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Integrated Literacy Assignment (2)

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Integrated Literacy Assignment
Part 1
Schedule
The Little
Red Hen
15 Minutes
25 Minutes
40 Minutes
25 Minutes
15 Minutes
Read aloud
DiscussionThe 5 W’s
(Who, What,
Where,
When, Why)
Dialogue
Journal
Responses
(Individual)
Paired
reading
(think, pair,
share)
Shared
reading
DiscussionCharacter
Traits
Oral Activity
“Role on the
Wall”
Paired
Reading
(think, pair,
share)
Read aloud
- Act it out
(small
groups
while
teacher
reads)
Paired
reading
DiscussionThemes in
the story
-Class
examples of
each theme
Oral Activity
Classroom
Rules- based on
themes
Guided
Reading
Independent
Reading
Wrap Up:
Group
questions
and
answers/
feedback
Wrap Up:
Group
questions
and
answers/
feedback
Wrap Up:
Group
questions
and
answers/
feedback
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Let’s talk
A. Helping
about it!
Hands poster
Helping
(Individual)
hands outside
B.
the classroom Conferencing
with teacher to
create
Storyboard
Poster
Sing Along Discussion:
Create your
What
own ending to
happens at
the story
the end of the (Group/Class
story?
Presentations)
What if it
were
different?
Creation of
Storyboard
with class and
final
presentation
Wrap Up:
Group
questions
and
answers/
feedback
Present end of
story (act,
write, draw,
sing)
Wrap Up:
Group
questions
and
answers/
feedback
Mentor Text
The Little Red Hen by: Margot Zemach
Grade: 2
This integrated literacy assignment is based on the children’s book, The Little Red Hen by
Margot Zemach. This book is about a hen who lives with her friends; a frog and a cat. The hen
takes on all the responsibilities at home because her friends are lazy. The hen leaves for the other
side of town, and while she is gone, the frog and cat miss her and all that she provides. They
realize how hard the hen works and they agree to help her from now on.
The teacher should note that there are several versions of this story that differ slightly.
This week-long literacy and language arts plan begins with introductory activities that allow
students to become familiar with the book and ensure an understanding of the story line,
characters and themes. Further into the week, activities focus on making connections between
the story and students’ lives in the classroom and at home. The week concludes with an activity
that allows students to use their creativity, imagination, and innovation. The open-ended activity
will extend students’ thinking process by allowing them to explore alternative endings to the
story.
Five Focal Lessons
Monday
Activity: Dialogue Journal Response (40 min)
Activity Focus: Understanding the Story/Personal Response
Strand(s): Oral Communication, Reading, Writing
Expectation(s):
Oral Communication: 1.4 demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in oral texts
by retelling the story or restating the information, including the main idea and several interesting
details (e.g., restate a partner’s reflections after a think-pair share activity; identify the important
ideas in a group presentation; carry on a sustained conversation on a topic)
Reading: 1.7 identify the main idea and some additional elements of texts (e.g., narrative:
characters, setting, problem, solution, events/episodes, resolution; procedure: goal, materials,
method)
1.8 express personal thoughts and feelings about what has been read
Writing: 1.2 generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources
(e.g., formulate and ask questions such as the five W’s [who, what, when, where, why] to
identify personal experiences, prior knowledge, and information needs; brainstorm ideas with a
partner)
Lesson Description
The dialogue journal response activity takes place after the class discussion of the book (See
block two on Monday titled “Discussion- The 5 W’s”). In the class discussion, the teacher will
set up an organized chart (on the blackboard or chart paper) with the five subheadings: who,
what, where, when, why. Students will be gathered in front of the teacher and the chart at the
learning carpet/center. The teacher will facilitate discussion focusing on these subheadings to
ensure students have an understanding of the story and to allow students to identify the key
points of the story. The teacher can flip through the book to remind students of certain parts or to
reference a certain page after an idea was expressed. Following the class discussion, the teacher
will group students in pairs and ask them to ‘think, pair, share’ in regards to their personal
responses to the book. The teacher will ask students to think about their overall feelings of the
book, including what they liked or did not like, what they would change, what was unclear, etc.
