Uploaded by tdbfpv08

structured supervision-content rev.2013. bacb.docs rev.2015

advertisement
Structured Supervision Folder
Content Last Revised November, 2013*
BACB Documents Last Revised August, 2015
Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D, BCBA-D &
Peter Adzhyan, Psy.D, LEP, BCBA-D
Master’s of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis
Department of Psychology
California State University, Northridge (CSUN)
_______________________________
Note. We thank Ashley Rice for her ongoing support & efforts on this document.
Correspondences regarding the folder should be sent to Dr. Kazemi (e-mail:
[email protected]).
*The authors are working with Springer Publishing to finalize a Handbook on Competencybased Supervision that should become available to the public in 2017.
1
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
How to Use this Supervision Folder
Below are general guidelines on how to use the supervision folder when supervising interns. Supervisees are to
seek appropriate supervisors who meet the BACB® supervisor qualifications (see BACB® website for additional
details). CSUN students will be given more information about practica options, paid and unpaid internships,
and CSUN approved supervisors at the mandatory orientation.
To guide your use of the Supervision Folder we have provided a Folder Index of all of the documents included.
The supervisee should obtain a 3-ring binder to place copies of the provided documents, and a file system for
the physical documentation of each activity. Compilation of this work constitutes evidence that the supervised
experience activities have been completed. All related records, such as written summaries, tables, completed
forms, data sheets and graphs, should be saved for the growing portfolio of evidence. The supervisee can use
one or several clients to meet these competencies. Below is an image of a sample set-up of the 3-ring binder
You will create a tab for the Competency and then use number tabs for the Tabs that correspond with each
competency.
The supervisee should accomplish the objectives of the Supervision Folder at a steady rate throughout the
supervision period. We suggest that the supervisee create a time line at the onset of supervision and use a
personal cumulative graph to monitor progress and show the number of competency objectives that have been
met. This graph should have the total number of competencies required at the right side with a cumulative line
of progress beginning at the left side. This graph should be kept in your folder with other Contracts &
Important Forms. The supervisor may occasionally ask the supervisee to submit a copy of this graph, and
folder, to monitor supervisee’s progress.
2
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
The index provided below will serve as your guide for creating your Supervision Folder layout and contains
hyperlinks to connect you to the appropriate pages throughout the electronic document for quick reference.
The first two sections on the index are the following: Contracts & Important Forms to keep for your records &
BACB ® Guidelines. In Contracts & Important Forms is a list of important documents we advise supervisees to
save. Place these documents under a tab in the front of your 3-Ring Binder. In the BACB ® Guidelines section
you will find links to relevant materials on the BACB® website. You are encouraged to print these and place
them under a tab in the front of your 3-Ring Binder or find a method to readily refer to these documents
throughout your supervision experience.
The next sections outline the Ten Competencies, outlined by Dr. Kazemi, and their corresponding Tabs. The
supervisee is to complete the activities discussed in each competency and the tab(s) that fall within them under
the direct supervision of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (group or individual basis).
List of Competencies
I.
Use the professional and ethical guidelines with colleagues and clients
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods and record and analyze data
III.
Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior Assessment, Preference Assessment,
Reinforcer Assessment)
IV.
Develop evidence-based intervention plans based on assessment results and baseline data
V.
Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial assessment (e.g., design a
language acquisition program based on VB-MAPP results)
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures
VII. Program and probe for generalization and maintenance
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
IX.
Train another individual to conduct a procedure
X.
Develop and present a training module to individuals who are not familiar with behavior
analysis
3
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
For each competency, the supervisee should read related documents, offer a brief written summary of major
concepts involved, and be prepared to discuss the reading with supervisor. Upon meeting the competency, the
supervisee should provide a brief summary of how each objective was achieved. This should occur prior to
obtaining the signature of the supervisor and moving to the next competency.
The directions and readings for competencies in this folder are suggestions to help narrow the focus of
supervision activities and enable supervisors to have systematic procedures. However, much is left to the
discretion of the supervisor. There is flexibility in the format of how the response to each competency is
produced since each supervisee may have different opportunities in different situations.
