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MIP

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Lancashire School of
Business and Enterprise
HR2015 – Work and Organisational
Change
Academic Year 2019-2020
Tutor
Module Leader:
Richard Fisher
Module Tutor:
David Opperman
RoomPhone Extension
E-Mail
Gr144
3124
[email protected]
Gr145
4694
[email protected]
Level 6
Module of 20 Credits
Please note that this Module Information Pack (MIP) must be read in conjunction
with your Course Handbook and the relevant sections of the Academic Regulations
Aims:
This module will develop students’ understanding of the theory and practice of work
and organisational change. It is designed to enable students to explore theoretical
approaches to understanding change in organisations and the challenges and issues
that may be faced by leaders engaged in organisational change strategies.
Furthermore, it will also consider a range of workplace themes and strategies
associated with the management of individuals and groups at work.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:
1.
Identify and critically analyse different theoretical approaches to the management of
2.
3.
4.
5.
organisational change and their relevance within organisations
Appraise a range of different theoretical approaches that can be used in the workplace
to implement organisational change
Critique different approaches to overcoming the issues and challenges faced by
managers in the implementation of change in the workplace
Evaluate a selection of workplace themes and practices associated with the
management of people at work
Critically analyse the application of theoretical approaches associated with the
management of individuals and groups within organisational contexts
Employability Skills developed in this module
The module delivery and assessment activities are underpinned by ensuring that the
UCLan employability skills are embedded in the module. The skills have been
informed by drawing upon national occupational standards and extensive relationship
with local, national and international employers
Smarties
Employability Skills
Personal Development
Research Skills
Problem Solving
Reflection
Sector Skills
Innovation
Subject Skills
Team Working
Communication Skills
For further information about the Employability Framework please go to the following
link. http://www.uclan.ac.uk/information/uclan/employability/resources.php
Blackboard Support
All documents will be available via Blackboard including MIP, assessments and lecture
notes. Where possible, video copies of lectures will be made to support students who
are unable to attend due to extenuating circumstances. In addition, where relevant,
visiting lecturer sessions and paperwork will also be posted on Blackboard. In the
case of cancellation of class due to tutor absence, please ensure that you read all
lecture notes and undertake all activities on Blackboard as highlighted by the tutor
Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy
The module will be taught by a one hour lecture and a one hour seminar/workshop
each week over the course of the academic year. In order to stimulate learning and
support understanding the module is structured to provide opportunities for
questioning, debate, and particularly the development of an understanding of the
applicability and limitations of the theory of leadership and project management within
organisations.
Typically the topics and debates covered within the lecture will be repeated within the
seminar. The seminars will focus on developing students’ understanding of the
applicability (and limitations) of theory in relation to organizational environments. They
will also seek to develop students’ ability to critically analyse the subject matter and to
consider the implications of the subject matter for their future roles as leaders. This
will be achieved through the use of techniques such as case studies, role play, videos
and the discussion of organizational data.
The assessments for the module will play a particular role in students’ learning. The
report will be based on leading change at the level of a team within an organisational
context the assessment will be developed throughout the academic year. This will
involve the use of a detailed case study with students’ actively engaged in the
management of the change process at team level.
The group presentation with a reflective element is based on a case study. This will
encourage the students to focus on their academic learning, knowledge of change
management and interpersonal skills. It is also designed to build on presentations that
students have delivered in the first year of their degree programme.
It is intended that both of these assessments support the development of knowledge
and skills that will be relevant to the future careers in the field of management.
Two seminars within the year will be dedicated to feedback from the assignments; to
exploit students’ opportunities to learn from the comments on assignments. In
particular the graduate attributes that this module will develop are oral and written
communication skills; commercial awareness; managing change and leadership skills.
As well as engaging in the classes, students will be expected to undertake work
outside of set classes. This will include undertaking guided reading, personal research
for assignments, completing pre-class work and taking part in group planning
activities. The learning time for the module is expected to be as follows:
Direct Contact Hours
No of Hours
Lectures
30
Seminars
30
Independent Learning Hours
Seminar Preparation and guided reading
60
Assignment preparation, research and writing
50
Learning from Feedback
10
Reflection on and remedial work relating to generic and 20
individual assessment feedback
Total Student Learning Hours
200
Guidelines for attendance
You are expected to attend all lectures and seminars to ensure the developmental
work is facilitated.
