Uploaded by Andres Soliz

Mr. Soliz - 2019-2020 - Eng. I - Wk 3 - Aug. 26th - 30th, 2019

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English I:
Plot, Setting & Tone
Mr. A. J. Soliz
Qtr. 1 - Week 3
Monday, August 26th, 2019
Bell Ringer
Identify the plot, setting, and
tone of the following clip.
Provide details to support your
response.
Objective:
Identify the different parts
of plot in a story, and
understand how setting
affects the tone, mood,
characters and conflict in a
story
Lesson:
In today’s lesson we will
finish identifying and
defining the key
differences between Plot &
Setting and how they are a
key literary element of a
text.
Once upon a time…
Plot is the sequence of related events that tells us
what happens in a story.
A good plot:
• Has characters who experience a
problem/conflict.
• Has a conflict that is resolved in some way.
• Includes interesting details that add depth to the
story.
• Takes place in a specific span of time.
Building Blocks of Plot
Basic situation (exposition)
Introduces the main character and setting (time
and place) of the story. Often the character wants
something very much and encounters a conflict
while trying to get it
Conflict
Struggle between a character and something or
someone else
• External conflict: a struggle between a character
and something outside himself/herself (another
character, nature, God, fate, society, etc.)
• Internal conflict: a struggle between a character
and himself or herself (a struggle inside the
character’s mind)
Building Blocks of Plot
Complications
Problems that arise during a story that
keep the main character from getting
what he/she wants
Climax
The story’s most exciting or suspenseful
moment, when something happens that
decides the outcome of the conflict.
Usually occurs toward the end of the
story.
Building Blocks of Plot
Resolution (denouement)
The last part of the plot where the
conflict is resolved, and the story ends. A
good resolution makes the story feel
complete.
Structured Pair Share
What is plot, and what makes a good
plot? What are the two types of conflict
and how are they different?
A: Plot is _______________. A good plot __
_______________________________.
B: The two types of conflict are _________.
They are different because _____________.
Playing with Time
Chronological order
The author begins at the beginning of the story, then tells
about each event in the order in which it happens
Flashback
The present action in a story is interrupted with a scene or
scenes from the past
Flashforward
The present action in a story is interrupted with a scene or
scenes from the future
En media res
The author begins in the middle of the story and the
beginning is filled in later (through flashbacks, dialogue, etc.)
What Happens Next?!?
Foreshadowing
The writer plants clues that hint at
something that will happen later in the
plot
Suspense
The quality in a story or play that
makes the reader eager to discover
what happens next and how it will end
• Authors often manipulate time and
use techniques such as
foreshadowing in order to build
suspense (and keep us reading)
Structured Pair Share
What are the ways that authors play with
time when telling their story? How do
authors create suspense?
A: Authors use _____, _____, _____, and
_____ to play with time in a story.
B: Author’s create suspense by _________
_____________________.
Does Setting Matter?
Setting helps create a story’s:
• Mood: how the story makes the reader feel
while reading
• Tone: how the author feels about a given
subject (a character, society, an idea, the
reader, etc.)
• Characters: Our environment affects in one
way or another, so setting can provide clues
as to what a character is like.
• Conflict: In some cases, the setting can
provide the conflict for the main character,
or reflect the character’s internal conflict.
Structured Pair Share
What is setting? Why is setting important in a
story?
A: Setting is _________________________.
B: Setting is important because _________
_________________________________.
What is Tone?
Tone is the author’s attitude toward
the subject, the characters or the
readers, which is revealed by the
author’s diction.
Activity 1
Explain the difference between the following sets of words:
 Silly/Giddy-silliness implies an element of childish behavior whereas
giddiness implies happiness. You can be giddy without being silly.
 Angry/upset -
 Mocking/sarcastic -
Tone Words
Angry
Sharp
Upset
Silly
Boring
Afraid
Happy
Hollow
Joyful
Allusive
Sweet
Vexed
Tired
Bitter
Dreamy
Restrained
Proud
Dramatic
Sad
Cold
Urgent
Joking
Poignant
Detached
Confused
Childish
Peaceful
Mocking
Objective
Vibrant
Frivolous
Audacious
Shocking
Somber
Giddy
Provocative
Sentimental
Fanciful
Complimentary
Condescending
Sympathetic
Contemptuous
Apologetic
Humorous
Horrific
Sarcastic
Nostalgic
Zealous
Irreverent
Benevolent
Seductive
Candid
Pitiful
Didactic
Activity 2
“This is Just to Say” by William Carlos Williams
I have eaten
the plums
that were in
the icebox
and which
5
you were probably
saving
for breakfast
Forgive me
they were delicious
so sweet
and so cold
10
What is the author’s tone towards the
subject of forgiveness?
