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DEPED MENTAL PSYCHOSOCIAL

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THE 2020
ONLINE AND
SELF-GUIDED
PFA MODULES
Supplemental to the
SEES Manual
AUTHORS
PIA ANNA PERFECTO RAMOS, Ph.D.
EDUARDO C. CALIGNER, Ph.D.
ANNA KATRINA K. BERSAMIN, M.A.
Psychological Association of the Philippines
PROJECT SUPERVISION AND MANAGEMENT
RONILDA R. CO
Director IV, Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service
PAOLO R. AQUINO
Project Development Officer III, Disaster Risk Reduction and Management
Service
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service
2nd Floor, Rm 201, Mabini Building, Department of Education
DepEd Complex, Meralco Avenue, Pasig City, Philippines
This 2020 Online and Self-Guided Modules: Supplemental to the SEES Manual is intended for use of
Secondary Teachers, School Heads and identified Non-Teaching Personnel of DepEd region and division
offices for the provision of remote Psychological First Aid to secondary learners.
©DepEd 2020
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The development of this Guidance Notes and Supplemental Modules to the SEES Manual has been
made possible under the direction and leadership provided by the Disaster Risk Reduction and
Management Service (DRRMS).
The recognition and support of the Executive Committee, under the leadership of Secretary, Leonor
Magtolis Briones, on the importance of providing appropriate Mental Health and Psychosocial Support
Services (MHPSS) to learners amidst COVID-19, as identified in the Basic Education Learning Continuity
Plan, is greatly appreciated.
Appreciation to the Psychological Association of the Philippines is extended, for the technical assistance
and expertise provided in the development of this supplementary material to the SEES Manual.
Last but not least, sincere gratitude also goes to the UNESCO Jakarta Team for the approval and support
on the development of this Guidance Notes and Supplemental Modules to the SEES Manual.
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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Table of Contents
The 2020 Online and Self-Guided PFA Modules: Supplemental to the SEES Manual ...9
Introduction.............................................................................................................................................................9
Rationale ..................................................................................................................................................................9
Objectives ............................................................................................................................................................. 10
Guidance Notes for the User ........................................................................................................................... 12
A. Changes to be expected: ................................................................................................................................ 12
B. Add-ons and Revisions to the Basic Facilitation Skills Needed by Users (Adapted from the SEES 2015) ... 15
C. Additional Information on the Online PFA Delivery and PFA through Self-Guided Modules ..................... 22
D. Online Conduct of Supplemental Modules 1- 4 of the SEES ......................................................................... 24
E. Conduct of Supplemental Self-Guided Modules 1- 4 of the SEES ................................................................. 38
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
5
FOREWORD
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought massive challenges to the education sector.
Physical classes in the previous school year 2019-2020 were discontinued, national
events were cancelled, and the opening of classes for school year 2020-2021 has been
adjusted. The need for community quarantine and physical distancing have resulted to
dramatic changes in the lives of our learners and personnel, triggering worry, fear,
anxiety – all manifestations of stress – which are all normal given the new normal
situation we find ourselves in.
Amidst all these, the Department of Education is soldiering on and helping our
stakeholders face this brave new world. As I have affirmed many times in every
aftermath of a disaster or emergency, “Learning must continue because education
cannot wait.”
In this noble mission, the Department has been responding to the current challenges by
preparing our teachers, learners, and parents in this new normal of education. Sa
paghahanda upang maipagpatuloy ang edukasyon, maglalaan ang Kagawaran ng
angkop na proteksyon at gagawa ng mabisang aksyon para sa ating mga kabataan at
kababayan.
Aside from offering different modalities for distance and home-based learning this
coming school year 2020-2021, one of our advocacies focuses on safeguarding the
mental health of our learners. We must ensure that they will be able to cope with the
stresses brought about by the pandemic, and transition to the new normal.
LEONOR MAGTOLIS
BRIONES
Secretary
Department of Education
This is being done through the provision of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support
Services (MHPSS) to our learners which is anchored on the Basic Education Learning
Continuity Plan.
To enable the remote provision of MHPSS to secondary learners, DepEd, through the
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS), and in partnership with
the Psychological Association of the Philippines developed this 2020 Online and SelfGuided PFA (Psychosocial First Aid) Modules: Supplemental to the 2015 Supporting,
Enabling and Empowering Students (SEES) Manual. Secondary teachers, school
heads and identified non-teaching personnel of DepEd regional and division offices will
be capacitated with the help of this Manual to ensure the provision of remote PFA for
secondary learners on the first week of the opening of classes.
This Manual is vital as we look out not only for the knowledge and skills of our learners,
but also their mental health to ensure their overall wellness, especially in these trying
times. Our learners may be young, but they are never spared from stress. We must let
them know that their feelings are valid and that we are ready to guide and support them
as they cope and eventually adjust and thrive in this new normal. We have a challenging
school year ahead and we must be mindful more than ever of taking care of our learners’
mental well-being.
Let us all be advocates for mental health so that together, we can truly bridge everyone
towards a brave new world.
Sama-sama tayo sa paghahanda. Sama-sama tayo para sa kinabukasan ng ating mga
mag-aaral. Handang Isip, Handa Bukas!
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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FOREWORD
The COVID-19 pandemic is, indeed, a trying situation. It continues to
challenge healthcare systems, governments, economies, and the lives of
every individual facing the changes that accompany the New Normal. We
at the education sector are not spared from the demanding adjustments
needed to cope with this public health emergency, and we now face the
responsibility of ensuring learning continuity without compromising the
health and safety of our learners.
In addressing the situation, a task force for the management of DepEd
response to COVID-19 was created thru DepEd Memorandum (DM) 11
series of 2020 and amended by DM 19 s. 2020. The DepEd Task Force
COVID-19 (DTFC), under the Office of the Undersecretary for
Administration (OUA), leads the overall efforts of the Department within
the school system through formulation of policies and development of
strategies and actions plans. This includes the conduct of Mental Health
and Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) for learners, parents and
DepEd personnel, anchored on the Basic Education - Learning Continuity
Plan (BE-LCP) and part of the 2020 Brigada Eskwela and Oplan Balik
Eskwela.
ALAIN DEL B. PASCUA
Undersecretary for
Administration
DepEd
Our learners in the secondary level are likely to face stress, anxiety, fear,
and other strong emotions because of the current situation. The pressure
to learn independently, changes in their daily routine, and not being able
to bond with their friends can decrease their motivation to learn. The
impact of COVID-19 may cause them to struggle with mental health, and
we must make sure that we are prepared to give them a helping hand
when they need it.
In this light, DepEd will provide remote Psychological First Aid (PFA) for
secondary learners on the first week of classes by the teachers using the
2020 Online and Self-Guided PFA Modules: Supplemental to the
Supporting, Enabling and Empowering Students (SEES) Manual,
developed by the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Servic
(DRRMS)e, in partnership with the Psychological Association of the
Philippines (PAP).
We are about to face a challenging school year. Despite this, we must do
so bravely, and ensure that our learners will be able to cope with the
distance learning approach. In unity and guided by the spirit of Bayanihan
may we remain committed to the goal that no Filipino learner is left behind.
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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FOREWORD
Since 2015, the Department of Education through the Disaster Risk
Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS) has been providing Mental
Health and Psychosocial Support Services (MHPSS) to learners and DepEd
Personnel, which includes Psychological First Aid (PFA) trainings and actual
provisions. These psychosocial support services are anchored on the
Supporting, Enabling and Empowering Students (SEES) Manual, developed
by DepEd with UNESCO and the Psychological Association of the
Philippines (PAP).
The activities and methodologies in conducting PFA using the SEES Manual
have been enhanced and expanded in partnership with the Cultural Center
of the Philippines (CCP). In 2017, all Region and Division DRRM
Coordinators were trained on PFA. The PFA trainings were extended to
School Health Region and Division Nurses, School Guidance Counselors
and/ or Designated Guidance Teachers in 2018; and funds for cascading the
PFA training to schools were downloaded to divisions in 2018 and 2019. To
date, there are 10,842 Region and Division DRRM Coordinators, School
Health Region and Division Nurses, school Guidance Counselors and/or
Designated Guidance Teachers, and teachers trained in PFA, comprising the
DepEd’s pool of PFA providers.
RONILDA R. CO
Director IV
DRRMS
As we continue to prepare for a new normal in the field of education due to
the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic, we as an institution remain
to support and recognize the importance of providing appropriate MHPSS to
our learners. This commitment can be seen through its inclusion in the 2020
Brigada Eskwela and Oplan Balik Eskwela in line with the provision in the
Learning Continuity Plan of the department which identifies MHPSS as a vital
service to ensure learning continuity amidst the pandemic.
Given that provision of PFA in a face-to-face setting is not yet feasible due
to the COVID-19 pandemic, the DRRMS together with PAP developed this
Guidance Notes and Supplemental Modules for online PFA delivery and PFA
through self-guided modules for secondary learners.
With this Guidance Notes and Supplemental Modules to the SEES Manual,
we hope to support and enable our school heads and secondary teachers
and concerned non-teaching personnel to provide remote PFA for secondary
learners, in recognition of the possible effects and mental health related
concerns of learners to crisis situation, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.
Gaya ng lagi nating pinapaalala, ang bawat isa sa atin ay mahalaga. At
kapag tayo ay sama-sama, kayang kaya! Kayang kaya kapag tayo ay samasama!
