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NSF FE OverviewCII

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NSF International
A Global Leader in Public Health and Safety
Food safety Considerations for Hygienic Design of Manufacturing and Processing Equipment
Mona Malhotra and Navin Sharma
NSF International
3rd Dec. 2014
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Cleanable to a microbiological level:
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designed as to prevent bacterial ingress, survival, growth and reproduction on both
product and non-product contact surfaces of the equipment.
Made of compatible materials:
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with the product, environment, cleaning and sanitizing chemicals and the methods of
cleaning and sanitation.
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Accessible for inspection, maintenance, cleaning and sanitation:
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inspection, maintenance, cleaning and sanitation without the use of tools.
No product or liquid collection:
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self-draining to assure that liquid, which can harbor and promote the growth of
bacteria, does not accumulate, pool or condense on the equipment.
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Hollow areas should be hermetically sealed
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such as frames and rollers must be eliminated wherever possible or permanently
sealed
Bolts, studs, mounting plates, brackets, junction boxes, nameplates, end caps,
sleeves and other such items must be continuously welded to the surface not
attached via drilled and tapped holes.
No niches:
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such as pits, cracks, corrosion, recesses, open seams, gaps, lap seams, protruding
ledges, inside threads, bolt rivets and dead ends.
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Sanitary operational performance:
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does not contribute to unsanitary conditions or the harborage and growth of bacteria.
Hygienic design of maintenance enclosures:
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such as push buttons, valve handles, switches and touchscreens, must be designed,
to ensure food product, water or product liquid does not penetrate or accumulate in
and on the enclosure or interface.
physical design of the enclosures should be sloped or pitched to avoid use as storage
area.
Principles of Sanitary Equipment Design
Hygienic compatibility with other plant systems
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such as electrical, hydraulics, steam, air and water.
Validated cleaning and sanitizing protocols:
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Clearly written, designed and proven effective and efficient
Cleaning and sanitation chemicals must be compatible with the equipment and the
manufacturing environment.
Examples of Sanitary Equipment Design
Congested Design
Open Design
Hollow Rollers
Solid Rollers
Examples of Sanitary Equipment Design
Gasket
Continuous Welds
Non-Functioning Openings
Continuous welding of parts also prevents bacteria from harboring and
growing in niches.
BENEFITS
Optimizing the design and performance criteria for
equipment and related systems as well as establishing
industry-wide specifications benefit the entire industry by
promoting one standard design that will help reduce
contamination and associated recalls.
Food Equipment Certification
22 Food Equipment Standards
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NSF/ANSI 2: Food Equipment
NSF/ANSI 3: Commercial Warewashing Equipment
NSF/ANSI 4: Cooking and Hot Food Holding Equipment
NSF/ANSI 5: Water Heaters
NSF/ANSI 6: Dispensing Freezers
NSF/ANSI 7: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers
NSF/ANSI 8: Commercial Powered Food Preparation Equipment
NSF/ANSI 12: Automatic Ice Making Equipment
NSF/ANSI 13: Refuse Processors
NSF/ANSI 18: Manual Food and Beverage Dispensing Equipment
NSF/ANSI 20: Commercial Bulk Milk Dispensing Equipment
NSF/ANSI 21: Thermoplastic Refuse Containers
NSF/ANSI 25: Vending Machines for Food and Beverages
NSF/ANSI 29: Detergent and Chemical Feeders for dishwashing machines
NSF/ANSI 35: High Pressure Decorative Laminates
NSF/ANSI 36: Dinnerware
NSF/ANSI 37: Air curtains for entranceways in food establishments
NSF/ANSI 51: Food Equipment Materials
NSF/ANSI 52: Supplemental Flooring
NSF/ANSI 59: Mobile Food Carts
NSF/ANSI 169: Special Purpose Food Equipment and Devices
NSF/ANSI 170: Glossary of Food Equipment Terminology
Minimum Requirements for Certification
• Physical Evaluation: NSF evaluates the design and construction of
the equipment to make sure that it is easily cleanable. We look at
things such as joints, seams, fastening methods, radius’ etc.
• Material Review: We will review all materials that are in contact with
food or have the potential to be in contact with food to make sure
that they don’t impose any taste, odor, or harmful effects onto the
food. Materials will be evaluated against FDA guidelines (21 CFR).
• Performance Testing: Includes tests such as: Temperature
maintenance, in place cleaning test, coating tests, thermometer
accuracy test.
• Compliance Audit: An audit is conducted for initial Certification at
each production facility, and on an annual basis thereafter, for
continued Certification.
