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ASA Level ECR IT Paper3 v1.0

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Copyright © UCLES 2018
Cambridge Assessment International Education is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge
Assessment is the brand name of the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES),
which itself is a department of the University of Cambridge.
UCLES retains the copyright on all its publications. Registered Centres are permitted to copy material from
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material that is acknowledged to a third party, even for internal use within a Centre.
Contents
Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................ 4
Question 1 ......................................................................................................................................................... 6
Example Candidate Response – high ........................................................................................................... 6
Example Candidate Response – middle ....................................................................................................... 7
Example Candidate Response – low............................................................................................................. 8
Question 2 ....................................................................................................................................................... 10
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 10
Question 3 ....................................................................................................................................................... 12
Example Candidate Response – high ......................................................................................................... 12
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 13
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 14
Question 4 ....................................................................................................................................................... 15
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 15
Question 5 ....................................................................................................................................................... 16
Example Candidate Response – high ......................................................................................................... 16
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 17
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 18
Question 6 ....................................................................................................................................................... 20
Example Candidate Response – high ......................................................................................................... 20
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 21
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 22
Question 7 ....................................................................................................................................................... 24
Example Candidate Response – low........................................................................................................... 24
Question 8 ....................................................................................................................................................... 25
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 25
Question 9 ....................................................................................................................................................... 26
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 26
Question 10 ..................................................................................................................................................... 27
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 27
Examiner comments .................................................................................................................................... 27
Question 11 ..................................................................................................................................................... 28
Example Candidate Response – high ......................................................................................................... 28
Example Candidate Response – middle ..................................................................................................... 29
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Introduction
The main aim of this booklet is to exemplify standards for those teaching Cambridge International AS &
A Level Information Technology (9626), and to show how different levels of candidates’ performance (high,
middle and low where possible) relate to the subject’s curriculum and assessment objectives.
In this booklet candidate responses are derived from scripts of candidates from June 2017 to exemplify a
range of answers.
For each question, the response is annotated with clear explanation of where and why marks were awarded
or omitted. This is followed by examiner comments on how the answer could have been improved. In this
way, it is possible for you to understand what candidates have done to gain their marks and what they could
do to improve their answers. At the end of the booklet, there is a list of common mistakes candidates made
in their answers for each question.
This document provides illustrative examples of candidate work with examiner commentary. These help
teachers to assess the standard required to achieve marks beyond the guidance of the mark scheme.
Therefore, in some circumstances, such as where exact answers are required, there will not be much
comment.
The questions, mark schemes and pre-release material used here are available to download from the School
Support Hub. These files are:
June 2017 Question Paper 32
June 2017 Paper 32 Mark Scheme
Past exam resources and other teacher support materials are available on the School Support Hub
www.cambridgeinternational.org/support
4
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
How to use this booklet
This booklet goes through the paper one question at a time, showing you the high-, middle- and low-level
response for each question. The candidate answers are set in a table. In the left-hand column are the
candidate answers, and in the right-hand column are the examiner comments.
Answers are by real candidates in exam
conditions. These show you the types of
answers for each level.
Discuss and analyse the answers with
your learners in the classroom to improve
their skills.
Examiner comments are
alongside the answers.
These explain where and
why marks were awarded.
This helps you to interpret
the standard of Cambridge
exams so you can help
your learners to refine their
exam technique.
This section explains how the candidate could have
improved each answer. This helps you to interpret the
standard of Cambridge exams and helps your learners to
refine their exam technique.
Often candidates are not awarded marks
because they misread or misinterpreted the
questions.
This section lists the common mistakes candidates
made in answering each question. This will help
your learners to avoid these mistakes and give them
the best chance of achieving the available marks.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
5
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 1
Example Candidate Response – high
Examiner comments
This point clearly mentions two
or more people.
This point clearly mentions live
video and audio feeds.
Mark for (a)(i) = 2/2
Working from home is a feature
of teleworking.
Using IT is a feature of
teleworking.
Mark for (a)(ii) = 2/2
This point is equivalent to ‘more
difficult to manage employees’.
This refers to the increased
security risk that working from
home can introduce. Employers
can worry about this.
This refers to the decreased
opportunities for employers to
monitor the performance of their
employees, making it more difficult
to check on the progress of the
work.
This refers to the consequences
of employers not being able to
manage or monitor their employees
so closely.
Mark for (b) = 4/5
Total mark awarded = 8 out of 9
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a)(i) The question was fully answered but a comment that the live video and audio feeds were
simultaneously two-way would have made the answer perfect.