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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The 2020 Online and Self-Guided PFA
Modules: Supplemental to the SEES
Manual
Introduction
We all know that a teacher wears multiple hats. You are a teacher, a parent, a
musician, a counselor, an engineer, an actor, an artist, a coordinator, an
accountant, a manager, an events coordinator, nutritionist, disciplinarian,
behaviorist, mediator, doctor, and so many others. Some of those roles will be
put to rest for the time being as teachers shift to delivering lectures using a wide
array of remote learning platforms. However, other roles will be highlighted.
The events of late 2019 and early 2020 call teachers to step up and become
an online educator, a master technician ready and able to address technical
issues both from your end and your students’ end, a voiceover talent who
can keep students focused and entertained as they look through slides and
presentations, and a master module maker for students who will not be able to attend online classes. If
you have been teaching for a number of years now, you know that the job is ever-evolving, always
adapting to the changing needs of the time. The work does not seem to get any easier.
The current set of public school teachers and non-teaching staff for SY 2020-2021 is likewise being
tasked to conduct various psychosocial services to learners. This additional load may leave teachers
feeling stressed and overwhelmed. To put these concerns to rest, the Department of Education’s
Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Service (DRRMS) has partnered with the Psychological
Association of the Philippines in order to review the content of the SEES (Supporting, Enabling and
Empowering Students) Manual of 2015 and provide guidance for the conduct of the modules using
multiple remote learning modalities. It is hoped that this 2020 Online and Self-Guided PFA Modules
Supplemental to the SEES Manual (2020 O/SG PFA for short) will help ease your burden with regard to
how to appropriately deliver Psychological First Aid to the students prior to the start of classes.
Rationale
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (or SARS-CoV2) is an infectious disease that was
first identified in the province of Hubei, China in December 2019. The World Health Organization
declared the disease as a pandemic on March 11, 2020 as the virus spread across 110 countries. To
date, it has infected more than 11.5 million people worldwide and has caused more than half a million
deaths (https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/6/7/2020). Due to its infectious nature, governments
all over the world were forced to implement strict quarantine and lockdown measures to curb the spread
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
9
of the disease. Offices imposed work from home orders, all shops and restaurants were recommended
to shut down and schools were called off.
As the pandemic (coupled sometimes with other crisis situations) continues to affect the lives of people
all over the world, various sectors of governments have chosen to adapt other ways and means to
continue to provide their services to the people. These “new normal” practices shall continue to evolve
as specialists begin to understand more aspects of the virus itself.
In the Philippines, the number of infected persons continues to rise daily. The
President has ordered a “No School until there is a vaccine available” policy
(https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/05/school-coronavirus-vaccine-duterte200526084102106.html). With schools closed, the Department of Education
recommended a shift in the school calendar and moved the opening of classes to
August 24, 2020. Based on the Basic Education Learning Continuity Plan of
DepEd, classes will be delivered using following learning delivery modalities:
1. Face-to-face – with the pronouncement of the Philippine government that there will be no faceto-face learning until there is already a vaccine for COVID-19, this modality is not yet feasible
but given the possibility, this is one of learning modalities that is considered to be used with
consideration of the required social distancing measures in the classroom set-up
2. Distance learning – this include different distance learning modalities such as modular distance
learning, online distance learning and TV/Radio-based instruction
3. Blended learning – this refers to combination of face-to-face with any or a mix of distance
learning modalities
4. Home schooling – this is an ADM that aims to provide learners with access to quality basic
education through a home-based environment to be facilitate by qualified parents, guardians, or
tutors who have undergone relevant training
The DepEd has also announced that a week before the opening as well as the first week of opening of
classes will be devoted entirely to the provision of psychosocial services to the students/learners (DepEd
Order No. 07 series of 2020). This is the reason behind the development of the 2020 O/SG PFA.Modules.
As we help you become a teacher more knowledgeable on the conduct of PFA, we hope that this addon manual serves as your guide. We see your work as essential in keeping the public education system
functional for the benefit of the students under your care as well as for the benefit of their parents and
the nation in general. It is our hope that the 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
helps you help others.
Objectives
These supplemental modules and guidance notes were developed with the following objectives in mind:
For the users:
1. to provide teachers and non-teaching staff with a quick reference and guide regarding the proper
conduct of PFA when delivered either online or through self-guided modules.
2. to equip teachers with additional skills needed in the delivery of online PFA and PFA through selfguided modules.
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
10
3. to further develop the competence of the users in delivering PFA using other platforms.
For the students:
4. to provide students with a venue by which they can discuss their fears, feelings, and anxieties.
5. to enable students to manage their feelings and reframe their thoughts.
6. to empower students to look for linkages to services that could help others
7. to allow students to focus on their strengths and support systems during a fearful and worrisome time.
In other words, these supplemental modules serve to support, empower and enable teachers to help
students to move beyond the worries and fears brought about by the pandemic and help them become
more active members of the community.
2020 PFA
Modules Supplemental to the SEES
Support
Enable
Empower
Teaching and Non-Teaching Staff
Support
Enable
Empower
Secondary Education Students
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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Guidance Notes for the User
This portion is divided into 4 major parts:
A. An Overview of the changes to be expected
B. Add-ons and Revisions to the Basic Facilitation Skills needed by users
C. Additional Information on the Online PFA Delivery and PFA through
Self-Guided Modules
D. Online Conduct of Modules 1-4 of the SEES
E. Conduct of Self-Guided Modules 1-4 of the SEES
A. Changes to be expected:
•
Change in delivery platform: From classroom or face-to-face setting to either online setting or
through self-guided modules
As a teacher/non-teaching staff, the pandemic that we are now experiencing forces us to find
alternative ways of delivering our lessons. Additionally, since the students are likewise
experiencing the repercussions of the pandemic, there is a need to provide them with PFA in
order to help them manage their emotions, reframe their thoughts, look for linkages and focus on
their strengths. You will now be tasked to deliver PFA either online (for those who have access
to wifi) or through Self-Guided Modules (for those who cannot attend classes via online means).
For those who will be delivering the modules online, you shall use the guide called Online Conduct
of Supplemental Modules 1 – 4 of the SEES. You will need to prepare visuals beforehand to
ensure that sessions remain interesting and interactive for the students. For students who do not
have online access, you simply need to print out copies of the document called Conduct of
Supplemental Self-Guided Modules 1-4 of the SEES. Please inquire with your division regarding
the funds that may be used in order to have the supplemental modules printed. The DRRMS
downloaded program support funds for IEC printing can be used for the printing. Existing partners
or local government units can also be tapped for printing when necessary.
Prior to the actual conduct of the supplemental modules, users must determine the actual number
of students who will be using the online platform and the number of students who will use the
modular and self-directed platform of learning. The number of copies to be printed out must be
determined before the start of the schoolyear.
•
Updated Notes on Facilitation Skills for both Online PFA Delivery and PFA through Self-Guided
Modules:
In the SEES Manual developed in the year 2015, we outlined a number of skills that you must
possess in order to deliver the modules successfully. This 2020 supplement builds on that list of
skills and takes into account the change in the manner of delivery of Modules 1 – 4 of the SEES.
This 2020 supplement outlines the add-ons needed on the following:
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
12
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Communication skills
Seeing beyond students’ body language and tone
Time Management and Organization Skills
Role of the PFA providers
What PFA providers should look for
Managing Interactions Effectively
Resolving Technological Issues
These will be elaborated further on the section on Facilitation Skills.
•
Additional Information on the Online PFA Delivery and PFA through Self-Guided Modules
The additional information contained in this document focuses on how the core actions of PFA
are reflected on modules 1-4 of the SEES. It does not aim to arm you with knowledge on PFA.
Most of you have attended a PFA training or workshop as required by the Department. If you
need a refresher course, please find time to watch the video on PFA posted on the online
repository.
•
Updated Modules for both Online PFA Delivery and PFA through Self-Guided Modules
o
Script Updates for Modules 1-4 of the SEES
 The word “disaster” in the 2015 modules have been replaced with the word
“pandemic”. In cases where your locality is experiencing another crisis situation
other than the pandemic (for example, an earthquake or a typhoon), you can say
“pandemic and earthquake” or “coronavirus and typhoon” whenever appropriate.
 In the 2015 manual, the modules contained portions with the instructions “Say”or
“Do”. These subheadings were removed and replaced with clearer step-by-step
instructions for the user.
 The title of Module 2 was modified from Calming Down and Controlling One’s
Emotions to Calming Down and Managing One’s Emotions and Thoughts .
 This Supplement to the SEES includes an updated Ready-for-Printing 2020
SEES Modules 1-4 for learners
o
Revision of the Activities in Modules 1-4 of the SEES
 Some of the activities from the original SEES Modules 1-4 were revised but most
were retained. Changes were based mainly on the delivery platform, that is,
since teachers are no longer in the classroom with the students, the newlysuggested activities must be easier to implement. The teacher in charge of
running the SEES through online teaching is given the freedom to revise the
activities further in order to make it more culturally-appropriate or relevant to the
conditions in their regions or communities. Activities need to be modified if your
learners have special needs, if you work with IPs or with different religious
denominations. Kindly ensure that activities are still in line with the objectives set
in every module.
