Holt McDougal Assessment-File-Grade-7

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HOLT McDOUGAL
Assessment File
PREVIEW • GRADE 7
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Book 1: Diagnostic and Selection Tests . . . . . . . . 43
Teacher’s Guide to Managing Assessment . . . 44
Diagnostic Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Sample Selection Tests
Seventh Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Book 2: Unit and Benchmark Tests . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Unit 1 Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Benchmark Test 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
40
Assessment File Grade 7
ASSESSMENT FILE
Ongoing formative and summative
assessment
• Assess mastery
• Inform future instruction
Assessment File Grade 7
41
The Assessment File includes—
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Student Self-Assessment: Reading
Directions: Use this form to describe your attitude and thougths toward reading at
this time. You may circle more than one answer on any item.
1.
These are my thoughts and attitude about reading:
I like to read, both at home and at school.
I like to read for fun, but not for school.
I really don’t like to read and would rather do other things.
I would read more if I were a better reader.
e. I would like to read if I had more time.
a.
b.
c.
d.
2.
These are my thoughts and attitude about reading at home:
It’s a waste of time.
It helps me escape and relax.
I only read when I have to for an assignment.
I read mostly for entertainment.
e. I read mostly for information.
f. I love to read and wish I had more time for it.
a.
b.
c.
d.
3.
I consider myself to be
4.
In order to read and understand material for school,
a.
b.
a very good reader
a good reader
c.
d.
an average reader
a poor reader
a. I
read best when I’m alone in a quiet place.
I read best with things going on around me.
I read best with another student or in a small group.
I read best when the teacher tells us what to look for first.
e. I understand more when I have a long period of time to read.
f. I understand more when I read in short little spurts.
g. I read the material twice.
b.
c.
d.
5.
These problems bother me when I am reading:
a. There
are too many words that I don’t know.
I read too slowly.
I read too fast and forget things.
d. I get bored quickly and stop paying attention.
e. My eyes get tired easily.
f. Other things distract me.
b.
c.
BOOK
1
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
provide leveled tests for all selections
and diagnostic tools to match the
right assessment plan to students’
needs.
SAMPLE INSIDE
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Reading Comprehension
1 The author uses a point of view that helps
the reader understand —
A the mother and Phyllis’s thoughts and
feelings
B what Lisa thinks and feels
els about
Phyllis and her mother
C what all of the characters
rs think and feel
D what Charlie thinks and feels
2 The reader can infer that Lisa
sa lets Phyllis
use Lisa —
give her a permanent because
F trusts Phyllis’s sense of fashion
G enjoys changing her hairstyle
rstyle
H hopes to look more like Phyllis
J wants to please her mother
her
3 In paragraph 2, the author characterizes
Lisa’s mother by providing —
A a description of her appearance
earance
B direct comments about her
o her
C the narrator’s reaction to
D Phyllis’s comments about
ut her
4 At the beginning of paragraph
aph 4, the
author uses a flashback to help the reader
understand why Lisa —
F is so impressed by Phyllis
lis
G likes to talk about clothes
es
H enjoys visiting her mother
her at work
ith her friends
J wants to go shopping with
5 In paragraph 4, Lisa reveals an internal
conflict between her desire to —
A accept her mother as she is and her
wish that her mother were more like
Phyllis
B improve her relationship with Phyllis
and her hopes of spending time with
her mother
C get along well with her friends and her
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
feelings of embarrassment about her
mother
Read the following selections. Then answer the questions that follow
D teach her mother to sew well and her
them.
need to protect her mother’s feelings
from How Hot Air Balloons Work
6 In paragraph 15, the author characterizes
Tom Harris
Lisa’s mother by having Lisa —
Hot air her
balloons
are based
a very basic scientific principle: warmer air
present
mother’s
privateonthoughts
rises
in cooleronair.
hot air is lighter than cool air, because it has less
G comment
herEssentially,
mother’s speech
mass
per unit of volume. A cubic foot of air weights roughly 28 grams (about
H reveal how others react to her mother
an ounce). If you heat that air by 100 degrees F, it weighs about 7 grams less.
J describe her mother’s behavior toward
Therefore,
others each cubic foot of air contained in a hot air balloon can lift about 7
grams. That’s not much, and this is why hot air balloons are so huge-to lift
1,000
pounds,7,you
need can
about
65,000
7 In
paragraph
Phyllis
best
be cubic feet of hot air!
as the
a character
who is you
— need a way to reheat the air. Hot air
To keep
balloon rising,
2 described
balloons
doinconsiderate
this with a burner positioned under an open balloon envelope. As
A fun but
the
air in the balloon
cools, the pilot can reheat it by firing the burner.
B dedicated
but immature
1 F
C friendly but shy
D wise but self-important
8 In paragraph 12, Lisa escapes to her room
because she feels —
F tired
G ill
H overwhelmed
J jealous
3
4
BOOK
Modern hot air balloons heat the air by burning propane, the same substance
commonly used in outdoor cooking grills. The propane is stored in compressed
liquid form, in lightweight cylinders positioned in the balloon basket. The
intake hose runs down to the bottom of the cylinder, so it can draw the liquid
out.
Because the propane is highly compressed in the cylinders, it flows quickly
through the hoses to the heating coil. The heating coil is simply a length of steel
tubing arranged in a coil around the burner. When the balloonist starts up the
2
Unit and Benchmark Tests track
student progress as they master
Common Core Standards.
SAMPLE INSIDE
42
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and
Selection Test
Sample Pages
Assessment File Grade 7
43
Teacher’s Guide to Managing Assessment
Assessment has historically followed after instruction, informing teachers after-thefact about what has been accomplished in the classroom. Today, however, assessment
is at the very heart of the learning process, a part of every stage of instruction.
Begin at the End. Most teachers know that for instruction to be effective, planning
must begin with the end in mind. In other words, it is critical to identify up front
those skills and standards you want students to have mastered by the end of the lesson
so that the rest of the lesson, as well as an assessment, can be structured to lead to
student understanding and success. In Holt McDougal Literature, every unit is
designed around a set of related Common Core Standards, which are listed on the
Unit Goals page at the beginning of each unit. These concepts are then taught and
reinforced through material in the Student Edition and Teacher’s Edition. Students are
evaluated on key skills and standards through ongoing assessment as well as at the
end of the unit in a formal assessment.
Know Your Purpose. Assessment can occur at different stages of a lesson and for
different purposes. Remember these two very important functions of assessment.
Assessment informs instruction.
s 5SE DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT TO SEE IF STUDENTS ARE PREPARED TO READ GRADE LEVEL MATERIALS
s 5SE ONGOING OR FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT TO GAUGE HOW WELL STUDENTS HAVE GRASPED IDEAS
and skills during a lesson.
s 5SE SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TO SEE HOW WELL YOUR STUDENTS ARE PROGRESSING OVER
time in mastering standards.
Differentiate as Needed. With Holt McDougal Literature all students are tested on
the same skills and standards, but teachers have the option of using different
assessment components to find out how well students are doing. For example, both
Selection Tests and Unit Tests are available in A and B/C formats and use the same
passages to assess student understanding. The A assessment format is for students
who struggle with reading and literature. The questions are written at a lower
readability, yet are rigorous enough for teachers to tell whether students have
understood the concepts. The B/C format is for students who are working at or above
grade level. Give the C writing prompts to students you wish to challenge.
The Assessment File contains two books, which are described below.
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
This book provides the following diagnostic and ongoing assessments.
s Diagnostic Assessment. The diagnostic assessment shows what a student knows
about a topic or concept before instruction has taken place. Holt McDougal
Literature provides diagnostic assessment for use at the beginning of each year.
These assessments give teachers information about how well their students
perform with grade-level reading and writing materials. Each diagnostic
assessment includes a student reading inventory and writing inventory for selfassessment, an Independent Reading Inventory, a cloze test, and a writing prompt
with rubric. The student self-assessments will provide valuable insights into how
students perceive their interests, strengths, and weaknesses.
44
44
Diagnostic and SelectionTests
Grade 7
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Assessment measures student progress.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
TEACHER’S GUIDE TO MANAGING ASSESSMENT, CONTINUED
Use this diagnostic information to determine the kind of support students might
need as they read materials in the book as well as a means for motivating them.
s Selections Test A and B/C. Selection Tests are provided for each selection or
group of selections in the Student Edition. Each Selection Test includes multiplechoice items and written-response questions to assess students’ reading and
vocabulary skills as well as literary concepts. Tests A and B/C assess the same
skills using the same test passages. The A test is written in a simplified style. To
prepare students for the Selection Tests, give them the Reading Check, which is
provided for most selections and is available in the Resource Manager.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Unit and Benchmark Tests
This book provides summative assessments that take place at the end of a period
of instruction and cover important skills and standards that have been taught up to
that point.
s Unit Tests A and B/C. Unit Tests are provided at the end of each unit and assess
students’ understanding and mastery of the most commonly assessed skills taught
in the unit. Each Unit Test includes new reading passages and assesses students in
reading and literary concepts, vocabulary strategies, writing, and grammar. Unit
Tests A and B/C assess the same skills with the A test written in a simplified
style. The B/C test includes Challenge writing prompts for the advanced student.
You can help students prepare for the Unit Tests by having them take the
Assessment Practice at the end of each unit in the Student Edition. This test will
show them and you how well they understand key skills and standards taught in
the unit before they take the Unit Test. The Teacher’s Edition contains answers to
questions as well as suggestions for walking students through the questions and
answer choices.
s Benchmark Tests. Benchmark Tests occur four times a year and are designed to
assess students’ understanding of the concepts and skills that were taught in the
preceding units. The tests are cumulative in that skills taught early in the year are
carried over into subsequent tests. Each test includes new reading passages
followed by multiple-choice and short-answer, open-ended questions as well as an
essay prompt. These tests will also show how students have grown over time in
their understanding of key skills and standards.
Technology Support
Assessments in the Assessment File are available through ExamView on Teacher One
Stop DVD-ROM and Think Central Online Assessment.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and SelectionTests
Grade 7
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45
TEACHER’S GUIDE TO MANAGING ASSESSMENT, CONTINUED
To the Teacher
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
This diagnostic assessment will give you information about how well your students perform
with grade-level materials in reading and writing at the beginning of the school year. Student
self-assessments will provide valuable insights into how well students think they are doing.
s Self-Assessment: Reading. Students describe their attitudes and thoughts toward
reading.
s Informal Reading Inventory. This assessment contains a passage from a book
selection and 10 comprehension questions. You can administer this test to individual
students or have students administer it to each other.
s Cloze Test. This assessment is based on students “filling in” blanks created in a
passage of text unfamiliar to students.
s Self-Assessment: Writing. Students describe their attitudes and thoughts toward
writing.
s Writing Prompt with Rubric. Students respond to a writing prompt requiring narrative
or expository writing. A rubric on the following page provides a quick way to evaluate
student writing.
s Student Record Sheet. You can record the results of the various inventories and use
the information to help you determine how much support the student may need to be
successful with classroom materials.
46
Diagnostic and SelectionTests
Grade 7
46
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
.AME
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Student Self-Assessment: Reading
Directions: Use this form to describe your attitude and thoughts toward reading at
this time. You may circle more than one answer on any item.
1.
These are my thoughts and attitude about reading:
a. I
like to read, both at home and at school.
b. I like to read for fun, but not for school.
c. I really don’t like to read and would rather do other things.
d. I would read more if I were a better reader.
e. I would like to read if I had more time.
2.
These are my thoughts and attitude about reading at home:
a. It’s
a waste of time.
helps me escape and relax.
c. I only read when I have to for an assignment.
d. I read mostly for entertainment.
e. I read mostly for information.
f. I love to read and wish I had more time for it.
b. It
3.
I consider myself to be
very good reader
c. an average reader
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
a. a
a good reader
d. a poor reader
b.
4.
In order to read and understand material for school,
a. I read best when I’m alone in a quiet place.
b. I read best with things going on around me.
c. I read best with another student or in a small group.
d. I read best when the teacher tells us what to look for first.
e. I understand more when I have a long period of time to read.
f. I understand more when I read in short little spurts.
g. I read the material twice.
5.
These problems bother me when I am reading:
a. There are too many words that I don’t know.
b. I read too s lowly.
c. I read too fast and forget things.
d. I get bored quickly and stop paying attention.
e. My eyes get tired easily.
f. Other things distract me.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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STUDENT SELF - ASSESSMENT: READING, CONTINUED
6.