If you are unable to attend for any reason If you are unable to attend for any reason,
you must email: [email protected] to explain your absence.
Assessment Strategy:
The assessment for this module is 100% coursework and will be divided into 2
assignments.
Assignment 1 (70%)
Report based on a case study – Tesco
Assignment 2 (30%)
Group Presentation with reflective element based on a case study – UK Airlines
ASSESSMENT METHODS
The method of assessment for this module has been designed to test all the learning outcomes.
Students must demonstrate successful achievement of these learning outcomes to pass the module.
Number of
Assessments
Form of
Assessment
%
weighting
Size of
Assessment/Duration/
Word count (indicative
only)
Category of
assessment
Learning
Outcomes
being
assessed
1
Report
based on
case study
Group
presentation
70%
1500 words
Coursework
1, 2, 3
30%
15 minutes
Practical assessment
4, 5
1
Marking
The university uses the following bandings when marking undergraduate (Levels 4, 5
& 6) assessments.
Band
Exceptional 1st
High 1
st
Numerical
Equivalent
96
89
Mid 1st
81
Low 1st
74
High 2.1
68
Mid 2.1
65
Low 2.1
62
High 2.2
58
Mid 2.2
55
Low 2.2
52
High 3rd
48
Mid 3rd
45
Low 3rd
42
Marginal Fail
35
Mid Fail
30
Indicative Language
Exceptional, creative, insightful, illuminating,
inspiring, exciting, authoritative, challenging
Persuasive, sophisticated, original, reflective,
ambitious, meticulous, critical, convincing,
unexpected
Fluent, thorough, analytical, precise, rigorous,
confident, consistent, thoughtful
Satisfactory, clear, accurate, careful, congruent,
coherent
Sufficient, adequate, descriptive, limited
Incomplete, inadequate, inconsistent,
derivative, contradictory, superficial, irrelevant
25
Erroneous/wrong, missing, extremely limited,
inappropriate, insufficient, incoherent,
unstructured
Fail
10
Lacking, formless, detrimental
Non-submission
0
Low Fail
Non submission
Note: To satisfactorily complete the module all pieces of coursework must be
attempted. A 40% overall grade must be achieved.
Late Submission and Assignment Extension Request
The University requires students to adhere to submission deadlines for any form of
assessment. A penalty will be applied in relation to unauthorised late submission of
work.
If the situation is short term then you can apply for an Extension. To request an
extension
you
should
contact
the
module
leader,
or
email
[email protected] You should keep a copy of the email as evidence
of your request.
We aim to inform you of a decision about granting an extension within 2 days of the
receipt of the request.
Authorisation of the late submission of work requires written permission. The School
with responsibility for your module will be authorised to give permission for one
extension period of between 1 and 10 working days where evidence of circumstances
has been accepted and where submission within this timescale would be reasonable
taking into account those circumstances (Academic Regulation: G3).
The University operates a universal penalty scale for unauthorised late submission of
any form of assessed work. Students who submit work within 5 working days after
the published submission date without an authorised extension will obtain a
maximum mark of 40% for that element of assessment.
All work submitted later than 5 working days after the published submission date will
be awarded a mark of 0%.
Timetable Changes:
The module team strive to keep to the published timetable of lectures and seminars,
and communicate any changes that are necessary. For this reason it is important that
you regularly check your university email and communicate any change to your mobile
phone number. Although unlikely, it is possible that an event could occur that means
that a tutor is unable to attend a session and there is no time to alert you to this (for
example there being limited time for the administrative team to contact you before a
Monday 9 am lecture). Hopefully this will not happen, but in such a situation could you
respond in the following way:
Lecture – if you have an assignment for this module that is due in; please use the time
to work on this. If there is no outstanding assignment, then please review the previous
lecture and research the topic planned for this week. It is likely that two lecture topics
will be covered in the following week.