 For PFA through self-guided modules : The modules and activities therein are
written in a more instructional, worksheet-like manner. These are to be printed
out and given to the students. The student must be capable of self-directed
learning in order to complete all the activities and readings in the modules. You
must instruct the learners to return all completed modules to you so that you can
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
13
provide the necessary feedback to them. If necessary, learners may need
additional specialized services in order to help them cope. The Psychological
Association of the Philippines and the Philippine Guidance Counselors
Association have provided you with a referral system that you can tap whenever
necessary.

For online PFA delivery: The activities have been revised so that the online
delivery of the modules flows smoothly and logically. The table below outlines the
changes on the activities using the 2 new delivery platforms:
Original SEES
Module
1
Module Meditation or Breathing
Exercise
2
Listing and Categorizing
Feelings and Responses
Module Using a referral form
3
Module Kite or any other
appropriate cultural or
4
regional symbol
SEES Online
SEES Self-Guided
Counting backwards,
Sensory Check
Breathing Exercise
Updated referral form
Catch, Check, Change your
feelings
Breathing Exercise
Updated referral form
Kite and create a
poem
Kite and create a poem
Pie Chart or Graph of
Emotions
Letter Writing (about
activities and feelings)
If necessary, online learners may need additional specialized services in order to
help them cope. The Psychological Association of the Philippines and the
Philippine Guidance Counselors Association have provided you with a referral
system that you can tap whenever necessary.
•
Online Repository for Relevant Materials: This repository created by DepEd DRRMS can be
access at https://t.ly/BpvN. It will serve as your go-to folder in order to access any or all of the
following:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Easily accessible online copy of the 2020 O/R PFA Supplemental to the SEES Manual
IASC’s Guide for Covid-19 Responders 2020
IFRC’s PFA Guide 2020
PFA Basics Video from the Psychological Association of the Philippines
MHPSS Basics Video from the Psychological Association of the Philippines
Basic Facilitation Video from the Psychological Association of the Philippines
Printable: Basic Self-Care Practices you can do at home
Printable: Managing Stress during a Pandemic
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B. Add-ons and Revisions to the Basic Facilitation Skills Needed by Users (Adapted from the SEES
2015)
1. Who can facilitate Online PFA and PFA through Self-Guided Modules?
SEES psychosocial interventions may be delivered by teachers, guidance counselors or other
personnel who are trained to facilitate the program. The program does not require an expert, but
rather someone who can support, enable, and empower learners to find their own answers.
2. What competencies are expected of PFA Providers using these supplemental modules?
SEES facilitators are expected to have certain competencies depending on the mode of delivering
the modules. Listed below are the competencies needed for both online PFA delivery and PFA
through Self-Guided Modules:
2a. Mastery of Program Design – the ability to implement and process activities and adjust
design when necessary. Adjustments may be necessary depending on the mode of
delivery, environment, available resources, and nature of learners.
To achieve Mastery of Program Design:
o
o
o
o
Read the manual and understand the overall program
framework;
Familiarize yourself with module objectives, activities and
talking points or presentations;
Practice delivering the lectures/presentations and if
necessary, translate the terms to the local dialect or lingo;
and
Adjust the activities to suit the mode of delivery, resources,
and nature of learners
2b. Facilitation Skills for Online PFA Delivery
The online PFA delivery refers to the use of online platforms such as Microsoft Teams,
Workplace by Facebook and Google Meet as recommended based on DepEd’s Office of
the Undersecretary for Administration (OUA) Memorandum 00-042-00420. The skills
listed herein are also necessary if you are to deliver PFA in a classroom setting. These
skills are just as useful when delivering PFA online:
o
Active Listening – the ability to grasp both content and feeling or a speaker’s total
meaning. There are many levels of active listening:
 Listening for content – This involves reflecting back what the
speaker said either by repeating or paraphrasing their
message in your own words (e.g., Student says: I could not
make sense of why this was happening to our family.
Teacher can say: It was a confusing time.)
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
15

Clarifying – This involves checking your understanding by asking questions
about the content (e.g., So you mean to say that....? What did you mean
by...?)

Reflecting feelings – This is said to be the deepest type of listening. This
involves the ability to interpret what a person might be feeling even when
he/she did not specifically identify their emotions (e.g., “Wow, that must
have been really scary.”)
o
Integrating – In the context of groups, integrating means summarizing people’s
ideas or responses by highlighting the common themes of the discussion (e.g.,
“many of you felt fear during the event”) as well as unique responses (e.g., Tricia
also shared how she felt numb). It is also important in integration especially at the
end of each module to focus on significant learnings of the participants.
o
Process Observation and Analysis – Process Observation and Analysis (POA) refers
to the ability to observe not just one person at a time but also the interactions and
atmosphere within a group. POA is also the ability not just to listen to content (what
people are saying) but also process (what is happening in the group).
In a traditional classroom, it is easy to watch for students who are falling asleep,
fidgeting, or not paying attention. However, for remote learning, facilitators need to
look for body language in the bandwidth. This means seeking out subtle signals
that indicate the level of participant engagement and knowledge transfer. In the
virtual classroom, cues may come from unexpected sources. Specifically, the
facilitator may to look at:

Participation – Is everyone participating? During online sessions,
facilitators may also encourage participation by having students read bullet
points, and asking for their opinions or for illustrations of content.

Patterns of Communication – Are there some participants dominating the
discussion? If so, it may be useful to use strategies to engage everyone in
the discussion, such as passing a ball (whether actual or virtual). At times,
the facilitator may remain quiet in order to encourage others to participate.

Group atmosphere – Is the atmosphere friendly or tense? If the
atmosphere is tense, you may need to do an icebreaker or use humor. Do
the students seem interested or bored? If they seem sleepy, bored or tired
it might be time for a change in activity or to end the session.

Response time – A slow response may mean that a student is engaged in
reflective thought or has no idea what you’re talking about. It’s up to the
facilitator to determine what’s going on and respond accordingly. In order
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
16
to keep participants focused on the program and ensure that they’re still
present, plan interactions every three to five minutes.

o
Technology interference – It is advisable for facilitators to do a student
orientation first so that time will not be wasted while they figure out how to
virtually raise their hands, answer a poll, or write on the chat box.
Communication Skills – Once facilitators know what signals to look for, the
following techniques can help increase the effectivity of remote learning:

Pay attention to your vocal delivery – For online
sessions, vocal delivery is very important. Use a full range of
inflection or express emotion to keep your students engaged.
Use visually attractive and readable learning materials
– In a traditional classroom, participants’ eyes are generally
focused on the speaker. Remotely, the focus remains on the screen or on
the printed modules. To engage students, facilitators need to use this
medium effectively.

o

Be precise – In any mode of learning, facilitators need to make sure that
their language is precise. Instead of asking, “Do you have any questions?”
be more direct. Say, “If you have a question, raise your hand.” This not only
tells students exactly what you want them to do, but also assures you that
everyone is engaged.

Build rapport – Maintain a relaxed, engaging, and informative tone.
Encourage students to ask questions and share experiences.
Creating an Atmosphere of Unconditional Acceptance and Support –
In experiential learning, there is no one correct answer. Rather,
the best answer is that which makes most sense for the learner.
It is important to affirm that each person’s contribution is
valuable. The facilitator can do this by:
 Telling learners that there is no wrong or right opinion;
 Showing
encouragement
using
non-verbal
communication (e.g., eye contact, nodding, facial
expressions that mirror what a speaker is saying);
 Encouraging everyone to participate;
 Showing respect for each student by not ridiculing them;
 Setting ground rules within the group including respect for
each other; and
 Stepping in when you feel that a learner is being
embarrassed or ashamed.
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2c. Facilitation Skills for PFA through Self-Guided Modules:
The PFA through self-guided modules refers to the use of printed self-guided SEES
Supplemental Modules 1-4 to be provided to the learners. The needed facilitation skills for the
PFA providers for this are enumerated below:
o
Communication
 Encouraging Self-Directed Learning
• To encourage self-directed learning, help students become aware of their:
o Study habits;
o Learning styles; and
o Areas of strengths and weaknesses.
Creating self-awareness helps students to evaluate their study patterns
and readiness to learn.
Providing effective feedback – Meaningful feedback is:
• Personal;
• Task-related;
• Specific;
• Positive; and
• Timely
Make feedback more manageable by requesting that completed activities be
submitted in a standard format and by a particular day each week. Explain to students
when they can expect to hear back from you. Clear expectations will support effective
feedback.

o
Time Management/Organization Skills
All the 4 modules on PFA will be given right before the start of the school year. The
student will answer all the activities embedded in the learning packets and upon
completion, the student shall send back the packets to the class teacher or facilitator.
The teacher should read the answers of the students PER module and provide feedback
on their answers. They review the notes on signs of stress and keep an eye on messages
that may indicate presence of stress or abuse. (Refer to Item 4 of this section)
After the teacher has provided feedback for all 4 modules, they return the learning packets
and schedule a one-on-one session with those who may need it or refer students who may
need additional help.
3. What is the role of the PFA Providers?
Beyond the above-mentioned knowledge and skills, the orientation or attitude of the facilitator is
important. The role of the facilitator is to provide the opportunity and guide the process of selfreflection and learning. Although there is a psycho-educational dimension to the modules,
facilitators are not necessarily experts or teachers and should not position themselves as such.
Rather, they should respond to students in an empowering manner that:
• Shows unconditional positive regard and a belief in their ability to cope;
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•
•
Encourages them to help themselves and make their own decisions rather than imposing
solutions; and
Fosters self-awareness and perseverance in honing coping skills.