Tone word: Insincere
Explain: While Williams attempts to say he is sorry, “Forgive
me” (ln. 9), the insincerity of his apology is evident as he waits
to ask for forgiveness until the last stanza of the poem.
Additionally, he goes on to explain how good the plums were
that she was saving for breakfast “they were delicious/so
sweet/and so cold” (ln. 10-12). The fact that he rubs in how
good the plums were shows he wasn’t sincere in his
“apology.”
What is the author’s tone towards the
person to whom he is speaking?
YOU TRY:
Pick a tone word and explain. Remember, you must always back up your
explanation with evidence from the text.
What is Mood?
Mood is the feeling a piece of
literature arouses in the reader. It is
the atmosphere created by the
author. Some literature makes us feel
joyful, solemn, angry, etc.
Mood is often created by setting.
Closing:
• Define plot. Why is it important for a
story to have a good plot?
• What are the two types of conflict and
how are they different?
• When does the climax of a story
usually occur? What is the purpose of
the climax?
• What is setting and how does it affect
a story?
English I:
Literary Elements
Identifying Tone
Mr. A. J. Soliz
Qtr. 1 - Week 3
Tuesday, August 27th, 2019
Bell Ringer
You will have 2 minutes to circle the correct Literary
Element on you Bell Ringer Handout, and then 4 minutes
to discuss with the members of your group. Be
prepared to share your answer and defend it with the
class using in-text evidence.
 “I was only six months old and I was supposed to
croak during the surgery. And even if I somehow
survived the mini-hoover, I was supposed to suffer
serious brain damage during the procedure and live
the rest of my life as a vegetable” (*p2).
*THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME
INDIAN
Objective:
Today our focus will be on identifying
tone. Key words are used by authors
to help us come to determine the tone
in which they are writing their different
works of art. It is up to us to discover
what exactly that tone is.
Lesson:
Just like an athlete needs to practice
over and over to get their skills to the
level of perfection, so too do we
need to practice our detective skills
in literacy. Today we will focus on
practicing to further develop our
tone identification skills using the
“TONE Practice worksheet”.
What is Tone exactly?
Tone is an author's attitude toward
his or her audience and characters.
It is an integral part of an author’s
style. Like the tone of a speaker’s
voice, the tone of an author’s words
expresses the writer’s feelings.
You can’t “hear” the tone…
The difficult aspect of determining
tone through mere words is not
hearing those cues that we have
been accustomed to in speech that
suggest a particular attitude,
whether it is anger, joy, or sarcasm.
In other words, there is no voice
inflection to obscure or carry
meaning.
Tone Shift
Good authors rarely use only one
tone in their writings. Complex
attitudes might include a changing
attitude (tone shift) or one attitude
toward the reader and another
attitude toward the subject (split
tone).
Be careful though…
To misread tone is to misinterpret
meaning. If one misses irony or
sarcasm, one may misread the
meaning of an entire passage.
Use DIDLS
Use the
acronym DIDLS
to help you
remember those
elements of tone
that you should
consider when
evaluating prose
or poetry.
Be careful though…
Diction, imagery, details, language,
and sentence structure all help to
create the author’s or speaker’s attitude
toward the subject and the audience.
Familiarize yourself with the denotations
and connotations of the following tone
words. Some are not interchangeable!
Be sure you can use both adjective and
adverb forms of each word.
Individual Work and then
Small Group Share
Work on the TONE Practice worksheet.
 Make sure to write in complete
sentences.
 Provide “evidence” for your
response(s).
 Use the ABCD model when completing
your “chunk paragraph” at the end.
Closing:
The last 5 identify with your
group what was confusing
about identifying the tone in
the two videos, and what, if
any questions, you may still
have.
Turn in your Assignment:
As you are walking out, please
turn in your TONE Practice
worksheet on the top tray closest
to the door. I will grade these are
return them to you to include in
your Interactive Journals.
