram (N/kg). Explain how the
unit of gravitational field strength relates to the
unit of force.
(b) How does g vary with distance? How does it vary
with the object’s mass?
(c) Describe the direction of the gravitational field
around a spherical object.
27. The universal law of gravitation describes the force of
gravity between two bodies. What does it say about
the strength of the gravitational field? How does the
size of the object affect the use of the gravitational
force equation? (6.1) K/U
28. Rank the following from least to greatest gravitational
attraction on you. (6.1) T/I
(a) a mass of 4m a distance of 2d away
(b) a mass of 6m a distance of 5d away
(c) a mass of 2m a distance of 3d away
(d) a mass of m a distance of 2d away
29. A 68 kg spherical boulder is sitting 1.5 m from a
27 kg spherical rock. What is the gravitational force
between the boulder and the rock? (6.1) K/U
30. A traffic officer is standing 4.5 m from a 1200 kg
pickup truck. The gravitational force between the
officer and the truck is 1.7 3 10–7 N. What is the
officer’s mass? (6.1) T/I A
31. In 2005, the space probe Deep Impact launched a
370 kg projectile into Comet Tempel 1. Observing
the collision helped scientists learn about the comet’s
characteristics. The comet is estimated to have a mass
of about 9.0 3 1013 kg. (6.1) K/U T/I
(a) Assuming the estimated mass of the comet at
that time was correct, at what distance from the
comet’s centre was the gravitational force between
the comet and the projectile 32 N?
(b) What was the magnitude of the gravitational
force between the comet and the projectile at a
distance of 350 m?
(c) Deep Impact also released a probe to fly by
the comet and record images of the collision.
Determine the strength of the comet’s
gravitational field at the probe’s distance
of 5.0 3 103 km from the comet.
Chapter 6 Review 313
4/27/12 9:00 AM
32. Which is a more important factor in order for a
satellite to remain in orbit at a certain distance above
Earth’s surface: the speed or the mass of the satellite?
Explain your answer. (6.2) T/I A
33. Two identical satellites are orbiting different planets at
the same orbital radius, but one planet has twice the
mass of the other planet. How do the satellite’s orbital
speeds compare with each other? (6.2) K/U T/I
34. Two identical satellites are orbiting different planets
at the same orbital radius, but one satellite’s orbital
speed is twice as fast as the other’s. What can you
conclude about the masses of the planets the satellites
are orbiting? (6.2) K/U T/I A
35. The RADARSAT-1 and RADARSAT-2 satellites were
placed in orbit at an altitude of approximately 800 km
and have a mass of about 2750 kg each. RADARSAT
Constellation satellites orbit at approximately 600 km
and have masses of about 1300 kg. (6.3) K/U A
(a) Which set of satellites has greater speeds?
(b) What effect does the mass have on the speeds?
36. Why is the concept of dark matter sometimes referred
to as the missing mass problem? (6.4) K/U C
40. Henry Cavendish used freely moving balls to
measure the gravitational force between two masses
on Earth’s surface. Suppose a scientist repeated
the measurement using masses m1 5 0.032 kg
and m2 5 5500 kg. What is the gravitational force
between the masses when the distance between their
centres is r 5 0.75 m? (6.1) T/I
41. Calculate the strength of the gravitational field of a
6520 kg elephant at a distance of 5.75 m. (6.1) T/I
42. The world’s largest ball of twine was made by one
man in Minnesota in the United States. A basketball
sitting 55.0 m (measured from centre to centre) from
the ball of twine would experience a gravitational
field of 1.74 3 10–10 N/kg from the ball of twine.
Calculate the ball of twine’s mass. (6.1) T/I
43. The highest peak in Canada is Mount Logan
(Figure 2), which has an altitude of 5959 m above
sea level. Assume that sea level defines the height of
Earth’s surface. (6.1) T/I
Analysis and Application
37. Three balls are sitting on the ground, as shown in
Figure 1. The centre of each ball is an equal distance
from you. Ball A has mass m and radius r. Ball B has
mass 2m and radius r. Ball C has mass m and radius
2r. Compare the gravitational force of each ball on
you. Explain your answer. (6.1) T/I A
2m
Figure 2
B
m
A
C
m
Figure 1
38. Two people are standing 1.0 m apart (centre to
centre). Assume that each person has a mass of
45 kg. Calculate the gravitational force between the
two people. (6.1) T/I
39. Two small balls of mass 22 kg and 25 kg are a
distance of 1.2 m apart. (6.1) T/I
(a) Calculate the gravitational force between the
balls.
(b) How far apart would two balls of mass 16 kg and
21 kg have to be to have this same gravitational
force between them?
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8160_CH06_p282-317.indd 314
(a) Calculate the strength of Earth’s gravitational field
at the altitude of Mount Logan.
(b) What is the ratio of the strength of Earth’s
gravitational field at the top of Mount Logan to
the strength at Earth’s surface?
44. Neptune, the most distant planet in our solar system,
is at an average distance of 4.5 3 109 km from the
Sun. Its mass is 1.03 3 1026 kg. (6.1) T/I A
(a) Calculate the strength of the Sun’s gravitational
field at Neptune’s location.
(b) Calculate the strength of Neptune’s gravitational
field at the Sun’s location.
(c) Calculate the gravitational force between the Sun
and Neptune.
NEL
4/27/12 9:00 AM
45. The gravitational force due to the Sun on the planets
in our solar system decreases as the planetary
distance from the Sun increases. In your notebook,
draw a larger version of Figure 3, and complete it
for the force of gravity on an imaginary Earth–mass
planet if its distance were between the Sun’s radius,
rS, and 100rS. (6.1) K/U T/I C
Fg
on planet
(N)
Sun
rS
rS
50rS 100rS
Distance from the
centre of the Sun
Figure 3
46. How does the weight of a Mars lander change as it
travels from Earth to Mars? Does the weight ever
equal zero? Does the mass of the lander change?
Explain your answers. (6.1) K/U T/I C
47. Ceres is a dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt
between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The radius of
Ceres is 4.76 3 105 m. Suppose an astronaut stands
on the surface of Ceres and drops a 0.85 kg hammer
from a height of 1.25 m. The hammer takes 3.0 s to
reach the ground. (6.1) T/I A
(a) Determine the gravitational field strength of
Ceres at this height.
(b) Calculate the mass of Ceres.
(c) Determine the gravitational field strength of
Ceres at an altitude of 150 km above its surface.