(a)(ii) The question was fully answered. Working remotely would have been a more accurate answer.
(b) While this was quite a good answer, more detail in the references to the difficulties of managing and
monitoring of employees would have been awarded more marks.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
This mention of audio calls was
ignored.
The internet is mentioned as the
communication medium.
This last sentence lacks the
detail required.
Mark for (a)(i) = 1/2
This point is a feature of
teleworking and is awarded 1 mark.
Mark for (a)(ii) = 1/2
This sentence refers to the lack
of direct control by supervisors.
These points refer to the fact that
the employee is not working in
direct sight of the supervisor so the
supervisor has little knowledge of
the actual work being done and has
difficulty finding out the information.
The security of information is
reduced when it goes out of the
office environment.
Mark for (b) = 3/5
Total mark awarded = 5 out of 9
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a)(i) The candidate should have mentioned “two or more people” to be awarded full marks.
(a)(ii) The point about ‘working outside of the workplace’ was valid but mention of the use of IT was required
for full marks.
(b) This candidate made three good points about lack of direct control, not being able to find out easily how
the work was progressing and about security. There were other drawbacks that could have been
mentioned: increased costs of computer equipment, being unable to manage the hours worked by the
employees, time zone issues and the fact that some work is not suitable for teleworking. If the answer
had included more drawbacks, more credit would have been given.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
The candidate does not mention
the number of people.
Video and audio feeds are twoway and simultaneous. These
points are not mentioned.
The last sentence does not
answer the question.
Mark for (a)(i) = 0/2
This does not answer the
question.
Mark for (a)(ii) = 0/2
The candidate does not answer
the question as they refer to the
employees.
1 mark is awarded for reference
to the increased cost to employers
of supplying IT equipment for
teleworkers.
1 mark is awarded for the
reference to difficulty of monitoring
the progress of the work.
Mark for (b) = 2/5
Total mark awarded =
2 out of 9
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a)(i) Video conferencing involves two or more people using simultaneous video and audio feeds. The
response should have contained more detail about this.
(a)(ii) A good answer would have referred to using telecommunications systems to work remotely.
(b) The focus should have been on the drawbacks to employer. Only two good points were made. The
reference to the employees being distracted at home did not really answer the question despite a
consequence being mentioned. A better answer would have referred to the employer losing
customers/sales because of the failure to manage and monitor work progress of teleworkers.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
(a)(i) Responses were superficial and lacked the detail needed to clearly define video-conferencing. The
software and hardware used were not required for this question.
(a)(ii) Responses were superficial and lacked the detail needed to clearly define tele-working. Answers
needed to be precise and accurate.
(b) The most common error made by candidates was to refer to the drawbacks to the employees and not to
the employer.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 2
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
This is inaccurate.
These, and the following
sentences, are an attempt to
evaluate the use of a firewall. It
makes a point about checking and
allowing to pass but is not detailed
enough to score more than 1 mark.
The remainder of the response
does not answer the question.
Mark for (a) = 1/8
This point refers to the proxy
server being an intermediary.
This is a reference to the fact
that devices can be kept
anonymous.
This is too vague. It should refer
to access by devices such as client
computers.
This is a possible consequence
of using a proxy server but is not a
direct feature of one. It is also
vague. A better answer would have
explained what the risk was.
Mark for (b) = 2/4
Total mark awarded =
3 out of 12
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) This candidate has not answered the question. Although they described some of the functions of a
firewall, there was little evaluation of the use of a firewall. To gain credit in this question, answers had to
refer to the advantages and disadvantages of using firewalls. This required much more detail than listing
the functions. The answer should have considered how a firewall would be used effectively giving both
the advantages and disadvantages.
(b) There should have been more technical accuracy: ‘a proxy server acts as an intermediary between client
devices and the internet and provides anonymity to the devices by using network address translation
(NAT) services’ is a detailed, accurate response. A more detailed explanation of the risk of viruses to
files/data and preventing access to sites that might carry malware would have gained more credit.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
(a) Describe what a firewall does but not to evaluate its use in protecting the stored data. The question
required candidates to be able to use their knowledge of how firewalls work to assess how ‘good’ they
are at protecting stored data. Candidates who described only the actions of a firewall did not score
marks.