Seminar – carry on with discussion of the seminar questions in the absence of the
tutor. In the unlikely combination that the tutor is absent for a week when you have
not been given a seminar paper and questions in advance, then please review the
essay shown on eLearn under ‘Absence Activity’.
Absence Activity
Please work on your current assignment in the library and read the relevant chapter
of the course text.
Teaching Schedule 2019-20
Semester = 12 teaching weeks + Reflection week & Assessment week = 14 weeks
Week
Date – week
commencing
Semester 1
1
23 September
2
30 September
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
7 October
14 October
21 October
28 October
4 November
11 November
18 November
25 November
2 December
9 December
13
6 January
2020
14
13 January
Semester 2
1
20 January
2
27 January
3
3 February
Topic
Introduction to Module. What is change management?
Process Models of Change - ch1
Leading change: a process perspective – ch 2
Issue case study – assignment 1
Recognising a need or opportunity for change – ch 4
Diagnosis – ch 7
Student Reflection Week
The role of leadership in change management – ch 9
Power, politics and stakeholder management – ch 10
Responsible change management: an ethical approach - ch 11
Communicating change – ch 13
Shaping implementation strategies – ch 16
Developing a change plan – ch 17
Implementing change & Making change stick – ch 28 & 30
Facilitating collective learning – ch 33
Student Vacation – Christmas break (3 weeks)
Review Week – no taught classes
Assessment Week
17.01.2020 submitt assignment 1
Organising & managing work and Organisations & organising ch 1 & 2
4
10 February
People & organisations ch 3
Organisations & people Ch 4
07.02.2019 assignment 1 mark released
Managing the organisation Ch 5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
17 February
24 February
2 March
10 March
17 March
23 March
30 March
6 April
Issue case study – assignment 2
Student Reflection Week
Managing to manage Ch 6
Managing, motivating, leading & tasking Ch 8
Organisation, environments & strategic management Ch 9
Organising and managing HR Ch 10
Ch 3
Presentations – Assignment 2
Student Vacation – Easter break (2 weeks)
12
20 April
Presentations – Assignment 2 (2 weeks may be sufficient depending on class
sizes)
13
27 April
Presentations – Assignment 2 (students may prefer to complete group
presentations before the Easter hols)
04 May
11 May
18 May
LSBE Assessment Week
LSBE Assessment Week
LSBE Assessment Week
Essential Reading – Course Texts and reading chapters taken from:
Hayes, J. (2017), The Theory and Practice of Change Management, 5th edition Palgrave Macmillan
Watson T (20006) Organising and Managing Work, 2nd edition Financial Times Press
Recommended Reading
Adair, J. (2010), Develop Your Leadership Skills, 1st Edition, Kogan Page Limited,
London, England
Andriopoulos, C. and Dawson, P. (2014), Managing Change, Creativity and
Innovation, 2nd Edition, Sage Publications, London, England
Beech, N., Macintosh, R., (2012), Managing Change, Enquiry & Action, 1 st Edition,
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England
Burnes, B. (2009), Managing Change, 4th Edition, Financial Times/Prentice Hall,
Harlow, England
Cameron, E. and Green, M. (2015), Making Sense of Change Management, 4 th
Edition, Kogan Page Limited, London, England
Collins, D. (1998), Organisational Change – Sociological Perspectives, 1st Edition,
Routledge, New York, USA.