48. Three balls of mass m1 5 13 kg, m2 5 17 kg, and
m3 5 12 kg are arranged in a straight line. Mass m1
is in the middle, 6 m from both mass m2 and mass
m3. Calculate the total gravitational force exerted by
balls 2 and 3 on ball 1. State both the magnitude and
the direction of the force in your answer. (6.1) T/I
49. Titan, one of the moons of Saturn, has a radius
of 2.57 3 106 m and a mass of 1.35 3 1023 kg.
(6.1) T/I A
(a) Determine the gravitational field strength on the
surface of Titan.
(b) What is the ratio of Titan’s gravitational field
strength at its surface to the gravitational field
strength on the surface of Earth?
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50. The International Space Station (ISS) orbits Earth at a
height of approximately 375 km. (6.1) T/I A
(a) Calculate the gravitational field strength on
the ISS.
(b) Are astronauts truly weightless?
(c) Why do astronauts and other objects on the
ISS appear to float?
51. Consider what you have learned about the inversesquare law. Would it be possible for the force of
gravity between two very heavy supertankers to cause
them to float toward each other and collide? Explain
your reasoning. (6.1) T/I C A
52. A satellite in orbit above Earth’s equator is travelling
at an orbital speed of 7.45 km/s. (6.2) T/I
(a) Determine the altitude of the satellite.
(b) Determine the satellite’s period.
53. Saturn rotates once in 645 min (just under 11 h) and
has a mass of 5.69 3 1026 kg. Suppose that scientists
have placed a satellite in orbit around Saturn that has
the same period as Saturn. (6.2) T/I C
(a) Calculate the radius at which the satellite must
orbit.
(b) In a few sentences, compare this radius to Saturn’s
equatorial radius of 6.03 3 107 m, and compare
the ratio of these two numbers to the same ratio
for a satellite in geostationary orbit (around Earth).
54. Neptune has an orbital radius from the Sun of
4.5 3 109 km. (6.2) T/I A
(a) Assume the orbit is circular. Calculate the orbital
speed of Neptune. Express your answer in metres
per second and in kilometres per hour.
(b) Calculate Neptune’s orbital period in
Earth years.
55. Two satellites are placed in their desired orbit by
releasing them from the International Space Station
using the Canadarm2. Satellite A is released to an
orbital radius of r. Satellite B is released to an orbital
9
radius of
r. How does the velocity of satellite B
10
compare to the velocity of satellite A? (6.2) K/U T/I
56. The microsatellite MOST (Microvariability and
Oscillations of STars) has a mass of just 52 kg.
It travels in an almost circular orbit at an average
altitude of 820 km above Earth’s surface. (6.2) T/I A
(a) Calculate the gravitational force between Earth
and the MOST satellite at this altitude.
(b) What speed does the MOST satellite need to
maintain its altitude? Express the speed in metres
per second and in kilometres per hour.
(c) Determine the orbital period of MOST.
Chapter 6 Review 315
4/27/12 9:00 AM
57. Determine the ratio of the speed of a satellite in orbit
around Earth to the speed of a similar satellite in orbit
around the Moon, assuming the satellites have equal
orbital radii. The Moon’s mass is 1.23 % of Earth’s mass
and its radius is 27.2 % of Earth’s radius. (6.2) T/I A
58. A space vehicle is in circular orbit at a height
of 390 km above Earth’s surface. Explain how the
orbital speed of the vehicle would have to change
in order for its altitude above Earth to decrease by
75 km. (6.2) T/I
59. The Canadian Telesat communications satellite Anik
F2 has a mass of 5900 kg and orbits 35 000 km above
the equator. (6.2, 6.3) T/I A
(a) Determine the gravitational field of Earth at this
altitude.
(b) Determine the gravitational force between the
satellite and Earth.
(c) Calculate the speed needed by Anik F2 to
maintain its orbit. Express the speed in metres
per second and in kilometres per hour.
(d) Calculate the orbital period of Anik F2.
60. The black hole at the centre of the Milky Way galaxy
is called Sagittarius A* (Figure 4). Determining its
mass is difficult, but a typical value calculated for the
mass is 4.3 3 106 times the mass of the Sun. The mass
of the Sun is 1.99 3 1030 kg. (6.4) T/I
Figure 4
(a) If this value for the mass of Sagittarius A* is correct,
how would the black hole’s gravitational force on a
1 kg object compare with the gravitational force on
a 1 kg object the same distance from the Sun?
(b) Suppose an 8.5 kg space probe is a distance of
4.5 3 1012 m from the black hole’s centre. (This
is about the distance from Neptune to the Sun.)
What gravitational force does the black hole exert
on the probe?
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Evaluation
61. A magazine article claims that people are influenced
by the movement of the planets. Use the following
steps to evaluate this claim. (6.1) T/I A
(a) The planet closest to Earth is Venus. It has a mass
of 4.85 3 1024 kg, and its distance to Earth is
1.5 3 1010 m. Calculate the gravitational force
of Venus on an 85 kg person.
(b) Calculate the gravitational pull on an 85 kg
person by a 10 000 kg school bus a distance
of 0.5 m away.
(c) What is the ratio of the gravitational pull of the
bus to the gravitational pull of Venus?
(d) Interpret your findings.
62. Isaac Newton developed the equation for universal
gravitation several decades before Henry Cavendish
did his experiment. It was not until he did his
experiment that calculations using Newton’s equation
could produce data from observations. Cavendish’s
experiment yielded a value for G that is slightly higher
than today’s accepted value of 6.67 3 10211 N # m2/kg 2.
Some more recent measurements have shown the
value to be 6.69 3 10211 N # m2/kg2. What would
be the effect of changing the value of the constant?
(6.1) T/I A
63. In 1970, a NASA spacecraft called Apollo 13
experienced an explosion which crippled the
spacecraft. Engineers and scientists evaluated
whether they should turn the spacecraft around
immediately and use rockets to get the astronauts
aboard the spacecraft home or use the Moon’s
gravitational field to get back. They opted for the
use of the Moon’s gravitational field. Suggest some
reasons for this decision. (6.2) T/I A
64. A satellite is in orbit with velocity v at a distance d
above Earth’s surface. A student says that the satellite’s
velocity would not change if it were in orbit at the
same distance d around a planet with twice the mass
and twice the radius. (6.2) T/I C A
Gm
to determine
Å r
whether or not the student is correct.
(b) Would the satellite’s velocity around the more
massive planet be higher or lower? Defend your
answer.
(a) Use the equation v 5
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4/27/12 9:00 AM
65. Earth’s orbit around the Sun is almost but not quite
circular. We can approximate, however, a small piece
of the orbit as though it is part of a perfectly circular
orbit of the same radius. Earth’s orbital speed is
slightly greater during the winter in the northern
hemisphere than during the summer in the northern
hemisphere. (6.2) K/U T/I C A
(a) In which season, winter or summer, is Earth
closest to the Sun?