How often do you read each of the following? Circle your answer.
a. newspapers
never
never
never
never
never
b. magazines
c. novels
d. comic
books
e. books of information
7.
sometimes
sometimes
sometimes
sometimes
sometimes
often
often
often
often
often
usually
usually
usually
usually
usually
How much time do you spend at home reading for enjoyment?
a. never
b. up
to 30 minutes a week
c. between 30 and 60 minutes a week
d. more than an hour a week
e. an hour a day or more
Circle the topics or types of literature you like to read.
a. young
adult novels
b. adventure/survival
c. science fiction
d. mysteries
e. sports
f. stories about animals
g. humorous stories
h. historical fiction
9.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
n.
o.
p.
What is the best book you have ever read?
10.
What is the best book you have read lately?
11.
Look at the scale below and put an X where you think you belong.
I am not good at reading.
1
48
fantasy
myths and legends
science
poetry
biographies
history
travel/other places
news articles
2
3
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
48
I am OK at reading.
4
5
6
I am good at reading.
7
8
9
10
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
8.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Informal Reading Inventory
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
This informal inventory can give an initial idea of a student’s reading level. Teachers often
use an Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) to place students in the appropriate textbook or to
help them find books or articles for independent reading.
To conduct an IRI, you need at least one 100-word passage from the material in question,
and 10 comprehension questions about the material. Have the student read the same passage
twice, the first time orally to assess oral reading skills. The student should read the passage a
second time silently, after which he or she answers questions for assessement of reading
comprehension. Use these suggestions to administer this IRI.
1. Tell the student he or she will read the passage out loud, and then again silently,
and then you will ask some questions.
2. Give the students a copy of the passage and keep one for yourself. Have the student
read the passage. As students read aloud, note on your copy the number of errors he or
she makes.
s Mispronunciations: Words that are mispronounced, with the exception of proper
nouns.
s Omissions: Words left out that are crucial to understanding a sentence or a concept.
s Additions: Words inserted in a sentence that change the meaning of the text.
s Substitutions: Words substituted for actual words in the text that change the
meaning of a sentence. (An acceptable substitution might be the word hard for the
word difficult.)
3.
4.
5.
6.
Use these criteria for assessing reading levels after oral reading:
s Fewer than 3 errors: The student is unlikely to have difficulty decoding text.
s Between 4 and 9 errors: The student is likely to have some difficulty and may need
special attention.
s More than 10 errors: The student is likely to have great difficulty and may need
placement in a less demanding reading program.
Have the student read the passage again, silently.
When the student finishes, ask the comprehension questions on the next page. Tell the
student that he or she can look back at the passage before answering the questions.
Note the number of correct responses. Use these criteria for assessing reading
level after silent reading.
s Eight or more: The student should be able to interpret the selections effectively.
s Five to seven: The student is likely to have difficulty.
s Fewer than five: The student needs individual help or alternate placement.
Evaluate results from oral and silent reading to decide how good a match the material is
for a student.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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Informal Reading Inventory
from “Thank You, M’am”
by Langston Hughes
Read this passage aloud.
She was a large woman with a large purse that had everything in it but
hammer and nails. It had a long strap, and she carried it slung across her
shoulder. It was about eleven o’clock at night, and she was walking alone,
when a boy ran up behind her and tried to snatch her purse. The strap broke
with the single tug the boy gave it from behind. But the boy’s weight and the
weight of the purse combined caused him to lose his balance so, instead of
taking off full blast as he had hoped, the boy fell on his back on the sidewalk,
and his legs flew up. The large woman simply turned around and kicked him
right square in his blue-jeaned sitter. Then she reached down, picked the boy
up by his shirt front, and shook him until his teeth rattled.
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Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
number of mispronunciations: __________
number of omissions: __________
number of additions: __________
number of substitutions: __________
Total: __________
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
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Comprehension Questions
form “Thank You, M’am”
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
by Langston Hughes
1.
How would you describe the woman’s purse?
2.
How does the woman carry her purse?
3.
What time of day does the boy try to snatch the woman’s purse?
4.
Why might the boy have targeted this woman to steal from?
5.
What is the boy’s strategy for stealing the purse?
6.
What causes the boy to lose his balance?
7.
Where does the boy fall?
8.
How does the woman react to the boy’s actions?
9.
Does the woman seem scared? Explain why or why not.
10.
What causes the boy’s teeth to rattle?
Number of correct answers: __________
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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Administering a Cloze Test
Another test that has proven successful in determining reading skill levels is the cloze test.
Cloze is a psychological term which refers to the human tendency to “bring to closure” a
familiar but incomplete pattern. The test is based on “filling in” blanks created in a passage
of text unfamiliar to students. The cloze procedure is often used to place students in
informational texts, but it can also be used in other reading situations where you want to
match a student’s reading level with materials. A cloze test is created in the following way:
s 3ELECT A PASSAGE OF n WORDS THAT CONTAINS A COMPLETE THOUGHT UNIT OR
several paragraphs, preferably from the beginning of the article or book.
s $ELETE EVERY TH WORD IN THE PASSAGE EXCLUDING THE OPENING SENTENCE
s ,EAVE A BLANK FOR EACH WORD DELETED 9OU SHOULD HAVE APPROXIMATELY BLANKS
s &OR EACH BLANK HAVE STUDENTS GENERATE THE EXACT WORD THAT HAS BEEN DELETED
Use these suggestions to administer this cloze test.
1. Give the students a copy of the passage.
2. Tell them to read the passage and to fill in the blanks with the words that have been
deleted from the passage.
3. Use the following to determine reading level. This particular passage has 48 blanks.
3OME RESEARCHERS HAVE MODIFIED THE CLOZE PROCEDURE AS DEVELOPED BY *OHN "ORMUTH &OR
example, some have suggested replacing significant words or every 10th word, and accepting
synonyms; however, the scoring system above applies only when the process described above
is used.
&OR THE COMPLETE PASSAGE SEE THE NEXT PAGE
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Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
s INDEPENDENT LEVEL CORRECT ANSWERS OR MORE OR OF s INSTRUCTIONAL LEVEL n CORRECT ANSWERS OR n OF s FRUSTRATION LEVEL CORRECT ANSWERS OR LESS OR FEWER THAN OF Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Cloze Test: Answer
from “Exploring the Titanic”
Robert D. Balland
Bride picked up the iceberg message and stepped out onto the boat deck. It was a sunny but
cold Sunday morning, the fourth day of the Titanic’s maiden voyage. The ship was steaming at
full speed across a calm sea. Harold Bride was quite pleased with himself at having landed a
job on such a magnificent new ship. After all, he was only twenty-two years old and had just
nine months’ experience at operating a “wireless set,” as a ship’s radio was then called. As he
entered the bridge area, he could see one of the crewmen standing behind the ship’s wheel
steering her course toward New York.
Captain Smith was on duty on the bridge, so Bride handed the message to him. “It’s from
the Caronia, sir. She’s reporting icebergs and pack ice ahead.” The captain thanked him, read
the message, and then posted it on the bulletin board for other officers on watch to read. On
his way back to the radio room, Bride thought the captain had seemed quite unconcerned by
the message. But then again, he had been told that it was not unusual to have ice floating in
the sea lanes during an April crossing. Besides, what danger could a few pieces of ice
present to an unsinkable ship?
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Elsewhere on board, passengers relaxed on deck chairs, reading or taking naps. Some
played cards, some wrote letters, while others chatted with friends. As it was Sunday,
church services had been held in the morning, the first-class service led by Captain Smith.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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Cloze Test
from Exploring the Titanic
by Robert D. Ballard
Bride picked up the iceberg message and stepped out onto the boat deck. It was a
sunny [ 1 ] zcold Sunday morning, the ; = day of the Titanic’s [ 3 ] voyage. The ship
was [ 4 ] at full speed across ; = calm sea. Harold Bride [ 6 ] quite pleased with
himself ; = having landed a job [ 8 ] such a magnificent new [ 9 ]. After all, he was
[ 10 ] twenty-two years old and [ 11 ] just nine months’ experience ; = operating a
“wireless set,” -- [13 ] a ship’s radio was [ 14 ] called. As he entered ; = bridge
area, he could [ 16 ] one of the crewmen ; = behind the ship’s wheel [ 18 ] her
course toward New [ 19 ].
Captain Smith was on ; = in the bridge, so ; = handed the message to ; =.
“It’s from the Caronia, ; =. She’s reporting icebergs and ; = ice ahead.” The
captain ; = him, read the message,; =then posted it on ; = bulletin board for
other ; = on watch to read. ; = his way back to [ 30 ] radio room, Bride thought
[ 31 ] captain had seemed quite ; = by the message. But [ 33 ] again, he had been
[ 34 ] that it was not ; = to have ice floating [ 36 ] the sea lanes during ; = April
crossing. Besides, what [ 38 ] could a few pieces [ 39 ] ice present to an [ 40 ] ship?
Elsewhere on board, [ 41 ] relaxed on deck chairs, ; = or taking naps. Some
[ 43 ] cards, some wrote letters, [ 44 ] others chatted with friends. ; = it was
Sunday, church [ 46 ] had been held in ; = morning, the first-class service [ 48 ]
by Captain Smith.
Number of blanks: 48
Number of correct insertions: __________
CORRECT ??????????
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Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Read the passage below. On a separate sheet of paper, fill in the blanks with the
words that have been deleted from the passage.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
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Student Self-Assessment: Writing
Directions: Use this form to describe your thoughts and attitudes toward writing
at this time. You may circle more than one answer on any item.
1.
These are my thoughts and attitude toward writing:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
2.
I like to write, both at home and at school.
I like to write for fun, but not for school.
I really don’t like to write and would rather do other things.
I don’t think writing is a very useful tool for everyday living.
I would write more if I were a better writer.
I would like to write more if I had more time.
I spend this amount of time at home writing for enjoyment:
no time
b. up to 30 minutes a week
c. 30-60 minutes a week
a.
3.
more than a week
e. an hour a day or more
d.
I consider myself to be
a very good writer
a good writer
c. an average writer
d. a poor writer
a.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
b.
4.
This is how I would describe my improvement as a writer:
I feel as though I am improving as a writer.
b. I know what I need to work on as a writer.
c. I am not improving as a writer.
d. I don’t know what to work on to improve my writing.
a.
5.
These problems bother me when I am writing:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
6.
I have trouble thinking of topics to write about.
I have trouble expressing my ideas.
I have trouble thinking of just the right words.
I have trouble organizing my ideas.
I have trouble getting started.
Other things distract me.
When I am working on a writing project
I would rather work alone than with a group.
b. I would rather work with one other person.
c. I would rather work with a group.
d. I don’t care whether I work alone or with a group.
a.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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STUDENT SELF - ASSESSMENT: WRITING, CONTINUED
7.
I prefer to have my writing reviewed by
a peer reader
b. a small group of peer readers
c. a peer reader and my teacher
my teacher only
e. no one
a.
I most like to write
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
9.
in a diary or journal
letters to friends
stories or mysteries
poems
about my opinions
directions that tell others how to do
something
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
In my free time I like to write
cartoons
b. song lyrics
c. notes to friends
d. a diary or a journal
plays
f. computer notes
g. letters
h. jokes and puzzles
a.
10.
about my life
about other people
about inventions and ideas
about the news at school
____________________
e.
The best piece of writing I have done is
I like this about it.
11.
Look at the scale below and put an X where you belong.
I am not good at writing.
1
56
2
3
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
56
I am OK at writing.
4
5
6
I am good at writing.
7
8
9
10
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
8.
d.
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
.AME
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Writing Prompt
Writing Prompt
Think of a person whom you admire. It can be someone close to you—a parent,
friend, or teacher—or someone you don’t know whose life has inspired you. Write a
well-organized character sketch of this person. Include details about the person’s
appearance, actions, speech, and personality. Be sure to explain why you look up to
him or her.
