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The Water Cycle-comprehension

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The Water Cycle
What is the Water Cycle?
The water cycle is the movement of water from land to water to the atmosphere and
back again over billions of years. Take a look at the picture below. Do you notice
how the cycle has no start or end point? It goes around and around and around!
Why Does Water On Earth Move In A Cycle?
The amount of water on Earth never changes. This amount of water has cycled from
one form to another for 5 billion years! It can be a gas, a solid or a liquid. That is
because the earth is a closed system, meaning that no water can go in or out. So all
the water on Earth goes through a cycle, around and around, but always remains on
Earth.
Closed System – An area by itself where things like water can’t come in or leave.
Processes of The Water Cycle
1) Evaporation: This happens when sunlight heats the water in ocean, rivers,
lakes or even your swimming pool, and turns it from a liquid state to a
gaseous state called water vapor.
2) Evapotranspiration: Plants absorb water from the soil through their roots
so they can grow. The water travels through the entire plant, reaching the
leaves. The leaves have small openings called stomata, that open to let water
out and carbon dioxide in. When the stomata of the plant are open, water
evaporates from the leaves and turns into water vapor in the air! You can
think of this process as a plant sweating!
3) Condensation: When water vapor in the air rises, gets cold and turns into a
liquid! This water vapor can condense into clouds!
4) Precipitation: Is when water falls from the sky to the ground either as rain
(liquid), hail or snow (solid). Precipitation happens when the clouds get so
heavy because so much water has condensed, that the water falls. These
clouds can move around all over the earth, travelling from one place to
another.
5) Infiltration: Is when water soaks into the ground and all the way down
through the layers of soil and rock to reach the groundwater.
6) Runoff: Runoff water is the water that doesn’t get soaked up by the soil and
instead runs off the surface and flows downhill to reach lakes, rivers, ponds,
streams or the ocean!
We are all made from dinosaur spit!
Since the water on Earth hasn’t changed since it formed 5 billion years ago and all
living things are mostly made of water, there is a very high probability that at one
time, the water that makes up you would have been in a dinosaur!
Reading Comprehension Questions:
1) What is the water cycle?
2) Why does the amount of water on earth never change?
3) What are the three states that water can be in?
Extension Questions
4) Draw a diagram of the water cycle with all the processes listed in the article.
Your drawing must be different from the one provided and must show
creativity and use color for full marks.
5) Research how climate change can affect the water cycle. Summarize your
findings in 2-3 paragraphs.
6) Research the negative impacts of runoff on the environment.
Reading Comprehension Questions: Answer Key
1) What is the water cycle? The water cycle is the movement of water from
land to water to the atmosphere and back again.
2) Why does the amount of water on Earth never change? The amount of water
on Earth never changes because the Earth is a closed system. Matter
never leaves the Earth’s system, it only changes from one state to
another.
3) What are the three states that water can be in? Solid, liquid, gas.
Extension Questions
4) Draw a diagram of the water cycle with all the processes listed in the article.
Your drawing must be different from the one provided and must show
creativity and use color for full marks.
5) Research how climate change can affect the water cycle. Summarize your
findings in 2-3 paragraphs.
6) Research the negative impacts of runoff on the environment.
References
Kidzone Science (2016). The Water Cycle. Retrieved March 07, 2016, from
http://www.kidzone.ws/water/
Science kids (2016). The Water Cycle. Retrieved March 07, 2016, from
http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/weather/thewatercycle.html
USGS (2015, August). The Water Cycle, Retrieved March 07, 2016, from
http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycle.html
USGS (2015, August). Summary of The Water Cycle, Retrieved March 07, 2016, from
http://water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclesummary.html
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