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Course Outline CMN 2148 Winter 2013 syllabus

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Faculty of Arts
Department of Communications
CMN 2148 Section B
Organizational Communication (3 credits)
Jan 2013 – April 2013
Dr. Rumaisa Shaukat
Professor
E-Mail
TBA
[please double check the location with me before meeting as I
have more than one office on campus]
rshaukat@uottawa.ca (Preferred means of communication)
For any email query, in the subject colum write your course codes.
Office Hours
After the class on Thursday or By appointment only.
Class Location
DMS1140
Class Hours
Monday 11:30-1:00pm
Thursday 1:00-2:30pm
Office
Website:
Drop off Box for Assignments
Slides will be posted or emailed, NOT course notes. Please attend
classes!
TE22
DEPARTMENTAL COURSE DESCRIPTION
Course Deliverable
Due Date
In-class case analysis
In-class case analysis
In-class case analysis
In-class case analysis
In-class case analysis
In-class case analysis
Peer evaluation
Reflection Paper Due
Research report outline due
Research report
Role play outline due
Role play
Final exam
Jan 17th
Jan 24th
Jan 31st
Feb 7th
Mar 7th
Mar 18th
With all group assignments
Mar 7th
Feb 4th
Mar 21st
Feb 28th
Mar 21st –Mar 28th exclusively
Finals’ week (date and time
TBA)
1
Weight on Final
Grade
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
Please Read below
10%
Not submitting -5%
15%
Not submitting -5%
15%
30
Study of the basic concepts in interpersonal and organizational communication. Processes and
communication networks in the dyad, small groups and organizations.
COURSE INTRODUCTION
Organizational Communication is a critical exploration of the theories, structure, and processes of
communication in organizations. We will focus on communication competency as a linchpin of
organizational change and effectiveness, and address the nature of that competency at individual, group,
and organization-wide levels. Problems, issues, and techniques of organizational communication will be
analyzed through case studies, exercises, and projects. The examination of theory and examples is
intended to improve managerial effectiveness in communication and negotiation.
OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE
Through active participation in this course, it is anticipated that students will be able to:
1. develop and enhance their knowledge of major theories, and concepts concerning organizational
communication;
2. identify the dominant challenges of organizational communication in a variety of workplace
settings, domestically and globally;
3. describe verbal and nonverbal communications and their specific impact on leadership,
management, problem solving, and decision making in organizations;
4. compare traditional and emerging theories of organizational communication;
5. analyze and compare the concepts and practices of communication at individual, group, and
organizational levels and demonstrate their application in a variety of workplace situations;
COURSE FORMAT
Class format will be a combination of lecture, academic videos, and group activities. Lectures will cover
general theoretical concepts as well as specific examples and material from assigned and additional
readings. Students are required and expected to read assigned chapters before coming to the class. In
addition, be prepared to ask questions if you do not understand any concept. Lectures will also, at times,
provide differing perspectives to what you read; you are expected to understand these differing
perspectives.
COURSE EXPECTATIONS
1. Emails: I communicate with students through their student uottawa email accounts. It is your
responsibility to check your emails as I will be sending important messages through this
medium.
2. Active Participation. Students are expected to attend, take notes, and participate in class. Students
are expected to maximize their own learning by actively participating in all activities. This
includes raising questions for discussion or clarification, bringing their own work and other
organizational (only professional and academic) experiences to discussion, and interacting
professionally and ethically with classmates and with the instructor.
3. Regular Attendance. As most of the course material is structured in such a way that it builds upon
itself, and because this class, for obvious reasons, places so much emphasis on the practice of
communication through discussion, exercises, etc., it is difficult for you to enhance your
interpersonal skills if you are not regularly present to practice them. Also, because you will be
part of a group requiring your involvement and input, attendance is something that you owe to
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
your fellow group members. Therefore, punctual attendance and regular readings are strongly
recommended.
Follow Assignment Instructions. Carefully read the instructions for your written assignments
described in the course outline. Always use a title for your work. Strictly, follow the instructions
regarding page limit/font size/margins for your written submissions. In any case do not exceed
the required standard page limits for all submissions. Format for written submissions should
follow the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual (5th Edition).
Keep duplicates of deliverables. For your protection, always keep a copy of your written
assignments (either soft copy or a hard copy). In case of loss, theft, destruction, dispute over
authorship, or any other eventuality, it will be your responsibility to provide a copy of your
written submissions.
Respect Deadlines. All deadlines need to be respected, and exceptions will be granted only in
extraordinary cases. No make up case study, no make up assignment. Projects which are
submitted after the due date without an agreed upon extension are considered late assignments.
Assignments must be handed in at which they are due. Submission of late assignments requires
the prior consent of the instructor otherwise the penalty on late assignments is a grade loss of
10% per day up to a maximum of 3 days, after that assignments will not be accepted.
Respect your classmates’ desire to learn. In class, turn off all cell phones, beepers, or other
electronic communication devices.