Planning Your Essay
#HOOSE A SPECIFIC PERSON YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS
%XPLAIN WHY THE PERSON IS IMPORTANT TO YOU
0ROVIDE CLEAR DETAILS THAT BRING THE PERSON TO LIFE
7RITE A CLEAR INTRODUCTION A BODY THAT DEVELOPS YOUR IDEAS AND A STRONG
conclusion that summarizes your impression of the person.
s 5SE DIFFERENT SENTENCE BEGINNINGS AND LENGTHS
s 5SE CORRECT SPELLING PUNCTUATION AND GRAMMAR
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
s
s
s
s
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Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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Scoring Rubric
58
58
#/--/.ß#/2%ß42!)43
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß 3KILLFULLYßCONVEYSßAßSTRONGßIMPRESSIONßOFßAßSPECIFICß
SUBJECT ßDEVELOPEDßWITHßWELL CHOSENßDETAILSßEFFECTIVELYßUSESßDIALOGUEß
ANDßDESCRIPTION
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß #HOOSESßAßLOGICALßORGANIZATIONßUSESßTRANSITIONSßEFFECTIVELY
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß #REATESßAßVIVIDßPICTUREßWITHßPRECISEßWORDSßANDßPHRASESßANDß
SENSORYßLANGUAGEßSHOWSßAßSTRONGßCOMMANDßOFßCONVENTIONS
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß %FFECTIVELYßCONVEYSßAßSTRONGßIMPRESSIONßDETAILSßAREßMAINLYß
WELL CHOSENßUSESßDIALOGUEßANDßDESCRIPTION
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß (ASßAßGENERALLYßORGANIZEDßAPPROACHßUSESßTRANSITIONS
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß )NCLUDESßSUFFICIENTßPRECISEßWORDSßANDßPHRASES ßTELLINGßDETAILS ß
SENSORYßLANGUAGEßHASßAßFEWßERRORSßINßCONVENTIONS
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß #ONVEYSßANßIMPRESSIONßUSESßSOMEßWELL CHOSENßDETAILSßCOULDß
USEßMOREßDIALOGUE ßDESCRIPTION ßORßREFLECTION
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß /CCASIONALLYßSTRAYSßFROMßLOGICALßORDERßUSESßFEWßTRANSITIONS
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß )NCLUDESßSOMEßVIVIDßLANGUAGEßHASßAßFEWßDISTRACTINGßERRORSßINß
CONVENTIONS
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß #ONVEYSßANßIMPRESSION ßBUTßNEEDSßMOREßDEVELOPMENTß
INCLUDESßDIALOGUE ßDESCRIPTION ßANDßREFLECTIONßINTERMITTENTLY
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß (ASßAßCONFUSINGßLOGICßANDßINCLUDESßEXTRANEOUSßDETAILSßUSESß
TRANSITIONSßRARELY
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß )NCLUDESßSOMEßIMPRECISEßLANGUAGEßANDßDOESN´TßCONVEYßAßVIVIDß
PICTUREßHASßSOMEßSIGNIFICANTßERRORSßINßCONVENTIONS
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß #ONVEYSßANßIMPRESSIONßBUTßLACKSßDEVELOPMENTßANDßREFLECTION
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß ,OSESßFOCUSßANDßMAKESßSLOPPYßORßINCORRECTßTRANSITIONS
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß ,ACKSßPRECISIONßANDßSENSORYßLANGUAGEßHASßMANYßDISTRACTINGß
ERRORSßINßCONVENTIONS
„ß $
ß EVELOPMENTß ,EAVESßNOßIMPRESSIONßANDßLACKSßDEVELOPMENT
„ß ß/RGANIZATIONß (ASßNOßAPPARENTßORGANIZATION
„ß ß,ANGUAGEß ,ACKSßVIVIDßLANGUAGEßHASßMAJORßPROBLEMSßWITHßCONVENTIONS
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
3CORE
Assessment File
Assessment File Grade 7
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Student Record
1. Informal Reading Inventory
Oral reading
Total number of errors: __________
____
The student is unlikely to have problems decoding text. (2 or fewer errors)
____
The student is likely to have some difficulty decoding text and may need help. (4–9 errors)
____
The student is likely to have great difficulty decoding the text. (more than 10 errors)
Silent reading
Total number of answers correct: __________
____
The student should be able to interpret selections effectively. (8 or more answers correct)
____
The student is likely to have difficulty. (5 to 7 answers correct)
____
The student may need individual help or alternate placement. (fewer than 5 answers correct)
2. Cloze Test
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Number of blanks: 48
Number of correct responses: __________
____
independent level (Student is likely to read the material without teacher involvement.)
(58% correct answers or more, or 28 of 4)
____
instructional level (Student is likely to read the material with teacher involvement.)
(44–57% correct answers, or 21–27 of 48)
____
frustration level (Student will probably get little out of reading the material.)
(43% correct answers or less, or fewer than 21 of 48)
3. Writing prompt
Student writing sample is
strong
average
weak
Comments:
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Grade 7
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SEVENTH GRADE
Selection Test A
Comprehension
Read each of the following questions. Then choose the letter of the best answer.
(6 points each)
1.
At which point in the story do you learn
that Victor is beginning a new year at
school?
4.
A. impress Teresa
A. climax
action
C. exposition
D. resolution
B. prove
Mr. Bueller is wrong
C. beat Michael at something
D. have fun at school
B. falling
One of Victor’s goals for this school year
is to
A. learn
how to speak Spanish fluently
B. build a close friendship with Teresa
C. convince Mr. Bueller to tell a lie
D. become Michael’s best friend
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
3.
How does Victor feel about his first
answer when Teresa said hi to him after
homeroom?
5.
Which of the following happens in the
resolution of the story?
SEVENTH GRADE
2.
Victor pretends that he can speak French
in order to
A. Michael
and Victor become best
friends.
B. Mr. Belton speaks over the
loudspeaker.
C. Teresa and Victor become closer
friends.
D. Victor admits that he told a lie in
French class.
A. embarrassed
B. proud
C. happy
D. confused
Assessment File
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Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
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SELECTION TEST A, CONTINUED
Vocabulary
Choose the answer that best explains the meaning of each underlined word.
(6 points each)
6.
What does quiver mean?
9.
A. roll
7.
A. intensity
B. slide
B. frequency
C. shake
C. friendliness
D. jump
D. ability
Portly means
10.
A. beautiful
SEVENTH GRADE
B. harmful
C. overweight
D. important
8.
What does ferocity mean?
Linger means to
A. start
over
B. repeat again
C. delay leaving
D. stop moving
What does unison mean?
A. hatred
B. harm
C. happiness
Written Response
Short Constructed Response Answer the following questions based on your
knowledge of the story. Write a sentence or two on a separate sheet of paper.
(10 points each)
11.
What do we learn in the exposition of the story?
12.
How does the relationship between Victor and Teresa change during this story?
Answer the following question based on your
knowledge of the story. Write one or two paragraphs on a separate sheet of paper.
(20 points)
Extended Constructed Response
13.
62
Which character in the story is most like you? Explain how you and this character are similar.
Diagnostic and Selection Tests
Grade 7
62
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
D. agreement
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Assessment File Grade 7
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SEVENTH GRADE
Selection Test B/C
Comprehension
Read each of the following questions. Then choose the letter of the best answer.
(6 points each)
1.
Which of the following events happens in
the exposition of the story?
A. Victor
2.
One of Victor’s goals for this school year
is to
how to speak Spanish fluently
B. build a close friendship with Teresa
C. convince Mr. Bueller to tell a lie
D. become Michael’s best friend
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A. learn
3.
Victor claims to be able to speak French in
order to
A. prove
that Mr. Bueller is wrong
B. persuade Michael to take French
C. make a good impression on Teresa
D. prove to himself that he can do it
5.
In the resolution of this story, Victor
SEVENTH GRADE
pretends that he can speak
French fluently.
B. Mr. Bueller welcomes students to
French class.
C. Teresa asks Victor to help her in French
class.
D. Victor waits in line on the first day of
school.
4.
A. feels
optimistic about the upcoming
school year
B. is embarrassed by his own bad
behavior
C. admits to Teresa that he was lying
about speaking French
D. gets good advice from his best friend,
Michael Torres
Which of the following best describes
Victor’s first meeting with Teresa after
homeroom on the first day of school?
A. He
brags about taking a trip through
France.
B. Victor pretends that he does not
recognize Teresa.
C. He answers Teresa with a short and
rude response.
D. Victor tries to show off his knowledge
of French.
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Grade 7
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Assessment File Grade 7
Unit Test
Sample Pages
Assessment File Grade 7
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Assessment File Grade 7
Unit 1
TEST A
Reading Comprehension
Directions
Read the following selections. Then answer the questions that follow.
from Banner in the Sky
James Ramsey Ullman
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
10
20
30
There was the sky. There was rock and ice. There was a mountain
thrusting upward into blue emptiness—and at the foot of the mountain a tiny
speck. This speck was the only thing that lived or moved in all that world of
silent majesty.
Rudi climbed the white slope of the upper glacier. He did not hurry. He
looked neither up at the peak nor down at the valley, but only at the ice
flowing slowly past beneath his feet. In the ice were the marks of their boot
nails from the previous day, and it was easy to follow the route. When the
slope steepened, there were the steps cut by Winter and Saxo with their axes.
He had only to step up, balance briefly, step up again—and again.
With the step-cutting, it had required two hours to reach the bergschrund.
Today it took him perhaps a third of that time. Coming out on the rim of the
great crevasse, he approached the snow-bridge, tested it, and crossed without
mishap. Then, still following the trail of the day before, he threaded his way
through the steep maze of the icefall.
The seracs rose around him in frozen stillness. And Rudi’s mind seemed
frozen too. What he was doing was not a result of conscious choice or
decision; it was simply what he had to do. He had not lost his senses. He
knew that alone, and without food or a tent, there was no chance on earth of
his reaching the top of the Citadel. And it was not hope for the top that pushed
him on. It was simply—well, he wasn’t sure—perhaps simply the hope to set
foot on the mountain. Or more than the hope. The need. The need of his
body, his mind, his heart, to come at last to the place of which he had
dreamed so long; to stand on the southeast ridge; to follow where his father
had led; to climb, perhaps, even as high as the Fortress, which was as high as
any man had gone. That was what he wanted; what he had to have. That
much. Before it all ended. Before descending to the village; to his uncle’s
anger, his mother’s tears, Klaus Wesselhoft’s laughter; to the soap and mops
and dishpans of the Beau Site Hotel.
He climbed on. The seracs slid past like tall hooded ghosts. And then they
dropped away behind him and he came out at the base of the snowslope.
Above him he could see a trail of zigzagging footprints, extending perhaps
halfway to the ridge and disappearing into smooth drifts where the avalanche
had erased them. The drifts were huge, billowing, dazzling in the sunlight; but
he knew that they had frozen overnight and that the sun was not yet strong
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
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60
enough to dislodge them. He shuffled his boots in the snow, and it was firm
and dry. As Winter had said, the slope was safe in the morning.
Even so, he was cautious as he climbed upward, testing every step before
trusting his weight to it. And when he came to the avalanche area he detoured
to the left and kept as close as possible to the bordering rock-wall, so that he
would have something to cling to, just in case. . . . But nothing happened. The
snow stayed as motionless as the rock. In all that spreading wilderness there
was no movement except that of his own two legs plodding slowly on
through the drifts.
And then—he stopped—then there was a movement. He felt it rather than
saw it: the merest flicker or shadow, not on the slope, but on the cliff high
above. He tensed, peering upward. . . . A stonefall? . . . No. There was no
sound. And then again there was the flicker: a moving speck of reddish
brown against the tall grayness of the rock. Suddenly it leapt into focus. It was
a chamois. For an instant it stood outlined on a crag, motionless, staring down
at him; and Rudi, motionless too, stared back. Then the animal moved
again—wheeled—vanished. It was as if the cliff had opened and swallowed it.
And the stillness closed in again, even more absolute than before.
Rudi moved on. Through the stillness. Up the white slope. Kick—step, he
went. Kick—step. Kick—step. And though the going through the deep drifts
was slow, it was neither steep nor slippery, and his progress was steady. He
looked back—and the icefall was far below; ahead—and the ridge loomed
nearer. . . . Nearer. . . . And then at last the great moment came, and the slope
was beneath him. There was no longer snow under his feet, but solid rock.
He took a step up—a second—a third . . . and stood on the southeast ridge of
the Citadel.
From Banner in the Sky by James Ramsey Ullman. Copyright © 1954 by James Ramsey
Ullman. Used by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.
68
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
68
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
from To the Top of Everest
Laurie Skreslet with Elizabeth MacLeod
10
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
20
30
When I arrived back at Base Camp from Kunde, I was told the Icefall had
been closed. I couldn’t go through? Well, maybe—maybe not. I radioed Bill.
“Laurie, it’s too dangerous. Stay in Base Camp!” Bill barked. “Do
NOT—”
I flicked off the radio. That wasn’t what I wanted to hear. After a year and
a half of working on this expedition, I had too much energy invested to sit at
the bottom of Everest. I’d gained a lot of experience in my years of climbing.
I knew I could make an important contribution to the climbers struggling high
on the mountain. It would all be wasted if I waited in Base Camp. So I took
the risk.
Next morning I shouldered my pack and set off. Base Camp had radioed
Bill, and he did the only thing he could—he ordered that no one come with
me. Bill also insisted that I radio Base Camp every time I crossed a crevasse.
If I fell, I was still on my own—the radio call would just let them know
where to find my body.
At first, the climb wasn’t too bad—I’d done it many times before, and
with a heavier pack. The route was in much worse shape than my last time
there, three weeks before, but most ladders were usable. The Icefall was quiet
and the wind light.
