Uploaded by Sabrina Zalles

Pulse Lab- high school

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Pulse Lab
Name:
Period:
Date:
Introduction:
William Harvey was the scientist who discovered that blood circulated through
the body. At the time Harvey began his work, anatomists believed that the liver produced
blood from food that the body consumed. The blood was then carried through veins to the
heart, purified in the lungs, and then pumped to the various organs of the body where it
was consumed. Now we know blood cells are made in your bone marrow and travels
through the body delivering oxygen and nutrients to all your cells. In this lab, you will
analyze your pulse after different levels of physical activity.
Procedures Part 1:
1. While sitting quietly at your desk, find the pulse in your wrist or neck.
2. To find the number of beats per minute, time your pulse for 30 seconds and
multiply that number by 2. Record your data in table 1.
3. Repeat step 2 two more times. Calculate the average beats per minute.
4. Copy down your lab partner’s pulse and compare.
Table 1: Resting Pulse
Name
Trial 1 (bpm)
Trial 2 (bpm)
Trial 3 (bpm)
Average (bpm)
Procedures Part 2:
1. For this portion of the lab you will measure your pulse standing up.
2. Hypothesis: How do you think standing up will affect your pulse rate?
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3. While standing, find your pulse and time it for 30 seconds. To find the number of
beats per minute, multiply that number by 2. Record your data in table 2.
4. Repeat step 3 two more times. Calculate the average beats per minute.
5. Copy down your lab partner’s pulse and compare.
Table 2: Standing Pulse
Name
Trial 1 (bpm)
Trial 2 (bpm)
Trial 3 (bpm)
Average (bpm)
© 2014 Science Lessons That Rock
Procedures Part 3:
1. For this portion of the lab you will measure your pulse while holding your breath.
2. Hypothesis: How do you think holding your breath will affect your pulse rate?
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3. While holding your breath, find your pulse and time it for 30 seconds. To find the
number of beats per minute, multiply that number by 2. Record your data in table 3.
4. Repeat step 3 two more times. Calculate the average beats per minute.
5. Copy down your lab partner’s pulse and compare.
Table 3: Holding Breath Pulse
Name
Trial 1 (bpm)
Trial 2 (bpm)
Trial 3 (bpm)
Average (bpm)
Results:
1. Which activity gave you the slowest pulse rate? ___________________________
2. Which activity gave you the quickest pulse rate? __________________________
Conclusions:
3. What measurement did you use as a control in this experiment?
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4. What was the independent variable in this experiment?
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5. What was the dependent variable in this experiment?
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6. What are some possible sources of error in this experiment?
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7. Why do you think everyone’s pulse is a little different?
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© 2014 Science Lessons That Rock
Answer Key:
1. Answers will vary, but most likely resting pulse.
2. Answers will vary, but most likely standing pulse.
3. The control was the resting pulse because we used it for comparison.
4. Independent variables were sitting, standing, and holding breath.
5. Dependent variable was your pulse rate.
6. Some sources of error could be timing incorrectly, messing up the
math, or not holding breath long enough.
7. Everyone’s bodies are different. Healthy people typically have a
slower pulse than overweight people or smokers. Genetics and
metabolism can also play minor roles in your heart rate.
If you are satisfied with this lab, please leave positive feedback!
Thanks,
Copyright © Science Lessons That Rock
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Permission to copy for single classroom use only.
Electronic distribution limited to single classroom use only.
Not for public display.
© 2014 Science Lessons That Rock
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