(b) Does your answer to (a) explain why summer in
the northern hemisphere is so much warmer than
in the winter? Why or why not?
66. Consider a specific type of artificial satellite and
assess the impact of that satellite technology on
society or the environment. (6.3) T/I C A
67. Canada first used satellites in the early 1960s for
atmospheric observations. In the 1970s, however, the
use shifted to communications satellites. Satellites are
also used in Canada for weather and environmental
observations. Make a poster explaining the ways
that satellites affect your everyday life. Evaluate how
your life would be different without this type of
technology. (6.3) T/I C A
68. Communication satellites have made talking
anywhere in the world on a cellphone possible. These
communication satellites are difficult to service if
anything goes wrong. If a satellite has stopped working
completely, it is often left up in space to orbit. As more
and more satellites end up in orbit, they will create
clutter and possibly space junk. How will this clutter
affect future space travel? (6.3) T/I A
Reflect on Your Learning
69. When studying this chapter, you first read about
universal gravitation and then about gravitational
fields. Write a short paragraph explaining why it
was helpful to learn about these topics in this order
instead of the reverse order. T/I C
70. Look back at the diagrams and images in this chapter.
Create a slide show presentation that shows how they
helped you understand universal gravitation and
orbits. Be sure to include specific examples in your
presentation. T/I C
71. Consider the different topics you have studied in this
chapter. Choose one that you feel has an important
impact on your life. Formulate your thoughts on paper
and then express your thoughts to a parent or sibling,
explaining about the topic and why it is important
to you. What else would you like to know about this
topic? How could you go about learning this? T/I C
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Research
WEB LINK
72. View some actual radar images of Earth. Choose a
current meteorological or environmental event, explore
the information available on the Internet, and then report
your findings in the form of a brief news release. T/I C
73. Application of gravitational concepts has enabled
great advancements in astronomical research and
understanding. Gravity explains how stars are bound
together in galaxies, how galaxies are bound together
in groups, and how groups of stars and galaxies are
bound together in clusters. Knowledge of gravity
helps scientists develop theories about black holes and
dark matter. Research and prepare a report, two pages
or longer, about how the application of gravitational
concepts has helped astronomers. T/I C
74. The Lagrange points, labelled numerically as shown
in Figure 5, are positions in space where satellites can
be placed in stationary orbits relative to two larger
objects, such as Earth and the Sun. Research Lagrange
points. T/I C A
4
2
1
3
5
Figure 5
(a) In an email to a peer, explain why there are five
Lagrange points in the Earth–Sun system.
(b) What do the designations 1, 2, and so on, mean?
(c) How do scientists use these points when choosing
the placement of satellites in orbits?
(d) What satellites are currently in orbit at different
Lagrange points and why?
75. A geostationary satellite is a geosynchronous
satellite in orbit directly above the equator. In a
few sentences, describe why a satellite must orbit
above the equator to be geostationary and not just
geosynchronous. K/U T/I
76. Technology now allows researchers to map Earth’s
gravitational field and to use the map to study the
material making up Earth’s interior. Research gravity
surveys and how gravitational fields are used to
search for mineral deposits. C A
Chapter 6 Review 317
4/27/12 9:00 AM
CHAPTER
7
Electric Fields
What Effect Does the Electric Force Have
on the Motion of Charges?
KEY CONCEPTS
After completing this chapter you will
be able to
• describe properties of electric
charges and the electric force,
and describe how electric forces
affect the motion of charges
• describe properties of electric
fields
• solve problems related to electric
force and electric fields
• analyze the operation of
technologies that use electric
fields and assess their social
and environmental impact
• solve problems related to
electric potential and electric
potential energy
• conduct laboratory inquiries
to examine the behaviour of
particles in a field
Although physicists have answered many questions about our world, many
puzzles still remain. For one thing, researchers still do not fully understand
the phenomenon of lightning. We do know that lightning is an electrical effect
in which an imbalance of electric charge forms in storm clouds and suddenly
causes a discharge to try to cancel the imbalance. The violent energy of the
storm somehow causes this charge imbalance, but researchers do not yet
understand the exact cause. They also do not yet know how to predict when
and where lightning will strike.
Researchers do know that when the charge imbalance becomes great
enough, a current runs from cloud to ground, cloud to cloud, or even ground
to cloud. In fact, a rare form of lightning called ball lightning forms as a sphere
of charge that can travel along the ground with a ghostly, dangerous glow. A
bolt of lightning can provide up to a million times the voltage of a normal
wall receptacle. The flow of charge can heat the air around a lightning bolt to
seven times the temperature of the surface of the Sun. This sudden immense
heating causes the air to expand rapidly, leading to the sound wave we know
as thunder.
Astrophysicists have recently discovered another surprising phenomenon.
The imbalance of electric charge in storm clouds can cause a burst of antimatter!
Antimatter is the opposite of regular matter in some specific properties such as
charge. For example, the antimatter version of an electron is called the positron.
A positron has all of the properties of an electron except that it is positively
charged. The storm releases electrons upward from the top of the clouds, where
the electrons bump into air molecules. The collision leads to bursts of particles
high above the clouds, including positrons. This phenomenon is depicted in an
artist’s rendering on the facing page. When antimatter and regular matter collide, they annihilate each other to produce a significant amount of energy. You
will learn more about antimatter in Unit 5. To understand this effect and other
puzzles of lightning, we must understand the electric force and how it affects
electrons and other charged particles. You will be learning about the properties
of electric charges and electric fields in this chapter.
STARTING POINTS
Answer the following questions using your current knowledge.
You will have a chance to revisit these questions later,
applying concepts and skills from the chapter.
1. What might cause an imbalance of charges inside
an object?
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Chapter 7 • Electric Fields
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2. Can the path of an electron be directed?
3. How do electric fields compare to gravitational fields?
4. Is it possible to do work with electric charges?
5. What are some applications of electric fields?
NEL
4/27/12 10:36 AM
Mini Investigation
The Van de Graaff Generator
Skills: Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
Your teacher will first demonstrate how a Van de Graaff
generator works. You will then have a chance to touch the
generator and observe its effect on your hair.
The Van de Graaff generator produces a very high
voltage and can give you a dangerous shock,
especially if you have a heart condition. Remove metal
jewellery. Follow your teacher’s instructions.
Equipment and Materials: Van de Graaff generator; grounding
electrode; tall wooden stool
1. Observe as your teacher turns on the Van de Graaff
generator and slowly brings the grounding electrode close
to the generator sphere. Record your observations.