Fineman, S. Gabriel, Y. and Sims, D. (2010), Organising & Organizations, 4th Edition,
Sage Publications, London, England
Grint, K., (2015), Leadership: Limits and Possibilities, 2nd Edition. Palgrave Macmillan,
Basingstoke, England
Hughes, M. (2010), Change Management – A Critical Perspective, 2nd Edition. CIPD,
London, England
Mills, J H. and Dye, K. (2008), Understanding Organisational Change, 2 nd Edition,
Routledge, New York, USA
Palmer, I., Dunford, R. and Akin, G. (2008), Managing Organisational Change: A
Multiple Perspective Approach, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill Limited, Boston, USA
Paton, R.A. and McCalman, J. (2008), Change Management: A Guide to Effective
Implementation, 3rd Edition, Sage Publishing, London, England
Price, D. (2009), The Principles and Practice of Change. Basingstoke: Palgrave
Macmillan, London, England
Thompson, P. and McHugh, D. (2009), Work Organisations – A Critical Approach, 4th
Edition. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, England
Yukl, G. (2012), Leadership in Organisations, 8th Edition, Pearson Education, Harlow,
England
Academic and Professional Journals
Harvard Business Review
Human Relations
Journal of Change Management – see Blackboard for link
Journal of Management
Journal of Management Studies
Leadership
Organization Studies
People Management
Strategic Change
Module Pass Requirements
Student must attempt all elements of assessment and achieve a weighted average of
40% to pass the module.
Disability Support for assessment
We recognise that each student is an individual with their own education support
needs. The School of Business and Enterprise work with you to assess your
requirements and then help make sure you have access to the support you need
from the wide range of options available. This is in line with the University 'Disability
Statement' which outlines policy and provision for work in this area.
To ensure that we meet these standards, teaching, learning and assessment will be
tailored to the requirements of identified individuals. It is the responsibility of students
to ensure that any special educational needs are identified as soon as possible. This
will enable staff to amend teaching materials, assessment strategies as required.
For further information please email [email protected] or telephone 01772
892593.
Unauthorised Late Submission of Assessment work
If you submit work late and unauthorised, a universal penalty will be applied in
relation to your work:
● If you submit work within 5 working days following the published submission
date you will obtain a maximum mark of 40% for that element of assessment.
● Work submitted later than 5 working days after the published submission date
will be awarded a mark of 0%.
● Unauthorised late submission at resubmission will automatically be awarded a
mark of 0%.
Any uncollected assignments will be retained for the current academic year, but will
be destroyed on 31 October.
Extenuating Circumstances and Poor Performance
Students who are unable to submit work within 10 working days after the submission
date due to verifiable extenuating circumstances which are serious and exceptional,
may submit a case for consideration in accordance with the University’s Extenuating
Circumstances Procedure.
The University operates a universal scheme for the submission of extenuating
circumstances. If you feel that you have extenuating circumstances then you need
to obtain a special envelope marked "Extenuating Circumstances" from the Student
Office. This contains a form which asks for details of the course, the year of study,
the name of the student, the name of the course leader and identifies the modules
affected. (This includes modules internal and external to the School).
You must attach relevant documentary evidence such as medical certificates. The
completed form and envelope are then returned to the Student Office.
[Note: disability or learning difficulty does not constitute an extenuating
circumstance]
Cheating, Plagiarism and Using Unfair Means to Enhance Performance
The University regards any use of unfair means in an attempt to enhance
performance or to influence the standard of award obtained as a serious academic
and disciplinary offence.
Unfair means includes all forms of cheating, plagiarism and collusion. Students are
required to sign a declaration indicating that individual work submitted for
assessment is their own.
All instances or allegations of the use of unfair means will be investigated under the
procedure detailed in Appendix 10 of the Academic Regulations.
It is therefore essential that you acknowledge an author's work that you may
have used to support an argument in any of your assignments.
Plagiarism is a particular form of cheating that the University is concerned about. All
work that is submitted for assessment must be genuinely your own work and not the
result of plagiarism. You sign to this effect on each cover sheet submitted with your
assignments. If you are quoting actual words from a published or unpublished text
you must use quotation marks and cite your source. In order to avoid accusations of
plagiarism you should use the Harvard Referencing System. This will ensure that
there is no ambiguity.
You must also not pass work off as the result of your individual efforts, if you have in
fact colluded with other students to prepare the piece of work jointly, or you have
copied each other’s work. Clearly, it is also wrong to copy another student’s work
without them knowing about it.
You are advised to read the extract on this subject in the University Regulations. If
you have any doubts on this important matter, you are advised to speak with the
module tutor or Course Leader.