After students share and compare their thoughts, the teacher will give instructions regarding the
dialogue journal response activity: Individually, students will return to their desks and express
their response to the book in their dialogue journal by drawing, writing, or a combination of
drawing and writing. Students can choose to express any personal ideas or feelings that came up
as a result of the class discussion of the 5 W’s or using the ideas generated in ‘think, pair, share’.
Differentiation: For their response, students can choose to draw, write, or combine the two
skills depending on their individual comfort level/ability. Students who are finished with time
remaining in the period may choose to share their responses with each other and will be
encouraged by the teacher to identify and discuss similarities and differences between their
responses.
Assessment Tool: The teacher will use a checklist to assess students’ ability to express their
response to the story. See “Dialogue Journal Response Checklist” below.
Resources/Materials: blackboard and chalk/chart paper and markers for the organized chart of
the 5 W’s, the book (The Little Red Hen) for reference, students’ journals, pencils, crayons,
and/or markers (if students do not have any).
Assessment: Checklist
Dialogue Journal Response Checklist
Student Name:
Date:
The student was able to express his or her response to the story c
The student was able to express his or her response to the story with some assistance c
The student was not able to express his or her response to the story c
Additional Notes/Comments:
Tuesday
Activity: Role on the Wall (40 min)
Activity Focus: Character Traits
Strand(s): Oral
Expectation(s):
Overall:
2. use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a
variety of purposes;
Specific:
Interactive Strategies:
2.2 demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations,
including paired sharing and small- and large-group discussions
Appropriate Language:
2.4 choose a variety of appropriate words and phrases to communicate their meaning accurately
and engage the interest of their audience
Lesson Description
Setting the Stage
-Place blank character silhouettes for 3 characters from “The Little Red Hen” book
(Hen, Frog, Cat)
-Identify each of the characters for students by placing the character’s names above their
silhouettes
-Discuss and define character traits and provide students with examples
(i.e., refer to pictures from “The Little Red Hen” and describe one of the characters (i.e. the Frog
is being lazy in this picture)
Core Activity
-Introduce and integrate drama technique of Role on the Wall in lesson
-Role on the Wall: An outline of a body (in this case, the three characters from “The Little Red
Hen”) is drawn on a large sheet of paper and placed on board in front of the class; Words or
phrases describing the characters can be placed inside of the character silhouette as students
explore the characters
-Have students generate possible character traits for characters in the book “The Little Red Hen”
-In order for all students to benefit from the discussion, provide opportunities for listening and
speaking
-Start off with the Cat & begin with describing inner and personal traits that the cat portrays
-Guide students by suggesting that these traits can be descriptions of the cat’s physical
appearance, age, gender, attitudes or their likes/dislikes… (i.e. The cat is lazy)
-Write down the inner character traits/roles inside the character silhouette that is posted on
whiteboard as they come up with descriptions
-Do the same activity for the Frog and conclude with the Hen
-After inner traits have been described, focus on external traits
-On the outside of the silhouette, have students generate and write down some potential external
influences for each of the characters that may have an influence on their inner/personal traits that
students have brainstormed (i.e. the Hen learned to be hardworking from her mother or the cat is
lazy because the Hen does all of the work)
-Have students work on their writing skills in addition to oral communication by volunteering to
come up and write some of the character traits on the board
Consolidation
-After students explore each of the characters and their traits, have students identify with these
characters. Ask students if they have ever known someone with similar characteristics
(i.e. Do you know anyone who is as hardworking as the Hen?)
-Ask students: Which character they liked the most and why? Which character would they like to
be friends with? Which character would they like to be more like?