DO
DON’T
Clearly introduce yourself – your name and
role
Don’t assume that the student knows who you
are or what your role is
Maintain a calm and soft tone of voice with a
moderate volume
Don’t shout or speak very quickly
Use supportive phrases to show empathy (“I
understand what you are saying”) and
acknowledge any losses or difficult feelings
that the person shares (“I am so sorry to hear
that”, “That sounds like a tough situation”).
Don’t pressure the student to speak if they do
not want to.
4. What should PFA Providers look for?
Beyond the traditional classroom, PFA providers must learn how to look
between the lines for signs of stress and anxiety. The following are common
reactions to stressful events (IASC, 2020):
• Emotional reactions: feeling sad, angry, scared, etc.
• Behavioral reactions: lack of motivation, avoiding doing activities,
becoming violent, etc.
• Physical reactions: headaches, muscle pain, back pain, difficulty
sleeping, lack of appetite, etc.
The signs of stress described above are natural and may fluctuate over time. Some people may
have longer-lasting and more intense reactions. When this happens, they might be seriously
distressed. Feeling serious distress is a normal reaction to extraordinary circumstances, but it can
stop people being able to function. In a situation like this, it is likely that you will need to refer the
student to specialized support. Consider referring if he/she is:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
So upset they cannot take care of themselves or others
Being very anxious and fearful
Talking about wanting to hurt or kill themselves
Does not know their name, where they are from, or what is happening
Being very withdrawn
Shouting
Being angry
Threatening to hurt others
Feeling disoriented or “unreal”
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5. How can I manage interactions effectively?
Managing interactions, whether physically or virtually, can be sometimes
challenging. Here is a summary of common situations and what facilitators can
do to manage them:
SITUATION
POSSIBLE STRATEGIES
Tense Atmosphere
•
•
Use icebreakers or humor to break the tension
Remind students that there are no right or wrong answers, all answers are
acceptable
Non-participation
•
Silence is also an effective way to get people to talk. After you ask a question,
just stay silent and someone might speak out
Paraphrase the question you asked
Encourage the silent participants by asking them directly what they think or if
they have something to say
•
•
Sleepy, bored, or tired
•
•
Change the activity
Shorten/end the activity/module
Participant doing other
things (texting, etc.)
•
Set rules at the beginning of the module and remind students of the norms (e.g.,
Keep cameras on, mute microphones, etc.)
Call the student to participate
If behavior is repetitive, talk to the person outside of the session to see if he/she
has concerns and is really interested to be part of the group
•
•
Conflict or arguments
•
•
•
Don’t side with any one participant
Acknowledge their perspectives
Remind participants that there are no right or wrong answers, and they can
agree to disagree
A participant breaks
down
•
•
Allow the person to cry and comfort if appropriate
If crying is prolonged, suggest a break so you can talk to the student in private. If
you have a co-facilitator, that person can be with the student in another location
while you resume the session. The person can rejoin the group when he/she is
ready.
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6. How do I resolve technology management issues?
ISSUES
POSSIBLE STRATEGIES
Technology
Capabilities
•
Lack of Computer
Skills
•
Learning
Styles/Preferences
•
Be mindful of students’ different learning styles. Provide them
with a variety of activities to suit their preferences.
Connection Issues
•
Connection issues can happen to anyone. Try to use other
means of communication such as email, text, phone, or instant
messaging to help students complete the program.
Cyberbullying or
Harassment
•
Be clear about DepEd’s stand on cybersafety. State clear
expectations before beginning the program.
•
•
Communicate to students the importance of reviewing the online
tools needed for accessing online classes
Use applications that are user-friendly and include technical
support resources
Provide students with additional resources which may help them
build their computer skills
Switch to modular/print materials
7. How do I know if I am ready to facilitate these supplemental modules?
You are ready to provide PFA to learners if you have:
•
•
•
•
•
Attended the training program given either by the Psychological Association of the
Philippines, DepEd Philippines or other similar institutions duly recognized by the
government
Understood the MHPSS framework and the pyramid of psychosocial responses
Developed basic but effective facilitation skills, such as:
 Active listening skills
 Process observation skills
 Communication skills
Built knowledge on Psychological First Aid (PFA)
The ability to validate students’ feelings and normalize their reactions
• The ability to teach students ways to calm down and control their emotions
• The ability to help students identify and address their needs
• The ability to empower students in enumerating their strengths
• The ability to identify students who need professional help
• Built knowledge on the stages and processes of grief
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The ability to care for oneself especially after providing psychosocial interventions to
students or after undergoing stressful events in one’s life
Undergone PFA and psychological processing. There is a need for facilitators to process
their own feelings, thoughts, reactions and behaviors related to disasters before they are
requested to facilitate
Demonstrated adaptability and flexibility
Demonstrated patience and understanding
Demonstrated compassion and empathy
Demonstrated sensitivity to the needs of students especially if assigned to classes where
there are students with disabilities
Understood the need to prioritize the welfare and safety of learners, including the
confidentiality and privacy of their personal information as required under the Data Privacy
Act of 2012 (RA 10173) as guided by the DepEd Freedom of Information Manual (DO 72
s. 2016).
C. Additional Information on the Online PFA Delivery and PFA through Self-Guided Modules
Psychological First Aid (PFA) is a method to help others feel safer and more connected during times
when people feel stressed, worried, anxious or fearful. These feelings are usually brought about by
situations such as natural and manmade disasters (earthquakes, floods, fire, volcanic eruptions, war)
or by pandemics or medical emergencies (WHO et al, 2011). PFA is guided by the 3 major core actions
of LOOK, LISTEN and LINK. Because of the current situation in the country, PFA cannot be
administered to the students within the confines of a classroom. Thus, the 3 core actions will have to
take on a different form. Refer to the table below to have a better understanding of the principles and to
know which modules would coincide with each of the core actions:
CORE ACTIONS
In the Context of Online PFA Delivery and
PFA through Self-Guided Modules
(taken from: Remote Psychological First Aid during the Covid-19
Outbreak Interim Guidance March 2020)
Look
(Module 1 and 3)
Listen
(Modules 1, 2 and 4)
Link
(Module 3)
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
Refers to how to assess the current situation,
what the risks are, who are affected, what the
needs are and what feelings students may have
or may have had
Refers to paying attention and listening actively,
accepting feelings, calming someone in
distress, asking about needs and concerns, and
helping find solutions to problems
Refers to how to assist with accessing
information, social support, accessing services
and tackling problems
22
It is important for teachers to understand that PFA will be conducted to the students through the help of
the 4 modules contained herein. To reiterate, these modules were originally a part of the SEES Manual
developed in 2015 by the Psychological Association of the Philippines in partnership with UNESCO for
exclusive use by the Department of Education. There were 9 modules in the original manual, the first 4
of which are supposed to be conducted within 6 months after a disaster as these were the modules on
PFA. The last 5 modules were to be conducted anytime after the first 4, as they were more focused on
helping students develop more resilience and further strengthen their Adversity Quotient (Stoltz, 1997).
Below are the titles of the first 4 modules and the corresponding take-away messages for the students:
Module 1
Title
Validating feelings and normalizing reactions
Module 2
Calming down and Managing one’s Emotions and
Thoughts
Module 3
Identifying and Addressing Needs
Module 4
Identifying Sources of Strengths
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
Take away Message
My feelings toward this
disaster/pandemic are normal
and valid. Others may also feel
the same way. It is okay to not
feel okay.
I can manage my own emotions
and I am able to bring myself to
calm down
I am capable of identifying my
own and other people’s needs. I
can link others to the proper
channels which can best
address their concerns
I am strong because I can rely
on my inner strength and
because I have people around
me who support me
23
D. Online Conduct of Supplemental Modules 1- 4 of the SEES
Module I: Validating Feelings and Normalizing Reactions
Objectives
• Identify feelings/reactions related to the pandemic/any form of disaster
• Accept that all feelings and reactions are normal and valid
Materials/Handouts
• Small Whiteboard and marker/bond paper and marker
• Sample Graph of Emotions
• Common Reactions of Students to Stressful Events
• Handout: When Terrible Things Happen (attached at the end of this module)
Introduction
Say: Hi. How are you all feeling today? How has it been since the start of ECQ/MECQ/GCQ? Classes
are about to start again and this is how we will be conducting classes but before we can do that, it is
important that we talk about how you are first. Before we begin, can you make sure that you have a
sheet of paper with you please? (PAUSE)
ACTIVITY: Graphing Feelings
Say: So I want to ask, KAMUSTA KAYO? This is a strange crisis situation that we are all
experiencing, don’t you agree? So how are you? Are you okay, not okay? Were you not okay three
months ago but okay now? Were you okay at the start but okay now? Can I ask you to identify about 5
feelings or emotions that you have experienced during the past few months/weeks or days? I will give
you time to think about it. (PAUSE)
Say: Using the sheet of paper, can you create a graph or a pie chart of feelings/emotions that you have
or may have had during all the crisis situations that you experienced? Here is an example (show on
camera). On the x-axis, write down each of the feelings/emotions. On the y-axis, write the numbers 25,
50, 75 and 100 to represent the percentage of time that you were feeling that way. Rate each
emotion/feeling based on how much or how often you would feel that way over the past few
months/weeks/days. I will give you 5 minutes to do this activity. After 5 minutes, I will ask some of
those who have videos to share their graphs and talk about it for a short while. I will also call those who
only have audio to share as well.