Late arrivals and early departures are not acceptable in this class. Do not ‘leave’ early, that is,
pack up books, stand up, etc. near the end of the class. The class period is over when the allocated
time is completely up or when the instructor dismisses the class. Late students conspicuously
disturb the learning experience for their classmates. As a courtesy, you should plan to arrive no
later than the start of class (if not sooner).
Modifications in the schedule: Teaching is a dynamic process. There may be occasions during our
time together where modifications to various aspects of the course will be necessary. Thus, the
course syllabus is a guide only for our teaching and learning.
EMAIL GUIDELINES
 Please be professional.
 Always use your university account. E-mail from other domains (hotmail, gmail) often are treated as
spam.
 Always identify the course number and section in the Subject line
 Please use proper greetings. You can refer to your instructors as “Professor X” or “Dr. X.” Any other
title (Ms., Mrs., Miss, or Mr.) is less appropriate given the classroom context. As university students,
it is imperative that you learn to use proper titles.
 Always sign your email with your first and last names and include your student number.
EXAM MAKE-UP POLICY:
If you show up late for any exam, you will not be allowed extra time. If you show up after someone has
left the room, you will not be allowed to take the exam. No exceptions!
If you miss an exam due to medical reasons or personal emergencies, it is your responsibility to contact
the professor within 24 hours of the beginning of the class period you missed. You will only be allowed
to take a make-up exam upon providing an official document (e.g., doctor notes in case of a medical
emergency) detailing the reason for your absence. Make-ups, if permitted, may differ from the original
exam in terms of the number of questions asked and/or question format.
POLICY ON RE-MARKING
From time to time, students have legitimate concerns about marks they have received on a Case, Quiz, or
Project. If you feel that any paper handed back to you has not been marked appropriately for the work you
have submitted, you do have recourse for re-marking. However, please note that to be eligible for re-
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marking, you must embark upon the following procedure within one week of the deliverable being
handed back in class:
1. Indicate in writing specifically what your concern(s) is (are). This does NOT mean that you
simply say “I think I deserve more marks.” You must clearly indicate where the marker made a
mistake in his/her marking of the paper. In this regard, you must refer to the class notes, excerpt
in the textbook, etc., supporting your claim.
2. After completing #1 above, you must submit the paper with your comments back to the Professor
within one week of the paper being handed back in class. If you did not pick up the paper when it
was handed back, you still have only 1 week from the original hand-back date to request a
remark.
3. If a deliverable is not resubmitted following the above guidelines, the Professor will regard the
mark as originally assigned to be the final mark for that deliverable.
NO MARKS will be changed at a later date. It is important to note that the Professor reserves the right to
remark the entire paper in question and to either leave the mark as is or to change it positively or
negatively as required.
REQUIRED READING MATERIALS
Required Text book (available at university of Ottawa bookstore)
Shockley-Zalabak, P. (2012). Fundamentals of Organizational Communication, 8/E. Allyn & Bacon. (7TH
Edition is acceptable as well)
Required Course Pack
All required case studies are in the CMN2148 course reader, to be purchased at RYTEC printing (former
Enviro copies) at 404 Dalhousie Street [between Rideau & Besserer]. Open 8:30-6:00pm. Ph. (613) 2412679.
COURSE SCHEDULE
The following is a tentative schedule of events subject to change as necessary and desirable. Students will
be notified in advance of any changes requiring preparation. I will keep you posted in class.
Date
Jan 7th
Jan 10
Jan 14
Jan 17
Jan 21
Jan 24
Jan 28
Topic
Readings
Introduction to the course, Overview of intended outcomes, readings,
assignments and evaluation for the course
No reading assigned
Organizational Communication: A competency-based approach
Theoretical perspectives for Organizational Communication
&
Images of Organizations
Communication Implications of major Organizational Theories
Case Study One
The Indictment: The Superior-Subordinate Confrontation
Organizational Communication: Values and Ethical Communication
Behaviours
Case Study Two
Vocabularies of motives in a crisis leadership
Individuals in Organizations & Groups in Organizations
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Read Ch 1-2
Reading One From
Course Pack
Read Ch 3
Case Study from
Course Pack
Read Ch 4
Case Study from
Course Pack
Read Ch 5-6
Jan 31
Feb 4
*Project outline Due*
Feb 7
Feb 11
Feb 18 & Feb 21
Study Break
Feb 25
Feb 28
*Role Play Outline Due*
Mar 4
Mar 7
*Reflection Paper Due*
Case Study Three
Submerging the emergent culture
Participating in Organizations: Developing Critical Organizational
Communication Competencies
Case Study from
Course Pack
Read Ch 8
Case Study Four
There is no Smile on your face brother John
Groupthink DVD02045
Case Study from
Course Pack
Video + Discussion
No Class
No reading assigned
Organizational Conflict: Communicating for Effectiveness
Read Ch 9
Conflict Management VH02864 & VH05474
Video + Discussion
Strategic Organizational Communication: Professional Applications of
Organizational Communication & Leadership and Management
Communication
Read Ch 7 & 10
Case Study Five
I heard it through Grapevine
Cross-Cultural Communication; Cross –Cultural Communication &
Negotiation (Video); Applications of Organizational Communication
Mar 11
Mar 14
Mar 18
Mar 21
**All Project Reports Due
with Peer Evaluations**
Mar 25
Organizational Change and Communication
*Career Options for Organizational Communication*
Case Study Six
Changing the Information Culture
& Pre Exam Review
Role Play Presentations
Role Play Presentations
Case Study from
Course Pack
Notes will be posted on
Virtual Campus
Read Ch 11 & 12
Case Study from
Course Pack
Apply all Knowledge
Apply all Knowledge
Mar 28
Apr 1 Easter Break
Role Play Presentations
No Class
No reading assigned
EVALUATION
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
6 In-class case studies [in groups]: 30%
2 Reflection Papers: 10%
Designing, Scripting, and Performance of a Role Play Exercise [in groups]: 15%
Research Paper [in groups): 15%
Peer evaluation: Please read carefully in the section below
Final Exam: 30%
Note: The composition of groups for the case studies, Role plays and Research Project will be
determined, at the latest, by the start of the second class. Students will form their own team (minimum 5,
maximum 6 members) early in the course, and will remain in this team to complete all in-class case
studies and deliver the final group presentation.