2. Your teacher will discharge the generator before having
you touch it and then turning it on. Sit on the stool, which
is insulated from the ground, and touch the generator
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SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.1
with both hands. Do not let go when the generator
is turned on. Have your classmates observe what
happens to your hair during the demonstration. Note any
sensations that you feel when you touch the generator.
The generator must be discharged before you let go.
Observe what happens when other students touch the
generator. Record your observations.
A. Describe what happened when your teacher brought the
grounding electrode near the Van de Graaff generator. K/U
B. Suppose the spark represented a lightning strike. Explain
how to apply what you observed to protecting buildings
from lightning damage. T/I A
C. Describe what you observed in Step 2 when you were
touching the generator. Describe what you observed in
Step 2 while watching your classmates. Did you note any
differences in the effect on students with long hair compared
to the effect on students with short hair? K/U C A
Introduction
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7.1
Properties of Electric Charge
A visit to a science museum can be, literally, a hair-raising experience. In Figure 1,
the device that the child is touching is a Van de Graaff generator, which produces a
large amount of electric charge. When you touch the generator, the electric charge
spreads along your skin and onto each individual hair. The charges repel each other,
so the hairs spread out and stand on end. How do electric charges move from one
place to another and charge an object? In this section, you will learn the answers to
this and other questions related to the properties of electric charges.
Electric Charge
Figure 1 Electric charges on each strand
of hair exert a repulsive force on the other
strands, causing the hair to rise and
spread out.
About 2500 years ago, Greek scholars first reported that rubbing amber with a piece
of animal fur caused the amber to attract dust particles. You can demonstrate this
effect with modern materials, such as a plastic rod and small bits of paper (Figure 2).
Note that neither the fur nor the rod attracts the paper pieces under normal conditions, but rubbing the two materials together seems to create an attractive force on
each object. An even more remarkable feature is that the rod attracts the pieces of
paper without making direct contact with them.
(b)
(a)
Figure 2 When a plastic rod is rubbed with fur (a), the rod acquires an electric charge. (b) The charged
rod attracts small bits of paper and other objects.
By the early 1900s, physicists had identified the subatomic particles called the electron and the proton as the basic units of charge. All protons carry the same amount
of positive charge, e, and all electrons carry an equal but opposite charge, 2e. Charges
interact with each other in very specific ways governed by the law of electric charges
(Figure 3).
Law of Electric Charges
Like charges repel each other; unlike charges attract.
Like
charges
repel.
Unlike
charges
attract.
Figure 3 The electric force between two like charges (charges with the same sign) is repulsive,
whereas the electric force between unlike charges (charges with opposite signs) is attractive.
An atom or a molecule is considered to have a charge of zero because the number of
protons is equal to the number of electrons. Atoms and molecules can become charged
to form ions. Ions can be positively or negatively charged. In a positive ion, or a cation,
the number of protons must be greater than the number of electrons. Electrons are
removed from an atom or a molecule to become a cation. Conversely, in a negative
ion, or an anion, the number of electrons must be greater than the number of protons.
Electrons are added to an atom or a molecule to make an anion.
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When looking at objects larger than atoms and molecules, we consider the
total charge. The total charge on an object is the sum of all the charges in that
object and can be positive, negative, or zero, just as in the case for atoms and
molecules. A deficit of electrons means that the object is positively charged, and
an excess of electrons means that the object is negatively charged. An object is
said to have a total charge of zero when the number of negative charges equals
the number of positive charges. An object with a charge of zero is said to be
neutral.
In addition, we know that charge can move from place to place, and from one
object to another, but the total charge of the universe does not change. This is stated
clearly in the law of conservation of charge.
Law of Conservation of Charge
Charge can be transferred from one object to another, but the total
charge of a closed system remains constant.
What Is Electric Charge?
In the SI system, the basic unit of charge is called the coulomb (C), in honour of the
French physicist Charles de Coulomb (1736–1806). The charge of a single electron,
2e, is 21.60 3 10219 C, and the charge of a single proton, 1e, is 11.60 3 10219 C.
The symbol e often denotes the magnitude of the charge on an electron or a proton.
In this text, e will have the positive quantity (11.60 3 10219 C).
The symbol q denotes the amount of charge, such as the total charge on a small
piece of paper. To say that a particle has a charge q or that it carries a charge q is
simply a way of saying that the total charge of the particle is q. For example, an
alpha particle is a helium nucleus (a helium atom with no electrons). The helium
nucleus has two protons, so its charge is 2e, or 3.20 3 10219 C (2 3 1.60 3 10219 C).
coulomb the SI unit of electric charge;
symbol C
Conductors and Insulators
To understand how researchers observe electric forces, you need to understand the
various ways that charge can be transferred from one material to another.
Conductors
In most metals, each individual atom is electrically neutral, with equal numbers
of protons and electrons. When these neutral atoms come together to form a large
piece of metal, one or more electrons from each atom are able to escape from the
parent atom and move freely through the entire piece of metal. These electrons are
called conduction electrons, and the metal is a conductor. A conductor is a substance
in which electrons can move easily among atoms. Copper is a good example of a
conductor. The conduction electrons leave behind positively charged ions, which are
bound in place and do not move. By adding or removing electrons from a conductor,
the conductor can acquire a net negative or positive charge.
conductor any substance in which
electrons are able to move easily from
one atom to another
Insulators
On the other hand, electrons in insulators cannot move freely from atom to atom or
escape from the molecules, so no conduction electrons are available to carry charge
through the solid. Extra electrons placed on the surface of an insulator do not move
about freely. Instead, these added electrons stay where they were initially placed.
Examples of insulators are amber, plastic, and quartz.
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insulator any substance in which electrons
are not free to move easily from one atom
to another
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Conductivity of Liquids and Gases
In the case of liquids, the atoms and molecules are free to move throughout the
substance. Certain substances, such as table salt (NaCl), dissolve in water to form
separately charged atoms, or ions. The sodium ion (Na1) and the chloride ion (Cl2)
provide an electric charge in the salt–water solution. This property of salt water
makes it a good conductor, which is especially important for marine animals that rely
on bioelectricity for survival.
The conductivity of gases is similar to that of liquids. The constituent atoms and
molecules of a gas are mostly neutral, but a few are present as ions and are able to carry
charge from place to place. Some free electrons are usually present in a gas as well.
Placing Charge on an Insulator
To understand the electrical behaviour of an object, you must understand what
happens when you add or remove charge from the object. Take, for instance, the
case of an insulator such as quartz, when it is dry and surrounded by dry air. If
you place a few electrons at a particular location on this insulator’s surface, these
electrons will stay in that location (Figure 4(a)). This is because there are no free
electrons in an insulator, and the insulator does not allow the extra electrons to
move about easily.