Sharing and Comparing Graphs
Say: If you are done, may I ask ___ to share his graph… (During the sharing, listen for feelings that
they rate with 50 percent or higher). Acknowledge it and say if you felt the same. Call on another
student. Do this until all or most have shared.
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ANALYSIS
Say: What were the feelings that were mentioned a lot? Write these down on your whiteboard/manila
paper.
What did you notice about your reactions to the different situations? Are these normal reactions to
everything that you experienced? I would like to show you this table of common reactions of students to
stressful events. Please read those and tell me what you realize.
Say: It’s good that you realized that these are normal reactions as of this time. I want you to realize
that it is okay to not feel okay.
ABSTRACTION
Show page 1 of the handout “When Terrible Things Happen” from the National Child Traumatic Stress
Network (NCTSN). Say: Say: I want to share with you a document called: When Terrible Things
Happen. You may access it on this webpage/google folder/etc. Please read it because it can help you
better identify your reactions and it also gives you a list of behaviors that can help you cope and
behaviors that you should try to avoid.
Highlight the feelings that are similar to those that were mentioned.
As a teacher, your major role now is to look for risk signs in the students. Look at the table on common
reactions to stressful events found on the next page.
APPLICATION
Say: Today we learned that our reactions to the pandemic, to any stressful event/disaster are normal
and valid. How can you apply this learning to your life especially because the pandemic is not yet
over? (Pause and call 2 -3 students to share).
Acknowledge all answers then say: can someone come up with a short line that we can say altogether
that would sum up what you just learned?
After class decides on the line to use, everyone turns on their microphones to say the line all at the
same time. You may add a hand movement is necessary.
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My Emotions
100
75
50
25
0
worried
scared
angry
numb
Common Reactions of Students to Stressful Events
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
feel a strong responsibility to the family.
feel anxious brought about by uncertainty of the future.
feel intense or prolonged grief for not being able to wake.
may become self-absorbed and feel self-pity.
may experience changes in their relationships with other people.
may also start taking risks, engage in self-destructive behavior, have avoidant
behavior, and become aggressive.
may experience major shifts in their view of the world accompanied by a sense of
hopelessness about the present and the future.
may become defiant of authorities and parents while they start relying on peers
for socializing through social media.
may feel guilty and anxious having been separated from their loved ones due to
lockdown.
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Module I Handout: When Terrible Things Happen
Immediate Reactions
There are a wide variety of positive and negative reactions that students can experience during and
immediately after crisis situations. These Include:
Domain
Negative Responses
Positve Responses
Cognitive
Confusion, worry, self-blame
Determination courage, optimism, faith
Emotional
Shock, sorry, grief, sadness, fear, anger,
numb, irritability, guilt, and shame
Fights with others or does not speak
with others
Tired, headache, muscle tension,
stomachache, difficulty sleeping, fast
heart beat
Feeling involved, challenged, mobilized
Social
Physiological
Seeks out others who can help them, helps others
in need
Alertness, readiness to respond, increased energy
Common negative reactions that may continue include:
Intrusive reactions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Distressing thoughts or images of the event while awake or dreaming
Upsetting emotional or physical reactions to reminders of the experience
Feeling like the experience is happening all over again (“flashback”)
Avoid talking, thinking, and having feelings about the traumatic event
Avoid reminders of the event (places and people connected to what happened)
Restricted emotions; feeling numb
Feelings of detachment and estrangement from others; social withdrawal
Loss of interest in usually pleasurable activities
Physical arousal reactions
•
•
•
Constantly being “on the lookout” for danger, startling easily, or being jumpy
Irritability or outbursts of anger, feeling “on edge”
Difficulty falling or staying asleep, problems concentrating or paying attention
Reactions to trauma and loss reminders
•
•
•
Reactions to places, people, sights, sounds, smells, and feelings that are reminders of the disaster
Reminders can bring on distressing mental images, thoughts, and emotional/physical reactions
Common examples include: sudden loud noises, sirens, locations where the disaster occurred, seeing
people with disabilities, funerals, anniversaries of the disaster, and television/radio news about the
disaster
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Positive changes in priorities, worldview, and expectations
•
•
Enhanced appreciation that family and friends are precious and important
Meeting the challenge of addressing difficulties (by taking positive action steps, changing the focus of
thoughts, using humor, acceptance)
Shifting expectations about what to expect from day to day and about what is considered a “good
day”
Shifting priorities to focus more on quality time with family or friends
Increased commitment to self, family, friends, and spiritual/religious faith
•
•
•
When a Loved One Dies, Common Reactions Include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Feeling confused, numb, disbelief, bewildered, or lost
Feeling angry at the person who died or at people considered responsible for the death
Strong physical reactions such as nausea, fatigue, shakiness, and muscle weakness
Feeling guilty for still being alive
Intense emotions such as extreme sadness, anger, or fear
Increased risk for physical illness and injury
Decreased productivity or difficulties making decisions
Having thoughts about the person who died even when you don’t want to
Longing, missing, and wanting to search for the person who died
Children and adolescents are particularly likely to worry that they or a parent might die
Children and adolescents may become anxious when separated from caregivers or other loved ones
What Helps
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
What Doesn’t Help
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Talking to another person for support or spending time with others
Engaging in positive distracting activities (sports, hobbies, reading)
Getting adequate rest and eating healthy meals
Trying to maintain a normal schedule
Scheduling pleasant activities
Taking breaks
Reminiscing about a loved one who has died
Focusing on something practical that you can do right now to manage the situation better
Using relaxation methods (breathing exercises, meditation, calming self-talk, music)
Participating in a support group
Exercising in moderation
Keeping a journal
Seeking counseling
Using alcohol or drugs to cope
Extreme withdrawal from family or friends
Overeating or failing to eat
Withdrawing from pleasant activities
Working too much
Violence or conflict
Doing risky things (driving recklessly, substance abuse, not taking adequate precautions)
Extreme avoidance of thinking or talking about the event or a death of a loved one
Not taking care of yourself
Excessive TV or computer games
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•
Blaming others
Source: Brymer et al., 2012
Module II: Calming Down and Managing One’s Emotions and Thoughts
Objectives
By the end of the session, students should be able to:
•
•
•
Identify positive ways to manage one’s emotions
Practice calming down using a relaxation exercise
Be able to practice reframing one’s thoughts
Materials/Handouts
• Manila Papers
• Permanent Markers
INTRODUCTION
So far, we’ve talked about your reactions to the pandemic or any form of disaster. Today, we will talk about
how to manage your feelings.
ACTIVITY # 1
Yesterday I asked you to identify your different reactions and feelings towards the pandemic or any type of
stressful situation that you may have experienced recently. Can you recall what those feelings were? Today,
let’s talk about some ways to help you manage your feelings. Can you recall for me some of those feelings that
you mentioned yesterday?
The teacher now writes down some of those feelings in one column.
Say: So when you feel this way, what do you usually do to help manage or get rid of that feeling?
Teacher then writes those actions down right beside each feeling. Teacher then asks another student to recite.
She does this until she has 5-6 examples.
Say: So these actions help make us feel better. They help us address our stress. But can we identify if there are
actions here which would be considered as unhealthy ways of dealing with the stress? Which ones would be
considered as healthy ways of coping? What made you say that?
Say: Please take a look at your own list of emotions from yesterday and list down the ways that you deal with
the emotions. Can you identify if you were using healthy or unhealthy ways of dealing with the stress? Today, I
want to remind you of healthier ways of dealing with our feelings. I will teach you three new and easy ways:
ACTIVITY # 2
Say: Suggestion # 1: Count backwards. If you feel that you are getting more upset or stressed or anxious or
nervous. You can ask to be excused or you can just close your eyes, or turn around and just silently, count
backwards from 10 until 1. While doing so, focus on your breathing and tell yourself to calm down. Let us try it
together.
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Say: Suggestion #2: 3-2-1 Senses Check. In this method, I want you to quietly name 3 things you can
see around you, 2 things you can feel and 1 thing that you can hear. While doing that, breathe in and
out 5 times but every time you do so, you add one more second to each inhale and one more second to
each exhale.
Say: Suggestion #3: Reframe. This means that a feeling usually comes from a thought and when we
can change or reframe a thought, then we can change how we feel. For example, I feel angry because
my mother called me lazy. I think my mother called me that way because she does not see me working
hard or maybe because she is just really unfair all the time. I can reframe that by saying, my mother is
just very stressed and tired tonight. She does not mean what she says. By reframing the thought, I
have changed the way I feel about the situation.
Alternative Activities
Other breathing exercises, yoga poses, tai-chi with humor injected into it, engaging in sports but in a
non-competitive manner, or dance moves using both slow and fast beats.
ANALYSIS
What do you feel? What do you think was the point of this activity?
ABSTRACTION
Can you compare how you feel right now with how you felt before we started with the relaxation
activity? On a scale of 1-5, 5 being the highest, rate your level of stress before and after we stared with
the exercise. Did the levels change?
APPLICATION
How can you apply your newfound knowledge to your daily life?
CLOSING
Say: As a way to close this session, do you know that people who do yoga close the sessions by
saying “Namaste.” Namaste is a word which means “bow to you”. People in India use it to say hello or
to bid each other goodbye. Can you think of a short phrase that you can share with the class now to
show our appreciation about being with them during online classes? What would be a good phrase or
word? (Possible answers are “thank you, “ “kamusta,” “good vibes,” etc. Can we all say this to each
other now as we leave our online class?