Differentiation:
- Students will be given 1 minute to think, pair and share their ideas before responding
with possible character traits and feelings
- Give students adequate time to think about genuine answers and collaborate with peers if
they are uncertain
- Ensure students are given a proper wait time (At least* 15 seconds must be provided)
Assessment Tool:
- Anecdotal records will be used to make note of students’ speaking behaviour in small and
large group discussion as well as their use of vocabulary (i.e. if they are communicating
appropriate words and phrases to their peers)
- Record students’ strengths and weaknesses in achieving the oral achievement
expectations from the language curriculum
- Assess students using visual observation to see if they participate in the core learning
activities
- Make note of segments of the lesson students had difficulty with
- Optional: If students reluctant to participate, participate in a one-on-one conference with
these students after lesson is completed
Resources/Materials:
- “The Little Red Hen” book
- Character silhouettes (1 Hen outline, 1 Cat outline, 1 Frog outline)
- Whiteboard
- Whiteboard Markers
Sample Silhouettes for “Role on the Wall”
Assessment: Anecdotal Notes
Student Name:
Language Arts
Oral Anecdotal Records
Goals:
Date
Strengths:
Activity and Observation
Next Steps to Meet Goal
Wednesday
Activity: Classroom Rules (40 min)
Activity Focus: Themes
Strand(s): Oral, Reading
Expectation(s):
Oral: 1 Listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety of situations for a
variety of purposes (Overall Expectation)
1.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in oral texts by
retelling the story or restating the information, including the main idea and several
interesting details (Specific Expectation)
Reading: 1 Generate, gather and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose
and audience (Overall Expectation)
1.7 Identify the main idea and some additional elements of texts (Specific Expectation)
Lesson Description:
- This activity requires the themes generated from class discussion in the previous time
block (work ethic, being helpful, responsibility and friendship).
- On that carpet, the teacher will have students re tell these major themes and how they applied to
the story.
- As students recap the themes, the teacher will write them on the blackboard for the class to see
- The teacher will then ask students to think of examples of how to demonstrate these specific
themes in the classroom
- Once students have an idea, they will raise their hand quietly and those who have their hand
down will be given more time to think of an example
- Students will be asked to say which theme their example goes with
- As students give their examples, the teacher will list them on chart paper on the board, leaving
a margin on the top for an anticipated title
- Once all examples are given, the teacher will write “Our Classroom Rules” on the top and ask
the class to read the title together
- The teacher will explain the new classroom rules created by the class
- As a class, they will read each rule out loud repeating after the teacher after each rule is said
- The teacher will hang up the rules in the classroom for students to look and act upon
Differentiation:
- 1 minute think, pair, share before responding with an example
- give students time to think and collaborate with peers if they are unsure
- wait time (at least 10 seconds)
- the teacher will read one rule at a time and then have the class repeat the sentence
- a pointer stick will be used to allow students to follow together as a class
Assessment Tool:
- Anecdotal Records
- Note any individual behaviors of concern, or processes/thinking/work habits (either positive or
needing improvement)
Resources/Materials: Blackboard, chart paper and markers to generate the list of classroom
rules, The Little Red Hen for reference, tape or sticky tack to put the rules up in the
classroom
Assessment: Anecdotal Notes
Date:
Activity: Classroom Rules Using Little Red Hen Themes
- Note any individual behaviours of concern, or processes/thinking/work habits
(either positive or needing improvement)
Student Name:
Student Name:
Student Name:
Student Name:
Student Name:
Student Name:
(continue for entire class list)
Additional Notes/Comments:
Thursday
Activity: Helping Hands Poster (40 min)
Activity Focus: Real life connections
Strand(s): Writing, Media Literacy
Expectation(s):
Writing 1. Generate, gather and organize ideas and information to write for an intended purpose
and audience. (Overall Expectation)
Media Literacy: Form 3.2 identify an appropriate form to suit the purpose and audience for a
media text they plan to create (Specific Expectation)
Lesson Description:
- While on the carpet, using the ideas generated from class discussion in the previous time block
(Let’s talk about it: Helping Hands outside the classroom), students will gather and organize
ideas regarding their responsibilities at home in order to complete the worksheet “Helping
Hands!” Students will be asked to draw a picture depicting a responsibility they have at home
and complete the sentence “At home I am responsible for…”
- The teacher will explain the integration of StoryBoard into the activity. [As students work
independently on their worksheet the teacher will come around to those who are finished and
record their responsibilities into a created StoryBoard in order to produce a final classroom
poster.]