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In-class case studies: 30%
Throughout the course, activities will take place to accompany lectures. When cases are used, they may
be from the end of a chapter or from the required course pack. Each group is expected to analyze the
assigned case in class, and to work together to produce a short, written case analysis report. Your report
should use text theory (from the chapter assigned for that class) to explain and suggest ways of managing
the OC phenomena depicted in the assigned case. Ideally, each of you will be familiar enough with the
course material for that class to be able to contribute to your in-class case discussions. To provide some
encouragement in this regard, these case study reports will be picked up, at the end of class, 6 times
during the semester. Late case submissions will be subject to a 50% penalty per half hour late. For the
purposes of this course, specific questions will be assigned for each case. The marking format for each
question will be announced at the time. Each case will be worth 5%. Case answers should be a maximum
of 5 pages hand written (one-side only) or 2.5 pages typed with 12 font-size, Times New Roman, and 1inch margins. Please write as neatly as possible. Illegible reports will not be graded! A maximum of
20% of the grade assigned to a team’s report can be removed if the report contains significant
grammatical and/or spelling mistakes.
For each case, I will assign you specific questions for each case a day before the case is due. Read the
case before coming to the class and as a group answer the assigned questions using material assigned for
that case class (as well as material taught in the course, and your academic and professional experience if
also applicable – don’t just dump indiscriminately). Each case will be marked out of 5%.
Format:
1. Use a cover/title page. You must use the template provided by the professor (posted on virtual
campus).
2. Double-spaced, maximum 5 pages.
3. Point form is acceptable (and even preferable to verbosity) as long as you’re coherent.
4. Integrity Statement: Be sure to include a signed (by all team members) copy of the personal
ethics agreement (attached with your course outline) for group assignments. Groups who did not
include this agreement will not receive a grade for that particular case. This form is at the
end of your course outline.
5. Peer Evaluation: Be sure to include a peer evaluation for the group (attached with your course
outline). NO PEER EVALUATION WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER THE ASSIGNMENT WAS
SUBMITTED. Groups that did not include a peer evaluation will not receive a grade for
that particular case/assignment. You will be reminded about this at the start of the first two
cases. Peer evaluations are supposed to be confidential so I don’t want people standing or sitting
in circle and evaluating each other.
6. Format for written submissions should follow the American Psychological Association (APA)
Publication Manual (5th or 6th Edition).
Submission Timing Requirements:
Cases must be submitted to me, in person, by 10 minutes prior to the end of the class in which the case is
being done. Late submissions will not be accepted. I should be receiving one large envelope from each
group with all above mentioned documents. It is your responsibility to make sure you have an envelope
and peer evaluation forms. No hand written peer evaluations or integrity statements will be acceptable.
Marking:
1. You will be expected to support your responses to the questions by providing examples and/or
citing areas of scholarly support for your position taken, where applicable.
2. More specifically, each assignment question will be graded according to the following general
guidelines, as per the grade sheet appended at the end of this document:
a) How well did the response actually answer the question in a logical, clear and
comprehensive manner?
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b)
c)
d)
e)
How well did the response deal with all aspects of the question?
How well did the response link the relevant course material?
Did the response demonstrate an appropriate effort/level of analysis?
To what extent did the response demonstrate original thought or new insights to the issue
that falls outside the course materials? (exceptional grades are awarded for this level of
effort)? .
About the Reflective Log (10%)
Learning theory indicates that competency is enhanced by repetition and reflection, particularly when
students are asked to transfer their learning beyond the immediate classroom material/context.
Accordingly, on at least 2 different occasions as you go through this course, I would like you to write 2
entries critically assessing the value that you have taken from that week’s readings/class activities and
relating it to real life events/issues (either your own, or those in the news). Quality of the content and
expression is what you should aim for. Two concise, thoughtful reflections are required not summaries of
the readings that have little analytical (positive and/or negative) element to them.
