Uploaded by Kristi Hatton

analyze Claims guidednotes doc

advertisement
Name:______________________________
Date: ___________________
“Making the Best of Invasive Species” by Kristin Ohlson
Guided Notes – Lesson 4
Beyond specific examples of invasive species, how does Ohlson prove that one way to
control invasive species is to eat them?
Objective: In this lesson you will learn how to analyze an author’s use of evidence to develop a claim by examining
the impact of a section of text.
Steps:
1.
2.
3.
Reread text and identify a section of text that develops an author’s claim.
Ask, “What is the evidence in this particular section of text that develops the author’s claim?”
Ask, “Is this section of text different from the rest of the article?” If so, how does it impact the
meaning of the text?
FOCUS PASSAGE: Paragraphs 16-17
1.
Reread text and identify a section of text that develops an author’s claim.
We’ve already identified a section of text that develops the author’s claim.
Perhaps no one tackles the issue of eating invasives with as much gusto as Jackson Landers,
author of The Locavore Hunter blog. Over the past year, he's traveled the country hunting
invasives and gathering material for his new book, Eating Aliens. Landers has hunted and
eaten feral pigs in Georgia, green iguanas in the Florida Keys, pigeons in New York City,
Canada geese in Virginia and European green crabs in Massachusetts, among others.
"As a systematic approach to invasives, eating them should be a major component," Landers
says. "After all, human beings have eaten other species to extinction."
2.
Ask, “What is the evidence in this particular section of text that develops the author’s claim?”
Highlight the words and phrases from this section that help to develop Ohlson’s claim.
Perhaps no one tackles the issue of eating invasives with as much gusto as Jackson Landers,
author of The Locavore Hunter blog. Over the past year, he's traveled the country hunting
invasives and gathering material for his new book, Eating Aliens. Landers has hunted and
eaten feral pigs in Georgia, green iguanas in the Florida Keys, pigeons in New York City,
Canada geese in Virginia and European green crabs in Massachusetts, among others.
"As a systematic approach to invasives, eating them should be a major component," Landers
says. "After all, human beings have eaten other species to extinction."
3.
Ask, “Is this section of text different from the rest of the article?” If so, how does it impact the
meaning of the text?
Remember that this is a two-part question. Be sure to answer both parts!
Your Turn!
Beyond specific examples of invasive species, how does Ohlson prove that one way to
control invasive species is to eat them?
1.
2.
3.
Reread text and identify a section of text that develops an author’s claim.
Ask, “What is the evidence in this particular section of text that develops the author’s claim?”
Ask, “Is this section of text different from the rest of the article?” If so, how does it impact the
meaning of the text?
FOCUS PASSAGE: Paragraphs 20-21
1.
Reread text and identify a section of text that develops an author’s claim.
We’ve already identified a section of text that develops the author’s claim.
The exception was Jonathon Sawyer, owner of the Greenhouse Tavern and named a Best
New Chef of 2010 by Food and Wine magazine. Sawyer loves to forage the ring of parks
around Cleveland and has been carrying garlic mustard back to use in his restaurant and
home for five years. In the springtime, he likes to eat the leaves raw, comparing their taste
and bite to arugula. As the plants get older, he blanches and eats them like mustard greens.
“Dude, it’s the ultimate food!” Sawyer exclaimed as he passed out his artichoke and spinach
dip with crème fraiche, garlic mustard, and thick-cut potato chips. “It’s free, and nature
wants us to get rid of it.”
2.
Ask, “What is the evidence in this particular section of text that develops the author’s claim?”
Highlight the words and phrases from this section that help to develop Ohlson’s claim.
The exception was Jonathon Sawyer, owner of the Greenhouse Tavern and named a Best
New Chef of 2010 by Food and Wine magazine. Sawyer loves to forage the ring of parks
around Cleveland and has been carrying garlic mustard back to use in his restaurant and
home for five years. In the springtime, he likes to eat the leaves raw, comparing their taste
and bite to arugula. As the plants get older, he blanches and eats them like mustard greens.
“Dude, it’s the ultimate food!” Sawyer exclaimed as he passed out his artichoke and spinach
dip with crème fraiche, garlic mustard, and thick-cut potato chips. “It’s free, and nature
wants us to get rid of it.”
3.
Ask, “Is this section of text different from the rest of the article?” If so, how does it impact the
meaning of the text?
Remember that this is a two-part question. Be sure to answer both parts!