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Renewable Wood

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NZ WOOD
Our Endlessly Renewable
Environmentally Friendly Resource
Cross curricular activities and
investigations brought to you by
www.woodcareers.co.nz
www.nzwood.co.nz
Session Index
Curriculum Areas .................................................................................................................1
Wonderful Wood – How We Use It ......................................................................................2
Forests – NZ’s Special Resource........................................................................................3
Forestry And Climate Change.............................................................................................4
Soil And Water Conservation..............................................................................................5
Natural Habitat And Recreation ..........................................................................................6
Forestry And Wood Facts To Share ...................................................................................7
Concluding Activities...........................................................................................................8
Our endlessly renewable environmentally friendly resource
NZ Wood
Curriculum Areas
Science
Living World,
Planet Earth
and Beyond
How living things interact with their environment and the
human effects on our environment, and understanding how
planting forests can help combat climate change.
Learning about the interdependence of our subsystems of
land, water, air and life.
Discovering the diversity of species that our forests support
and encourage.
Social Sciences
Place and
Environment,
Economic
World
Using forests and wood as a context, students will learn how
people interact with places and the environment.
Further Links
to
The Arts, English, Technology. Best suited to curriculum levels
2-4+
© FITEC
Learning how people participate in economic activities and the
importance of the wood industry to New Zealand’s economic
health and the jobs it provides for people.
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NZ Wood
Wonderful Wood – How We Use It
Students complete a 5 minute brainstorm of a list of items
we use in our everyday lives, made wholly or partly from
wood.
Groups list all items including fittings and furniture that make
up their classroom, e.g. apparatus, walls, ceilings, books, paper,
art materials and equipment …
Groups prepare a table listing all materials used in each item, e.g.
Classroom Item
Materials Used
Desk
Computer
Walls
wood, metal, screws, rubber
plastic, glass, screen, metal
wood, paper, plaster, nails
Groups present tables to the class and must include a summary
sheet that gives the following totals
-
total number of items
total that includes wood products
50% or more of wood
less than 50% wood
% of items that include 50% or more of wood
% of items that contain some wood products
ratio of items containing 50% or more to less than 50%
Subtract all items that include some wood products. What is
left?
Assign each student a room(s) of their own house to inspect
for products and fittings, walls, ceilings etc made with some/
all wood or wood products. Have each student inspect the
outside of their house for wood materials including cladding.
Students report back. What % of houses are mainly wood?
What parts of their houses and rooms are mainly wood? What
parts of their houses include some wood?
Use the importance of wood as a topic for class discussion.
Have each student/group write and present a paragraph on
the importance of wood in everyday life.
© FITEC
Issue 1.June 2009
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NZ Wood
Forests – NZ’s Special Resource
What is a forest? Can students define it? Did they know that
about 30% of New Zealand is covered in forests?
Introduce the idea that we have two types of forests –
indigenous and plantation forests. What does the dictionary or
Google say is the difference between the two?
Challenge groups to list as many names of trees that they
know that fit into each category, e.g. exotic (Plantation): pinus
radiata, blue gum. Indigenous: rata, kauri. Combine group
results in table form.
Where is the closest forest to the school? How many students
have visited a forest? Where was it and what was the purpose
of their visit?
Pose the question ‘Why are trees and forests very important
and what benefits do they provide?’ List responses, e.g. they
- are a source of wood for building and many other uses
- provide a pleasant recreational environment for people
- provide homes for birds, animals and insects
- absorb greenhouse gases…
© FITEC
Issue 1.June 2009
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NZ Wood
Forestry And Climate Change
Print out the Climate Change section at: www.nzwood.co.nz
> select Sustainability > select Climate Change. Through
discussion, work through the following ideas –
-
What is generally recognised as the cause of global warming
-
The causes of increased CO2 in our atmosphere
-
Ensure students understand that throughout history, climate has
always changed
-
Identify the fears we have of global warming caused by CO2
emissions into our atmosphere
Develop the idea that planting of more forests is one of the best
ways of fighting global warming because trees absorb and lock
in CO2 from the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide also stays trapped
in the wood we use.
Canvas students’ opinions about
cutting down mature pine (pinus
radiata) trees and replanting the
forests? Did students know that new
trees absorb far more CO2 than old
trees?
Point out also, that by cutting down
our mature exotic trees from our
pinus radiata plantations and planting
new forests of pines helps absorb
more CO2 from the atmosphere.
Have students
conduct group /
individual research on
forests as carbon
sinks at:
www.insights.co.nz > Wood
and Climate Change > Wood to
the Rescue. Summarize and
report findings
© FITEC
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NZ Wood
Soil And Water Conservation
Introduce the concept of soil erosion. What is the students’
understanding of soil erosion? What is it, what causes it and
how does it occur? Are there any areas in the local district that
have been affected by soil erosion?
Have any students seen soil erosion – especially on our hills
when they have been flying in a plane or driving in car? Before
web research begins, have students make suggestions on
ways that we can help prevent it or repair it.