Content: Your entries can be written prior to a class, but if you do so be sure to follow up with a note
indicating how the class discussion did/did not satisfy any unanswered questions you may have had about
the topic. Here are some suggested questions to guide your entries:
o -Include the title page
o -Be sure to introduce yourself briefly on the first page of your reflective log submission
(after the title page). What motivated you to register for this course? What are your initial
expectations upon
registration? What sort of career are you interested in? Please note that this introduction
does NOT count toward one of your two memos, it is merely a means for allowing us to
gear our feedback to you in a way that would be most helpful to you.
o -What do you see as the principal lessons to take away from that week’s
readings/activities? Be very brief about this (1-2 sentences would suffice), I am not
interested in reading summaries of my lecturer or book chapters. I am more interested in
reading your reflections about the lecture’s key learning points, as follows:
1. -To what extent do the arguments/findings put forth from the readings/activities
surprise you?/Ring true to you?
2. - Do you believe that your own motivation, communication style, etc. would then be
consistent with what the readings would suggest about people and multiple contexts?
3. -Do you foresee any challenges you would have in implementing the key learning
points from any particular lecture?
4. -Feel free (but not obliged) to explore the relevance of the week’s material to
organizational communication related encounters you have experienced in the past,
are currently experiencing, or expect to experience (e.g., in your career).
Format for Submission: Each entry should be between 2-3 pages, typed, double spaced, with 1” margins,
12ptfont. No Email submissions.
Submission Timing Requirements:
You are required to submit all 2 entries (stapled together not in any file) on the due date, submission must
be done in class, within 5 minutes of the start of class. Late submissions will NOT be accepted. No
extensions will be granted. Start working on reflective logs as soon as possible.
Grading: Please note that because the reflective log taps your reflections on the class material and
activities, it is, in essence, also a reflection of your attendance. You need to offer insightful reflection,
including raising questions, critiquing, drawing in current events from the news or from your own
experience (as discussed in the content section, above).
Designing, Scripting, and Performance of a Role Play Exercise [in groups]: 15%
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In groups you will design, and perform a role play exercise on any theme/topic covered for the course. A
more detailed description of this assignment will be provided in the class. A one-two pages summary of
your role play is required on the day you present (not the script) with peer evaluations. A proposal outline
(your chosen scenario and different roles) of the role play is due on Feb 28th. You are encouraged to
consult professor as soon as possible; this due date is the deadline only. Please note: The outline has no
marks but if you didn’t submit an outline and got approval, you would lose 5% of your role play mark.
Guidelines for Role Play Exercises
It is very important to structure role plays by clearly defining both the situation and the roles to be played
by each actor. Your role play exercise should have a proper beginning, middle, and end. I will be
observing following specific points such as:
Was the problem relevant to the course, similar to or different from real life, and did all players show
feelings realistically?
 Was the team calm and focused while performing?
 Were the obstacles/problems resolved/managed? If so, how well did the actors handle it?
 Was the solution a cooperative, positive, practical one? Did it make the situation better?
 Are there other solutions that could be used to solve the problem even better?
 How was the timing, tone of voice, and body language as the team carried out the plan?
 What kinds of skills were significant: critical thinking, empathy, decision making, assertiveness
etc.?
Some other elements:
Conceptual clarity (lucid thinking, clear presentation of ideas)
Issue description (comprehensiveness, depth of detail)
Critical analysis (objective critique of material)
Internal logic and consistency (flow of ideas, connectedness of writing)
Originality and creativity (uniqueness, inventiveness)
Research Project: 15%
The research project involves a descriptive and analytical study of a selected organizational crisis and
communication strategies used to deal with the situation within that specific organization (e.g., BP’s oil
spill crisis, Maple Leaf’s listeria crisis). The research project is a group initiative and the proposed issue
must be cleared prior to commencement of the research assignment with the professor to ensure that no
organization is approached by more than one student group in the class. The research project will help
solidify relevant concepts studied in a practical environment and raise issues of application and
implementation problems. In summary:
1 Choose any crisis situation in any organization. If possible, interview (via email or phone if
personal face to face interview is not possible) someone in an organization who is in a position to
talk about that company’s communication strategy in that situation/crisis. For example, managers,
public relations staff, human resource s manager or communication officers etc.
2 Analyze how the organization handled the situation through its communication strategy. Clearly
analyze the pros and cons of the way the challenge was dealt with. Provide and explain an alternative
strategy that could have been used to deal with the challenge, and present its pros and cons . In this
section refer to the content of the course.
3 Make an overall commentary on what you have learned from your research effort. What else would
you have liked to have learned about this topic that you were not able to discover? Finally, if you had
to do this research project all over again, what would you have done differently?
A written proposal/outline (max 1 page) is to be submitted to the professor on Feb 4th and approved prior
to commencing work. The proposal should have a detailed structure (use the template cover page) and a
bibliography. Proposal details will be discussed further in class. The research project will be presented in
class. Plagiarism and academic fraud as described in the regulations will involve sanctions. Please note:
The outline has no marks but if you didn’t submit an outline and got approval, you would lose 5% of your
project mark.