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Module III: Identifying and Addressing Needs
Objectives
By the end of the session, students should be able to:
•
•
•
To identify one’s current needs and those of one’s family
Become aware of the various institutions, departments and centers present within the school
environment or the immediate community
Take note of the important numbers and information regarding who to approach for their needs
Materials/Handouts
• List of Emergency Contact Numbers and Information: This should be filled out by the teacher
before the start of the session
• List of needs during a pandemic and how to access them
• Pens or Pencils
• Handout: Needs Form
Additional Information on Psychological First Aid (PFA)
Regardless of the type of disaster or pandemic, people who are affected often need help in the following:
Frequent Needs (WHO et al., 2011)
•
Basic needs: food, shelter, water, clean toilets
•
Health services for those who are ill and injured (and for those who seem to be suffering from
anxiety, trauma and depression)
•
Simple and correct information about the event, loved ones and services available for them
•
Access to cell phones, internet, email in order to contact loved ones and other sources of social
support
•
Being consulted about major decisions that will directly affect their lives (e.g., being transported to
another province, moving to a bunk house, etc.)
It cannot be assumed that just because students are at home then all their basic needs have been met.
It is essential to have a venue where students can express their needs and see how the school can
help them access these. As a teacher, you will need the important contact numbers beforehand in order
to know where to link students who need help. List this information down on the table provided in the
following page. Please note that this is just a sample. You may change the items as needed.
ACTIVITY 1
Show the sheet called List of Emergency Contact Numbers and Information. Ensure that the sheet is
properly filled out by the teacher. A copy of this sheet should be shown during class time or the teacher
can provide a link where the students can get this information from.
Say: I want to show you a list of emergency contact numbers that I want you to take note of or you may
want to take a screenshot with your phone. (Give them time to copy or take a photo). Let us all discuss
first what these offices do. (Teacher explains how each office can help).
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Say: Please save the screenshot on your phone or if you listed the numbers down, please tape it to
any part of your house so that it can easily be seen by everyone.
ACTIVITY 2
Show this list of common needs of survivors after a disaster and discuss with the class.
Say: Take a look at the common needs of survivors after a disaster or pandemic. Do you think it is
complete? What other needs should be on the list? Take a look at this list of needs of people during a
pandemic and how to access them. Let’s discuss these for a while.
Please get a piece of paper and make three columns (you can show an example). On the first column,
list down all the members of the family whom you live with. On the second column, identify the
immediate needs of this person that your family cannot address as of this moment. On the third
column, identify where you can refer this person to or who you can approach in order to ask for help
regarding the needs of this person. If you do not know anyone who can help that person, just leave it
blank first. (Give them time to do this)
How many of you know who to refer your loved ones to for their needs? May I know what these needs
are and who you are going to refer your loved ones to? (Please commend them for knowing whom
they could approach in times of need).
Can we talk about what you think your own needs are? Who can you approach in order to address your
own needs? Why do you think it is important for all of you to learn about whom you can go to for your
own needs and the needs of your family?
Acknowledge them for having good support systems and for knowing who to link themselves or their
family members to.
ABSTRACTION
Say: Can some of you share with us stories that show how at times, even these linkages cannot do
their responsibilities efficiently? Why do you think these groups had a hard time? Can you also tell me
some great or good stories about how other groups were able to help you very well?
APPLICATION
Say: Now that you know how to LINK, can you tell me how you will apply this new knowledge to your
life right now?
Listen to their answers and acknowledge them.
CLOSING
Ask students to come up with a chant or cheer after that activity. It should be a chant that will remind
them to find people/organizations to help them/their loved ones address their most pressing needs.
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List of Emergency Contact Numbers and Information
Organization
Contact # and Address
Contact Person
Barangay Health Office
Barangay Disaster Team
DSWD office
Hospital
Psychologist or Social
Worker
Covid Screening Center
Your School
List of Common Needs of Survivors after a Disaster or Pandemic
General
To find missing family members, to provide medical assistance to those who
were hurt, to gain access to list of casualties, to know how many were
affected, to provide proper burial facilities for those who have passed on
Food and Water
To provide waterline to homes, to gain access to source of water for multiple
purposes, food for x number of days
Family Goods
Blankets, clothes, beddings, tarp, flashlight, storage boxes, underwater,
dignity kits, disinfectants/alcohol
Fuel
For vehicle, gas for cooking, for kerosene lamps
Shelter
Temporary shelter, building materials to be used for repairs
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List of Common Needs During a Pandemic and how to access them
Relief Goods
To receive relief goods and “ayuda” or from the Barangay level, City Mayor, and
DSWD.
Selling of Product and
Goods
Is your family involved in selling some products or goods? They too, need to get
permits to travel and to sell their basic goods and commodities. Go to your
Barangay Center to issue the permit.
Transportation within
your area.
If you need to travel within your area of vicinity, go to your Barangay Center and ask
for permission to go to a Grocery Store, Market place, Supermarket or Pharmacy
store. A quarantine pass is issued by your Barangay. Wearing face-mask is always
needed.
Transportation outside
your city or municipality.
Go to your Barangay Center to get a travel pass that will allow you to pass major
thoroughfares. Make sure you are Covid-free. Make sure also that you wear your
face-mask. They also provide you with vehicles.
Cash Assistance or Social
Amelioration Program
(SAP)
The DSWD releases cash amounts in three tranches to poor but deserving families.
Contact your local DSWD.
Cash Assistance to OFW
Overseas Foreign Workers (OFW) may avail of Government Cash Aid by the DOLE
and workers who have been displaced due to Pandemic.
Needs Form
Family/Relative/Friend
Current Immediate Need
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Refer to
34
Module IV: Identifying Sources of Strength
Rationale
The aim of this module is to encourage students to revisit their strengths in order to support their selfefficacy to deal with their situation. In order to encourage a hopeful outlook, the module serves to
reinforce students’ sources of support and internal and external resources.
Objectives
• Identify personal, social, and emotional sources of strengths during and in the aftermath of the
disaster/stressful situation
• Identify their internal and external sources of strength
Materials
• Drawing of a kite (or of a vinta, windmill, a train with several carriages, a caterpillar with several
body segments, a tree, spider web, fingers, etc.)
• Blank sheets of paper
• Coloring materials
REVIEW
Does anyone remember what the three previous sessions were about? (Give clues if they cannot)
Last meeting, we talked about our needs and how to address them. We talked about how to control our
reactions and emotions. Now let us reflect on what has helped us to move on. We are able to move on
and not continue to feel the way that we were feeling days or months ago because we have strengths.
Show the drawing of a kite and say: This is a drawing of a kite (saranggola). Can you tell me what
makes it go up in the air? (Wait for answers) You are right, it needs the wind, it needs to be made of
good material, it needs a line or a long string, it needs a strong brace, etc. This is our way of reminding
you that you have resources within yourselves or with others that have allowed you to begin your
process of recovery. Just like a kite, you too have what it takes to fly.
ACTIVITY
Can you draw a kite with a diamond with 4 parts? On each part of the kite’s diamond, please write
down what you think are your sources of strength. What makes you strong despite what you have
gone through? Can you also identify what or who acts like the wind for you? Who or what helps you
soar?
Give them time to draw, answer and color their drawings. After, give them time to share their drawings
online.
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ANALYSIS
What have you realized about each other after that group sharing? What have you realized about
yourself? Do we have common sources of strengths??
ABSTRACTION
How are you similar to the kite? Can you think of other objects that can be a symbol for your many
sources of strength?
APPLICATION
The next time you feel weak, what can you focus on in order to remind yourself that you have a number
of sources of strength?
CLOSING
Would any of you want to volunteer to come up with a poem or a rap about what you have learned
about your sources of strength and those who help or support you? Here is an example:
Ang saranggola ko at ako
Parehong-pareho
Ako ay Matatag, Sya rin ay Matatag
Ako ay di Babagsak, sya din ay di babagsak
Tangayin man ng hangin
Hinding hindi matitinag!
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Module IV Handout: Sample Kite Drawing
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E. Conduct of Supplemental Self-Guided Modules 1- 4 of the SEES
A few more reminders for the teacher/facilitator:
1.This conduct of PFA through Self-Guided Modules refers to provision of PFA through printed selfguided modules which will be provided to the learners without internet access and computer equipment.
This is the reason behind the use of darker font colors and larger and bolder fonts as well.
2. Please remember to fill out the table called: List of Contact Numbers and Information in Module III
before you make copies of these modules.
3. Please remind the student to return the answered forms. You must look through their answers and
provide feedback. It will also be a good way to check for signs of stress and abuse. Please refer
students who need additional help or who need to undergo counseling using the newly-established
referral system.
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2020 Supplemental Self-Guided SEES Modules 1 - 4
Module I on PFA: Validating and Normalizing Feelings
By the end of the session, you should be able to;
•
•
Identify feelings/reactions related to the pandemic/any form of disaster
Accept that all feelings and reactions are normal and valid.
Introduction
How are you feeling today? You are now on page 1 of a set of pages that will contain modules
to help you talk about your experiences during the months of lockdown due to the pandemic or
maybe due to another disaster. I am sure you are eager to participate because there are many
things to talk about. There will be a total of 4 modules for you to answer in order to complete this
task.