- Before students are sent back to their desks to work, the teacher will ask if students have ideas
for their worksheet. If so, they are to quietly raise their hand and the teacher will select those
who are ready and give more time to those who have there hands down.
- Once at their desks, the teacher will be observing and conferencing with each student to make
sure they are on the right track and assist those who need help with writing. When a student feels
they are finished, they are to raise their hand and wait for the teacher to come and record their
responsibility in the netbook/laptop. This portion of the activity will open students’ eyes to the
possibilities in which their ideas can be demonstrated.
- If students finish early; they can either add one more responsibility to their worksheet (to
further strengthen writing skills) if they feel comfortable or help their elbow partners.
- After all responsibilities are recorded and students continue to work independently the teacher
will proceed to complete the StoryBoard3 of the Helping Hands classroom poster in order to
have it ready to present to the class on the SMART Board or projector.
Differentiation:
- Allow students for extra time to express/generate their ideas during carpet time and
independent time
- In the worksheet, teacher has the beginning of the sentence written and students fill in the rest
o Ex: At home I am responsible for __________________
- Students can add more sentences or focus on drawing.
- Students who finish early can either add one more responsibility at home to their page or help
their elbow partner
Assessment Tool:
- Observe students during brainstorming and independent work period through conferencing and
anecdotals
Resources/Materials:
Worksheet, pencils, markers/crayons/pencil crayons, laptop or netbook (for teachers use),
SMART Board or projector (to display final poster)
Sample Handout:
Assessment: Anecdotal Notes
The teacher will use the following chart during observation and conferencing to take brief notes
of students’ progress. They will be able to note what needs more work and what students are
excelling in through this activity. (ie. Writing skills, understanding, drawing connections)
Student Anecdotal Records: Helping Hands!
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
[Students Name]
Friday
Activity: Create your own ending to the story (40 min)
Activity Focus: Creative Expression
Strand(s): Oral communication, Reading, Writing, Media literacy, Drama, Music
Expectation(s): The teacher should note that all of the groups will achieve the following two
expectations as a result of the requirement that all groups present their story to the class:
1] Oral Communication: 2.3 communicate ideas, opinions, and information orally in a clear,
coherent manner using simple but appropriate organizational patterns (e.g., give an oral account
of a current event using the five W’s to organize the information; restate the main facts from a
simple informational text in correct sequence)
2] Reading: 1.9 identify, initially with support and direction, the speaker and the point of view
presented in a text and suggest one or two possible alternative perspectives (e.g., develop a
narrative or role play to present a story from the point of view of one or two minor characters)
However, the achievement of the other strands and expectations will vary among groups
depending on how they choose to present their ending of the story. For example, students who
act out their story will be meeting some drama expectations, students who sing their story will be
meeting some music expectations, students who write and read their story will be meeting some
writing and reading expectations, etc.