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Marking criteria for the project
Marks will be assigned to each section according to the following general guidelines:
1. How well did the response actually address the proposed topic in a logical, clear and
comprehensive manner? Correspond to the original outline proposal? (And if it deviated, how
sound is the explanation that was provided?)
2. How well did the response link the relevant course theory & demonstrate an appropriate
effort/level of analysis?
3. To what extent did the response demonstrate an independent research effort – in other words,
was the response supported by any additional references (i.e. other sources of information on the
same subject that offer context, perspective, support for your position, etc.), ideas, etc. that
demonstrate original thought or new insights to the issue that fall outside the course materials?
More specifically, you are expected to demonstrate a research effort and contain positions that are
supported by independent sources. You are expected to explore and cite as many external sources
of information as practicable in developing your responses. You will be expected to support your
position by providing examples and/or citing areas of scholarly support for your position taken,
where applicable. (the better grades are awarded for this level of effort)
Format:
Marks will be deducted for failing to comply with the following format details:
1. Conform to Size Contraints: Not exceed 15 pages, double-spaced, word processed using a 12
pitch font and 1” margins (you will be penalized for exceeding these constraints) –PLEASE
NOTE: the 15 page limit excludes title page, bibliography, footnotes and any appendices. To
save trees, you are encouraged to print on both sides of the page whenever possible (although this
will not affect your mark).
2. Pagination: Include page numbers;
3. Grammar: Be grammatically sound. Writing Resources available to you include the Academic
Writing Help Centre, University of Ottawa. http://www.sass.uottawa.ca/en/awhc/ and the book:
The Elements of Style (Strunk & White) [should be available at the library].
4. Proper Referencing: I cannot emphasize this point enough. If you make ANY factual
statement that is obviously taken from a source other than your own common knowledge, you
need to demonstrate a responsibility to scholarship by including a bibliography and footnotes in
an acceptable format (i.e., Follow the American Psychological Association (APA) Publication
Manual (5th Edition) - APA Style http://www.apastyle.org) Please note that the majority of the
references must be reasonably current (past 2 years). I repeat: Do NOT present facts in the body
of the project without references! The best that will happen will be a 50% deduction in your
mark; the worst that will happen would be a charge of plagiarism.
5. Cover Page. Include a title page displaying the names and student numbers of the authors. You
must use the template provided by the professor (posted on virtual
6. Flow: Be well organized – i.e. clearly label the section headings & questions being responded
to;
7. Peer Evaluations: Include completed peer ratings with the group’s number written on top of it.
The peer evaluation must be submitted along with the project submission. Group members who
did not include a peer evaluation will not receive a grade for the project.
8. Integrity Statement: Attach the ethics statement form attached with your course outline.
Failure to include this signed attestation will result in an automatic “F”.
9. Submission Method & Timing Requirements for Report: Projects must be submitted to me
in paper form within 10 minutes of the START of class in the week in which the projects are due
(see Agenda at the end of this course outline). Late submissions will not be accepted and will
receive a score of zero.
Note: No hand written peer evaluations or integrity statements will be acceptable.
Peer Evaluations with all group assignments
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With all case studies, role play script and the final project report, each group member should submit, in a
sealed envelope, a grade for all group members. Use only the original Peer evaluation form attached with
the course outline (no hand written evaluations will be accepted). Peer evaluations are supposed to be
confidential so please do it in private then fold them and put them in the large envelope with the
assignments.
Deadline: With each group assignment.
Note: Evaluation from individual students without a sealed envelope will not be accepted (no staples or
glue, use the original Peer evaluation form). As a group place all peer evaluation envelopes and your final
project report in One large envelope. Not following any of the instructions above could affect your grade.
In addition, if you are not submitting peer evaluation forms for your group members, you will personally
lose 5 marks. Please Note peer evaluation marks can drastically affect your mark so make sure to pull
your weight and contribute towards all group assignments fairly. No email or late submissions will be
accepted.
None of the students will have access to these forms after the submission. This evaluation is strictly
confidential; all forms will be destroyed at the end of the semester.
Final Examination: 30%
2 hours long final exam will consist of 50 multiple-choice questions only (30% mark), which will cover
material from lectures, readings and videos. Please bring your own erasers, and lead pencils.
Exam Date: To be determined by the scheduling office
GRADING SCALE
The following grading scale will be used. Grading of assignments may be conducted using numbers or
letter grades. In either case, the description included below describes the expectations for candidates at
each grade level.
A+
Exceptional
90-100%
A
Exemplary
85-89%
AExcellent
80-84%
B+
Very Good
75-79%
B
Good
70-74%
C+
Satisfactory
66-69%
An exceptional grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a
thorough knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in content and
presented in a clear, coherent and effective manner. In addition an exceptional response adds something
novel and original which distinguishes an A+ from an A. Exceptional responses are rarely encountered
as they are, by definition, outstanding among other responses.
