Uploaded by Meredith Stephens

Literary Analysis Outline

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LITERARY
ANALYSIS
OUTLINE
Includes:
1-page editable outline
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Literary Analysis Outline
This is not necessarily a five-paragraph essay just because there are five Roman numerals. It
might be five paragraphs. It might be more paragraphs, if it’s meant to be more thorough. It
might be fewer paragraphs, if fewer than three claims are used. Regardless of the length of the
essay, there should be five main elements: thesis, claim, evidence, commentary, conclusion.
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
Introduction
a. Hook/background
b. Thesis
i. TAG (title, author, genre)
ii. Take a firm, specific position
c. Direction (foreshadow what we’re about to read))
Claim #1
a. Topic sentence (state your claim #1)
b. Evidence #1 that proves claim #1
c. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #1)
d. Evidence #2 that proves claim #1
e. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #1)
f. Commentary (explain how/why claim #1 helps to prove thesis)
Claim #2
a. Transition phrase or sentence
b. Topic sentence (state your claim #2)
c. Evidence #3 that proves claim #2
d. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #2)
e. Evidence #4 that proves claim #2
f. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #2)
g. Commentary (explain how/why claim #2 helps to prove thesis)
Claim #3
a. Transition phrase or sentence
b. Topic sentence (state your claim #3)
c. Evidence #5 that proves claim #3
d. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #3)
e. Evidence #6 that proves claim #3
f. Commentary (explain how/why the evidence proves claim #3)
g. Commentary (explain how/why claim #3 helps to prove thesis)
Conclusion
a. Transition phrase or sentence
b. Summarize claims
c. Restatement of thesis (say it in a new way)
d. So what? (explain the significance of your thesis – why should we care?)
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