Then I came to a crevasse about 3.5 m (12 ft.) wide. There was a ladder
across it, but the ice had shifted since it had been put in place. Now the bridge
ended 1.5 m (5 ft.) from the far wall. On my side, the end of the ladder was
frozen into the ice, but the other end hung 30 m (100 ft.) above the bottom of
the crevasse.
No problem, I thought, I’ll just find another place to cross.
For more than an hour, I searched desperately, but there was no other
place. I had to admit defeat. Slowly, I started down to Base Camp.
Then I stopped. Did you give that your best? I asked myself.
Yes, I thought. But then I asked, Did you give it more than your best?
No, I had to answer. More than my best was to go back and jump from
the ladder to the far side. I knew the impossible is often the untried. I couldn’t
leave without trying, so back I went.
I decided to use the handrail ropes that were still there, adding new
anchors and Petzl ascenders pointing both forward and back. I figured I had a
fifty-fifty chance of making it across.
The ladder bobbed up and down as I edged my way out. At the end of the
ladder, I focused all my concentration—and jumped.
Thwack! My ice pick bit into the ice on the lip of the crevasse. It held. I
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Unit 1, Test A
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UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
40
50
dug my crampons into the icy wall and used all my strength to pull myself
up.
As I lay gasping on the far side, I realized that something powerful had
happened. I seemed to be seeing things differently—everything was clearer
and colors more vivid. It was like a different world. In making that leap, I’d
let go not only of the ladder, but of some of my fears, too. I knew then that
things would work out for me as long as I kept giving more than my best.
As I climbed to Camp One and on toward Camp Two, I thought about
Bill. What would happen when I had to explain face-to-face why I’d
disobeyed his order to stay in Base Camp? Would he allow me to keep
climbing?
He was right there when I arrived.
“Laurie!” Bill shouted. Then he smiled and said, “It’s great you’re here!”
“Huh?” I said, stunned by his good humor.
“Look,” said Bill, “four people have died. If I’d asked you to come up and
something had happened to you, I couldn’t bear to have another death on my
conscience. I had to tell you to stay put.” Bill paused. “But I knew you’d come
up no matter what. So, welcome. I need you here.”
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Material from To the Top of Everest written by Laurie Skreslet is used with permission by
Kids Can Press Ltd., Toronto. Text © 2001 by Laurie Skreslet.
70
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
70
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer the following questions about the excerpt from Banner in the Sky.
1.
2.
3.
The setting is a
6.
A. cave
C. river
A. snowslope
C. rock-wall
B. desert
D. mountain
B. crevasse
D. ridge
Based on lines 1–4, you can make the
inference that the speck is a
7.
C. chamois
A. a
B. person
D. snow
B. something
snow drift
moving
C. an avalanche
D. the mountain top
drift
Which of the following words in lines
11–15 is a sequence clue?
8.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
The last event in lines 45–61 is that Rudi
B. Coming
A. reaches
C. without
B. looks
the Citadel
back at the icefall
C. takes a step up
D. sees the chamois
D. Then
5.
Rudi stops climbing in lines 45–48 because
he feels
A. rock
A. required
4.
The setting in lines 30–37 is a
Rudi’s conflict described in lines 16–29 is
A. rising
C. external
B. internal
D. falling
Based on lines 27–29, you can make the
inference that Rudi works as a
A. repairman
C. bellhop
B. hiking
D. cleaner
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
guide
9.
When Rudi reaches the Citadel, it is the
story’s
A. falling
action
B. conflict
C. exposition
D. climax
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
71
71
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer the following questions about the excerpt from To the Top of
Everest.
10.
Which of the following phrases in lines
1–5 tells you Laurie reached Base Camp?
couldn’t go through?”
B. “When I arrived”
C. “I was told”
D. “had been closed”
14.
A. “I
11.
15.
In lines 16–24, which event happened
first?
B. Base
D. ridge
Camp
Because he cannot cross the ladder bridge,
Laurie
16.
The details in lines 46–49 are part of the
story’s
A. exposition
C. climax
B. rising action
D. falling action
A. The
13.
According to the chronological order of
events, Laurie had been on the same route
the morning before
B. three weeks earlier
C. last month
D. two years ago
A.
72
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
72
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
icefall made little or no sound.
B. The wind was light.
C. The ice shifted.
D. Laurie made the climb with a lighter
pack.
C. ledge
Base Camp
B. sets up camp
C. looks for another crossing
D. makes a new bridge
A. tells
12.
A. crevasse
A. contacts
The effect of the events in lines 1–2 is that
Bill
Laurie to stay in Base Camp
B. offers advice for climbing
C. learns that Laurie is upset
D. reveals problems at Base Camp
The setting described in lines 20–24 is a
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer these questions about both selections.
17.
18.
Based on the details in both selections,
you can make the inference that Rudi and
Laurie both feel that mountain climbing is
A. rewarding
C. relaxing
B. easy
D. graceful
How are the events of both selections
organized?
19.
Which of the following describes the
conflict in both selections?
A. animal
vs. predator
B. human vs. nature
C. honesty vs. hard work
D. human vs. human
and contrast
B. chronological order
C. cause and effect
D. main idea and details
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A. compare
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
73
73
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
Written Response
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE
Directions Write two or three sentences to answer each question on a separate sheet
of paper.
20.
Identify the setting of To the Top of Everest. Provide two details from the text to support your
answer.
21.
Based on the information in both selections, you can make the inference that mountain
climbers are determined. Provide one detail from each excerpt to support this inference.
EXTENDED CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE
Directions Answer the following question. Write two or more paragraphs on a
separate sheet of paper.
Define the following plot stages: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and
resolution. Then provide an example of each plot stage from To the Top of Everest.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
22.
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
74
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Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
Vocabulary
Directions
1.
2.
Use your knowledge of Latin word roots to answer the following questions.
The Latin word appropiare means “near.”
Which word in Banner in the Sky most
likely comes from the word appropiare?
A. axes
C. anger
B. approach
D. avalanche
3.
The Latin word decidere means “to
decide.” Which word in Banner in the Sky
most likely comes from the word decidere?
A. descend
C. decision
B. drifts
D. dropped
The Latin word experientia means “act
of trying.” Which word in To the Top of
Everest most likely comes from the word
experientia?
A. experience
C. Everest
B. energy
D. edged
Use your knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to answer the following
questions. The line numbers will help you find the words in the excerpts.
Directions
4.
The word still means “not moving.” What
is the most likely meaning of the suffix
-ness, which is used to form stillness in
line 16 of Banner in the Sky?
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A. skilled
in
B. without
5.
of
B. the opposite of
Directions
8.
The word tried means “attempted.” What
is the most likely meaning of the prefix
un-, which is used to form untried in line
31 of To the Top of Everest?
C. result
A. with
C. not
D. state
B. again
D. apart
of
The word danger means “exposure to
harm or pain.” What is the most likely
meaning of the suffix -ous, which is used
to form dangerous in line 3 of To the Top
of Everest?
A. full
7.
6.
C. result
in
D. skilled in
Use your knowledge of analogies to complete each item.
Chicago is to Illinois as Los Angeles is to
9.
Minute is to hour as year is to
A. South America
C. Europe
A. decade
C. month
B. California
D. capital
B. evening
D. day
Lead is to pencil as ink is to
A. pen
C. school
B. writing
D. permanent
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
75
75
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
Revising and Editing
Read the descriptive essay and answer the questions that follow.
(1) Located just 20 miles south of my hometown of Jamesville, Calton
Canyon is one of the area’s most beautiful features. (2) It is also my favorite
place to go to escape from city life. (3) The canyon is not a desolate
wilderness, though in fact, it is the most popular picnic spot around. (4)
This is one of the reasons I love the canyon I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it. (5) It is very relaxing to sit on the warm
sandstone boulders and watch families and friends eat and play. (6) Children
play tag and explore the canyon for interesting bugs or creatures. (7) Parents
and grandparents place plastic silverware and cloth napkins on old, red
picnic tables. (8) They take out juicy red apples, crisp carrot sticks, and
crunchy potato chips for people to snack on.
(9) After the picnickers finish its fun, they often take walks. (10)
Several scenic hiking trails snake through the canyons walls. (11) My
favorite trail leads up onto a narrow ridge of the canyon. (12) On this trail,
large boulders tower over hikers heads. (13) The trail loops through a
wide, sweeping plain full of wildflowers. (14) They are the most colorful
flowers I have ever seen. (15) I am sure that each hiker on the trail wants
to fill their pockets with the beautiful blooms! (16) However, I am just
happy to look at the flowers and smell them. (17) I lie down on the plain
and take a nap. (18) The sweet smell of the flowers and the sound of the
wind always relax me.
(19) After a great day of people-watching, hiking, and napping, I head
home. (20) I tell my family about my adventures. (21) They always listen
with interest. (22) My family agrees that no other place near Jamesville
offers the same beauty and peace as Calton Canyon.
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
76
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Directions
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
1.
2.
Sentence 1 identifies the essay’s
A. conclusion
C. subject
B. author
D. organization
What is the best way to correct sentence 3
so that it is no longer a run-on sentence?
A. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness,
though. In fact, it is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
B. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness
though in fact it is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
C. The canyon is not. A desolate
wilderness. Though, in fact, it is the
most popular picnic spot in the area.
D. The canyon, is not a desolate
wilderness, though, in fact, it is the
most popular, picnic spot in the area.
3.
4.
What is the best way to correct sentence 4
so that it is no longer a run-on sentence?
5.
6.
The words “warm sandstone boulders”
in sentence 5 appeal to which of the
following senses?
A. smell
C. touch
B. hearing
D. taste
To maintain pronoun-antecedent
agreement in sentence 9, change “its” to
A. his
C. their
B. ours
D. her
Choose the correct way to write the
possessive form of canyons in sentence
10.
A. canyons’
B. canyon’s
7.
C. canyon
is
D. canyons’s
The words “narrow ridge” in sentence 11
appeal to which of the following senses?
A. hearing
C. smell
B. taste
D. sight
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A. This,
is one of the reasons, I love the
canyon I like to see people, enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
B. This is one of the reasons I love the
canyon. I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
C. This is one of the reasons. I love the
canyon I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
D. This is one of the reasons, I love the
canyon I like to see people. Enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
77
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UNIT 1, TEST A CONTINUED
8.
9.
Choose the correct way to write the
possessive form of hikers in sentence 12.
Which would be an appropriate transition
to add to the beginning of sentence 17?
A. hiker’s
C. hiker’s’
A. Then
C. So
B. hikers’
D. hiker
B. Which
D. But
is
To maintain pronoun-antecedent
agreement in sentence 15, change “their”
to
A. us
C. his
or her
D. thems
B. my’s
10.
11.
12.
Which transition word could you use to
combine sentences 20 and 21?
A. if
C. and
B. but
D. then
Which sentence includes a transition
word?
A. sentence
B. sentence
15
16
C. sentence
D. sentence
17
18
Writing
Read the following quotation. Then read the prompt that follows and
complete the writing activity.
Directions
Flannery O’Connor
Write a descriptive essay about a room in your home that is important to
you. First, think about all of the things that make the room special. What sights,
sounds, smells, tastes, and feelings do you experience in this room? Then, as the
author of the quotation suggests, use specific sensory details to bring the room to life.
Now write your essay. Use the reminders that follow to help you write.
Prompt:
Reminders
s
s
s
s
s
78
"E SURE YOUR WRITING DOES WHAT THE PROMPT ASKS
'IVE A CLEAR OVERALL IMPRESSION OF THE ROOM
5SE TRANSITIONS TO CONNECT IDEAS
5SE SPECIFIC SENSORY DETAILS TO BRING THE ROOM TO LIFE
#HECK FOR CORRECT GRAMMAR SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test A
78
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
“[The writer] appeals through the senses, and you
cannot appeal to the senses with abstractions.”
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit 1
TEST B/C
Reading Comprehension
Directions
Readg the following selections. Then answer the questions that follow.
from Banner in the Sky
James Ramsey Ullman
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
10
20
30
There was the sky. There was rock and ice. There was a mountain
thrusting upward into blue emptiness—and at the foot of the mountain a tiny
speck. This speck was the only thing that lived or moved in all that world of
silent majesty.
Rudi climbed the white slope of the upper glacier. He did not hurry. He
looked neither up at the peak nor down at the valley, but only at the ice
flowing slowly past beneath his feet. In the ice were the marks of their boot
nails from the previous day, and it was easy to follow the route. When the
slope steepened, there were the steps cut by Winter and Saxo with their axes.
He had only to step up, balance briefly, step up again—and again.