English I:
Engaged Reading
Vocabulary of our First Text –
“The Land Lady”.
Mr. A. J. Soliz
Qtr. 1 - Week 3
Wednesday, August 28th, 2019
Bell Ringer
You will have 2 minutes to circle the correct Literary
Element on you Bell Ringer Handout, and then 4 minutes
to discuss with the members of your group. Be
prepared to share your answer and defend it with the
class using in-text evidence.
 “And then Dad pulled down his rifle and bullets
from the closet. ‘Junior,’ he said, ‘Carry Oscar
outside.’ ‘No!’ I screamed. ‘He’s Suffering,’ Dad
said, ‘We have to help him.’ ‘You can’t do it!’ I
shouted” (*p10-11).
*THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME
INDIAN
Objective:
Students will be able to
identify and develop their
vocabulary skills by
identifying and defining
key vocabulary words for
our first class Read-aloud.
Lesson
Developing vocabulary skills is
essential to not only being able to
understand what something means,
but how it is being used as well. Today
we will work on defining and providing
graphic examples of our vocabulary
words utilizing “Word-Splashes” to help
us better grasp and remember the
vocabulary words.
Small Group and then
Whole Group Share
For the following Vocabulary words, you are to:
• Look up their definition, and see how they best fit
in context with the story of the Land Lady.
• Provide the definition on the poster paper.
• Draw a picture to help us understand the
definition.
• Explain how the word is being used in the story.
Vocabulary List
Dotty
Facades
Congenial
Proceedings
Illuminated
Earnestly
Rapacious
Frisky
Blotchy
Threshold
Lapsed
Dainty
Hearth
Blemish
Queer
Splendid
Puzzling
Peculiar
Closing:
Discuss with your group, what
one new word did you learn
today, and how do you think
this practice of the word
splash, can help you when
reading and even when
writing.
English I:
Engaged Reading
“Dry run” in Class Reading of our First Text –
“The Land Lady”.
Mr. A. J. Soliz
Qtr. 1 - Week 3
Thursday, August 29th, 2019
Bell Ringer
You will have 2 minutes to circle the correct Literary
Element on you Bell Ringer Handout, and then 4 minutes
to discuss with the members of your group. Be
prepared to share your answer and defend it with the
class using in-text evidence.
 “So I mostly hang out alone in my bedroom and
read books and draw cartoons. I draw all the
time. I draw cartoons of my mother, and father;
my sister and grandmother; my best friend,
Rowdy; and everybody else on the rez. (*p5)
*THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME
INDIAN
Objective:
We will complete building our
vocabulary for our reading of “the
Land Lady”. The purpose is to
become exposed to the distinct
words that we are not familiar with
from the text.
Individual Work and then
Small Group Share
In small groups, we will wrap up building
our word-splashes with our new Vocabulary
Words from the text which will then be
presented to the class.
Closing
Discuss with your group.
List one new word that you learned
today and how you think it will be
helpful to you for this class.
EngLish I:
Engaged Reading
In Class Reading of our First Text –
“The Land Lady”.
Mr. A. J. Soliz
Qtr. 1 - Week 3
Friday, August 30th, 2019
Bell Ringer
You will have 5 minutes to circle the correct Literary
Element on you Bell Ringer Handout, and then 4 minutes
to discuss with the members of your group. Be
prepared to share your answer and defend it with the
class using in-text evidence.
 “I wish I were magical, but I am really just a
poor-ass reservation kid living with his poor-ass
family on the poor-ass Spokane Indian
Reservation” (*p7).
*THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME
INDIAN
Objective:
We will present our new
vocabulary words to the
class and begin our dry-run
reading of “the Land Lady”
just to read it. The purpose
is to become exposed to
the text.
Lesson:
In a dry run reading of a text, the purpose is
simply to become exposed to the text. Don’t
worry so much about who did what, or what the
plot/setting/tone are, the point of views, etc.
Simply enjoy the text for what it is… a story that
can convey some kind of emotion to you if you
just allow it.
There will be a time where we will go back and
focus on “zeroing in” on the other aspects, but
this is not that time yet.
Individual Work and then
Small Group Share
• Students will do an A-B Choral read to
one another of the text.
• Then as a whole group we will come
back and read the text one more time
all together.
Closing:
The last 5-10 minutes of our
class we will share out loud
any misconceptions we may
have had from the reading up
until now.