Uploaded by Erika Worthing

Classroom Observation A.Y.(1)

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Classroom Observation: Allison Young
Date: 10/18/2019
School/Classroom: Village Elementary School
● First Grade General Education Room
-One student who is on an IEP but was not present during the time of observation
Running Log: 1035-11:05
Activity: Writing Workshop/Independent Reading Time
1035-1040
Students loudly enter classroom after going to
a bus evacuation safety drill outside. Teacher
prompts them to sit on dot spots on the rug in
front of an easel. Literacy specialist walks in
classroom and sits in the back of the room.
She has to repeat the group instruction for
them to sit on a spot 3 times. She individually
prompts 2 students to come and sit down.
Dots are organized in neat rows but students
are moving them to be closer to peers next to
them or in front of them. She tells them they
will be learning about, Writing about Reading,
and writes it on the easel.
1040-1045
She asks the group if anyone knows what this
means. 3 students raise their hands and
some students shout out. When she calls on
a student she says, “Thank you for raising a
quiet hand.” Then, the teacher goes over
what has been previously taught about
installing good habits in writing. She asks
more questions and the same 3 to 5 students
continue to raise their hands. 4 students in
the classroom are fidgeting and constantly
moving their dot spot while looking at the
ground. The teacher then says, “Eyes up
here.” 2 students look up but 2 are still not
looking at her. She points to a poster behind
her labeled, Whole Body Listening, and goes
over what that looks like. She reminds them
to use this poster to self-monitor their
listening. During this time 2 students raise
their hand and ask to use the bathroom. She
asks them to wait until the end of the lesson.
1045-1050
After the reminder about whole body listening,
the 4 students who were having a hard time
listening begin to engage more. 2 of those
students who are sitting next to each other,
begin to talk while the teacher is talking. The
literacy specialist from the back of the room
tells them, “Shhh.” The teacher asks 3 more
questions about a book they read together as
a class 2 days before the lesson, and the
same 3 to 5 students are raising their hands
every time. She says, “I’m going to challenge
you if you haven’t put your hand up.” The
teacher works with the class to come up with
an answer to the question, Why did we like
this book?, and asks them to share things
they found funny about the story. They all
raise their hand .
1050-1055
After the group response is written, she tells
them this is something they will be practicing
more on Monday, and shows them the
journals they will be writing in. Students begin
to fidget again, and the verbal prompt, “Eyes
on me,” is given. She then discusses how it is
time to start readers workshop, and reminds
them that they are working towards a goal of
24 minutes of independent reading time. She
dismisses them in groups of 3 to go get their
reading bags, and sit in their designated
reading spot. She allows the students who
needed to go to the bathroom to go, and then
2 more ask to use it. She sits at her desk and
calls 2 students over for small group
instruction with her. The literacy specialist sits
with one student and quietly reads with them.
1055-11
Students begin to quietly read out loud or to
themselves around the room. Some students
begin to engage in conversation and the
teacher calls from her desk to stop talking.
One student begins to chat more with another
student loudly and she calls him over. She
asks him to go over and look at the expected
behaviors for independent reading poster as
a reminder for how he should be acting.
Students are coming in from the bathroom
and others become distracted by this and
begin to talk to them. One student comes
back from the bathroom and sits with his
reading bag but does not open a book. A lot
of the conversations between students heard
were about the books they were reading but
appeared to be distracting to other students.
The literacy specialist moves to another
student who has been on task the whole time.
During this time a student has been using the
ASL sign for bathroom with no teacher
responding to this. She sits there not reading
with this gesture waiting for a teacher to
notice her.
11-11:05
Students continue to chat about books
occasionally but independently return to task.
The teacher calls up 2 different students to
her small group instruction. The literacy
specialist goes to the student who returned
from the bathroom and was not on task to
read with. Another student raises their hand
with the ASL symbol but no teachers notices
him.
Time Sampling Recording: On Task Behavior (Momentary Time Sample)
● An “x” was marked when the target behavior was observed at the end of the time
interval.
● I begin this time sample at 10:55 when students begin their independent quiet reading
time and ended it at 11:20 when this activity was wrapping up.
Time:
105511
11-1105
11051110
11101115
Student 1
x
x^
x^
x
Student 2
x
x^
x^
x
Student 3
x
x
x
x
Student 4
*
Student 5
x
*
x
x^
Student 6
x
x
x
x
Student 7
x
x
x
x^
Student 8
x
x
x
x
Student 9
x
x
x
x
x
80%
Student 10
x
x
x
x
x
100%
Student 11
x
x
x
Student 12
*
x
x*
1115-1120
%
80%
x
100%
80%
x*
20%
x^
80%
80%
x^
100%
80%
60%
x
60%
Average:
76.67%
*: Student in restroom
X^: Attending while in small group instruction
X*: Attending while sitting with literacy specialist
:
Strong Points:
● The teacher chose books that all the students were interested in
● Background knowledge was activated by reviewing previously learned skills
● The classroom is well organized and student book bags were in an easily accessible
place
● The teacher had positive in interactions with students. She was always smiling and
appeared interested in what students were sharing with her.
● The teacher had a light-up sign at her desk that said, “Small group in session.” This
visual allowed students to know she was unavailable during independent reading time.
● Students were all having positive interactions with each other and enjoyed sharing points
about their books.
● Students felt comfortable reading out loud and were all reading at an appropriate volume
● Positive praise was frequently given when room was quiet and students were following
expectations
● Students were staying in their designated reading areas
● Teacher was patient when students were talking and listened to all questions and
comments
Suggested Recommendations:
● If a transition was loud or challenging do a calming activity, like square breathing, to help
students be calm and ready to learn
● Go as a group to the bathroom before the lesson allowing students the opportunity, then
they don’t have to interrupt a lesson, or miss out on instructions.
● Have a bathroom pass, perhaps seperate ones for the boys and girls bathroom,
available in the classroom. Students can independently take it when they need to. Also,
a sign could be put down on the student’s desk when they leave, making it so the
instructor can know who has left the room.
● Have dots on floors that aren’t as easily moved or consider other options for designated
seating on rug.
● Pre-teach expectations before writer’s workshop. Go over whole-body listening and what
it looks like. By using both the poster and having students model it.
● Pre-teach expectations during independent reading time. Read over poster on
classroom expectations while reading together.
●
●
●
●
●
A lot of the posters on the wall had rules written in words. Add pictures to these
expected behaviors that can act as visuals to students who aren’t sure what the poster
says.
The literacy specialist should sit with the group, rather than the back of the room, during
the writing lesson and prompt students to listen while the teacher is talking.
The literacy specialist in between changing students should monitor for on-task
behavior.
Some of the students may not have the stamina for the 24 minutes of independent time
and could be given other quiet tasks to work on while sitting.
Have a share-out opportunity where students can chat with each other about what
they’re reading when it isn’t during the designated independent reading time.
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