Zones
• Food Zone
– Direct food contact
– Surfaces where food can drain or drip back on to food
• Splash Zone
– Surfaces subject to splash or spills
• Nonfood Zone
– Surfaces exposed to dirt and debris but not exposed to food or
splash
• Unexposed Nonfood Zone
– Surfaces that are not exposed
Material and Design Requirements vary by Zone…
Food Zone Direct Contact Examples
Food pans
Cutting board
Food preparation surface
Food Zone Non-Direct Contact Examples
Interior of
refrigerator
Underside of top
cover
Splash Zone Examples
Interior of cabinet and
exposed exterior surfaces
Exposed shelving
Nonfood Zone Examples
Underside of
equipment
Underside of wall shelf
1. Wrong Materials – Wood or Bamboo Needs to be Replaced
Critical Issues of material, design and construction
Potential Food safety hazards
2. Inadequate Materials – Quality of Plastic or Steel not fit for purpose
Minor issues of material, design, performance and construction
Potential Food safety hazards
3. Inadequate Cleaning – Improved Cleaning Procedures Needed
Potential Food safety hazards from harborage of bacteria
4. Improper Use – Continual Improvement Needed
Potential Food safety hazards from use of equipment
Training needs
5. Improper Design or Construction – Need to Change Equipment
Minor issues of material, design and
construction
Replaced with approved equipment
6. Rust from Inadequate Material Specification
Material specification not suitable for intended use
Cleaning chemicals and processes may be a factor
7. Continual Improvement on site
Replacement equipment to be certified
Use and cleaning of equipment to be controlled
Overview of Material Requirements
Requirement
Food Zone
Splash Zone
Nonfood Zone
Nontoxic
Required
No Requirement No Requirement
Smooth
Yes
Yes
Yes
Easily Cleanable
Yes
Yes
Yes
Corrosion
Resistant
Yes
Yes
Yes
Overview of Design Requirements
Requirement
Food Zone
Splash Zone
Nonfood Zone
Accessibility
Without Tools
With Tools
With Tools
Required
Not Required
Not Required
Fasteners
Not Permitted
Easily Cleanable
Easily
Cleanable
Exposed
Threads
Not Permitted
Not Permitted
Limited
Sealed
Sealed
Closed
Radius
Seams
Examples of Performance Testing Required
• Temperature maintenance
– Verify equipment can maintain food at safe temperatures
• In place cleaning test
– Confirm manufacturers cleaning & sanitizing instructions remove
harmful bacteria
• Organic coating tests
– Confirm food contact materials meet regulations
• Thermometer accuracy test
– Validate accuracy of readings over a range of temperatures
• Corrosion resistance testing for shelving
– Verify surfaces remain smooth and easily cleanable
NSF Certification Process
Quote and Application
Providing all clients with:
• A dedicated point of contact
Physical Evaluation
• Access to NSF/ANSI standards
• Ongoing technical support
Testing / Material Review
(if Applicable)
Documentation Report Issued
Certification, Listing and
Authorization to use NSF Mark
Facility Audit to Verify Ongoing
Compliance
• Unmatched food safety expertise
• 65+ years of certification excellence
Water is an important part of Food and Food Chain
Safe Water – Delivery has many Mechanical Elements
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Pipes / Pipe fittings
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Miscellaneous components
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Plastics
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Pumps
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UV systems (municipal)
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Water meters
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Membranes
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Filters
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Tanks
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Valves
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Faucets
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And more
Safe Water – Delivery has many Chemical Elements
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Coagulation Chemicals
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Corrosion Inhibitors
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Disinfectants
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RO Antiscalants
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Miscellaneous
treatment chemicals
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And more!
How do NSF standards Work?
• Evaluation of any contaminants (metal and non-metal)
that migrate into drinking water.
• Evaluation of weighted average lead content for
products that contain brass or bronze.
• Evaluation of claims by the manufacturers (cyst
removal, TDS removal, other contaminant removal,
etc.)
• Evaluation of the Performance claims
Various NSF Standards
Applicable Standards :
 NSF/ANSI 60
Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals
 NSF/ANSI 61
Drinking Water Treatment Components
(Public Health only)
 NSF/ANSI 14
Plastic Pipes/Pipe fittings
(Public Health and Performance)
 NSF/ANSI 42 and/or 53
Filtration, Active Media
 NSF/ANSI 44
Ion Exchange Softener
 NSF/ANSI 55
Ultraviolet Systems
 NSF/ANSI 58
POU Reverse Osmosis
 NSF/ANSI 177
Shower Filtration
 NSF/ANSI 372
Low Lead Compliance
 NSF/ANSI 50
Shower Filtration
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