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Abstract Art Line Lesson

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New York State Visual
Art Standards
Over the course of a year, how do you
make sure that learning outcomes
include objectives that address the NYS
Learning Standards for the Visual Arts,
as laid out in the NYC Blueprint for
Teaching and Learning in the Visual
Arts, PreK-12?
☆ (1c Setting Instructional
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
VA:Cr3.1.1
1st Grade
Use art vocabulary to describe choices
Outcomes)
Essential Question:
How can we think like an artist?
The goals for learning are
communicated clearly to students.
Lessons support instructional
outcomes and reflect important
concepts)
☆ (3a Communicating with
☆
Students)
(1e Designing Coherent
Instructions)
Learning Target
A brief statement that explicitly describe
what students should know, understand
and be able to do as a result of the
learning and teaching.
☆ (3a Communicating with
I can organize my ideas by creating a plan to design an abstract painting.
.
Students)
Success Criteria
Summarize the key steps the student
needs in order to fulfill the learning
target - the main things to do, include or
focus on.
● What is the criteria for mastery of
the lesson outcome(s)?
☆ (1c Setting Instructional
Outcomes)
I will be successful if I :
 Make a plan for my abstract painting.
 Draw lines that go from one end of the page to another end of the
page.
 Use the line sheet to help draw many different types of lines.
 Show examples of overlapping lines.
 Write a sentence that explains which lines I chose and how I decided
to place the lines.
Lesson Procedures
The procedures should clearly describe the sequence of learning activities and should identify where and how all materials, technology tools
and student-created technology products, and reproducible materials/handouts are utilized in the lesson. Describe the lesson sequence:
● In what ways do you provide opportunities for students in various groupings to engage in art-based questioning and discussions?
● In discussions of masterworks and student artwork, what are some ways in which you use various levels of questioning to promote
students’ critical thinking skills?
● How do you ensure that students take leadership roles in discussions of masterworks and in peer-to-peer critiques?
☆ (3b Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques)
☆ (1a Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy)
☆ (1e Designing Coherent Instruction)
☆ (3c Engaging Students in Learning)
Vocabulary
3 minutes
Think – Write - Pair
Share
Display lines on the smartboard
Say: Let’s play a little game, I’m going to draw a line with my fingers and
you are going to try to guess what line I am drawing.
zig-zag, diagonal, wavy
Display 2 works of art. Students compare and contrast the two pictures.
Purple folder
6 minutes
2 min think and
write
1 min share with
partner.
2 min share whole
group
Say:
What does it mean when I say compare?
 Pick one boy and one girl to stand up and give an example of how they
are different (boy, girl) and how they are the same (1st grade).
 Give students their partners.
 We have 2 min to think about the differences between the 2 pictures.
 Facilitator please take out the purple folder.
 As you think you should write your thoughts on a post it and place the
post it on the pictures in front of you.
 When you hear the alarm go off you will be able to talk to your partner.
Set Alarm
Connection
1 minute
I Do
4 minutes
 1 min to discuss the differences with your partner.
 2 min to share with whole group.
Say: Do you know what? This type of picture by Kandinsky is called
abstract art, and everything you have said about this picture describes the
word abstract!
Say:
 Before we begin, I would like your help with designing an abstract
work of art.
 In today’s lesson you are going to create a plan.
 This is an abstract painting because it has lots of lines shapes and
colors, but no objects.
 I have a few abstract pictures here to show you.
Show students examples of a completed work and demonstrate how an
artist would make a plan for their artwork by referring to the completed
work and the line sheet.
Say:
 Today we are going to make a plan, because that’s what good artists
do!
 I’m going to think like an artist right now. Let me show you how I plan
for my abstract line painting.
 When I plan to create abstract art, It is really important to think about
things like size, shape and color

Success Criteria
2 minutes
We Do
Baggie
4 minutes
Self-Assessment
Baggie
2 minutes
You Do
Yellow folder
15 minutes
Green folder
3 minutes
See how I am making this line extend from one edge of the paper to
another edge. (I do this because I want to fill up the whole space on my
paper, not just a little part of it.)
 I also want to overlap some of my lines because it helps make my lines
look like one artwork and less like just some lines on a page.
Ask:
What do you think the success criteria should be for this project?
Take one or 2 answers and go through the rest.
Say:
 On this index card draw a vertical line that extends from one edge of
the paper to another edge.
 Facilitator take the index cards out of the baggie and pass them out.
 Now draw a broken line that extends from one edge to another. Next
draw a zig-zag line that extends from one edge to another.
Medial Assessment – Teacher walks around from group to group checking
to see if they are successfully drawing the lines.
Ask:
 What kinds of lines will you use in your line painting?
 Can you tell me how you plan to show these lines when you are making
the line painting?
Say:
 Facilitator, please take the self-assessment chart and post its from the
baggie and pass them out.
 Write your name on the post it and place it on the chart.
 Students decide how well they understand what they are about to do.
Are they a Novice, Apprentice, Practitioner, or Expert?
 Then they place a post-it with their name onto the self-assessment
chart.
 The teacher checks the chart to see which students feel they need the
most help.
Students split up into appropriate groups
Say: (set timer for 15 min)
 and In your bin you will find a checklist that you will use to check at the
end of today’s lesson.
 You have a task card to help remind you of the steps.
 This is the planning sheet where you will create your plan and then
write a sentence explaining which lines you chose and how you decided
to place the lines.
 These are the line sheets and examples of abstract paintings to help
create your plan
 Read the question on the planning sheet to the students.
 Facilitator please take out the yellow folder and pass out the planning
sheet.
After 15 min say:
 Now we are going to use this checklist to rate our work.