(b) Confuse the role of a proxy server with that of firewalls and anti-virus software. There was also a lack of
technical details in most answers, e.g. ‘looks at’ is not a technical term; ‘checks’ was not followed up by
detailing how any checks were carried out.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 3
Example Candidate Response – high
Examiner comments
All 8 marks are awarded for:
– all correct labels
– tasks in appropriate order in the
table
– all correct task lengths
– initial research starting before
writing the initial report AND in
parallel with interviewing users
– both reports ending before/on due
dates
The annotations are not required.
Total mark awarded =
8 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
This candidate fully answered the question. However, the drawing in the table could have been neater and
there was no need to annotate the tasks with ‘parallel’ or ‘not parallel’ as this was not required; such
annotations may detract from the answer and cause confusion if inaccurate. In this case, the correct term for
‘not parallel’ could be sequential but this was not entirely accurate either.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
The task labels are all correct.
The tasks are in an appropriate
order.
The annotations are not required.
The valuation of the initial report
should come after it has been
written.
Both reports end before/on the
due dates.
Total mark awarded =
5 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
A better answer would have showed the initial research and interviewing of users as being parallel tasks, the
evaluation of the report as following the writing of the initial report (being sequential) and would have been
consistent with the drawing of the tasks. The dots used were not clear as some were surrounded by brackets
or boxes.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
13
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
The labels are all correct but the
order of the tasks is not.
All of the tasks are of the correct
length.
Parallel and sequential tasks are
not shown correctly.
The reports do not end by the
due dates.
Total mark awarded =
3 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
While the labels were shown correctly, the order of the tasks was not appropriate, e.g. an evaluation of a
report cannot start before the report is written. Both of the reports were shown as finishing after their due
dates and the initial report was shown as the last task. A better answer would have transcribed the
information given in the table to the chart more accurately.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
Parallel and sequential tasks were not identified correctly. A common logical error was to evaluate a report
before it had been written. Incorrect task lengths were also a common mistake.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 4
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
The shape used is worth a mark.
Total mark awarded =
1 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
A better answer would have used the correct shapes for the components and showed the correct data flow.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
Candidates confused the different types of flow chart. Answers showed a mixture of the symbols and shapes
used in the different flow charts.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 5
Example Candidate Response – high
Examiner comments
This is a reference to linking the
letter template to the database.
The merge fields/placeholders
are inserted.
The other merge fields are
inserted.
Mark for (a) =3/5
Refers to the omission for New
Zealand from the merge by filtering
it out.
Explains where to filter out New
Zealand.
Mark for (b) = 2/2
Total mark awarded =
5 out of 7
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) The candidate could have made reference to checking for accuracy/errors of data and letter templates.
Also, the omission of the email address from the letter template/final letter was important and should
have been mentioned. The email address is used when the letters are sent/merged.
(b) While scoring both marks, the response could have been more concise. The relevant points appeared
right at the end of the response.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
1 mark is awarded for linking the
letter to data source but it is not the
most accurate term to use.
This is a reference to the fields
to be inserted.
The other fields are inserted.
Mark for (a) = 3/5
This is a correct reference to
skipping the records for New
Zealand.
Mark for (b) = 1/2
Total mark awarded =
4 out of 7
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) Using the most appropriate/accurate terms was important. ‘Link’ was a more accurate term than ‘import’
in this context and ‘import’ may not have been credited if the sentence was worded even slightly
differently. The omission of the email address from the letter template/final letter was important and
should have been mentioned. The email address is used when the letters are sent/merged.
(b) The candidate should have used ‘skip if’ instead of describing a ‘skip’ to be awarded the second mark.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
The references to the fields are
correct.
This is not correct; the email
address should not be included.
The other merge fields are
inserted.
The last sentence is not required;
the question refers to the use of the
data so references to the layout of
the template are not needed.
Mark for (a) = 2/5
This refers to the field on which a
filter should be carried out.
This is too vague.
From this point on, the response
does not answer the question.
Alternative answers are not
considered by examiners. Only the
first answer is marked.
Mark for (b) =1/5
Total mark awarded =
3 out of 7
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) The question asked for the use of the data source not the layout of the template. The candidate should
have focused on how the data in the data source was linked and merge fields placed in the template
ready for the final mail merge.
(b) The first sentence was worthy of credit but the second sentence did not follow from it so was not
considered as an explanation. A better answer would have been to explain that an advanced filter of
excluding New Zealand would be applied to the country field. Responses must be accurate to be given
credit.