In reality, excess charge will not stay on an insulator indefinitely. If an insulator
contains some excess electrons, they will attract the stray positive ions that are usually
part of the surrounding air. These stray ions will combine with the electrons on the
insulator and cause the net charge on the insulator to become zero.
Placing Charge on a Conductor
Metals are excellent conductors because electrons can move easily through a
metal. We have to refer to the law of electric charges to understand what happens
when an excess of electrons is present in a conductor. Electrons naturally repel
each other. In a metal object, the electrons are free to move from atom to atom,
but they will never end up moving toward other electrons. The electrons do not
concentrate at the centre of the piece of metal; rather, they move as far away from
one another as possible. Also, the electrons do not spontaneously leave the metal
to get away from each other. There are attractive forces from the protons in the
atoms preventing the electrons from leaving. Since the electrons must repel each
other while staying within the metal, excess electrons on a piece of metal must all
spread evenly on the metal’s surface (Figure 4(b)).
conductor
insulator
(a)
(b)
Figure 4 (a) When excess electrons are placed on an insulator, they generally stay where they are
placed for a period of time. (b) Excess electrons placed on a conductor, however, spread out on the
surface of the material immediately.
This does not mean that there are no charges within the metal. The interior of a
neutral, uncharged metal contains equal numbers of positive and negative charges.
These charges are present inside the metal at all times. Only the excess charge resides
at the metal’s surface. In Figure 4(b), excess charge on the metal surface distributes
as negative charge, by adding electrons to the conductor, or as positive charge, by
removing electrons from the conductor.
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Charging an Object by Friction
Electricity was discovered when a piece of amber was rubbed with fur. The act
of rubbing caused electrons to move from the fur to the amber. The amber thus
acquired a net negative charge (an excess of electrons), whereas the fur was left with
a net positive charge (an excess of positive ions). This process is called charging by
friction. You can also charge a glass rod by rubbing it with a silk cloth, in which
case electrons leave the glass and move to the silk, so the glass acquires a net positive charge. Through investigation, scientists have found that some materials have a
stronger hold on their electrons than others. For example, glass has a weaker hold on
its electrons than does silk. If you were to let glass and silk touch each other, some
electrons would leave the glass and travel to the silk. Rubbing allows more surface to
come into contact, and the friction it produces rips more electrons off the glass to go
to the silk. Figure 5 shows the electrostatic series, which indicates the relative hold
on electrons that different materials have when being charged by friction.
acetate
glass
wool
cat fur, human hair
calcium, lead
silk
aluminum
cotton
paraffin wax
ebonite
polyethylene (plastic)
carbon, copper, nickel
sulfur
platinum, gold
weak hold on
electrons
increasing
tendency
to gain
electrons
strong hold on
electrons
Figure 5 The electrostatic series
Charging an Object by Induced Charge Separation
If you look back at the example of using a charged plastic rod to attract pieces of
paper, you may notice that something seems wrong. You now know that rubbing the
rod with fur charges the rod. However, the pieces of paper start out neutral with a
total charge of zero. How is the neutral paper attracted to the charged rod?
Although the paper is electrically neutral, the presence of the rod nearby causes
some slight movement of the charges in the paper. The negatively charged rod repels
electrons in the paper, which are then redistributed throughout the material. The
electrons thus move a short distance away from the rod, as shown in Figure 6. A net
positive charge remains on the portion of the paper nearest the rod, and a net negative charge stays on the paper opposite the rod. This process is called charging by
induced charge separation.
Figure 6 The negative charges in the paper have been repelled by the negative charges in the rod,
leaving the area of the paper nearest to the rod positively charged and causing attraction between
the paper and the rod.
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7.1 Properties of Electric Charge
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Unlike charges attract, and the positive side of the paper is closer than the negative side of the paper to the negatively charged rod. This makes the paper attractive,
overall, to the charged rod. In this way, an electric force pulls on an electrically
neutral object once the object has undergone induced charge separation.
Another example of induced charge separation is shown in Figure 7. Ordinarily,
the stream of water flows straight downward due to the force of gravity. However, if
you place a charged balloon near the stream, it exerts a deflecting force on the water.
The charged balloon induces a charge separation in the water molecules, producing
an attractive force similar to that produced by the charged rod on the pieces of paper.
Figure 7 A stream of water is deflected by a nearby charged balloon.
Grounding
Suppose you place a charged rubber rod on a table. If you watch carefully with sensitive
electronic measuring equipment, you will find that the excess electrons originally
on the rod move to the table and then to other adjacent objects. Grounding occurs
whenever any charge imbalance is cancelled out by either sending excess electrons into
the ground or moving excess electrons from the ground into the object. Grounding
works because Earth is so large that any extra electrons going into or out of the ground
have an insignificant effect on Earth. The concept of grounding is used by electrical
engineers to ensure that buildings and appliances are safe. Ground wires direct excess
CAREER LINK
charges away from users, protecting them from electric shock.
Charging by Contact and by Induction
How would you transfer some of the electrons on a negatively charged rubber rod to a
piece of metal? You could do this by simply touching the rubber rod to the metal. The rod
contains an excess of electrons, and some of these electrons will move to the metal upon
contact (Figure 8). This is an example of charging by contact, or charging by conduction.
before contact
contact
after contact
Figure 8 If one charged object touches a second object, the second object will usually acquire some of
the excess charge. Hence, the second object is charged by contact. The stand in this illustration is an
insulating stand.
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Now suppose you want to give the metal a net positive charge using the same
negatively charged rubber rod. This might seem an impossible task, but an approach
called charging by induction will accomplish it. This approach uses the properties of
induced charge separation and an electrical ground.
First, bring the negatively charged rod near the metal. This polarizes the conductor by moving conduction electrons to the side opposite the rod and leaving
the side of the metal near the rod with a net positive charge (Figure 9(a)). Now,
connect the negatively charged portion of the metal to an electrical ground using
a metal wire. This allows electrons to move even farther from the charged rod by
travelling into the electrical ground region (Figure 9(b)). Finally, after removing the
grounding wire, the original piece of metal has a net positive charge (Figure 9(c)).
Notice that no positive charges are transferred to the metal; instead, electrons are
removed and the charge left on the metal is positive.
charged rod
ground (a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 9 An object can be charged by the process of induction. (a) The object is first brought near
a charged rod, separating the charges on the object. (b) The object is then connected to a ground;
some electrons flow between it and the ground. (c) The object is left with an opposite excess
charge when it is disconnected from the ground.