An exemplary grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough
knowledge of all relevant concepts and techniques. The response is complete in its content, with a clear
and coherent presentation designed to communicate effectively.
An excellent grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates a thorough
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is largely complete in its content and
clearly presented. However, some minor aspect of the assignment which may pertain to content or
effective communication is lacking.
A very good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. The response is both informative and clearly presented.
However, the response is incomplete, as some substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked.
A good grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates adequate
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. However, the response is incomplete as some
substantive aspect of the assignment has been overlooked. In addition, there are difficulties with
effective communication.
A satisfactory grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates basic
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been
overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that
readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
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C
Pass
60-65%
D+ 55-59%
D 50-54%
Passable
E 40-49%
Non-redeemable
Failure
A pass grade in a course or on an assignment is given for a response that demonstrates incomplete
knowledge of relevant concepts and techniques. A substantive aspect of the assignment has been
overlooked. In addition, the difficulties with effective communication result in a lack of clarity such that
readers or listeners struggle to get the information.
The category of redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or
techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. Clearly not adequate but passable.
A non-redeemable failure demonstrates an unacceptable level of knowledge of concepts and/or
techniques to satisfy the requirements of an assignment or course. No supplemental examination and/or
assignments are offered.
ACADEMIC FRAUD
A note of caution regarding cheating and plagiarism
Students are advised to become familiar with the University of Ottawa’s policy regulations on academic
fraud. Plagiarism is one type of academic fraud. A student found guilty of committing plagiarism will be
subject to sanctions, which range from receiving a mark F for the work in question to being expelled from
the University, and even the revocation of a degree, diploma, or certificate already awarded. For useful
guidelines to help you avoid plagiarism, please consult the following web pages:
http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/info/regist/fraud_e.html
http://www.uottawa.ca/plagiarism.pdf
Writing Resources
The Academic Writing Help Centre, University of Ottawa.
http://www.sass.uottawa.ca/en/awhc/.
The Elements of Style (Strunk & White)
http://www.bartleby.com/141/.
APA style
http://www.apastyle.org.
FOR STUDENTS IN NEED OF LEARNING SUPPORTS
Students who require accommodations or academic support because of a physical or learning disability,
or any condition that affects their ability to learn, are invited to register with ACCESS SERVICE:
In person: UCU 339. By Telephone: 562-5976. TTY: 562-5214. By Email: adapt@uottawa.ca
Students can then meet with an Access Service specialist to identify their individual needs and to discuss
appropriate
interventions.
IMPORTANT DATES TO REMEMBER
For requesting accommodations for a mid-term examination: Requests must be submitted at least 7 days
(not including the day of the exam nor any statutory holiday) prior to the writing date of mid-terms, tests,
quizzes or other forms of written evaluations.
For requesting accommodations for final exams: Fall Semester: before 15 November ; Winter Semester:
before 15 March Spring/Summer Semester: 7 days prior to the exam (not including the day of the exam
nor any statutory holiday)
11
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Ashcraft, K. L., Allen, B. J. (2003). The racial foundation of organizational communication.
Communication Theory, 13(1), 5-38.
Ashcraft, K. L., & Kedrowicz, A. (2002). Self-direction or social support? Nonprofit empowerment and
the tacit employment contract of organizational communication studies. Communication
Monographs, 69(1), 88-110.
Beebe, S. A. (2004). Interpersonal communication: Relating to others. Toronto: Pearson Canada
Dodson, H. B. (2000). Organizational communication online. Journal of Rehabilitation Administration,
24(1),47-55.
Edley, P. P., Hylmo, A., & Newsom, V. A. Alternative organizing communities: Collectivist organizing,
telework, home-based internet businesses, and online communities. In Kalbfleisch, Pamela J
(Ed.). (2004). Communication yearbook 28. (pp. 87-125). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum
Associates, Publishers
Fisher, B. A., Adams, K. L. (1994). Interpersonal communication: Pragmatics of human relationships.
New York: McGraw-Hill
Goodman, J., & Truss, C. (2004). The medium and the message: Communicating effectively during a
major change initiative. Journal of Change Management, 4(3), 217-228.
Goczol, J., & Scoubeau, C. (2003). Corporate communication and strategy in the fields of projects.
Corporate Communications, 8(1), 60-66.
Harris, T. E. (2002). Applied organizational communication: Principles and pragmatics for future
practice (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
Jablin, F. M., & Putnam, L. L. (2001). The new handbook of organizational communication: Advances in
theory, research, and methods. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications
Jones, E., Watson, B., Gardner, J., & Gallois, C. (2004). Organizational communication: challenges for
the new century. Journal of Communication, 54(4), 722-750
Jones, D., & Stubbe, M. (2004).Communication and the reflective practitioner: a shared perspective
from sociolinguistics and organisational communication. International Journal of Applied
Linguistics,14(2), 185-211.
Keenan, J. P. (2002). Whistleblowing: A study of managerial differences. Employee Responsibilities &
Rights Journal, 14(1), 17-32.