Alternative answers such as that appearing after the ‘or’ were not marked. Only first answers were marked.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
(a) Describe how the format of the template was created rather than how the data in the data source could
be linked to the template. Candidates also included the email address in the final letter when it was not
necessary and would have been omitted.
(b) Answers that were too vague were not given credit. All that was required was to explain how a filter was
applied to the correct field. Candidates who referred to skipping records did not explain how this could be
done.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 6
Example Candidate Response – high
Examiner comments
This is a correct reference to the
black and white squares.
This is a reference to how the
data is read from the QR code.
Mark for (a) = 2/4
The answer refers to the little
space that QR codes occupy on
packaging. This is a valid point and
is given credit.
This is a reference to the extra
information that can be given to
users when they scan a QR code
on a product.
Mark for (b) = 2/2
The candidate refers to the
malicious website to which a QR
code may direct a user.
This refers to the installation of
malicious code.
The remainder of the response is
a repeat of the previous points.
Mark for (c) = 2/4
Total mark awarded =
6 out of 10
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) There was no requirement for any descriptions of how a camera is used to read the QR codes.
Descriptions of the coding of data were required.
(b) The candidate could have added that the QR codes could lead to links and information that could easily
be altered and updated by advertisers without the need to reprint any literature or packaging about the
products.
(c) The response should have contained more detail as to how QR code contains data that leads to the
malicious website which downloads malicious code onto the device. Details of the code e.g. JavaScript
or how a website redirects users and what this may do would have been awarded more marks.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
This is the only point worthy of
credit which described the QR
code.
Mark for (a) = 1/4
This is a valid point and is given
credit. However, the focus of the
question was on the ‘use of QR
codes’, not on the use of any area
saved by using them, so only 1
mark is given.
This is not correct.
Mark for (c) = 1/2
This is a reference to the extra
information that can be given to
users when they scan a QR code
on a product.
This refers to the malicious
website to which a QR code may
direct a user.
Mark for (c) = 2/4
Total mark awarded =
4 out of 10
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) Descriptions of the coding of data were required, so, to achieve the marks, this candidate should have
described how the data was encoded in the black and white squares. Descriptions of the coding of
binary numbers along with any necessary error correction should have been included.
(b) The candidate focused on the space that was freed up by the use of QR codes. A better response would
have been to focus on what can be done with QR codes.
(c) The references to viruses, while valid, would have been better as references to code, as stated in the
question, and the answer expanded to cover e.g. JavaScript code.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
This is too vague to be given
credit.
Again, this sentence is vague.
The remainder of the response
does not answer the question.
Mark for (a) = 0/4
There is no reference to the
advertisers at all.
Mark for (b) = 0/2
‘Malicious code’ is given in the
question but the candidate has
made an attempt at describing how
the code could be a risk.
Mark for (c) = 1/4
Total mark awarded =
1 out of 10
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
How the candidate could have improved the answer
(a) The candidate should have described how the QR stores data as a set of black and white squares with
descriptions of how these squares are interpreted as binary data. The descriptions of the reading of the
QR codes do not answer the question so do not gain any credit.
(b) The candidate did not refer to the advertiser; references to ease of use are a benefit to a user. A better
answer would have described how an advertiser would benefit from the use of QR codes.
(c) The references to placing malicious code into the database were vague. A better description would
have included details of how the code could possibly be spread to the user’s device. However, it would
have been more sensible for the candidate to describe the more usual method of spreading malicious
code.
Common mistakes candidates make in this question
(a) A very common mistake was to describe how the QR codes were read by e.g. smartphones and how
these then followed any l nks to websites. This did not answer the question.
(b) References to how a user benefits by e.g. ease of scanning were common. The question required
candidates to describe benefits to the advertisers, not to the users i.e. the purchasers of the products.
(c) Hacking and viruses were common mistakes. The question asked about the risks to users of scanning
QR codes so answers should have referred to this. Vague answers about viruses and hackers gaining
information from the user devices did not properly answer the question.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 7
Example Candidate Response – low
Examiner comments
This response describes
‘tweening’, not morphing.
Transition images are used in
morphing so this is given credit.
Mark for (a) = 2/4
The answer is not accurate.
Total mark awarded =
1 out of 6
How the candidate could have improved the answer
There was considerable confusion with ‘tweening’. The single mark was awarded for referring to transition
images but, even here, the reference was not in the correct context. To achieve full marks, the candidate
should have described how morphing is carried out.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
A common mistake was to confuse the process of morphing with that of tweening. Both are editing
techniques used in animations but are quite different. It is essential that candidates know and understand the
different techniques used in animation.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 8
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
RAD has a high level of user
involvement so this sentence is
awarded 1 mark.
