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Complete set of conferring templates

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NAME
GOAL
EMERGENT READING/
READING FROM PICTURES
SKILL PROGRESSION:
NARRATIVE
QUESTION AND PROMPTS FOR RESEARCH
` ` [f iction] “Read me this story, using the pictures.”
` ` [nonf iction] “Tell me about what you’re learning in this book.”
` ` “Can you read this to me?”
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Points to picture
and names things
Labels and comments
on what’s in the picture
Uses a narrator voice or dialogue
Uses some mixture of
narration and dialogue
Reading sounds like a story
(both dialogue and narrator)
Adapted from Sulzby, “Children’s Emergent
Reading of Favorite Storybooks” (1985)
and Collins and Glover, I Am Reading (2015).
SKILL PROGRESSION:
NONNARRATIVE
Points to picture
and names things
Labels and comments
on what’s in the picture
Connects information
between pictures
Connects information on
one page with information
on another
Adapted from Collins and Glover,
I Am Reading (2015).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
ENGAGEMENT
QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH
` ` “What made you choose this book?”
` ` “When you go to the library to choose a book, what do
you think about?”
` ` “When do you choose to read?”
` ` “Do you read even if it’s not assigned?”
` ` “When you read, do you f ind that you get distracted?”
` ` [if the student answers yes to the question above]
“What do you do to refocus?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Chooses books that are of
interest and that the student
can read with comprehension,
accuracy, and fluency
Can sustain reading for short
periods of time
Reads with focus and attention
Visualizes, reacts, and thinks
while reading
Can read for extended periods
of time
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
PRINT WORK
SKILL PROGRESSION
QUESTION AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “Read out loud to me, please.”
` ` “Can you please read aloud so I can listen?”
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Uses meaning and syntax (what’s
happened so far, pictures, title)
as sources of information
Uses meaning and syntax
together with visual information
(initial consonant)
Self-corrects
Uses meaning and syntax
together with visual information
(initial consonant, blend, or
digraph; and word ending)
Self-corrects
Uses meaning and syntax
together with visual information
(initial consonant, blend, or
digraph; word ending; and the
middles of words)
Self-corrects at or near the point
of error
Uses meaning and syntax
together with visual (initial
consonant, blend, or digraph;
word ending; and the middles of
words, including vowel teams)
Decodes by analogy
Self-corrects at or near the point
of error
Uses meaning and syntax
together with visual (initial
consonant, blend, or digraph;
word ending; and the middles
of words)
Decodes by analogy; has
strategies for decoding
multisyllabic words
Self-corrects at or near the point
of error
Adapted from Clay, Reading Recovery:
A Guidebook for Teachers in Training (1993b).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
FLUENCY
SKILL PROGRESSION
QUESTION AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “Read out loud to me, please.”
` ` “Can you please read aloud so I can listen?”
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Reads word by word
Reads in two- to
three-word phrases
Reads in longer phrases, though
phrasing may be awkward
Reads in longer phrases,
informed by midsentence
punctuation (commas, dashes,
semicolons)
Reads with appropriate phrasing
and some expression, mostly
informed by ending punctuation
Reads with appropriate
phrasing and consistently uses
expression that matches the
author’s meaning
Adapted from 2002 NAEP fluency scale
(Daane et al. 2005).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
PLOT AND SETTING
QUESTIONS AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “Retell the book to me. What happened f irst?”
` ` “What problem(s) is your character dealing with?”
` ` “Describe what you picture in this part.”
` ` “Tell me about an important event. What causes it to happen?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Retells the story’s beginning,
middle, and end
Names setting
Retells in sequence
Identifies a problem
Names setting
Understands cause and effect
Retells relevant details
in sequence
Identifies multiple aspects of
problems (internal, external)
Describes setting
Understands cause and effect
Retells important events from
more detailed plots that may
not be sequential, and which
may include flashbacks and
foreshadowing
Identifies multiple aspects of
several (3+) problems
Describes setting and shifts in
setting. Understands that setting
creates mood.
Understands multiple causes
and effects
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
CHARACTER
QUESTIONS AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “What ideas do you have about the character
?”
` ` “How is your character feeling in this part?”
` ` “How is your character changing?”
` ` “Describe the relationship between
and
.”
` ` “How does [character] affect [character]?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Identifies character(s) and can
describe with text/picture details
Identifies feelings and/or
traits of a main character
Identifies how feelings change
Identifies several traits that
show different sides to the
main character
Names change(s) in
character traits
Interprets multiple traits of
main and secondary characters
that show complexity to name
a theory
Names impact of one character
on another
Identifies complexity of multiple
characters, and analyzes
relationships between characters
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
VOCABULARY AND
FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE
SKILL PROGRESSION
QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH
` ` [identify a word or phrase with context support]
“What does this mean?”
` ` “Can you explain what the word
STRENGTHS
means?”