When you are done checking each step you should write a sentence
telling what you will need to work on next time.
. Table 1
Table 2
Table 3
Closing
3 minutes
Table 4
Say:
 Facilitators please take the exit slip out of the green folder and pass
out the exit slip.
 Take a minute to fill out the exit slip and write one thing you
learned in today’s lesson by thinking and planning like an artist.
Select a few students to share.
 What have you learned by thinking and planning like an artist?
Reflection:
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Materials /Resources
and Technologies
List all materials, handouts, resources,
and technology tools that are needed by
the student or the teacher to execute the
Unit.
☆ (1d: Demonstrating





Talking about art
Art vocabulary
Power Point
Kandinsky Painting (Sea Battle)
Line examples
Knowledge of Resources)
Academic Vocabulary
What terms are essential to develop and
extend students vocabulary?
Line, horizontal, vertical, diagonal, zig-zag, curvy, wavy, broken, parallel,
thick, thin
☆ (1a Knowledge of
Content and Pedagogy)
☆ (1b Knowledge of
Students)
New York State Visual
Art Standards
Over the course of a year, how do you
make sure that learning outcomes
include objectives that address the NYS
Learning Standards for the Visual Arts,
as laid out in the NYC Blueprint for
Teaching and Learning in the Visual
Arts, PreK-12?
☆ (1c Setting Instructional
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
VA:Cr3.1.1
1st Grade
Use art vocabulary to describe choices
Outcomes)
Blueprint for Teaching
and Learning in the
Visual Arts
How do you align lessons with
appropriate learning standards in the
NYC Blueprint for Teaching and
Learning in the Visual Arts
☆ (1a: Demonstrating
Benchmark: Through an exploration of art materials and techniques,
students exercise imagination, construct meanings, and depict their
experiences; work in two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms use
basic art tools, and gain knowledge of media and compositional elements
Drawing and Painting:
exploration of lines such as: straight, curved, bumpy, zig-zag, spiral, looped,
and broken.
Knowledge of Content
and Pedagogy)
Universal Design for
Learning (Multiple
Entry Points)
Design curriculum that offers all learners
full and equal opportunities to learn. In
what ways do you incorporate students’
out-of-classroom art experiences into
the lesson?
When students struggle with mastering
a technique, how do you provide several
strategies the students can try until they
are able to successfully demonstrate
use of that technique in their work?
Checkpoint 1.1 – Offer ways of customizing the display of information
 Display information in a flexible format so that the following perceptual features can
be varied:
o The size of text, images, graphs, tables, or other visual content
o The contrast between background and text or image
o The color used for information or emphasis
o The layout of visual or other elements
Checkpoint 1.3 - Offer alternatives for visual information
 Provide physical objects and spatial models to convey perspective.
Checkpoint 2.1 - Clarify vocabulary and symbols.
 Pre-teach vocabulary and symbols, especially in ways that promote connection to the
learners’ experience and prior knowledge
Checkpoint 2.5 - Illustrate through multiple media
☆ (3e Demonstrating
Flexibility and
Responsiveness)
Present key concepts in one form of symbolic representation with an alternative
form (e.g., an illustration, dance/movement, diagram, table, model, video, comic
strip, storyboard, photograph, animation, physical or virtual manipulative)
Checkpoint
Checkpoint 6.1 - Guide appropriate goal-setting
● Provide guides and checklists for scaffolding goal-setting
● Post goals, objectives, and schedules in an obvious place
Checkpoint 6.2 - Support planning and strategy development
● Embed prompts to “stop and think” before acting as well as adequate space
● Embed prompts to “show and explain your work” (e.g., portfolio review, art critiques)
● Provide checklists and project planning templates for understanding the problem,
setting up prioritization, sequences, and schedules of steps
Checkpoint 6.4 - Enhance capacity for monitoring progress
● Ask questions to guide self-monitoring and reflection
● Provide differentiated models of self-assessment strategies (e.g., role-playing, video
reviews, peer feedback)
● Use of assessment checklists, scoring rubrics, and multiple examples of annotated
student work/performance examples
Checkpoint 7.3 - Minimize threats and distractions
● Create an accepting and supportive classroom climate
● Charts, calendars, schedules, visible timers, cues, etc. that can increase the
predictability of daily activities and transitions
● Creation of class routines
Formative Assessment
How do you plan assessments that
include evaluation of:
● art making that demonstrates
understanding of technique?
● art making that shows evidence of
imaginative qualities?
● discussion and writing about works
of art, including their own?
☆ (4b Maintaining
Accurate Records )
☆ (3d Using Assessment in
Instruction )
☆ (1f Designing Student
Assessments)
Differentiation
Describe how you will differentiate
instruction for a variety of learners,
including students will special needs,
English Language Learners, and high
achieving students to ensure that all
students have access to and are able to
engage appropriately in this lesson. Be
specific.
☆ (1e Designing Coherent
Instruction)