Keyton, J., & Shockley-Zalabak, P. (Eds.). (2004). Case studies for organizational communication:
Understanding communication processes. Los Angeles, Calif.: Roxbury Publishing Company
Kozminski, A. K., & Cushman, D. P. (Eds.). (1993). Organizational communication and management: A
global perspective. Albany : State University of New York Press
12
Lewis, L. K., & Hayward, P. A. (2003). Choice-Based Learning: Student Reactions in an Undergraduate
Organizational Communication Course. Communication Education, 52(2), 148-156.
Lynch, O. H. (2002). Humorous communication: Finding a place for humor in communication research.
Communication Theory, 12(4), 423-445.
McCroskey, J. M. (1998). Communication and personality: Trait perspectives. Cresskill, N.J.: Hampton
Press
McPhee, R. D., & Zaug, P. (2001). Organizational theory, organizational communication, organizational
knowledge, and problematic integration. Journal of Communication, 51(3), 574-591.
Mokros, H. B. (2003). Identity matters: Communication-based explorations and explanations. Cresskill,
N.J.: Hampton Press
Mohan, M. L. (1993). Organizational communication and cultural vision: Approaches for analysis.
Albany : State University of New York Press
Neher, W. W. (1997). Organizational communication: Challenges of change, diversity, and continuity.
Boston: Allyn and Bacon
Renz, M. A., & Greg, J. B. (2000). Effective small group communication in theory and practice. Boston:
Allyn & Bacon.
Schuler, M. (2004). Management of the Organizational Image: A Method for Organizational Image
Configuration. Corporate Reputation Review, 7(1), 37-53.
Stohl, C. (1997). Organizational communication: Connectedness in action. Thousand Oaks: Sage
Publications
Sobo, E. J., & Sadler, B. L. (2002). Improving organizational communication and cohesion in a health
care setting through employee-leadership exchange. Human Organization, 61(3), 277-287.
Stangor, C. (2004). Social groups in action and interaction. New York: Psychology Press.
Stevens, P. M., Williams, K. P., & Smith, M. C. (2000). Organizational communication and
information processes in an Internet-enabled environment. Psychology & Marketing, 17(7), 607632.
Trenholm, S., Jensen, A. (2004). Interpersonal communication. New York: Oxford University Press
Tukiainen, T. (2001).An agenda model of organisational communication. Corporate Communications,
6(1), 47-52.
Wanguri, D. M. (2003). Federally regulated corporate communication: An analysis of dominant values.
Corporate Communications, 8(3), 163-172.
13
Additional Online Resources - Communication and Organizational Communication
Communication Institute for Online Scholarship
http://www.cios.org
Social Science Information Gateway
http://www.sosig.ac.uk
American Communication Association
http://www.americancomm.org
Organizational Communication Page
http://web.syr.edu/~blbousfi/OrganizationCom.html
International Communication Association
http://www.icahdq.org
National Communication Association
http://www.natcom.org
International Communication Association Organizational Communication Division
http://www.ohiou.edu/ica-orgcomm/index.htm
Academy of Management Organizational Communication and Information Systems Division
http://divisions.aomonline.org/ocis/newsletter
14
APPENDIX I
Peer Evaluation Form
Please write a short narrative addressing the evaluee’s contributions before assigning a rating. Include in
your narrative how many times the group met outside of class, how many meetings the evaluee attended,
whether the evaluee made a serious effort to complete the assigned work before the group meeting,
whether the group member attempted to make contributions in group project, whether the member was
cooperative with the group effort, and whether the group member did all the readings before coming to
the meetings.
Excellent
Very Good
Satisfactory
Marginal
Unsatisfactory
Carried more than her/his part of the load
Consistently did what she/he was supposed to do
Usually did what she/he was supposed to do
Minimally prepared and cooperative
Unprepared and uncooperative
5 points
4 points
3 points
2 points
1 or 0 point
Name of Evaluator: ___________________________________________________________________
Case Study Number:______________________________________________ Date: _______________
Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
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Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Name of Student Being Evaluated: _______________________________________________________
Rating Scales: Rating: _____/5
Comments:__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Note: None of the students will have access to these forms after the submission. This evaluation is strictly
confidential; all forms will be destroyed at the end of the semester.
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APPENDIX II
Personal Ethics Statement Concerning Assignments
Group Assignment:
By signing this Statement, I am attesting to the fact that I have reviewed not only my own work, but the work of my
colleagues, in its entirety. I attest to the fact that my own work in this project meets all of the rules of quotation and
referencing in use at the University of Ottawa, as well as adheres to the fraud policies as outlined in the Academic
Regulations in the University’s Undergraduate Studies Calendar. I further attest that I have knowledge of and have
respected the “Beware of Plagiarism” brochure found on the university website. To the best of my knowledge, I also
believe that each of my group colleagues has also met the rules of quotation and referencing aforementioned in this
Statement. I understand that if my group assignment is submitted without a signed copy of this Personal Ethics
Statement from each group member, it will be interpreted by the School that the missing student(s) signature is
confirmation of non-participation of the aforementioned student(s) in the required work.