Referencing guide:
https://padlet.com/lgornall/HarvardGuideReferencing
Marking guidance
Grade
%
Descriptive
terms
associated
with students’
performance
across a level
What are we
looking for in
each column?
Exemplary,
outstanding,
creative,
insightful,
illuminating,
inspiring,
authoritative,
professional,
exceeding
expectations
Knowledge /
Understanding
Argument /
Evaluation /
Application
Research /
Evidence/
Interpretatio
n
Presentation /
Structure /
Referencing
What do you
know and
understand?
Demonstrates
outstanding
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
How do you
communicate
this?
Work
professionally
presented and
communicated
; references
accurate,
reliable and
precise
70-85
Excellent,
persuasive,
sophisticated,
original,
ambitious,
meticulous,
critical,
innovative
Demonstrates
excellent
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
60-69
Very good,
fluent,
thorough,
analytical,
precise,
rigorous,
sustained,
convincing
Demonstrates
very good
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
50-59
Good,
reasonable,
clear,
confident,
thoughtful,
accurate,
careful,
congruent,
Good knowledge
of the underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
What do you How do you
do with this? evidence/su
pport this?
Develops
Ability to
authoritative
present,
argument and evaluate and
makes sound interpret
judgements
qualitative
in
and
accordance
quantitative
with
data in an
fundamental
insightful
theories and
manner
concepts
Develops
Ability to
sophisticated present,
argument and evaluate and
makes sound interpret
judgements
qualitative
in
and
accordance
quantitative
with
data in a
fundamental
persuasive
theories and
manner
concepts
Develops
Ability to
rigorous
present,
argument and evaluate and
makes sound interpret
judgements
qualitative
in
and
accordance
quantitative
with
data in an
fundamental
convincing
theories and
manner
concepts
Develops
Ability to
reasonable
present,
argument and evaluate and
makes solid
interpret
judgements
qualitative
in
and
accordance
quantitative
with
data in an
86-100
Work
excellently
presented and
communicated
; references
accurate,
reliable and
precise
Work precisely
presented and
communicated
; references
accurate and
reliable
Work clearly
presented and
communicated
; references
generally
accurate with
minor
deficiencies
40-49
30-39
15-29
0-14
coherent,
solid, relevant,
minor
deficiencies
Satisfactory,
sufficient,
adequate,
descriptive,
partial,
elementary,
basic, mostly
relevant, with
deficiencies
Incomplete,
inadequate,
inaccurate,
inconsistent,
contradictory,
superficial,
partially
relevant,
limited, below
level
Erroneous/wro
ng, missing,
extremely
limited,
irrelevant,
inappropriate,
insufficient,
unstructured,
below
expectations,
not systematic,
poor
Absent/none,
lacking,
formless,
detrimental,
incoherent,
non-existent,
deficient
Online Reading List
fundamental
theories and
concepts
coherent
manner
Develops
satisfactory
argument and
makes
adequate
judgements
in
accordance
with
fundamental
theories and
concepts
Superficial
argument and
inaccurate/
inconsistent
judgements
using
fundamental
theories and
concepts
Basic ability
to present,
evaluate and
interpret
qualitative
and
quantitative
data
Work
satisfactorily
presented and
communicated
; references
mostly
accurate but
some
deficiencies
Limited ability
to present,
evaluate and
interpret
qualitative
and
quantitative
data
Work
inadequately
presented and
communicated
; references
inaccurate and
inconsistent
Demonstrates
extremely limited
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
Superficial
argument and
insufficient
reference to
fundamental
theories and
concepts
Extremely
limited ability
to present,
evaluate and
interpret
qualitative
and
quantitative
data
Work is
unstructured;
poorly
presented and
communicated
; referencing
erroneous/mis
sing
Demonstrates an
absence of
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
Argument is
incoherent;
reference to
fundamental
theories and
concepts
non-existent
Incoherent
presentation,
evaluation
and
interpretation
of qualitative
and
quantitative
data
Presentation
and
communication
are careless
and deficient;
an absence of
referencing
Demonstrates
adequate
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
Demonstrates
incomplete
knowledge of the
underlying
concepts and
principles
associated with
their area(s) of
study
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