You will be doing a lot of activities, and you will also learn from the readings and infographics
provided in this booklet. The aim of these activities is to help you feel better as you are provided
with ways to react to all the disruptions caused by the pandemic or the disaster. After you are
done answering all the 4 modules, you will need to submit these back to me so that I can give
you feedback on your answers. Let’s begin.
Look at the lines below. You are going to write a letter.
Pause and Think. Then write, My Dear Friend.
Using the lines on the next page, write to a friend about the following:
During the months of lockdown, what were the 5 routines or reactions you did at home? An
example would be; “I slept most of the time.” Or, “I watch television/GMA7/AbsCbn.” Others may
say,” Nothing. I help in the household chores.” Number them from 1-5, and write them down on
the front part of your letter.
On the back page of your letter, write to your friend about your feelings towards your
reactions or routines. An example of feeling would be; “I felt bored.” Or, “I felt afraid.” Others
may say, “I experienced anxiety.” You can repeat your feelings, but, you may not repeat the
routines or reactions. You can explain why you felt that way or why you reacted that way. You
do not need to write a long letter. A short one will do.
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_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
Once you are finished writing, I would like you to read the information entitled Common
Reactions of Students to Stressful Events. Compare your feelings to the feelings written inside
the box. Are there commonalities? Were there feelings that you also felt but that you were not
able to mention in your letter?
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Common Reactions of Students to Stressful Events
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
feel a strong responsibility to the family.
feel anxious brought about by uncertainty of the future.
feel intense or prolonged grief for not being able to wake.
may become self-absorbed and feel self-pity.
may experience changes in their relationships with other people.
may also start taking risks, engage in self-destructive behavior, have avoidant
behavior, and become aggressive.
may experience major shifts in their view of the world accompanied by a sense of
hopelessness about the present and the future.
may become defiant of authorities and parents while they start relying on peers
for socializing through social media.
may feel guilty and anxious having been separated from their loved ones due to
lockdown.
I want you to know that all your feelings, all your reactions for the past days are valid. To validate
is to affirm that these feeling/s are happening. I want you to say to yourself, “ it is okay that I felt
this way. It is okay to not be okay’. I want you to know that all your emotions are real and true.
And that all of those, they are normal feelings. They are normal because other people may
also share the same feeling/s but the intensity of feelings is uniquely yours. Tell yourself, “all
these are normal feelings. Normal lang ang pakiramdam ko”.
Analysis
What are the common feeling/s to the usual routines of your everyday life? What are your shared
human experiences of Covid-19 or of the disaster that hit your town? Are they similar? Are they
dissimilar? Now that you have recognized your common humanity, you feel a sigh of relief from
knowing that you were not alone. You can empathize with each other. You accept each other.
These are all normal feelings to stressful situations..If you wish, you can take a photo of the letter
and share it with your friend. I hope this empowers you to go on living.
Please read the handout entitled: When Terrible Things Happen. I am certain it will help you
learn more about how you can help yourself.
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Module I Handout: When Terrible Things Happen
Immediate Reactions
There are a wide variety of positive and negative reactions that students can experience during and immediately
after crisis situations. These Include:
Domain
Negative Responses
Positve Responses
Cognitive
Confusion, worry, self-blame
Determination courage, optimism, faith
Emotional
Shock, sorry, grief, sadness, fear, anger,
numb, irritability, guilt, and shame
Fights with others or does not speak
with others
Tired, headache, muscle tension,
stomachache, difficulty sleeping, fast
heart beat
Feeling involved, challenged, mobilized
Social
Physiological
Seeks out others who can help them, helps others
in need
Alertness, readiness to respond, increased energy
Common negative reactions that may continue include:
Intrusive reactions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Distressing thoughts or images of the event while awake or dreaming
Upsetting emotional or physical reactions to reminders of the experience
Feeling like the experience is happening all over again (“flashback”)
Avoid talking, thinking, and having feelings about the traumatic event
Avoid reminders of the event (places and people connected to what happened)
Restricted emotions; feeling numb
Feelings of detachment and estrangement from others; social withdrawal
Loss of interest in usually pleasurable activities
Physical arousal reactions
•
•
•
Constantly being “on the lookout” for danger, startling easily, or being jumpy
Irritability or outbursts of anger, feeling “on edge”
Difficulty falling or staying asleep, problems concentrating or paying attention
Reactions to trauma and loss reminders
•
•
•
Reactions to places, people, sights, sounds, smells, and feelings that are reminders of the disaster
Reminders can bring on distressing mental images, thoughts, and emotional/physical reactions
Common examples include: sudden loud noises, sirens, locations where the disaster occurred, seeing
people with disabilities, funerals, anniversaries of the disaster, and television/radio news about the
disaster
Positive changes in priorities, worldview, and expectations
•
Enhanced appreciation that family and friends are precious and important
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•
Meeting the challenge of addressing difficulties (by taking positive action steps, changing the focus of
thoughts, using humor, acceptance)
Shifting expectations about what to expect from day to day and about what is considered a “good
day”
Shifting priorities to focus more on quality time with family or friends
Increased commitment to self, family, friends, and spiritual/religious faith
•
•
•
When a Loved One Dies, Common Reactions Include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Feeling confused, numb, disbelief, bewildered, or lost
Feeling angry at the person who died or at people considered responsible for the death
Strong physical reactions such as nausea, fatigue, shakiness, and muscle weakness
Feeling guilty for still being alive
Intense emotions such as extreme sadness, anger, or fear
Increased risk for physical illness and injury
Decreased productivity or difficulties making decisions
Having thoughts about the person who died even when you don’t want to
Longing, missing, and wanting to search for the person who died
Children and adolescents are particularly likely to worry that they or a parent might die
Children and adolescents may become anxious when separated from caregivers or other loved ones
What Helps
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
What Doesn’t Help
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Talking to another person for support or spending time with others
Engaging in positive distracting activities (sports, hobbies, reading)
Getting adequate rest and eating healthy meals
Trying to maintain a normal schedule
Scheduling pleasant activities
Taking breaks
Reminiscing about a loved one who has died
Focusing on something practical that you can do right now to manage the situation better
Using relaxation methods (breathing exercises, meditation, calming self-talk, music)
Participating in a support group
Exercising in moderation
Keeping a journal
Seeking counseling
Using alcohol or drugs to cope
Extreme withdrawal from family or friends
Overeating or failing to eat
Withdrawing from pleasant activities
Working too much
Violence or conflict
Doing risky things (driving recklessly, substance abuse, not taking adequate precautions)
Extreme avoidance of thinking or talking about the event or a death of a loved one
Not taking care of yourself
Excessive TV or computer games
Blaming others
Source: Brymer et al., 2012
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ABSTRACTION/REFLECTION
Now that you knew that what you were feeling or how you were reacting was similar to the one
on the list, how do you feel now about yourself? Always remember that your reactions to the
stressful situation are normal at the moment or until about three months. Most young people will
react in the same manner. You are not being crazy when you have those feelings. Also, the next
time you feel that way, try to take ten deep breaths. Slowly. And then try to do letter writing and
send the letter to your close friends. This will help you calm down. Can we try to do that together?
Count 1-10 as you breathe in and out.
APPLICATION
Today you learned that our reactions to the stressful events of Pandemic or any other form of
disaster were normal and valid. How does this new learning that my reactions and feelings
toward Covid-19/disaster were normal after all help me?
_____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
How can you apply this learning to your life especially after experiencing such a pandemic?
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________
Closure
Read your letter again. Compare how you feel now that you know that those feelings were normal and
valid? Say to yourself: my feelings are valid. My reactions are normal. My feelings and reactions are
valid and normal.
________________________________________________________________________________
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Module II on PFA: Calming Down and Managing one’s Emotions and Thoughts
Objectives
By the end of this module, you should be able to
Materials
ball, paper, pen
•
•
•
Identify positive ways to manage one’s emotions
Practice calming down using a diaphragmatic breathing and the 3C’s of Feelings and Thoughts
Be able to practice reframing one’s thoughts
Introduction
So far, we have discussed your routines and feelings during the past few months of pandemic.
Today, we shall focus on how to manage your feelings.
Remember when I asked you to identify your feelings and reactions to Covid-19/disaster? Can
you recall what those feelings were? Now. I want you to consider some ways to help you manage
your feelings of stress and anxiety
I want you to stay outdoors and play, “Catch the Ball” with your sibling or friend. If it is not
possible for you to do this with someone, you can also just throw the ball towards a wall then
catch it. After throwing and catching the ball for a while, think, “what am I catching”?
Imagine that what you are catching are feelings. Those were some of the feelings you caught
during the lockdown/pandemic/disaster. They are feelings of fear, boredom, anxiety, etc. Stop
playing for a moment. You accepted the ball. Hold it. Look at it. Accept the feeling. Say to
yourself, “Yes, I was feeling afraid.” Or “Yes, I was feeling anxious.”
Catching your Feelings It is always good to catch what you are feeling. It is a normal and
valid feeling. It’s okay to Not feel okay. But they are real and true only as the not-so-normal
situation that triggers it.
It is ok to not feel okay, in a not-so-ok-situation like the pandemic or any disaster. Now, I want
to invite you to do some diaphragmatic breathing. Breathe in (Inhalation of Air). A very slight
pause before you exhale. Breathe out (exhalation of air). Breathe in (inhalation of Air). A very
slight pause before you inhale. Breathe out (exhalation of air). Release all the feelings.