With the step-cutting, it had required two hours to reach the bergschrund.
Today it took him perhaps a third of that time. Coming out on the rim of the
great crevasse, he approached the snow-bridge, tested it, and crossed without
mishap. Then, still following the trail of the day before, he threaded his way
through the steep maze of the icefall.
The seracs rose around him in frozen stillness. And Rudi’s mind seemed
frozen too. What he was doing was not a result of conscious choice or
decision; it was simply what he had to do. He had not lost his senses. He
knew that alone, and without food or a tent, there was no chance on earth of
his reaching the top of the Citadel. And it was not hope for the top that pushed
him on. It was simply—well, he wasn’t sure—perhaps simply the hope to set
foot on the mountain. Or more than the hope. The need. The need of his
body, his mind, his heart, to come at last to the place of which he had
dreamed so long; to stand on the southeast ridge; to follow where his father
had led; to climb, perhaps, even as high as the Fortress, which was as high as
any man had gone. That was what he wanted; what he had to have. That
much. Before it all ended. Before descending to the village; to his uncle’s
anger, his mother’s tears, Klaus Wesselhoft’s laughter; to the soap and mops
and dishpans of the Beau Site Hotel.
He climbed on. The seracs slid past like tall hooded ghosts. And then they
dropped away behind him and he came out at the base of the snowslope.
Above him he could see a trail of zigzagging footprints, extending perhaps
halfway to the ridge and disappearing into smooth drifts where the avalanche
had erased them. The drifts were huge, billowing, dazzling in the sunlight; but
he knew that they had frozen overnight and that the sun was not yet strong
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
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40
50
60
enough to dislodge them. He shuffled his boots in the snow, and it was firm
and dry. As Winter had said, the slope was safe in the morning.
Even so, he was cautious as he climbed upward, testing every step before
trusting his weight to it. And when he came to the avalanche area he detoured
to the left and kept as close as possible to the bordering rock-wall, so that he
would have something to cling to, just in case. . . . But nothing happened. The
snow stayed as motionless as the rock. In all that spreading wilderness there
was no movement except that of his own two legs plodding slowly on
through the drifts.
And then—he stopped—then there was a movement. He felt it rather than
saw it: the merest flicker or shadow, not on the slope, but on the cliff high
above. He tensed, peering upward. . . . A stonefall? . . . No. There was no
sound. And then again there was the flicker: a moving speck of reddish
brown against the tall grayness of the rock. Suddenly it leapt into focus. It was
a chamois. For an instant it stood outlined on a crag, motionless, staring down
at him; and Rudi, motionless too, stared back. Then the animal moved
again—wheeled—vanished. It was as if the cliff had opened and swallowed it.
And the stillness closed in again, even more absolute than before.
Rudi moved on. Through the stillness. Up the white slope. Kick—step, he
went. Kick—step. Kick—step. And though the going through the deep drifts
was slow, it was neither steep nor slippery, and his progress was steady. He
looked back—and the icefall was far below; ahead—and the ridge loomed
nearer. . . . Nearer. . . . And then at last the great moment came, and the slope
was beneath him. There was no longer snow under his feet, but solid rock.
He took a step up—a second—a third . . . and stood on the southeast ridge of
the Citadel.
From Banner in the Sky by James Ramsey Ullman. Copyright © 1954 by James Ramsey
Ullman. Used by permission of HarperCollins Publishers.
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
80
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
from To the Top of Everest
Laurie Skreslet with Elizabeth MacLeod
10
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
20
30
When I arrived back at Base Camp from Kunde, I was told the Icefall had
been closed. I couldn’t go through? Well, maybe—maybe not. I radioed Bill.
“Laurie, it’s too dangerous. Stay in Base Camp!” Bill barked. “Do
NOT—”
I flicked off the radio. That wasn’t what I wanted to hear. After a year and
a half of working on this expedition, I had too much energy invested to sit at
the bottom of Everest. I’d gained a lot of experience in my years of climbing.
I knew I could make an important contribution to the climbers struggling high
on the mountain. It would all be wasted if I waited in Base Camp. So I took
the risk.
Next morning I shouldered my pack and set off. Base Camp had radioed
Bill, and he did the only thing he could—he ordered that no one come with
me. Bill also insisted that I radio Base Camp every time I crossed a crevasse.
If I fell, I was still on my own—the radio call would just let them know
where to find my body.
At first, the climb wasn’t too bad—I’d done it many times before, and
with a heavier pack. The route was in much worse shape than my last time
there, three weeks before, but most ladders were usable. The Icefall was quiet
and the wind light.
Then I came to a crevasse about 3.5 m (12 ft.) wide. There was a ladder
across it, but the ice had shifted since it had been put in place. Now the bridge
ended 1.5 m (5 ft.) from the far wall. On my side, the end of the ladder was
frozen into the ice, but the other end hung 30 m (100 ft.) above the bottom of
the crevasse.
No problem, I thought, I’ll just find another place to cross.
For more than an hour, I searched desperately, but there was no other
place. I had to admit defeat. Slowly, I started down to Base Camp.
Then I stopped. Did you give that your best? I asked myself.
Yes, I thought. But then I asked, Did you give it more than your best?
No, I had to answer. More than my best was to go back and jump from
the ladder to the far side. I knew the impossible is often the untried. I couldn’t
leave without trying, so back I went.
I decided to use the handrail ropes that were still there, adding new
anchors and Petzl ascenders pointing both forward and back. I figured I had a
fifty-fifty chance of making it across.
The ladder bobbed up and down as I edged my way out. At the end of the
ladder, I focused all my concentration—and jumped.
Thwack! My ice pick bit into the ice on the lip of the crevasse. It held. I
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
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UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
40
50
dug my crampons into the icy wall and used all my strength to pull myself
up.
As I lay gasping on the far side, I realized that something powerful had
happened. I seemed to be seeing things differently—everything was clearer
and colors more vivid. It was like a different world. In making that leap, I’d
let go not only of the ladder, but of some of my fears, too. I knew then that
things would work out for me as long as I kept giving more than my best.
As I climbed to Camp One and on toward Camp Two, I thought about
Bill. What would happen when I had to explain face-to-face why I’d
disobeyed his order to stay in Base Camp? Would he allow me to keep
climbing?
He was right there when I arrived.
“Laurie!” Bill shouted. Then he smiled and said, “It’s great you’re here!”
“Huh?” I said, stunned by his good humor.
“Look,” said Bill, “four people have died. If I’d asked you to come up and
something had happened to you, I couldn’t bear to have another death on my
conscience. I had to tell you to stay put.” Bill paused. “But I knew you’d come
up no matter what. So, welcome. I need you here.”
Material from To the Top of Everest written by Laurie Skreslet is used with permission by Kids
Can Press Ltd., Toronto. Text © 2001 by Laurie Skreslet.
1.
The main setting of the excerpt is a
3.
A. windy
seaside cliff
B. warm grassy meadow
C. peaceful river valley
D. rugged mountain slope
2.
and Saxo were with him
B. is a patient mountain climber
C. climbs with great speed and strength
D. is extremely tired and wants to rest
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
82
A. two
hours
B. third
C. Then
D. the day before
Based on lines 5–14, you can make the
inference that Rudi
A. wishes Winter
Which sequence word or words in lines
11–15 tell you that Rudi made it past the
snow-bridge?
4.
Rudi experiences an external conflict with
A. the
mountain
B. himself
C. Winter
D. the seracs
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer the following questions about the excerpt from Banner in the Sky.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
5.
Based on lines 22–29, you can make the
inference that Rudi
8.
A. wishes
that he had friends
B. misses his mother and his uncle
C. wants to leave his village
D. dislikes his job at the Beau Site Hotel
6.
Rudi stays close to the rock-wall as he
climbs because he is afraid of
A. tenses
with fear
B. stares at the chamois
C. peers upward
D. stops climbing
9.
The climax occurs when Rudi
A. crosses
the snow-bridge
B. clings to the rock-wall
C. sees the chamois
D. reaches the Citadel
A. sliding
down a snow drift
B. being swept away by an avalanche
C. slipping on the rocks
D. being hit by falling rocks
7.
In lines 45–53, the first event that takes
place is that Rudi
What happens after Rudi spots the
chamois?
chamois disappears.
B. Winter says the slope is safe.
C. Rudi thinks of the hotel.
D. Rudi climbs the upper glacier.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
A. The
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer the following questions about the excerpt from To the Top of Everest.
10.
Laurie turns off the radio at the beginning
of the excerpt because he
12.
A. dislikes
Bill’s message
B. wishes Bill was in Base Camp
C. wants to talk to Bill in person
D. thinks that Bill is done speaking
11.
What happens after Laurie leaves Base
Camp?
comes to a crevasse.
tells Bill not to join him.
C. The wind becomes stronger.
D. Laurie goes to Kunde.
According to the chronological order of
events, Base Camp radios Bill
A. one
day before Laurie fills his pack
B. before Laurie sets off
C. two hours after Laurie leaves
D. after Laurie reaches the first crevasse
13.
The descriptions of setting in lines 16–19
are part of the story’s
A. Laurie
A. rising
B. He
B. climax
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
action
C. falling
action
D. resolution
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
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UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
14.
Which event causes Laurie to look for
another place to cross the crevasse?
16.
A. Bill
tells him to find a new bridge.
crevasse is too wide.
C. Laurie thinks the ice is too soft.
D. The ladder bridge is too short.
A. realizes
that good things will happen if
he gives more than his best
B. learns to take chances because
sometimes you get lucky
C. decides that he wants to teach others
how to climb Mt. Everest
D. wishes Bill were there to share the
moment with him
B. The
15.
The effect of Laurie’s leap across the
crevasse is that he
According to lines 46–49, what two things
happen simultaneously?
A. Laurie
climbs to Camp One and Camp
Two.
B. Laurie climbs on and thinks about Bill.
C. Laurie thinks about Bill and jumps the
crevasse.
D. He climbs to Camp One and talks with
Bill.
17.
The exposition in both selections hints at a
conflict between a person and
A. an
authority figure
B. a mountain
C. his family members
D. himself
18.
The setting of both selections is a
A. snow
drift
B. crevasse
C. mountain
D. ridge
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
84
19.
You can make the inference that Rudi from
Banner in the Sky and Laurie from To the
Top of Everest both
A. think
that mountain climbing is a
rewarding experience
B. think that Mt. Everest is the hardest
mountain to climb
C. wish they had company while
mountain climbing
D. respect the wishes of family members
and friends
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
COMPREHENSION
Directions Answer these questions about both selections.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Written Response
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE
Directions Write two or three sentences to answer each question on a separate sheet
of paper.
20.
What internal conflict is shared by Rudi in Banner in the Sky and Laurie in To
the Top of Everest? Provide a detail from each selection to support your answer.
21.
Identify the falling action and the resolution of To the Top of Everest. Support
each answer with one example from the selection.
EXTENDED CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE
Directions Answer one of the following questions. Write two or more paragraphs on
a separate sheet of paper.
22.
How does the setting contribute to the plot in Banner in the Sky and To the Top of
Everest? Use details from the selections to support your answer.
To the Top of Everest contains an external conflict and an internal
conflict. Which conflict is more important to the plot? Use details from the
selection to support your answer.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
23. Challenge
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
85
85
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Vocabulary
Directions
1.
2.
Use your knowledge of Latin word roots to answer the following questions.
The Latin word prae means “in front of ”
or “before.” Which word in Banner in the
Sky most likely comes from the word prae?
A. speck
C. upper
B. mountain
D. previous
3.
The Latin word scire means “to know.”
Which word in Banner in the Sky most
likely comes from the word scire?
A. conscious
C. detoured
B. mind
D. simply
The Latin word insistere means “to
persist.” Which word in To the Top of
Everest most likely comes from the word
insistere?
A. heavier
C. insisted
B. crevasse
D. arrived
Use your knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to answer the following
questions. The line numbers will help you find the words in the excerpts.
Directions
The word brief means “short.” What is
the most likely meaning of the suffix -ly,
which is used to form briefly in line 10 of
Banner in the Sky?
A. capable
of
B. in a certain way
5.
8.
C. concrete
result
D. skilled in
Which suffix can be added to the noun
humor in line 52 of To the Top of Everest
to form an adjective that means “not having
humor”?
A. -less
C. -ness
B. -ly
D. -able
The word obeyed means “followed
commands.” What is the most likely
meaning of the prefix dis-, which is used
to form disobeyed in line 48 of To the Top
of Everest?
A. under
C. not
B. again
D. without
Directions
7.
6.
Use your knowledge of analogies to complete each item.
Eye is to face as tooth is to
9.