Mini Investigation
Observing Electric Charge
Skills: Controlling Variables, Performing, Observing, Analyzing, Communicating
SKILLS
HANDBOOK
A2.1
In this investigation, you will explore how different objects become charged. You will draw
conclusions based on how these charged objects affect small pieces of paper.
Equipment and Materials: plastic pen; pencil; glass stirring rod; tissue paper; fabric
1. Tear a piece of tissue paper into several small pieces and gather them into a pile.
2. Charge the plastic pen by rubbing it on a piece of fabric, such as part of an old
flannel shirt.
3. Bring the charged object near the pieces of paper.
4. Observe how the pieces of paper behave relative to the charged object used, and
record your observations.
5. Gather the pieces of paper into a pile again, and repeat the steps, first using the
pencil, and then using the glass rod. Record your observations.
A. Why does each charged object attract the pieces of paper differently?
K/U
T/I
B. Why do some pieces of paper fall off your charged objects after a short while?
K/U
T/I
C. If you used a metal sphere with a large charge, the pieces of paper would jump off
instead of falling. Explain why this occurs. K/U T/I
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7.1
Review
Summary
• Electric charges are either positive or negative. Objects that have more negative
charge than positive charge are negatively charged. Objects that have more
positive charge than negative charge are positively charged. Objects that have
an equal number of positive and negative charges are neutral and have a total
charge of zero.
• Electrons are the only subatomic particle capable of being transferred from
one object to another. Protons are bound to the atomic nucleus.
• The law of electric charges states the following: Unlike, or opposite, electric
charges attract each other. Like, or similar, electric charges repel each other.
• The law of conservation of charge states that charge can be created or
destroyed, but the total charge of a closed system remains constant.
• Objects can be charged by friction, by induced charge separation, by contact,
and by induction.
Questions
1. When you rub a glass rod with silk, the rod becomes
positively charged; when you rub a plastic rod with
fur, the rod becomes negatively charged. Suppose
you have a charged object but do not know whether
it carries a positive or a negative charge. Explain
how you could use a glass rod and a piece of silk to
determine the sign of the charge on the unknown
object. K/U T/I
2. Explain how two objects attract one another due
to an electric force, when one object has zero net
charge. K/U C
3. Suppose children at a party rub balloons on their
hair and then place the balloons on the wall. If
the rubbing process puts excess electrons on the
balloons, how do the balloons stay attached to the
wall? K/U A
4. The end of a charged rubber rod attracts small
pellets of foam plastic that, having made contact
with the rod, quickly move away from it. Explain
why this happens. T/I C
5. When two objects, such as a glass rod and a silk
cloth, are rubbed together, electrons move from one
object to the other. Can protons also move from one
object to the other? Explain why or why not. K/U T/I
6. If you walk across a thick carpet on a cold,
dry day, electrons will move from the carpet to
your body. K/U
(a) How does the charge on your body compare to
the charge on the rug?
(b) Which of the three methods of charging is
demonstrated in this example?
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7. A student upgrades the memory in her computer
by replacing the memory chip. Before handling
the chip, she first touches the metal casing of the
computer. Why is this a good precaution? K/U A
8. Provide an example of how to give a neutral object
a positive charge using only a negatively charged
object. K/U C
9. In the following examples, describe the change in
charge on each rod and charging material or object
in terms of the movement of electrons. K/U
(a) A glass rod is rubbed with a wool rag.
(b) A plastic rod is rubbed with a silk scarf.
(c) A platinum rod with a negative charge is touched
with a similar rod with a positive charge.
(d) A small metal rod touches a large positively
charged metal sphere.
10. A student shakes hands with his father, who is
wearing a wool sweater. As soon as they shake
hands, a spark jumps between their hands.
Explain what caused the spark. K/U
11. Fabric softener sheets are supposed to reduce the
static cling between the clothes in a dryer. Research
fabric softener sheets, and answer the following
K/U T/I
questions.
(a) Why do clothes cling to each other when
removed from a dryer?
(b) How does a fabric softener sheet reduce the
static cling among clothes?
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7.2
Coulomb’s Law
Recall that charged objects attract some objects and repel others at a distance, without
making any contact with those objects. Electric force, FE, or the force acting between
two charged objects, is somewhat similar to gravity. Both are non-contact forces.
Similar to the force of gravity, the electric force becomes weaker as the distance, r,
between the charged objects increases (Figure 1). Electric force becomes stronger
as the amount of charge on either object increases, in the same way that the force of
gravity becomes stronger with an increase in mass of either object. In this section,
you will learn more about how the electric force depends on charge and distance. You
will also learn how to solve problems related to the electric force.
FE
(a)



1F
4 E
FE
r
2r
electric force (FE) a force with magnitude
and direction that acts between two
charged particles

1F
4 E
(b)
Figure 1 The electric force of repulsion between two identical charges decreases as the separation
increases.
The Electric Force
If you drop a tennis ball, the force of gravity is responsible for its fall. The tennis
ball will take approximately 1 s to fall from a height of 5 m. How long do you
think the tennis ball will take to stop as it hits the ground? It will take a lot less
time to stop than it took to fall. What force is responsible for making the tennis
ball stop? The electric force of repulsion between the protons in the tennis ball and
the protons in the ground stop it. This electric force must be significantly stronger
than gravity.
Consider two charged objects so tiny that you can model them as point particles.
These objects have charges q1 and q2 and are separated by a distance r (Figure 2). The
magnitude of the electric force between q1 and q2 is expressed by the equation
FE 5 k
r
FE
q1
FE
q2
Figure 2 The electric force between
two point charges q1 and q2 is given by
Coulomb’s law.
q1q2
r2
This equation represents Coulomb’s law.
Coulomb’s Law
The force between two point charges is inversely proportional to the
square of the distance between the charges and directly proportional to
the product of the charges.
The constant k, which is sometimes called Coulomb’s constant, has the value
k 5 8.99 3 109 N # m2/C2. Do not confuse this constant k with the spring constant in
Hooke’s law. Most physicists use the same symbol for both.
The direction of the electric force on each of the charges is along the line that connects the two charges, as illustrated in Figure 2 for the case of two like charges. As
mentioned earlier, this force is repulsive for two charges with the same type of charge.
Strictly speaking, the value of FE in the equation for Coulomb’s law applies only to
two point charges. However, it is a good approximation whenever the sizes of the
particles are much smaller than their distance of separation.