Check your Feelings Were those feelings helpful to me? You will probably answer with both
a yes and a no. That means that some of your feelings were helpful but others were not. For
instance, if you keep feeling fearful, do you need to stay in fear for long? How helpful is fear to
you? How accurate or appropriate is the feeling of anxiety, now? How helpful is it to always be
worrying about things? While thinking about this, Breathe in and Breathe out (5x).
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Change that Feeling
In this part, I want you to think of something else to help you feel
better. This means that you can replace that feeling. Some feelings are productive and useful
while some may be unproductive and useless. It is because they are no longer appropriate to
the situation. You have the power to change your feelings by actually changing your thoughts
about the feeling. This process is called REFRAMING.. Where is the feeling coming from? Or,
you can ask, “Where is the ball coming from?” Why did it hit you? How do you manage your
feelings? You can manage it by changing the name of the ball into feelings of gratefulness,
understanding, happiness, and contentment. Breathe in. Breathe out (5x)
Alternative Activities
You can also do other breathing exercises, yoga poses, tai-chi with humor injected into it,
engaging in sports but in a non-competitive manner, or dance moves using both slow and fast
beats.
ANALYSIS
What do you feel? What do you think was the point of Catching, Checking and Changing your
feelings?
_________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
What was the reason why you had to reframe your thoughts?
___________________________________________________________________________
ABSTRACTION
Can you compare how you feel right now with how you felt before we started with the activity?
Do you see some changes? Are the feelings positive? What are these new changes in the way
you feel at the moment?
Use the columns below labeled with the words “Before” on one side and “After” on the other
side. Under the word Before, write your feelings during the pandemic/disaster. Under the word
After, write your feelings at this very moment, after going through the Catch, Check and Change
Exercise.
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BEFORE (my feelings during the
pandemic/disaster)
AFTER (my feelings right now)
APPLICATION
How can you apply your newfound knowledge to your daily life? After going through the
activity, I learned that the feelings that I CAUGHT could be…
_________________________________________________________________________
After a while, I CHECKED the feelings and realized that I could…
_________________________________________________________________________
And so I CHANGED my feelings into the following:
_________________________________________________________________________
Tell yourself: The next time when I experience intense feelings, I would take a deep breath 5X
to calm down, and then check, change the feelings by reframing my thoughts.
CLOSURE
As a way to close the session, repeat this line to yourself: “Emotions can be caught (like in a
ball), checked (on helpfulness or usefulness and accuracy) and changed.”
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Module III on PFA: IDENTIFYING and ADDRESSING NEEDS
Objectives: By the end of this module, you should be able to
•
•
•
To identify one’s current needs and those of one’s family
Become aware of the various institutions, departments and centers present within the school
environment or the immediate community
Take note of the important numbers and information regarding who to approach for their needs
Materials: pen
ACTIVITY
Saan ka Pupunta?
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We have discussed about feelings, thoughts and how to accept and reframe them. Today, you
will learn about how to refer people in need. I want to show you the List of Emergency Contact
Numbers and Information. Please detach this list from this module set and place it somewhere
List of Emergency Contact Numbers and Information
Organization
Contact # and Address
Contact Person
Barangay Health Office
Barangay Disaster Team
DSWD office
Hospital
Psychologist or Social
Worker
Covid Screening Center
Your School
in your home where it would be visible to all members of your household. The list contains
numbers, names, and addresses of certain government and non-governmental offices that we
may all approach in order to have our family’s needs addressed. You can add other emergency
contact information to this list.
Let us now discuss the list of common needs of people after they have experienced a disaster:
List of Common Needs of Survivors after a Disaster or Pandemic
General
To find missing family members, to provide medical assistance to those who
were hurt, to gain access to list of casualties, to know how many were
affected, to provide proper burial facilities for those who have passed on
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Food and Water
To provide waterline to homes, to gain access to source of water for multiple
purposes, food for x number of days
Family Goods
Blankets, clothes, beddings, tarp, flashlight, storage boxes, underwater,
dignity kits, disinfectants/alcohol
Fuel
For vehicle, gas for cooking, for kerosene lamps
Shelter
Temporary shelter, building materials to be used for repairs
Would this list be complete? What do you think are the needs that are missing? Let us talk
about the needs of people during a pandemic. Look at the table below to find out how best to
access these needs:
List of Common Needs During a Pandemic and How to Access Them
Relief Goods
To receive relief goods and “ayuda” or from the Barangay
level, City Mayor, and DSWD.
Selling of Product and Is your family involved in selling some products or goods?
Goods
They too, need to get permits to travel and to sell their basic
goods and commodities. Go to your Barangay Center to issue
the permit.
Transportation within
your area.
If you need to travel within your area of vicinity, go to your
Barangay Center and ask for permission to go to a Grocery
Store, Market place, Supermarket or Pharmacy store. A
quarantine pass is issued by your Barangay. Wearing facemask is always needed.
Transportation outside Go to your Barangay Center to get a travel pass that will
your city or
allow you to pass major thoroughfares. Make sure you are
municipality.
Covid-free. Make sure also that you wear your face-mask.
They also provide you with vehicles.
Cash Assistance or
Social Amelioration
Program (SAP)
The DSWD releases cash amounts in three tranches to poor
but deserving families. Contact your local DSWD.
Cash Assistance to
OFW
Overseas Foreign Workers (OFW) and workers who have
been displaced may avail of Government Cash Aid by the
DOLE.
Now look at the Needs Form below. On the first column, list down all the members of the family
whom you live with. On the second column, identify the immediate needs of this person that your
family cannot address as of this moment. On the third column, identify where you can refer this
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person to or who you can approach in order to ask for help regarding the needs of this person. If you
do not know anyone who can help that person, just leave it blank first.
Needs Form
Family/Relative/Friend
Current Immediate Need
Refer to
Congratulations on being able to identify where you can refer your loved ones to in order to get help. It
is not easy to be able to do this so if you were able to do so, then you did a great job!
Can we talk about what you think your own needs are? Who can you approach in order to address your
own needs?
ANALYSIS
Why do you think it is important for all of you to learn about whom you can go to for your own needs
and the needs of your family?
Why do you think it is important for you to learn about whom you can go to for your own needs and the
needs of your family?
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I would like to commend you for knowing whom you can approach in times of need. I am happy to know
that they too have a good support system in you. It’s good to know that they can depend on you.
ABSTRACTION
Think about news reports that showed how at times, even these linkages could not do their
responsibilities efficiently. Why do you think these groups had a hard time? Can you also recall some
great or good stories about how other groups were able to help you very well?
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Module IV on PFA- SOURCES OF STRENGTHS
Rationale
The aim of this module is to encourage you to revisit your strengths in order to support your self-efficacy
to deal with their situation. In order to encourage a hopeful outlook, the module serves to reinforce
sources of support and internal and external resources.
Activity: Ang Saranggola at Ako
Objectives: By the end of this module, you should be able to
• Identify personal, social, and emotional sources of strengths during and in the aftermath of the
disaster/stressful situation
• Identify your internal and external sources of strength
Materials: markers/crayons, pen
Introduction
Hi! During the first day, we discussed validating and normalizing our feelings. Last Tuesday, we talked
about how to calm down and manage our feelings. Yesterday, we talked about our needs and how to
address them. How are you today? You just have one last module to do before you reach the end of
these PFA sessions. Today, we will focus on your sources of strength. This is our way of reminding that
you have resources within yourself or with others that have allowed you to begin to face the new
normal-your process of recovery.
One the next page is a drawing of a kite or what we call a saranggola. Another name for it is, Guriyon or
Bulador. Among the Cebuanos, it is called Banog-Banog. Can you tell me what makes it go up in the air?
You are right, it needs the wind to go up in the air. What can make it strong enough to not break by air?
It needs good needs a strong brace. It needs good material. It needs a line or a long string. The paper
must be properly glued. And it needs a strong brace.
Just like a kite, you too have what it takes to fly. On each part of the kite’s diamond, Kindly write down
what you think are your sources of strength. What makes you strong despite what you have gone through
during the past few months of pandemic? An example would be, “ang pagiging matatag, buo ang loob,
masayahin, at may tiwala sa sarili.”
Can you also identify what or who acts like the wind for you? Who provides you with support? Who or
what helps you soar? On the areas outside the kite, write down the names of these people or things that
act like the wind for you.
Take time to color your drawing. Below it, write a brief explanation about your sources of strength and
the people and things who act like the wind to help you fly or soar.
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_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
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ANALYSIS
What have you realized about yourself after drawing the kite?
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
ABSTRACTION
How are you similar to the kite? What are your strengths as a person?
___________________________________________________________________________
APPLICATION
The next time you feel weak, imagine your saranggola in order to remind yourself that you have a number
of sources of strength? Finally, can you write a poem with one stanza and 4 lines (isang saknong na may
4 na linya o taludtod ng tula) about your sources of strengths?
Example: Ang Saranggola ko at Ako
Ang saranggola ko at ako
Parehong-pareho
Ako ay Matatag, Sya rin ay Matatag
Ako ay di Babagsak, sya din ay di babagsak
Tangayin man ng hangin
Hinding hindi matitinag!
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
CLOSING
Facing the mirror, read and recite out loud the poem you have written about your sources of strength.
The 2020 O/SG PFA Modules Supplemental to the SEES Manual
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