Brick is to wall as room is to
A. face
C. tongue
A. door
B. mouth
D. toothache
B. town
Singer is to choir as piano is to
A. symphony
C. violin
orchestra
B. tune
D. musical
C. window
D. house
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
4.
instrument
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
86
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Revising and Editing
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Directions
Read the descriptive essay and answer the questions that follow.
(1) Located just 20 miles south of my hometown of Jamesville, Calton
Canyon is one of the area’s most beautiful features. (2) It is also my favorite
place to go to escape from city life. (3) The canyon is not a desolate
wilderness, though in fact, it is the most popular picnic spot around. (4)
This is one of the reasons I love the canyon I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it. (5) It is very relaxing to sit on the warm
sandstone boulders and watch families and friends eat and play. (6)
Children play tag and explore the canyon for interesting bugs or creatures.
(7) Parents and grandparents place plastic silverware and cloth napkins on
old, red picnic tables. (8) They take out juicy red apples, crisp carrot sticks,
and crunchy potato chips for people to snack on.
(9) After the picnickers finish its fun, they often take walks. (10)
Several scenic hiking trails snake through the canyons walls. (11) My
favorite trail leads up onto a narrow ridge of the canyon. (12) On this trail,
large boulders tower over hikers heads. (13) The trail loops through a
wide, sweeping plain full of wildflowers. (14) They are the most colorful
flowers I have ever seen. (15) I am sure that each hiker on the trail wants
to fill their pockets with the beautiful blooms! (16) However, I am just
happy to look at the flowers and smell them. (17) I lie down on the plain
and take a nap. (18) The sweet smell of the flowers and the sound of the
wind always relax me.
(19) After a great day of people-watching, hiking, and napping, I head
home. (20) I tell my family about my adventures. (21) They always listen
with interest. (22) My family agrees that no other place near Jamesville
offers the same beauty and peace as Calton Canyon.
1.
In sentence 1, the author identifies the subject as
A. Calton
Canyon
B. beauty in nature
C. Jamesville
D. hometown cities
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
87
87
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Choose the correct way to rewrite sentence
3 so that it is no longer a run-on sentence.
5.
A. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness,
though in fact: It is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
B. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness;
though, in fact, it is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
C. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness,
though. In fact, it is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
D. The canyon is not a desolate wilderness,
though, in fact it is the most popular
picnic spot in the area.
3.
A. After
the picnickers finish our fun,
they often take walks.
B. After the picnickers finish its fun, them
often take walks.
C. After the picnickers finish their fun,
they often take walks.
D. After the picnickers finish its fun, us
often take walks.
6.
B. canyon’s
C. canyon’s’
A. This
4.
Which of the following sentences contains
the most sensory details?
A. sentence
2
B. sentence 8
88
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
88
C. sentence
16
D. sentence 19
Choose the correct way to write the
possessive form of canyons in sentence 10.
A. canyons’
Choose the correct way to rewrite sentence
4 so that it is no longer a run-on sentence.
is one of the reasons I love the
canyon. I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
B. This is one of the reasons I love the
canyon, I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
C. This is one of the reasons. I love the
canyon I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
D. This is one of the reasons, I love the
canyon I like to see people enjoying
nature as much as I enjoy it.
Choose the correct way to maintain
pronoun-antecedent agreement in sentence
9.
D. canyons’s
7.
Which words in sentence 11 contain a
sensory detail?
A. favorite
trail
B. onto
a
C. narrow ridge
D. the canyon
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
2.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
8.
9.
Choose the correct way to write the
possessive form of hikers in sentence 12.
11.
Which would be an appropriate transition
to add to the beginning of sentence 17?
A. hiker’s
A. After
B. hikers’
B. But
C. hiker’s’
C. And
D. hikers’s
D. Therefore
To maintain pronoun-antecedent
agreement in sentence 15, change “their”
to
12.
Which transition word could you use to
combine sentences 20 and 21?
A. generally
A. us
C. them
B. or
B. my
D. his
C. and
or her
that
D. specifically
10.
In sentences 14–16, which is a transition
word or phrase?
A. “have
ever seen”
am sure”
C. “However”
D. “happy”
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
B. “I
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
89
89
UNIT 1, TEST B/C CONTINUED
Writing
Read the following quotation. Then read the prompts that follow and
complete one of the writing activities.
Directions
“[The writer] appeals through the senses, and you
cannot appeal to the senses with abstractions.”
Flannery O’Connor
Write a descriptive essay about a place in your home that is important to
you. Bring the place to life, as O’Connor suggests, by appealing to the reader with
sensory details. What sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and feelings do you experience in
this special place? Why are these details significant?
Now write your essay. Use the reminders that follow to help you write.
Prompt:
Challenge Prompt: Write a descriptive essay that explores the ways in which our
senses help determine our favorite places. Begin by choosing a place in your home of
which you are especially fond. As suggested in O’Connor’s quotation, use vivid
sensory details to engage your readers. Analyze why the appeal to your senses makes
the place more important to you than other places are.
Now write your essay. Use the reminders that follow to help you write.
s
s
s
s
s
90
"E SURE YOUR WRITING DOES WHAT THE PROMPT ASKS
'IVE A CLEAR OVERALL IMPRESSION OF THE ROOM
5SE TRANSITIONS TO CONNECT IDEAS
5SE SPECIFIC SENSORY DETAILS TO BRING THE ROOM TO LIFE
#HECK FOR CORRECT GRAMMAR SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Unit 1, Test B/C
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Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Reminders
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Benchmark Test
Sample Pages
Assessment File Grade 7
91
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Reading Comprehension
In the first paragraph, the narrator uses
foreshadowing to suggest that Clyde will —
A. graduate soon
B. have a bad report card
C. be late for school
D. play with his friends
2.
At the beginning of the story’s plot, the
first thing Clyde’s friends do is —
A. look at the grades on his report card
B. offer to help Clyde improve his grades
C. enjoy a story about Clyde’s father
D. sit around in Clyde’s room talking
3.
The author probably used the kitchen as
the setting to make it natural for —
A. Clyde and his friends to cook
B. Clyde’s mother to feed Clyde’s friends
C. Clyde to do his homework
D. all the characters to talk together
casually
4.
Which of the following characters is a
minor character?
A. Kitty
B. Mrs. Jones
C. Clyde
D. Sam
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1.
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Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
5.
In what way is Clyde’s adviser’s attitude
different from his father’s?
A. His adviser wants to give up
B. Clyde’s father always kept trying
C. His adviser thinks math is important
D. Clyde’s father prefers to study instruments
8.
Paragraph 2 shows a conflict between
Clyde and his —
A. friends
B. mother
C. math class
D. conscience
6.
The beginning of paragraph 2 helps the
reader understand that the narrator is —
A. eager to brag about his own success
B. concerned about hurting Clyde’s
feelings
C. shy about talking with Kitty
D. anxious to get away from Clyde’s
house
9.
According to the sequence of events,
Mrs. Jones enters the room before —
A. Clyde talks to his grade adviser
B. she shops for groceries
C. the narrator gets his report card
D. Clyde starts crying
The point of view from which the story is told
helps the reader —
A. follow the plot of the story
B. identify with the narrator
C. understand the main character’s motives
D. see all the characters’ problems
Clyde’s actions in paragraph 9 indicate that he
feels —
A. disappointed
B. irritated
C. confused
D. sick
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
7.
10.
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
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93
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
11.
When the children move to another room,
the plot —
A. gets more tense
B. winds down
C. ends
D. becomes more complicated
12.
The story about his father affects Clyde
by —
A. encouraging him to do well in school
B. making him feel sad about not having a
father
C. suggesting that he drop the academic
program
D. telling him how to study
13.
You can predict that Clyde will work hard
in math because —
A. Mrs. Jones contacts his teacher
B. he is afraid of changing programs
C. the narrator offers to help him study
D. he wants to be like his father
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES
14.
Describe an internal conflict that the narrator faces in the excerpt from Fast
Sam, Cool Clyde, and Stuff.
15.
Explain how the conflict in the story is resolved.
Write a paragraph to answer this question.
16.
94
How is Clyde’s experience in school similar to his father’s experience playing the
trombone? Explain how their experiences reveal a common character trait, and
support your answer with examples from the story.
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
94
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Write two or three sentences to answer each question.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Read this selection. Then answer the questions that follow it.
from Sons from Afar
Cynthia Voigt
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Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
4
5
6
He lay back and looked at the sky. The stars were coming out, little pale
pinpricks of light. He knew they weren’t really coming out, that they’d been
burning away out in the darkness of space all day long; but it looked like they
were coming out, like flowers coming into bloom. Sammy had his head against
the stiff splintery boards of the dock, and he was looking out into space so deep
it might as well be endless. He thought it would be great to explore space:
sailing out among the stars, discovering . . . you couldn’t even begin to imagine
what you might discover. If there were huge winds that blew across the vast
empty reaches, and your ship had a big metal sail . . . but he didn’t think there
were space winds. He could ask James, but he didn’t want to. “I’m good at
math and science. I could be an astronaut,” he said to the stars.
“I thought you were going to play tennis,” James answered.
“I’ll do both,” Sammy said. The sky turned darker, and darker still. The
stars burned white, making the sky look crowded. You could put a tennis court
in a spaceship; the ship would have to be large, anyway, and people would have
to have something to do, to fill in the vast stretches of time, and to keep in
shape. “Why shouldn’t I do both?”
“Because they’re both careers for young men—too short-lived,” James’s
voice informed him. “Be practical.”
That was pretty funny, coming from James. Sammy thought. Now James
was getting going on being a lawyer, and Sammy was letting his brother’s
words blow away on the wind. He’d heard it all before, about a 4.0 average so
you could get a scholarship to a good college; about the right major, something
to do with history or political science, to prepare you for the three-year course in
law school; about the best schools and the scholarships they offered to the best
students. After that, the voice went on—Sammy had heard it all before—you
just chose how you wanted to make your money.
Government work was secure but paid the least. If you did corporate law,
working for a big corporation, you earned big bucks but the job wasn’t that
secure. Or you could work for a law firm, criminal law or property law, or
handling wills and estates. You could do whatever you wanted, whatever you
were good at, in a law firm, as you worked your way up to being a partner and
taking a percentage of the firm’s earnings. With a law degree you could even go
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Grade 7
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Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
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8
9
10
11
12
13
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15
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96
into politics—although Sammy couldn’t see anybody voting for James. He
didn’t think he would.
“International law, international banking law,” James’s voice said. “I think
I’d be good at that.”
“I wouldn’t,” Sammy said. “I wouldn’t like something where you didn’t do
anything.”
James sputtered and Sammy was afraid he’d start explaining how
important banking was, but he didn’t.
James had heard the boredom in Sammy’s voice and reminded himself that
Sammy was still young, still just a kid, only twelve. “What about your
homework?” he asked.
“What I don’t get done tonight I can finish on the bus.”
James shrugged: Sammy just didn’t care about grades. He just didn’t know
how important they were; he didn’t care about knowing things either.
“You know,” Sammy’s voice said, “it always looks like the stars are
coming out, even if they aren’t.”
“They’re really suns,” James told him. He looked up at the sky then. It was
black, silky black, with no moon yet so the suns burned clear out there. James
picked out the constellations he knew: Orion, by his belt, he could always,
always find Orion; the big dipper, like a geometric figure, like a rhomboid; the
little dipper, a smaller rhomboid, his eyes searched it out. Then the North Star,
Polaris. The Pleiades, the sisters, crowded together, the seventh sister burning
faintly. “Every one of them is a sun, a mass of burning gases. Do you know
how hot the sun burns?”
“So what,” Sammy’s uninterested voice said.
“Neither do I,” James admitted. He used to know, but he’d forgotten.
Sammy’s laugh sounded friendly. “Tell you a story,” James offered. “You
want to hear a story?” Sammy always liked being told stories.
“Good-o.”
James identified the story’s source, first. “This is from Greek mythology.
There was an inventor, named Daedalus, a famous inventor. Everybody knew
about him. So when King Minos of Crete wanted a labyrinth built—a
maze—where he’d keep his son, the Minotaur, in the middle—”
“I remember the Minotaur,” Sammy interrupted. “It was in my book of
monsters. It was half man, half bull.”
“Yeah. So Minos hired Daedalus to design and build this labyrinth.
Daedalus took his son Icarus with him to Crete. But when the job was finished,
Minos kept them prisoners in a high tower.”
“Why?”