Students decide how well they understand what they are about to do. Are
they a Novice, Apprentice, Practitioner, or Expert?
Students then place a post-it with their name onto the section of selfassessment chart based on their level of understanding.
The teacher checks the chart to see which students feel they need the most
help.
● Teacher uses checklists, previous projects, and observation notes along
with collaborating with the classroom teacher, to assess the student’s
level. Students are grouped and given task cards according to their level
of understanding.
Student grouping may change during the lesson depending on teachers
observations of student’s ability and understanding
Teacher uses formative assessments and data gathered from previous lessons to
create differentiation
Readiness differentiation The teacher addresses readiness through small group
sessions and one on one goal setting
● Teacher provides different sorts of teacher, self, and peer support, different
kinds of modeling, and different kinds of coaching for success, depending on
the readiness levels of students.
● Students are grouped and given task cards according to their level of
understanding.
● Groups will be displayed on the smartboard.
● Student grouping may change during the lesson depending on student’s ability
and understanding.
Learning-profile differentiation is reflected in the different media that students
use to express their findings
English as a New Language:
● Anchor instruction using short videos, visuals, and graphic organizers. Start
with a common experience (video, hands-on activity, visual) to build
background knowledge and provide a concrete anchor for more abstract
discussions.
● Utilize graphic organizers or other guides to help students organize and
categorize new information and notes.
● If needed, describe and explain new concepts in several different ways. Ask
students to rephrase and retell to check for comprehension.
● Pair students who speak the same home language so they can support one
another. For example, they can translate and/or discuss their ideas in their
home language prior to sharing with the whole class.
Special Education Accommodations:
● Access IEP’s on SEISS.
● Present instructions simply and clearly. Students can repeat instructions as
they are presented. Post instructions and visual aids throughout the duration
of the project.
● Provide alternative resources so that all students are able to meet curricular
goals. For example, when asking students to research a specific artist or
technique, ensure that books at varying reading levels are available in the
library.
● Communicate with students using multiple modalities; explain assignments
orally; display instructions on the wall or whiteboard; and show examples,
such as sample projects or artists’ reproductions.
Use positive statements. State what you want students to do rather than what you
don’t want them to do. Recognize effort and persistence.
Assessments
●
●
☆
How do you plan for formative and
summative assessments based on
the Blueprint’s benchmarks,
medium-specific performance
indicators, and the NYS Visual Arts
Strands?
How do you plan assessments that
include evaluation of: art making
that demonstrates understanding of
technique? Art making that shows
evidence of imaginative qualities?
Discussion and writing about works
of art, including their own?
(1f Designing Student
Assessments)
Grouping Strategy
Describe how you will group students to
facilitate learning of the outcomes of this
lesson. What is the rationale for the
grouping strategy?
☆ (1e: Designing Coherent
Instruction)
(1b: Demonstrating
Knowledge of Students)
☆ (1f: Designing Student
Assessments)
☆
Teacher Checklist: teacher conducts a medial assessment by walking
around from group to group with a checklist and assessing whether
students understand.
Teacher Asks: Why did you choose this line? Can you tell me how you plan
to show these lines when you create your line painting?
● Student Self-Checklist: Students use a teacher made student checklist at
the end of the lesson to check that all goals for the lesson were met.
Rubric: Students receive a rubric for the lesson at the beginning of the
project so they could check to see that they are meeting all requirements
for the project.
●
Based on where students placed the post-it on the self-assessment chart, students
will sit at the designated group table where they will find the appropriate task
instructions to support their continued growth. Students work towards following
the success criteria and task for the project.
(Teacher reserves the right to change students grouping based on observations,
checklists, previous projects, and observation notes.)
 Novice: Students in this group believe the information might be too
complicated for them. In the Novice group the teacher will spend extra time
reinforcing the skill. The task has scaffolds to accommodate ability of the
learners so they can complete the project an achieve success.
 Apprentice: Students in this group understand the basics of the concepts
taught, but seem to be missing some of the finer details. Learning activities in
this group involve investigation as students identify the details around which
they are unsure.

●
Practitioner: Students in this group are fairly confident they understand and
can do the project on their own, but still have a few questions.
Expert: Students in this group are certain they will be successful.
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