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Coulomb’s constant (k) the
proportionality constant in Coulomb’s
law; k 5 8.99 3 109 N # m2 /C2
7.2 Coulomb’s Law
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Investigation
7.2.1
Coulomb’s Law (page 366)
Now that you have learned how to
calculate the electric force between
two charges with a given separation,
perform Investigation 7.2.1 to
determine how electric force
1
varies with distance r and 2 . You
r
will use this information with two
different charge values to determine
Coulomb’s law.
Coulomb’s law has several important properties:
• You have already seen that the electric force is repulsive for like charges and
attractive for unlike charges. Mathematically, this property results from the
product q1q2 in the numerator of the Coulomb’s law equation. The magnitude
of the electric force, FE, is always positive. In physics, it is convenient to use
a negative sign to show direction. Including the negative sign of a negatively
charged object would imply a direction. You never include the sign of the
charge when solving problems related to Coulomb’s law.
• The electric force is inversely proportional to the square of the distance
between the two particles.
• The magnitude of the electric force is the magnitude of the force exerted on
each of the particles. That is, a force of magnitude FE is exerted on charge q1
by charge q2, and a force of equal magnitude and opposite direction is exerted
on q2 by q1. This pairing of equal but opposite forces is described by Newton’s
third law, the action–reaction principle.
Using the equation for Coulomb’s law, we can show that electric forces can be
extremely large. Suppose you have two boxes of electrons, each with a total charge
of q T 5 21.8 3 108 C separated by a distance r of 1.0 m. For simplicity, assume that
each box is so small that it can be modelled as a point particle. The magnitude of the
total electric force is
q 1q 2
FE 5 k 2
r
N # m2 11.8 3 108 C2 11.8 3 108 C2
5 a8.99 3 109
b
11.0 m2 2
C2
FE 5 2.9 3 1026 N
This is an extremely large force, all from just two small containers of electrons. Note
that the negative sign for charge was not included.
Why, then, does the electric force not dominate everyday life? The fact is that it is
essentially impossible to obtain a box containing only electrons. Recall from earlier science
studies that a neutral atom contains equal numbers of electrons and protons. If our two
point-like boxes had contained equal numbers of electrons and protons, their total charges,
qT, would have been zero, and so would the force calculated using Coulomb’s law.
Ordinary matter consists of equal, or nearly equal, numbers of electrons and protons. The total charge is therefore either zero or very close to zero. At the atomic and
molecular scales, however, it is common to have the positive and negative charges
(nuclei and electrons) separated by a small distance. In this case, the electric force is
not zero, and these electric forces hold matter together.
Comparing Coulomb’s Law and Universal Gravitation
The equation for Coulomb’s law may seem familiar to you, even though you have only
just learned it. This is because it is similar to the universal law of gravitation, which
you learned in Chapter 6. Both of these laws describe the force between two objects.
In addition, both depend on certain properties of the objects involved. For gravitation, this property is mass. For the electric force, this property is electric charge. Both
mass and charge can be considered to be concentrated at a central point. If you think
of the mass or charge as a solid sphere, you can treat this same mass or charge as if it
were a point at the centre of that sphere.
Another similarity between the two laws is that both the gravitational force and the
electric force decrease as the distance between the two interacting objects increases.
If the distance between the objects is great (compared to the size of either object),
the actual size and shape of the objects involved become mathematically irrelevant.
The theoretical mass and charge at the centre point of each object are then used
in calculations.
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Although there are similarities between electric and gravitational forces, there are
also important differences. Gravitational forces are always attractive. The direction of
electric forces depends on the types of charge: unlike charges attract, and like charges
repel. Also, the magnitude of the electric force is much greater than the magnitude of
the gravitational force over the same distance.
The Superposition Principle
So far, you have learned about the electric force between two point particles. Now
consider how to use Coulomb’s law with more than two charges. Suppose you have
three particles. One particle has a charge of q1. The second particle has a charge of 2q1
and is a distance 2r from the first particle, as shown in Figure 3. What is the electric
force on a third charge, q2, placed midway between these two charges?
Solve this problem by first using Coulomb’s law to calculate the force exerted by
charge q1 on q2. Then use Coulomb’s law a second time to calculate the force exerted
by the charge 2q1 on q2. The total force on q2 equals the vector sum of these two
separate contributions. This combining of two forces is an example of the superposition principle. The superposition principle says that the total force acting on q2 is the
sum, or superposition, of the individual forces exerted on q2 by all the other charges
in the problem. Remember that force is a vector, so be careful to add these forces as
vectors. This means that, for charges not on a straight line, the solution requires some
trigonometry involving triangles or the use of vector components.
When all charges lie in a straight line, the superposition principle simplifies so that
you can add or subtract the various individual forces to or from one another to obtain
the resultant, or net, force. As shown in Figure 3, the separation between q2 and q1 is
r. Coulomb’s law for this pair of charges is therefore
kq 1q 2
FE1 5
r2
Using the coordinate system in Figure 3, this corresponds to a force on q2 by q1
in the positive x-direction because like charges repel. So, FE1 is the component of the
force along the positive x-axis. The charges line up along the x-axis, so the component
of the force along the y-axis is zero.
Now consider the force on q2 by the charge 2q1 in a similar way. The separation of
the charges is again r, so, using the equation for Coulomb’s law, you get
12q 12 q 2
FE2 5 k
r2
2kq 1q 2
FE2 5
r2
From Figure 3 you can see that this corresponds to the force on q2 by 2q1 in the
negative x-direction, again because like charges repel. This is because the electric
force acts along the line connecting the two charges, which in this case is the
x-axis. For this reason, the component of the force along the y-axis is again zero.
So, the force FE2 exerted by 2q1 on q2 is in the negative x-direction, or to the left.
The total force on q2 is the sum of the two electric forces, FE1 and FE2. Be careful to
take direction into account for the calculation. In this case, the sign of each force
indicates its direction.
>
>
>
F E net 5 F E1 1 F E2
kq 1q 2
2kq 1q 2
51 2 2
r
r2
>
kq 1q 2
F E net 5 2 2
r
The negative sign means that, for the positive product q1q2, the force exerted on q2
is along the negative x-direction.
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q2
q1 FE2
FE1
r
2q1
x
r
Figure 3 The total force on q2 equals
the sum of the forces from charges
q1 and 2q1.
superposition principle the resultant, or
net, vector acting at a given point equals
the sum of the individual vectors from all
sources, each calculated at the given point
7.2 Coulomb’s Law 329
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>
k 0 q1 0 0 q2 0
The equation for Coulomb’s law is more accurately represented by 0 F E 0 5
.