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BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
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Grade 7
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BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
22
23
“Because they knew how to get out of the maze and Minos wanted that to
be a secret. In the tower, they had to haul their food up in baskets, and they had
candles for light. The only things that could get into the tower were birds. They
were prisoners there for a long time. There was no way to escape, but Daedalus
figured out a way. See, when the birds flew in they’d shed their feathers. So he
and Icarus collected the feathers. They stuck them together with wax, to make
huge wings. When they had enough - it must have taken years—they were
ready to fly out, away, to fly free. Before they left, Daedalus warned Icarus that
he shouldn’t fly too close to the sun, because the heat of it would melt the wax
that was holding the wings together. But Icarus didn’t pay attention. Or he
forgot, maybe. Because when they were out and flying, he went up, and up,
until the heat was too great. His wings fell apart and he fell—he fell out of the
sky into the ocean. He drowned.” James never could tell a story the way it
should be told; when he told it, he could hear it sound like a series of facts, like
a history book, not like a story.
“I can see why he did that,” Sammy said. “If you could really fly, you’d
always want to go higher, once you started flying. Wouldn’t you?”
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Reprinted with the permission of Antheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint of
Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing Division from Sons from Afar
by Cynthia Voigt. Copyright © 1987 Cynthia Voigt.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
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BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
98
At the beginning of the story, the
conversation starts because —
A. the stars are just starting to show
B. James tells the story of Daedelus
C. the king locks Daedelus in a tower
D. Icarus flies too close to the sun
21.
In paragraph 1, the author helps the reader
learn about Sammy through —
A. Sammy’s thoughts
B. the narrator’s comments
C. James’s thoughts
D. Sammy’s actions
18.
By limiting the setting of the story to
James and his brother watching the stars
together, the author helps the reader —
A. learn about the stars
B. relax and listen to the story
C. understand how stars come out
D. focus only on the two brothers
22.
Information in the first paragraph leads
the reader to understand that Sammy —
A. has a powerful imagination
B. is good at making friends
C. does well in school
D. follows directions well
23.
In paragraph 10, the point of view shifts
from —
A. James’s thoughts to the narrator’s voice
B. James’s thoughts to Sammy’s thoughts
C. the narrator’s voice to Sammy’s thoughts
D. Sammy’s thoughts to James’s thoughts
19.
The excerpt begins at —
A. sunrise
B. midday
C. twilight
D. midnight
20.
The first paragraph’s point of view helps
the reader understand —
A. how stars are formed
B. the depth of space
C. Sammy’s ideas
D. James’s feelings
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17.
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Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
24.
Sammy’s approach to the stars is poetic,
while James’s approach is —
A. scientific
B. curious
C. disapproving
D. disbelieving
26.
According to the sequence of events,
James offers to tell a story —
A. before he tells Sammy about the stars
B. after he talks to Sammy about law
C. before he asks about Sammy’s homework
D. after he tells Sammy about Icarus
25.
Paragraph 16 states Sammy always liked
being told stories. This statement describes
Sammy by —
A. showing the narrator’s actions
B. Sammy’s speech
C. giving the narrator’s comments
D. expressing James’s thoughts
27.
According to the sequence of events in
James’s story, Icarus’ wings fall apart —
A. after he flies too close to the sun
B. before Daedalus designs the maze
C. after he falls into the ocean
D. before Daedalus escapes from the tower
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Write two or three sentences to answer each question.
28.
Explain one of the conflicts in the story that James tells. Then identify it as an internal or an
external conflict.
29.
Predict how James would respond to Sammy’s question at the end of the excerpt. Explain
your response.
Write a paragraph to answer this question.
30.
Discuss how the author uses characterization to develop James’s character in Sons from Afar.
Support your response with two examples from the excerpt.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
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99
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Read the following selections. Then answer the questions that follow
them.
Lifesaver
John DiConsiglio
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3
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6
7
100
Having grown up in San Diego, California, Mack Lothian knows a lot about
the beach—in particular, Newport Beach. He is aware that the best place to
avoid crowds is three miles north of the jetty. The area is so deserted that
lifeguards are stationed there only during the peak summer months. “It’s so
peaceful out there,” Mack, 15, tells Choices. “You look around and all you see
are miles of sand and water.”
But on an April afternoon in 2004, Mack saw more than waves. He saw a
little boy being swept out to sea, and Mack sprang into action to save him. Mack
never expected to be a lifesaver. He had gone to the beach that day with other
family members to relax. While his relatives were lying on the sand, Mack
waded out into the water to bodysurf.
He noticed two boys playing just a few yards from the shore. They seemed to
be about 8 or 9 years old. As Mack floated nearby, he noticed a troubling sign in
the water. On either side of the boys, steady waves lapped the shore. But the
boys were standing in oddly calm water. Mack knew what that meant: rip
current.
Deadly Waters
A rip current is a powerful flow of water away from the shore. It is caused by
waves traveling from deep to shallow water. Sometimes those waves break in
different ways. Some break strongly, others weakly. That makes the water move
in narrow, fast-moving belts. The ground under the current can drop from 3 feet
to more than 20 in one step. And the current can sweep you out to sea in as fast
as 8 feet per second.
Rip currents are deadly. More people die every year from rip currents than
from shark attacks, tornadoes, lightning, or hurricanes. According to the United
States Lifesaving Association, 80 percent of beach rescues are due to rip
currents—and more than 100 people drown each year when they can’t escape
the current.
As Mack watched, the head of one of the boys bobbed under the water.
Within seconds, the current started dragging him out to sea. Mack yelled out to
the boy. When he didn’t answer, Mack swam toward him—right into the current.
Mack grabbed the panicky boy’s arm and tried to calm him. They were about
15 yards from the beach, but Mack knew that the current could sweep them out
100 yards - the length of a football field—in minutes. Mack also
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Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
1
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Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
knew the beach led to the mouth of the Santa Ana River. If the current pulled
them into the powerful river, they might never make it back. He began to tread
water and told the boy to grab his legs. They were going to swim to shore.
8
9
10
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
11
12
13
14
Treading Water
Mack, who learned how to swim at age 4, knows how to swim in a rip
current. “It’s useless to fight it and swim headlong to shore,” he says. “You
won’t make any progress. The current will push you backward.” The boy
kicked and flailed. Mack told him to hold on.
But the current was too strong. Mack was getting tired and a little worried.
They were moving out to sea fast. The boy jumped on Mack’s shoulders,
pushing him into the water. Mack knew that swimming wasn’t the answer. The
best thing to do, he realized, was to wait.
Mack held the boy and assured him that everything would be OK. He kept
treading forward in the current, allowing the water to slowly move him
backward. “We were out there for maybe 10 minutes, but it seemed like 10
days,” Mack says. In the spring, few lifeguards patrol the beach. The current
had already pulled them far away from Mack’s family. He began to wonder if
anyone would ever find them.
Finally, Mack saw a lifeguard Jeep along the shore. He called out and
waved his right arm. “We’re going to be all right,” he told the boy. Within
moments, a team of lifeguards with buoys made their way to Mack and the
boy. The lifeguards took the boy to shore as Mack swam beside them. When
the boy was safe, a lifeguard turned to Mack, but he was already gone.
Worn Out
Mack slowly walked along the beach toward his family’s camp. He
dropped down on a towel, exhausted. “My arms and legs felt like lead,” he
says. “I felt like I’d just run a mile” None of his family knew what had
happened and Mack didn’t tell them.
“That’s just Mack,” says his father, who’s also named Mack. “He never
wants to take credit.” Soon, the lifeguard Jeep came by. The lifeguard told
Mack that he had probably saved the boy’s life. “If you hadn’t gone out to get
him, no one would have reached him in time,” the lifeguard said.
Mack still doesn’t think of himself as a hero even after he won the U.S
Lifeguard Association’s Heroic Acts Award. And he never saw the boy’s
family again. “Lifeguards are the real heroes,” he says. “They do this stuff
every day. I was just in the right place at the right time.”
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Reprinted with the permission of Antheneum Books for Young Readers, an imprint
of Simon and Schuster Children’s Publishing Division from Sons from Afar by
Cynthia Voigt. Copyright © 1987 Cynthia Voigt.
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
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101
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Rip Current Safety
National Weather Service
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3
4
5
6
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Why Rip Currents Are Dangerous
Rip currents are the leading surf hazard for all beachgoers. They are particularly
dangerous for weak or non-swimmers. Rip current speeds are typically 1-2 feet
per second. However, speeds as high as 8 feet per second have been measured—
this is faster than an Olympic swimmer can sprint! Thus, rip currents can sweep
even the strongest swimmer out to sea.
Over 100 drownings due to rip currents occur every year in the United States.
More than 80% of water rescues on surf beaches are due to rip currents.
Rip currents can occur at any surf beach with breaking waves, including the
Great Lakes.
When Rip Currents Form
Rip currents can be found on many surf beaches every day. Under most tide and
sea conditions the speeds are relatively slow. However, under certain wave, tide,
and beach profile conditions the speeds can quickly increase to become
dangerous to anyone entering the surf. The strength and speed of a rip current
will likely increase as wave height and wave period increase. They are most
likely to be dangerous during high surf conditions as the wave height and
wave period increase.
Where Rip Currents Form
Rip currents most typically form at low spots or breaks in sandbars, and also
near structures such as jetties and piers. Rip currents can be very narrow or
extend in widths to hundreds of yards. The seaward pull of rip currents varies:
sometimes the rip current ends just beyond the line of breaking waves, but
sometimes rip currents continue to push hundreds of yards offshore.
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
102
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
1
Why Rip Currents Form
As waves travel from deep to shallow water, they will break near the shoreline.
When waves break strongly in some locations and weakly in others, this can
cause circulation cells which are seen as rip currents: narrow, fast-moving belts
of water traveling offshore.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
How to Identify Rip Currents
7 Look for any of these clues:
s A CHANNEL OF CHURNING CHOPPY WATER
s AN AREA HAVING A NOTABLE DIFFERENCE IN WATER COLOR
s A LINE OF FOAM SEAWEED OR DEBRIS MOVING STEADILY SEAWARD
s A BREAK IN THE INCOMING WAVE PATTERN
None, one, or more of the above clues may indicate the presence of rip currents.
Rip currents are often not readily or easily identifiable to the average beachgoer.
For your safety, be aware of this major surf zone hazard. Polarized sunglasses
make it easier to see the rip current clues provided above.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
How to Avoid and Survive Rip Currents
8 Learn how to swim!
s .EVER SWIM ALONE
s "E CAUTIOUS AT ALL TIMES ESPECIALLY WHEN SWIMMING AT UNGUARDED BEACHES
If in doubt, don’t go out!
s 7HENEVER POSSIBLE SWIM AT A LIFEGUARD PROTECTED BEACH
s /BEY ALL INSTRUCTIONS AND ORDERS FROM LIFEGUARDS
s )F CAUGHT IN A RIP CURRENT REMAIN CALM TO CONSERVE ENERGY AND THINK CLEARLY
s $ONT FIGHT THE CURRENT 3WIM OUT OF THE CURRENT IN A DIRECTION FOLLOWING THE
shoreline. When out of the current, swim towards shore.
s )F YOU ARE UNABLE TO SWIM OUT OF THE RIP CURRENT FLOAT OR CALMLY TREAD WATER
When out of the current, swim towards shore.
s )F YOU ARE STILL UNABLE TO REACH SHORE DRAW ATTENTION TO YOURSELF FACE THE
shore, wave your arms, and yell for help.
If you see someone in trouble, get help from a lifeguard. If a lifeguard is not
available, have someone call 9-1-1. Throw the rip current victim something that
floats and yell instructions on how to escape. Remember, many people drown
while trying to save someone else from a rip current.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
103
103
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Use “Lifesaver” (pp. 232–233) to answer questions 31–40.
Information in paragraph 8 lets the reader
know that Mack —
A. enjoys helping other people swim
B. knows a lot about swimming in the
ocean
C. has studied all aspects of the ocean
D. fears the strong waves in the ocean
32.
According to the article, what is the
reason water sometimes moves in narrow,
fast-moving belts?
A. Changes in water temperature
B. Differences in the way waves break
C. Patches of oddly calm water
D. Waves traveling along the coastline
33.
34.
104
According to paragraph 10, the current
resulted in —
A. sweeping Mack and the boy farther
away from shore
B. attracting the attention of several
lifeguards with buoys
C. encouraging Mack to start swimming
against it
D. making the waves become choppy and
white
Which words in paragraphs 10 and 11
show that the two paragraphs are written
in chronological order?
A. 10 minutes, 10 days
B. In the spring, slowly
C. Kept treading, already gone
D. Finally, within moments
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
104
35.
Which statement is the best summary of
paragraph 11?
A. A lifeguard turned to Mack
B. Mack hollered and waved
C. A lifeguard Jeep was on the shore
D. Lifeguards rescued Mack and the boy
36.
According to the chronological order of
events, the lifeguards talked to Mack —
A. minutes before he swam back to shore
B. soon after he found his family’s camp
C. months after he received the award
D. seconds before he met the boy’s family
37.