Potential expectations that groups may meet include:
Oral Communication: 2.7 use a few different visual aids, (e.g., photographs, artifacts, a story
map) to support or enhance oral presentations (e.g., use a family photograph as part of an oral
recount of an event; use a story map to retell a story)
Writing: 1.2 generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources
(e.g., formulate and ask questions such as the five W’s [who, what, when, where, why] to
identify personal experiences, prior knowledge, and information needs; brainstorm ideas with a
partner)
1.5 identify and order main ideas and supporting details, using graphic organizers (e.g., a story
grammar: characters, setting, problem, solution; a sequential chart: first, then, next, finally) and
organizational patterns (e.g., problem-solution, chronological order)
2.1 write short texts using several simple forms (e.g., a friendly letter; a factual recount of a
scientific or mathematical investigation; a recipe describing the procedure for cooking a
favourite food; directions for playing a game; a paragraph describing the physical characteristics
of an animal; an original story or an extension of a familiar story, modeled on stories read; their
own variation on a patterned poem; an advertisement for a toy)
2.6 identify elements of their writing that need improvement, using feedback from the teacher
and peers, with a focus on content and word choice
3.7 use some appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including
print, different fonts, graphics, and layout (e.g., use legible printing, spacing, margins, varied
print size, and colour for emphasis; include a simple labelled diagram in a report; supply a
caption for a photograph or illustration)
Dance: A1.2 use dance as a language to represent the main ideas in poems and stories, with a
focus on body and space
Drama: B1.1 engage in dramatic play and role play, with a focus on exploring main ideas and
central characters in stories from diverse communities, times, and places
Music: C1.3 create simple compositions for a specific purpose and a familiar audience
Media Literacy: 3.4 produce media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using a few simple
media forms and appropriate conventions and techniques (e.g., a sequence of pictures and/or
photographs telling the story of a class event or celebration, a story illustrated with diagrams and
digital images)
Lesson Description
In the 25-minute block prior to this activity (See Block 2 on Friday titled Discussion: What
happens at the end of the story? What if it was different?). The teacher will facilitate a class
discussion around the end of the story. Points of discussion should include: why the author chose
to end the story the way he/she did, who likes or dislikes the ending and why, ideas about
alternative endings to the story and why, etc. After this discussion, the teacher will take
approximately ten minutes to group the students using a simple and fair strategy (ie: numbering
students), set the task and success criteria/expectations, and answer any questions. The groups
will be told that their task is to create and present their own ending to the story. They may use
ideas or thoughts that were generated in the class discussion as a guide. The teacher will verbally
express the success criteria, which includes: students begin by brainstorming ideas and the form
of their presentation in a fair and organized way (ie: writing all ideas, voting, etc), all members
participate (can suggest using roles and assigning tasks), the story should be presented in a
logical manner (ie: using key words like first, then, next, last), all members must present, be
creative (using props/artifacts/materials is allowed). The teacher will also provide each group
with a hard copy of the success criteria and inform the students that a checklist will be used to
assess their ability to reach the criteria. Following the instructions, students will be given twenty
minutes to brainstorm and create their own ending, and the remaining ten minutes will be used
for group presentations.
Differentiation: Groups will choose the form of their presentation (ex: act, write, sing, draw, use
of paint, use of digital images, etc.) as well as the assignment of roles/tasks for each member in
the group. This allows students to identify individual strengths and use these strengths to produce
the story to the best of their ability.
Assessment Tool: The teacher will use a checklist of the success criteria that was given to
students. The teacher will use this checklist as he/she observes groups working together as well
as during the final presentation. See “Creative ending to the story- Success Criteria Checklist”
below.
Resources/Materials: the book (The Little Red Hen) for reference, props/materials for groups to
use (ie: puppets, construction paper, glue, scissors, small instruments, markers, paper),
computer/printer
Assessment: Checklist
Creative Ending to the Story- Success Criteria Checklist
1) Brainstorming
Brainstorming was evident during group work c
Brainstorming was somewhat evident during group work c
Brainstorming was not evident during group work c
2) Organization of ideas
Organization of ideas was evident during group work c
Organization of ideas was somewhat evident during group work c
Organization of ideas was not evident during group work c
3) Participation
All members participated in group work and the presentation c
All members somewhat participated in group work and the presentation c
Not all members participated in group work and the presentation c
Names of students who did not participate: _____________________
(Teacher follows up in a conference to find out why)
4) Order/Flow of the story
The story was presented in an order that made sense (logically) c
The story was somewhat presented in an order that made sense c
The story was not presented in an order that made sense c
5) Creativity
The presentation was very creative c
The presentation was somewhat creative c
The presentation was not creative c
Additional Notes/Comments:
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