Uploaded by JONATHAN ZIMMERMAN

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TEACHER RESOURCES
Quick Lab
DATASHEET
The Mitosis Flipbook
Teacher Notes
Students will model the gradual transitions throughout mitosis by making a
flipbook (covers standards 7.1.e and 7.7.d). Students may work independently or
in groups of two or four. If students have difficulty with Step 5, instruct them to
place five blank cards between two of the consecutive cards from Step 3. Then,
ask students to draw any features that all of the cards will have in common
(e.g., shape of cell membrane, position of the dark yellow centrioles) on each of
the blank cards. Finally, tell students to select one element that changes, such
as a single color of chromosome, and to draw it as it changes over each card.
Students should repeat this step until all changing elements have been added to
the cards.
MATERIALS
For each group
•
•
•
•
brad (2)
cards, index (20)
hole punch
pencils, colored
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Holt California Life Science
88
The Cell in Action
Name
Class
Quick Lab
Date
DATASHEET A
The Mitosis Flipbook
The process of mitosis involves four phases, but the transition from one phase to
the next involves many intermediate stages. In this activity, you will illustrate and
assemble a flipbook. The flipbook will show the phases and intermediate stages
of mitosis.
PROCEDURE
1. Get 20 index cards and a hole punch.
• Punch two holes near the upper edge of the index cards.
2. Take four index cards from your stack.
• On the first card, write Prophase.
• On the second card, write Metaphase.
• On the third card, write Anaphase.
• On the fourth card, write Telophase.
3. Look at the images in Figure 4 in your text.
• On the card marked Prophase, draw a diagram similar to Mitosis Phase 1 in
Figure 4.
• On the card marked Metaphase, draw a diagram similar to Mitosis Phase 2
in Figure 4.
• On the card marked Anaphase, draw a diagram similar to Mitosis Phase 3 in
Figure 4.
• On the card marked Telophase, draw a diagram similar to Mitosis Phase 4 in
Figure 4.
4. Use colored pencils to make each chromosome a different color.
• On each card where the cell part is present, label at least one example of
the chromosome, centromere, and nuclear membrane.
5. On the remaining blank index cards, draw the intermediate stages between
each phase of mitosis.
• Show the gradual transitions between each phase of mitosis by making
small changes on each card.
• For example, between prophase and metaphase, you could draw several
cards showing the gradual disappearance of the nuclear membrane and the
movement of paired chromatids to the equator.
• Use three to five cards between each phase.
6. Put your cards in order.
• Place a brad in each hole to assemble your flipbook.
• Watch the phases of mitosis by flipping through your book quickly.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Holt California Life Science
89
The Cell in Action
Name
Class
Date
The Mitosis Flipbook continued
7. Look at your flipbook. During what phase of mitosis does the nuclear
membrane dissolve?
8. This flipbook shows the actions of chromosomes, centromeres, and the
nuclear membrane during mitosis. Mitosis refers to the division of the
nucleus.
• When do other organelles replicate and divide?
• Should you leave out of your flipbook what is happening to the rest of the
cell’s organelles? Why or why not?
9. It is important for eukaryotic cells to undergo mitosis.
• How do eukaryotic organisms grow and replace old, worn-out, or injured
cells?
• Why is mitosis important to organisms that must grow and replace cells?
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Holt California Life Science
90
The Cell in Action
TEACHER RESOURCES
Quick Lab: The Mitosis
Flipbook
Chapter Lab
DATASHEET A
5. Chromosomes are visible in all of
DATASHEET A
7. prophase
8. The other organelles replicate during
interphase. It is acceptable to leave
the other organelles off the flipbook
because mitosis only refers to
replication of the nucleus.
9. Eukaryotic organisms grow and
replace old cells by making new cells.
Mitosis is important to eukaryotic
cells because they need copies of their
genetic material to pass to the daughter cells. These new cells are needed
to replace old, worn-out, or injured
cells and to allow for the growth of the
organism.
6.
7.
8.
9.
DATASHEET B
7. prophase
8. It is acceptable to leave the other
organelles off the flipbook because
mitosis only refers to replication of the
nucleus. The other organelles replicate
during interphase.
9. Eukaryotic cells must undergo mitosis because they need copies of their
genetic material to pass on to the
daughter cells. These new cells are
needed to replace old, worn-out, or
injured cells and to allow for the
growth of the organism.
10.
11.
DATASHEET C
7. prophase
8. It is acceptable to leave the other
12.
organelles out of the flipbook because
mitosis only refers to replication of the
nucleus. The other organelles replicate
during interphase.
9. Eukaryotic cells must undergo mitosis because they need copies of their
genetic material to pass to the daughter cells. These new cells are needed
to replace old, worn-out, or injured
cells and to allow for the growth of
the organism. Daughter cells will not
have identical genetic material if cells
divide without going through mitosis.
the phases of mitosis: prophase,
metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.
Chromosomes are not visible in
interphase or cytokinesis.
The chromosomes line up along the
central axis of the cell.
Two separate nuclei appear in
telophase.
The only stage of mitosis in which
the nuclear membrane is visible is
prophase.
The nuclear membrane is visible
during prophase. At metaphase, the
membrane is dissolved and cannot be
seen. The nuclear membrane cannot
be seen during anaphase or telophase.
The membrane forms around each set
of chromosomes during telophase.
The nuclear membrane cannot be
seen during metaphase, anaphase, or
telophase. The nuclear membrane is
dissolved.
The genetic material is still within
the nucleus. However, it is found
in loosely packed fibers, not in the
thicker, easier-to-see chromosomes.
No, if the DNA did not double, then
the daughter cells would receive only
half the DNA that was found in the
parent cell. Each subsequent division
would produce cells with one-half the
genetic code of its parent. Most likely,
this lineage of cells would not survive.
Sample answer: The cell cycle begins
with one cell that has a certain number of chromosomes and organelles.
The cell goes through the process of
cell division and ends up as two cells
that are identical to the first. Each of
these cells can now start the process
over again. Besides mitosis, the stages
of the cell cycle are interphase and
cytokinesis.
Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved.
Holt California Life Science
115
The Cell in Action
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