This reference to customer
satisfaction is awarded 1 mark.
The reference to ‘bugs’ is
awarded 1 mark. It would have
been better to use more technical
terms such as referring to errors in
the code.
Total mark awarded = 3 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
There was little discussion of the advantages and disadvantages. This candidate stated a few points with
some expansion but these were limited. Good answers would have given both advantages and
disadvantages such as the production of a better quality product as there was focus upon the needs of the
users but having users involved at every stage could be costly due to the increase in production time.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
A common mistake was to make statements without any attempt at discussion or expansion of the
statements. This type of question requires candidates to give both the advantages and the disadvantages
and, where appropriate, make a reasoned conclusion about the process. Where the advantages and
disadvantages were not given, very little credit could be awarded.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 9
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
The variable ‘tableout’ is created
at the start.
A correct reference to the
variable being incremented by 1.
The reference to multiplication is
awarded 1 mark.
This section is worthy of credit.
Total mark awarded = 4 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
The candidate has explained some of the actions of the loop. To achieve more marks, the candidate should
have worked through each line and explained what it does and how the table would be created, making
specific references to the code itself. The candidate should have explained that the loops continuing until the
end value is reached and the code being embedded within HTML so that it can be displayed in a web
browser. The loops create the table values which are stored in the variable so that the result can be
displayed.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
Common mistakes were to omit the detail needed or to inaccurately describe the loops. To achieve good
marks, the code within the loops had to be thoroughly explained. Answers were often vague, e.g. mentioning
the ‘loop increments’ with no explanation of what or how.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 10
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
Credit was given for discussing
the advantages and disadvantages
of the use of the satellites, not for
describing how they were used.
This is an advantage.
This is a possible disadvantage.
Total mark awarded = 4 out of 8
How the candidate could have improved the answer
This candidate did not focus on the use of the satellites for data communications; there were references to
HD TV and to unsightly satellite dishes which were not relevant to the question. There was one advantage
and one disadvantage mentioned but with little expansion. This meant that a mark of 3 in Level 1 was
awarded.
To achieve Level 2, with marks from 4 to 6, at least two advantages and at least two disadvantages had to
be discussed. For Level 3, there had to be discussions and, preferably, a reasoned conclusion that drew on
the detail. A typical conclusion would be to state that the use of satellites for data communications was to be
preferred and gave reasons why.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
The most common mistake was to describe how satellites were used to distribute TV and ‘radio’ services and
to ignore the reference in the question to ‘data communications’. Answers that did not refer to ‘data
communications’ were not awarded marks. Few answers containing more than one advantage and more
than one disadvantage were seen, so nearly all responses were restricted to Level 1. There were very few
attempts at a conclusion.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Question 11
Example Candidate Response – high
Examiner comments
This is a valid point.
‘Anywhere in the world’ is valid
although most MOOC are probably
designed for local college use
rather than for a global audience.
This is a valid point.
This is a valid point.
Total mark awarded = 4 out of 6
How the candidate could have improved the answer
This candidate made four valid points. A better answer would have included references to the use of global
resources and the use of online tools to enhance the course, and reference to the benefits to both the
students and the course organisers.
This candidate also contradicted the point about not having travelling costs by stating that the course can be
carried out while travelling.
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Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
Example Candidate Responses – Paper 3
Example Candidate Response – middle
Examiner comments
This sentence is vague and is
not awarded marks.
This is a valid point.
The last part of this sentence is a
valid point.
This point is worthy of credit.
Total mark awarded = 3 out of 6
How the candidate could have improved the answer
This candidate made three points about MOOCs: students can work at their own pace at any time of the day,
and can access shared documents. However, there was a lack of detail and the overall response was vague
as these points were generic comments. It would have been better to refer to the MOOC as allowing
students access to their study materials at any time and from places other than the college classrooms or
campus. Benefits to the college, such as reduced costs of running the course, the use of global resources
and the ability to update the materials easily, would have also enhanced the response.
Common mistakes candidates made in this question
The most common mistake was to describe the benefits of online or computer-based learning and not focus
on the use of MOOCs. Many responses made generic points such as ‘can use anywhere’, ‘can access 24/7’,
etc., without referring to using/accessing/learning with a MOOC.
Cambridge International AS & A Level Information Technology (9626)
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