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Gives the gist of a word or phrase
Gives a simple definition of the
word or phrase
Uses local context to explain the
meaning of the word or phrase
Uses larger context (whole
chapter, multiple mentions, or
text and features) to explain the
meaning of the word or phrase
Considers author’s craft and
why the author chose the word
or phrase (connotation and
denotation)
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
THEMES AND IDEAS
QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH
` ` “What is a lesson or message you can learn f rom this book?”
` ` “What does
symbolize?”
` ` “What social issues are coming up in this book?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Names a topic (love, war,
friendship) in the book
Names a lesson in
book-specific language
Names a lesson in universal
language, with support from
the text
Names multiple universal lessons
Identifies a social issue and
interprets its significance
Names multiple universal lessons
Interprets social issues
and symbolism
Names multiple universal lessons
Understands complexity of how
social issues and symbolism, and
explains their significance to
themes in the text
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
MAIN IDEA
QUESTIONS AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “What is this book mostly about?”
` ` “What is this section mostly about?”
` ` “State a main idea for this section in your own words.”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Names a topic
Names topic(s) and subtopic(s)
Uses headings and topic
sentences to state a main idea
(usually by paraphrasing the text)
Uses original language to state a
main idea
States multiple main idea(s),
and/or captures complexity the
author brings to the topic
States main idea(s) and two or
three related subideas. Captures
complexity the author brings to
the topic
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
KEY DETAILS
QUESTIONS AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “What details support the main idea you just said?”
` ` “It says here [state main idea]. What did you learn f rom this
section that supports that?”
` ` “Explain how those details f it with the main idea.”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Lists details from a text
Lists details that support a topic,
subtopic, and/or main idea
Compares or contrasts
Identifies multiple key details
from across pages or parts, text
and features
Compares and contrasts
Identifies multiple key details
from multiple pages or parts, text
and features, and explains how
details support the main idea
Identifies multiple comparisons
Identifies multiple key details
from across several pages or
parts, using text and features.
Explains how information
supports main idea. Quotes from
the text.
Identifies multiple comparisons
and categorizes connections
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
TEXT FEATURES
QUESTIONS AND PROMPT FOR RESEARCH
` ` “How does this [feature] add to what you’re learning in
this section?”
` ` “What are you learning f rom [feature]?”
` ` “Explain how the [feature] connects to the rest of this
[section/chapter/book/article].”
` ` “How do these features f it together?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Names what the feature is
Can give one detail from
the feature
Can give multiple details from
the feature
Can give multiple details from
the feature and connects the
information to other features
and/or text
Explains how the feature adds
to information the author is
presenting and considers why
the feature is important
Adapted from Serravallo,
Understanding Texts & Readers (2018).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
CONVERSATION
QUESTION FOR RESEARCH
Observe students discussing books in pairs, small groups,
and/or as a whole class.
` ` “How do you use your partnership / book club time to help
you as a reader?”
SKILL PROGRESSION
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Listens actively
Uses listening body language
Stays on topic
Picks conversation-worthy topics
Elaborates on ideas;
explains oneself
Uses respectful language
Is accountable to the text and to
peers’ ideas
Balances voices, so all are heard
Keeps the conversation moving
and knows when ideas are
repeating and it’s time to move
to a new topic
Asks questions
Has stamina to talk for a long
time about one idea
Thinks flexibly, allowing one’s
own opinions to be changed and/
or considering new perspectives
Debates
Uses empathy to understand
others’ ideas, especially when
others’ opinions differ from
one’s own
Adapted from Serravallo,
The Reading Strategies Book (2015).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
WRITING ABOUT
READING
SKILL PROGRESSION
QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH
Look at a student’s writing about reading.
` ` “How do you decide when to write about your reading?”
` ` “How does writing about reading help you as a reader?”
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Marks spots in the text that
are important, interesting,
or worth sharing
Takes notes on the text
(records literal information)
Annotates text with own
thinking, using single words
or phrases
Uses annotations to make
connections between ideas
Uses annotations as a
springboard for extended
thinking
Elaborates and free writes based
on initial ideas to discover
new ideas
Adapted from Serravallo,
The Reading Strategies Book (2015).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
NAME
GOAL
ORGANIZATION
AND STRUCTURE:
NARRATIVE
SKILL PROGRESSION
QUESTION AND PROMPTS FOR RESEARCH
` ` “Tell me about how you’ve organized this story.”
` ` “What part of your story is most important?”
` ` “Please read me your lead.”
` ` “Please read me your ending.”
STRENGTHS
TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES
Events in sequence
Beginning/lead
Ending/closure
Problem-solution structure
Rising action builds tension
Heart of the story is most
developed
Author controls time
Use of flashback/foreshadowing
Meaning/significance controls
the organization
Adapted from Serravallo,
The Writing Strategies Book (2017)
and Calkins, Writing Pathways (2014).
May be photocopied for classroom use.
© 2019 by Jennifer Serravallo f rom A Teacher’s Guide to Reading Conferences. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
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