Have students find answers to the following at:
www.insights.co.nz > select Essential Facts > select Soil
and Water Conservation.
- why the potential for erosion is high in New Zealand?
- why have some areas been retired from agriculture?
- where in New Zealand can we see striking examples of eroded
hill country?
- what happens to such country when trees are planted?
- what jobs to trees do to protect the soil?
- what happens to the water when it flows through the roots and
vegetable litter on the forest floor?
- how do trees help prevent flash floods causing erosion?
Extra for Experts
© FITEC
Find out more detailed information at: www.insights.co.nz
> select The Forest Habitat > select Soil Conservation and
Water Conservation. Use for shared reading or projects.
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NZ Wood
Natural Habitat And Recreation
Have students consider the forest as an
ecosystem. Speculate on birds, insects
and animals that live in the forest. Revise
the concept of a food chain. Can they
outline a possible food chain up to four
(trophic) levels?
Before groups investigate food chains in
exotic forests, ensure students
understand the concept of: a producer,
first, second, and third level consumers,
e.g. forest tree bark, insect, fantail, stoat
Have groups investigate
food chains of the exotic
forests at:
www.insights.co.nz > The
Forest Habitat > Forest
Ecology.
Tell students that to ensure there is always a place for these
creatures, only a small section of the forest is cut down at one
time and there is always a forest close by for refuge.
Students should visit the Creatures section and listen to the
calls of the large numbers of forest birds. Tell students that
because of the variety of birds, many people use the forests
for bird watching as a recreational pursuit.
Have students think of and list other recreational activities
that people can enjoy in forests, e.g.
-
sight seeing
hunting
mountain biking
running
-
walking
car rally
off road driving
tranquillity
Discuss the importance of forests for NZ and visiting
tourists.
© FITEC
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NZ Wood
Forestry And Wood Facts To Share
Did students know that the
wood industry is the second
biggest exporter in New
Zealand (behind only dairy)
and earns about $3 billion for
New Zealand each year.
To explain the importance of
the forestry and wood industry,
tell students that it provides
over 22,000 jobs for New
Zealanders – that is people
who look after and work in the
forests and process the wood to
export it overseas.
Have students visit:
www.marketnewzealand.com/MNZ/aboutNZ/sectors/14373.aspx
to find out the products we export overseas.
Tell students that it is estimated that over 100,000 people also
have jobs that are related to the forestry and wood industry.
Challenge students to mind-map these jobs in graphic or
table form. These could include: builders & architects, railway
workers, furniture makers, timber merchants and building
supply stores, paper manufacturers, newspaper workers …
© FITEC
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NZ Wood
Concluding Activities
Have students/groups complete several of the following:
www.teara.govt.nz/TheSettledLandscape/TreesAndGardens/
RadiataPine/3/en to research and present findings:
-
the exotic forest cycle from site preparation to harvesting
the tasks carried out to manage the forests
types of logs and their uses
where forests are planted and soil improvement measures
what risks do forests face and protective measures taken?
Focus on jobs. Have students research the jobs and careers
that are available in the wood and forestry industry at:
www.woodcareers.co.nz > Students and Job Seekers > Career
and Career Paths
Have students select several jobs that they find interesting.
Invite people from some of these industry branches to talk to
the class about the special skills these jobs require, the
qualifications necessary and the satisfaction they get from
their jobs. www.woodcareers.co.nz can assist.
Have each student choose the industry career that appeals to
them the most and write a newspaper advertisement / article,
design a poster or web page or web banner promoting careers
in their chosen career.
Invite a local exotic plantation owner or manager to talk to the
class about caring/maintaining their plantation.
Invite a wood industry representative to talk to the class about
the many uses of pinus radiata and the different wood
products used. Summarise findings for a report.
Have all students contribute interest-based illustrated reports
on any aspect of the wood and forestry industry for a class
display entitled ‘It’s far more than just chopping down trees’.
© FITEC
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Our endlessly renewable environmentally friendly resource
NZ Wood
Copyright
FITEC holds the copyright for this publication. All rights
reserved. FITEC (Forest Industries Training and Education
Council) is the owner of the copyright of this publication. Other
than as permitted by the Copyright Act 1994, no part of this
publication may be reproduced, copied or transmitted in any
other form or by any other means, without the prior written
permission of FITEC.
Disclaimer
All information is correct as at the time of printing. FITEC
reserves the right to make any changes to the information
contained in this publication as it may deem desirable or
necessary, without prior notice.
Additional Copies
Copies of all FITEC resources are available from:
FITEC
PO Box 137067
Parnell, Auckland
New Zealand
Web Site: www.fitec.org.nz
0800 119911
Feedback
Feedback on the content of this document can be sent to the
Wood Careers Team at the above address, faxed on 09 356 8025
or emailed to woodcareers@fitec.org.nz
© FITEC
Issue 1.June 2009
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