>
r2
Here, the vertical bars surrounding the electric force vector, 0 F E 0 , represent the magnitude of the electric force, and the vertical bars surrounding the charges q1 and q2,
|q1| and |q2|, represent the absolute values of the electric charges. This representation
is more accurate because the magnitude of the electric force is a strictly positive
kq 1q 2
quantity. If you just use the equation FE 5
, you will get a negative value for
r2
the magnitude of the electric force when one of the charges is negative. The absolute
value bars keep the values of the charges positive. However, many people find the
more accurate version of the equation cumbersome and confusing and prefer to use
kq 1q 2
FE 5
. This is what we will do when solving problems. Always remember to
r2
drop the negative signs on charges when using this equation.
The following Tutorial will give you some practice in solving problems using
Coulomb’s law.
Tutorial 1 Using Coulomb’s Law
This Tutorial shows how to use Coulomb’s law to solve charge distribution problems
in both one and two dimensions.
Sample Problem 1: Applying Coulomb’s Law in One Dimension
An early model of the hydrogen atom depicted the electron
revolving around the proton, much like Earth revolving around
the Sun. The proton and electron both have mass, so they exert
a gravitational force upon each other. They also have charge, so
they exert an electric force on each other.
(a) The distance between the electron and the proton in a
hydrogen atom is 5.3 3 10–11 m, the charge of each
is 1.6 3 10219 C, the mass of the electron is
9.11 3 10231 kg, and the mass of the proton is
1.67 3 10227 kg. Calculate the ratio of the electric force FE
to the gravitational force Fg.
(b) Determine the accelerations of the electron caused by both
the electric force and the gravitational force.
Solution
(a) G
iven: r 5 5.3 3 10–11 m; q 5 1.6 3 10219 C;
me 5 9.11 3 10231 kg; mp 5 1.67 3 10227 kg;
k 5 8.99 3 109 N.m2/C2; G 5 6.67 3 10211 N.m2/kg2
FE
Required:
Fg
Analysis: Use Coulomb’s law to calculate FE, and use the
equation for universal gravitation to calculate Fg.
Gmemp
kqeqp
Fg 5
and FE 5 2 , where qe 5 qp.
2
r
r
FE
From these results, calculate .
Fg
kqeqp
Solution: FE 5 2
r
m2
a8.99 3 109 N # 2 b 11.6 3 10219 C2 2
C
5
15.3 3 10211 m2 2
FE 5 8.193 3 1028 N 1two extra digits carried2
330 Chapter 7 • Electric Fields
8160_CH07_p318-345.indd 330
Fg 5
Gmemp
r2
N # m2
b 19.11 3 10231 kg2 11.67 3 10227 kg2
kg2
5
15.3 3 10211 m2 2
247
Fg 5 3.613 3 10 N 1two extra digits carried2
a6.67 3 10211
FE
8.193 3 1028 N
5
Fg
3.613 3 10247 N
FE
5 2.3 3 10 39
Fg
Statement: The electric force FE between the electron and
the proton of a hydrogen atom is 2.3 3 1039 times the
gravitational force Fg between these same particles.
(b) G
iven: me 5 9.11 3 10231 kg; Fg 5 3.613 3 10247 N;
FE 5 8.193 3 1028 N
Required: aE; ag
Analysis: Use the equation for electric force to calculate
a E using FE and me. Likewise, use the equation for
gravitational force to calculate ag using the values of
Fg and me.
Fg
FE
aE 5
and ag 5 . Use 1 N 5 1 kg # m/s2.
me
me
FE
Solution: a E 5
me
m
8.193 3 1028 kg # 2
s
5
9.11 3 10231 kg
a E 5 9.0 3 1022 m/s2
NEL
4/27/12 10:37 AM
Statement: The acceleration of the electron caused by
the electric force of the proton is 9.0 3 1022 m/s2, and the
acceleration of the electron caused by the gravitational force
is 4.0 3 10217 m/s2.
Fg
ag 5
me
m
s2
3.613 3 10247 kg #
5
9.11 3 10231 kg
ag 5 4.0 3 10217 m/s2
Sample Problem 2: Determining Electrostatic Equilibrium
Two charges, q1 5 22.00 3 1026 C and q2 5 21.80 3 1025 C,
are separated by a distance, L, of 4.00 m. A third charge,
q 3 5 11.50 3 1026 C, is placed somewhere between q1
and q 2, as shown in Figure 4, where the net force exerted
on q3 by the other two charges is zero. Determine the location
of q3.
q1
q3
q2



x
L
Figure 4
Given: L 5 4.00 m; q1 5 22.00 3 10 C; q2 5 21.80 3 10
q3 5 11.50 3 1026 C; k 5 8.99 3 109 N.m2/C2
26
25
C;
Required: x, the location of q3
Analysis: Use the superposition principle, and use the equation
for Coulomb’s law to calculate the forces FE1 exerted on q3 by q1
and FE2 exerted on q3 by q2.
kq2q3
.
2
1L 2 x2 2
x
Since the net force on q3 is zero, FE1 2 FE2 5 0, or FE1 5 FE2.
The force equations are FE1 5
Solution:
kq1q3
and FE2 5
FE1 5 FE2
kq1q3
kq2q3
5
1L 2 x2 2
x2
Divide both sides of the equation by the common terms k and q3,
and then simplify.
q1
q2
5
1L 2 x2 2
x2
q1 1L 2 x2 2 5 q2x 2
2
q1 1L 2 2Lx 1 x 22 5 q2x 2
q1L2 2 2q1Lx 1 q1x 2 5 q2x 2
1q2 2 q12 x 2 1 2q1Lx 2 q1L2 5 0
1q2 2 q12 2
x 1 2Lx 2 L2 5 0
q1
Substitute the values for q1, q2, and L into the equation, noting
that x is in metres with three significant digits. Solve for x.
11.80 3 1025 C 2 2.00 3 1026 C2
x2 1
2.00 3 1026 C
2 14.002 x 2 14.002 2 5 0
a
1.60 3 1025 C 2
bx 1 18.002 x 2 16.0 5 0
2.00 3 1026 C
8.00x 2 1 18.002 x 2 16.0 5 0
x2 1 x 2 2 5 0
1x 2 12 1x 1 22 5 0
x 5 1 or x 5 22
Distance is always a positive quantity, so x 5 1.
Statement: The location of q3, such that the electric forces from
q1 and q2 cancel, is x 5 1.00 m, or 1.00 m to the right of q1.
Sample Problem 3: Applying Coulomb’s Law in Two Dimensions
Two point particles have equal but opposite charges of 1q1 and
2q1. The particles are arranged as shown in Figure 5. Suppose
a charge q2 is placed on the x-axis a