What does the following line from the
story tell the reader about the author?
Mack Lothian knows a lot about the beach
He thinks experience is important
Swimming is his favorite leisure
activity
C. The beach is the most important place
to be
D. He wishes he were at the beach
A.
B.
38.
The next time Mack sees someone caught
in a rip current, he will probably —
A. tell the person to swim toward shore
B. look to see whether the water is calm
C. swim with the current to save the
person
D. find the nearest lifeguard on duty
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
31.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
39.
Although he never sees the boy again after
rescuing him, Mack will probably —
A. remember the rescue for years to come
B. become an Olympic swimmer
C. try to contact the boy’s family later in
life
D. write a best-selling book about the
incident
40.
The lifeguards probably take the boy to
shore first because —
A. the boy is crying
B. they know Mack is a good swimmer
C. the boy’s mother asked them to
D. they didn’t see Mack in the water
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Use “Rip Current Safety” (pp. 234–235) to answer questions 41–45.
41.
Rip currents are likely to be most
dangerous as a result of increased —
A. wave height and period
B. water temperature
C. sandbar and beach depth
D. tides and surf
44.
After failing to swim out of a rip current,
what should a swimmer do next?
A. Call 911
B. Tread water
C. Fight the current
D. Call a lifeguard
42.
Which statement is the best summary of
paragraph 2?
A. Olympic swimmers can swim fast
B. Rip currents are dangerous when they
move at high speeds
C. Non-swimmers should always stay out
of the water
D. Scientists have measured the speeds of
rip currents
45.
Swimmers often drown in rip currents
because —
A. they don’t know how to swim well
enough
B. the water pulls them away from the
shore
C. the water is cold and choppy
D. lifeguards cannot see the swimmers
43.
Which sentence best describes the author’s
opinion?
A. Rip currents are safe only if you know
how to handle them
B. Surfing in rip currents is allowable if a
lifeguard is nearby
C. Rip currents are dangerous and should
be avoided by everyone
D. Slow or weak swimmers should use
caution near rip currents
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
105
105
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Use “Lifesaver” and “Rip Current Safety” to answer question 46.
Which information do the two articles
have in common?
A. The story of a rescue in a rip current
B. A list of tips for surviving a rip current
C. How to recognize a rip current
D. The name of a real-life hero
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
46.
106
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
106
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES
Write two or three sentences to answer this question.
47.
Analyze the writer’s position about rip currents in “Lifesaver.” Support your
analysis with one detail from the text.
Write a paragraph to answer this question.
Summarize the events in Mack’s rescue of the little boy in “Lifesaver.” Evaluate
your summary by stating whether it includes all the important events.
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
48.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
107
107
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Vocabulary
Use context clues and your knowledge of prefixes and suffixes to answer
the following questions about words in Fast Sam, Cool Clyde, and Stuff.
49.
Which prefix can be added to the adjective
satisfactory in paragraph 2 to form an
adjective meaning “not suitable”?
A. unB. disC. inD. re-
50.
Which suffix can be added to the adjective
academic in paragraph 2 to form an
adverb that means “in a scholarly way”?
A. -eous
B. -ally
C. -ness
D. -ial
51.
Adding the suffix -er to the word advise
produces a word that means —
A. quality of needing advice
B. action or process of giving advice
C. relating to advice
D. one who gives or offers advice
52.
Adding the prefix un- to the word wrap
produces a word that means to —
A. wrap again
B. do the opposite of wrap
C. wrap before
D. almost wrap something
108
53.
Which is the most likely meaning of
corporation in paragraph 6?
A. Government
B. Criminal
C. Company
D. Factory
55.
Which is the most likely meaning of
constellations in paragraph 14?
A. Geometric figures
B. Groups of stars
C. Visible planets
D. Clusters of moons
54.
Which is the most likely meaning of
percentage in paragraph 6?
A. Small fraction
B. Free education
C. Varying degree
D. Honest attempt
56.
Which is the most likely meaning of
labyrinth in paragraph 18?
A. Wing
B. Monster
C. Tower
D. Maze
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
108
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Use context clues to answer the following questions about words in Sons
from Afar.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Use context clues and your knowledge of multiple-meaning words to
answer the following questions about words in “Rip Current Safety.”
57.
Which meaning of break is used in
paragraph 1?
A. Exceed a record
B. Interrupt an activity
C. Emerge above a surface
D. Shatter into small pieces
59.
Which meaning of wave is used in
paragraph 5?
A. Surge or rush
B. Curved pattern
C. Rising trend
D. Ridge of water
58.
Which meaning of sweep is used in
paragraph 2?
A. Carry away forcibly
B. Destroy completely
C. Brush lightly
D. Pass over quickly
60.
Which meaning of period is used in
paragraph 5?
A. Division of time in a sport or game
B. Point at which something is ended
C. Time between repeating events
D. Punctuation mark indicating a full stop
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Use your knowledge of antonyms to answer the following questions.
61.
Which word is an antonym for deserted in
paragraph 1 of “Lifesaver”?
A. Protected
B. Busy
C. Convenient
D. Humid
62.
Which word is an antonym for powerful in
paragraph 4 of “Lifesaver”?
A. Constant
B. Deep
C. Weak
D. Hazy
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
63.
Which word is an antonym for required in
paragraph 5 of Fast Sam, Cool Clyde, and
Stuff ?
A. Difficult
B. Commercial
C. Creative
D. Optional
64.
Which word is an antonym for nonchalant
in paragraph 19 of Fast Sam, Cool Clyde,
and Stuff ?
A. Concerned
B. Willing
C. Late
D. Suspicious
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
109
109
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Revising and Editing
(1) Nature has always played an important role in my life. (2) Some of
my fondest memories are of my parents’ farm, where I grew up. (3) I loved
exploring the quiet ponds and peaceful woods, and I learn much about the
natural world. (4) That farm will always have a special place in my heart.
(5) Most days after school I would walk down a long dirt path that
snaked through the grounds. (6) I would enter the big gate, I would cross a
bridge to the far side of the pond. (7) On some days a blue heron would
greet me. (8) Flapping noisily as she circled above.
(9) The pond was always a calming place. (10) Closing my eyes, I
would concentrate on the frogs’s croaking. (11) When I opened my eyes, I
would take in the scenery. (12) There were bright yellow flowers perched
atop clusters of large green lily pads. (13) Large, iridescent dragonflies
flew through the air while other bugs flew around my head. (14) A falling
leaf made concentric circles in the water. (15) Concentric circles are
ripples.
(16) Usually, I would stay on the path while asking myself am I lost?
(17) Eventually, though, I would reach a large oak tree. (18) The old trees
trunk formed a perfect seat where they split into three branches. (19) The
seat was atop a large protuberance in the trunk. (20) A protuberance is a
lump. (21) Bushy-tailed squirrels darted from tree to tree as fuzzy-capped
acorns fall from the trees. (22) I would often take a pen and notebook from
my schoolbag and carry it into the tree to write or sketch. (23) Around me
I’d hear an owl say Hoo! Hoo! (24) Below me I’d smell fresh sap wafting.
(25) I still have all of the stories and drawings I made while sitting in that
tree.
(26) I don’t live on that farm anymore. (27) My parents sold them and
we moved to a big city. (28) Now I have a whole new set of sights and
sounds to explore. (29) I’ll always remember the farm and what it taught
me. (30) Those walks down the dirt path taught me to appreciate nature
and brought out my creative side.
110
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
110
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Directions
Read the descriptive essay and answer the questions that follow.
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
65.
The introduction is effective because it —
A. describes an important event
B. explains things that will be compared
C. identifies the place being described
D. establishes a serious tone
66.
To correct the verb tense in sentence 3,
change learn to —
A. learned
B. will learn
C. learning
D. had learned
67.
Which words in sentence 5 are sensory
details?
A. Most days
B. Dirt path
C. After school
D. Would walk
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
68.
What is the BEST way to rewrite sentence
6 so that it is no longer a run-on sentence?
A. I would enter the big gate I would cross
a bridge to the far side of the pond
B. I would enter the big gate; so I would
cross a bridge to the far side of the
pond
C. I would enter the big gate, I would,
cross a bridge to the far side of the
pond
D. I would enter the big gate, and I would
cross a bridge to the far side of the
pond
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
69.
What is the BEST way to revise sentences
7 and 8 to avoid having a sentence
fragment?
A. On some days a blue heron would
greet me flapping noisily as she circled
above
B. On some days a blue heron would greet
me; flapping noisily as she circled
above
C. On some days a blue heron would greet
me, flapping noisily as she circled
above
D. On some days a blue heron would greet
me flapping, noisily as she circled
above
70.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 10?
A. Change frogs’s to frogs’
B. Change frogs’s to frogs
C. Change frogs’s to frog’s
D. Make no change
71.
Which transition word could BEST be
added to the beginning of sentence 11?
A. However
B. Then
C. Therefore
D. Although
72.
Which words in sentences 11–12
demonstrate sensory details?
A. opened my eyes
B. take in the scenery
C. atop clusters of
D. bright yellow flowers
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
111
111
73.
Which words in sentence 13 demonstrate
sensory details?
A. Large, iridescent dragonflies
B. flew through the air
C. while other bugs
D. flew around my head
74.
What is the BEST way to combine
sentences 14 and 15?
A. A falling leaf made ripples and
concentric circles in the water
B. Falling concentric circles made ripples
in the water
C. Concentric ripples fell into the water
D. A falling leaf made concentric circles,
or ripples, in the water
75.
112
What is the CORRECT way to punctuate
sentence 16?
A. Usually, I would stay on the path while
asking myself, “Am I lost?”
B. Usually, I would stay on the path,
“While asking myself, Am I lost?”
C. Usually, I would stay on the path while
asking, “Myself, am I lost”?
D “Usually, I would stay on the path
while asking myself, Am I lost?”
76.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 18?
A. Change trees to tree’s
B. Change trees to trees’s
C. Change trees to trees’
D. Make no change
77.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 18?
A. Change they to he
B. Change they to it
C. Change they to you
D. Make no change
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
112
78.
What is the BEST way to combine
sentences 19 and 20?
A. The seat was atop a large protuberance
and lump in the trunk
B. The seat was atop a large protuberance
in the trunk, a protuberance is a lump
C. The seat was atop a large protuberance,
or lump, in the trunk
D. The seat was atop a large trunk, a
protuberance in a lump
79.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 21?
A. Change fall to fell
B. Change fall to will fall
C. Change fall to had fallen
D. Make no change
80.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 22?
A. Change it to its
B. Change it to him
C. Change it to them
D. Make no change
81.
What is the CORRECT way to punctuate
sentence 23?
A. Around me I’d hear an owl, “Say Hoo!
Hoo!”
B. Around me I’d hear an owl say “Hoo!
Hoo!”
C. Around me I’d hear an owl say, “Hoo!
Hoo!
D. Around me I’d hear an owl say, “Hoo!
Hoo!”
82.
What change, if any, should be made in
sentence 27?
A. Change them to her
B. Change them to me
C. Change them to it
D. Make no change
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
BENCHMARK TEST 1 CONTINUED
83.
Which transition word could BEST be
added to the beginning of sentence 29?
A. Therefore
B. However
C. Instead
D. Furthermore
84.
The conclusion is effective because it —
A. explains why the farm is important to
the writer
B. provides additional details about how
the farm looked
C. introduces a new idea about the
writer’s argument
D. describes what the farm is like many
years later
Writing
Directions
Read the following quotation. Then read the prompt that follows and
complete the writing activity.
“The two most engaging powers of an author are to make
new thingsfamiliar, familiar things new.”
Copyright © Holt McDougal, a division of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
William Makepeace Thackeray
Prompt: Write an essay that compares and contrasts two familiar people or things.
As Thackeray suggests, you have the power to consider your subjects in a new or
different way. Explore alternative ways of viewing your subjects as you compare and
contrast them.
Now write your essay. Use the reminders that follow to help you write.
Reminders
s
s
s
s
s
s
"E SURE YOUR WRITING DOES WHAT THE PROMPT ASKS
#LEARLY STATE THE PEOPLE OR THINGS BEING COMPARED AND CONTRASTED
)NCLUDE A FOCUSED THESIS STATEMENT
$ISCUSS SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE SUBJECTS
3UPPORT KEY IDEAS WITH EVIDENCE
#HECK FOR CORRECT GRAMMAR SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION
Assessment File
Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
Unit and Benchmark Tests
Benchmark Test 1, Units 1–2
113
113
114
Assessment File Grade 7
Assessment File Grade 7
115
116
Assessment File Grade 7
800.462.6595 holtmcdougal.com
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