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
_______________________________
Name, Capital letters
_________________
Student number
_______________________________
Signature
_________________
Date
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APPENDIX III
Quick APA Guide: Examples of APA reference format:
Journal Reference:
Akmal, T., & Miller, D. (2003). Overcoming resistance to change: A case study of revision and
renewal in a US secondary education teacher preparation program. Teaching & Teacher
Education, 19(4), 409-420.
Book Reference:
Apps, J. W. (1994). Leadership for an emerging age: Transforming practice in adult and
continuing education. San
Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Book Chapter Reference:
Cobb, A. T., Wooden, K. C., & Folger, R. (1995). Justice in making: Toward understanding the
theory and practice in organizational change and development. In W.A. Pasmore & R.
W. Woodman (Eds.), Research in Organizational Change and Development (pp. 243295). New York: JAI Press
Book Editions:
Friend, M., & Cook, L. (1996). Interactions: Collaborative skills for school professionals.
(2nd ed.). White Plains, NY: Longman.
Internet Article:
Bolognese, A. F. (2002). Employee Resistance to Organizational Change. Retrieved May 13,
2004 from http://www.newfoundations.com/OrgTheory/Bolognese721.html
Dissertation reference:
Bean, C. J. R. (2003). Framing and sensemaking in organizational change: The experience of
nomadic work. [Dissertation Abstract] Dissertation Abstracts International, 64(2-A),
564US: Univ Microfilms International.
Same Authors in same year:
Dent, E. B., & Goldberg, S. G. (1999a). Challenging “resistance to change”. Journal of
Applied Behavioral Science, 35(1), 25-41.
Dent, E. B., & Goldberg, S. G. (1999b). Resistance to change: A limiting perspective. The
Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 35(1), 45-47.
Text Citation:
1. Author’s last name and year of publication [E.g., Bolognese, (2002)]
2. For direct quotations, author’s last name, year of publication and page numbers. E.g., (Bolognese,
2002, p. 12) or Bolognese (2002) claims, “………” (P. 12). For more than one page (Bolognese,
2002, p. 12-15) or Bolognese (2002) claims, “………” (P. 12-15).
3. If you are just borrowing an idea from a text then simply write author’s last name and year of
publication. E.g., Bolognese, (2002) states....
4. For quotation containg more than 40 words, indent and single-space the whole quotation.
18
5. If you have more than one aouthors. For the first time, write last names of all authors and year of
publication. For second time text citation, use Cobb et al., (1995)...
6. If you are supporting a claim with more than 2 references, then quote authors in an alphabetic
order after your claim. E.g., (Hinings & Greenwood, 1988; Lewis, 2002; Prochaska & Prochaska,
1999; Vallas, 2003; Zell, 2003).
Levels of Heading:
CENTERED UPPERCASE HEADINGS Level 5
Centered Uppercase and Lowercase Headings Level 1
Centered, Italicized, Uppercase and Lowercase Headings Level 2
Flush Left, Italicized, Uppercase and Lowercase Side Heading Level 3
Indented, italicized, lowercase paragraph heading ending with a period Level 4
19
Appendix IV
If there are no assigned questions for case studies then I will grade your case studies on the
following components:
1. A description and analysis of the central problem (What is the problem (and why)?
After identifying the problem(s), try to analyze why they exist. This may lead to an even more
critical (or basic) problem. The obvious problem or the problem states by the character in the case
might not be the actual problem that needs solving. It is critical that you draw upon issues already
addressed in class when analyzing the causes of the problem(s).
2. Generate possible solutions to the problem. For each alternative solution, list positive and
negative consequences.
A description of the proposed solution(s) to the problem and the relationship of the solution(s) to
the problem. Theorize or conceptualize the problem based on readings and concepts discussed in
class. Provide literature support for the solution(s) that you have described. You must explicitly
draw upon multiple concepts, principles, or theories.
3. Make decisions and provide rationale for them.
A description of the expected outcomes of your proposed ‘feasible solution’. Why you believe
your proposed plan is good. What is the significance of your proposed plan and what is your
rationale regarding the validity of your plan? In other words, you not only describe and reflect on
the experiences, but also seek to explain and make sense of them in order to experiment with new
learning and action plans.
20
Appendix IV
Guidelines for in class Discussions
1. Everyone who is here has the right to be here and to participate. Everyone who is here brings
experience and knowledge that makes their participation valuable.
2. Everyone has the right to be silent, i.e. "To pass" in answer to a question. Remember that some topics
may be more difficult or painful for some than for others.
3. Be aware of how your participation affects the participation of others. Your words, your tone of voice,
your body language, the amount that you talk, all affect others.
4. Remember that people's experience and knowledge vary. What you hold most dear may not be obvious
or of value to others, and vice versa.
5. Actively listen. Reflect back to people what they are saying, even as you state your position.
6. Speak for yourself. Avoid speaking for others. Use "I" statements: "I think . . ."
7. Ensuring that everyone can participate is everyone's responsibility.
participating impoverishes the education of all.
21
Preventing someone from
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