4
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Below is a sample of a Tab and some of the items you can find:
Links to Supplemental
Materials
Competency
Tab Titles
Supervisor’s
Initial on
each tab in
appropriate
column for
1st or 2nd
year
students
Each tab has
a task
analysis for
how to meet
the
competency
If a column
is blacked
out, it is not
applicable
Each Tab has
suggested
readings
Each Tab has
a hyperlink
to return to
Folder Index
5
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
STRUCTURED SUPERVISION FOLDER
CSUN MS-ABA Program
FOLDER INDEX
(All text below is hyperlinked)
Materials/Documents
•
Contracts & Important Forms
•
BACB® Documents & Guidelines
Tabs
Important
Documents
BACB®
Guidelines
I. Use the professional and ethical guidelines with colleagues and clients
Demonstrate knowledge of ethical, responsible, professional and disciplinary guidelines
Demonstrate knowledge of HIPPA and Confidentiality rules
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods, record and analyze data
Select & define target behavior for change
Measure target behaviors using various direct observation measurement methods to collect
baseline data
Assess quality of behavioral measurement (Accuracy & Reliability)
Graph & analyze gathered information
III. Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior Assessment, Preference
Assessment, Reinforcer Assessment)
Conduct comprehensive functional behavior assessments
Conduct preference assessments (I-07)
Conduct reinforcer assessments
Design & conduct parametric analyses (B-12)
IV. Develop evidence-based intervention plans based on assessment results
and baseline data
Obtain, summarize, and evaluate research articles as part of recommendations & development
of intervention plans
Recommend intervention strategies based on the assessment results and the best available
scientific evidence
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial assessment
Conduct formal assessment using VB-MAPP or ABLLS-R
Skill Acquisition Programs
•
•
Implement skills acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior, imitation and
discrimination using direct instruction (e.g. DTT), precision teaching and/or natural
environment/incidental teaching
Develop skills acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior, imitation and discrimination
using direct instruction (e.g. DTT), precision teaching and/or natural environment/incidental
teaching
Daily Living Skills
•
•
Implement daily living skills programs based on formal assessment results
Develop daily living skills programs based on formal assessment results
Social and Play Skills
•
Implement social and play skills programs based on formal assessment results
6
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Ethics &
Professionalism
Tab 1*
Tab 2*
Behavior
Measurement
Tab 3*
Tab 4*
Tab 5*
Tab 6*
Behavior
Assessment
Tab 7*
Tab 8*
Tab 9*
Tab 10
Intervention
Planning
Tab 11*
Tab 12*
Skill
Acquisition
Tab 13*
Tab 14*
14A*
14B*
Tab 15*
15A*
15B*
Tab 16*
16A*
•
16B*
Develop social and play skill programs
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures
Antecedent-Based Interventions
• Implement antecedent based interventions
• Develop antecedent-based interventions
Consequent Based Interventions
•
•
Implement consequence-based interventions
Develop consequence-based interventions
Group Contingencies
•
•
Implement group contingences
Develop group contingences
Self-Management
•
•
Implement self-management strategies and contingency contracts
Develop self-management strategies and contingency contracts
VII. Program and probe for generalization and maintenance
Program and probe for stimulus and response generalization
Program and probe for maintenance
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
Evaluate the effectiveness of the behavioral programs (K-07)
Conduct treatment fidelity checks
Evaluate effectiveness of components of an intervention package
Compare effectiveness of different treatments
IX. Train another individual to conduct a procedure
Design and use competency based training for persons who are responsible for carrying out
behavior change procedures
X. Develop and present a training module to individuals unfamiliar with behavior
analysis
Develop and present a training module to individuals unfamiliar with behavior analysis
Explain behavioral concepts using non-technical language
Supplemental Materials
•
Supplemental Documents (e.g. Performance Monitoring Tools, Contracts etc.)
*competencies must be met to pass CSUN practica coursework
7
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Behavior
Reduction
Tab 17*
17A*
17B*
Tab 18*
18A*
18B*
Tab 19
19A
19B
Tab 20
20A
20B
Generalization
&
Maintenance
Tab 21*
Tab 22*
Ongoing
Assessment
Tab 23*
Tab 24*
Tab 25
Tab 26
Training
Tab 27*
Dissemination
Tab 28*
Tab 29*
Supplement
Materials
Supplemental
Documents
Contracts & Important Forms
We recommend you keep a copy of the following documents in your folder for quick reference.
1. Course and practica syllabi
2. Any contracts or agreements signed with internship site (orientation confirmation, evaluation materials,
policy agreements, etc.)
a. Sample CSUN Generic Contract
b. Sample BACB® University Practicum Contract
c. Sample BACB® Independent Supervision Contract
d. Sample BACB® Within-Agency Supervision Contract
3. Tracking Hours – (Click here and refer to Tab 7 for Excel Document)
4. Copy of BACB® Experience Supervision Form – (Click here and refer to page 6)
a. You will receive these documents every couple of weeks, be sure to keep all of them in this
folder.
5. Graph Timeline of Completion (referenced above in “How to use the Supervision Folder”)
Return to Folder Index
8
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
BACB® Documents & Guidelines
We recommend you review the following documents with your supervisor and keep copies of these documents
accessible for quick reference (click on the documents to access the documents)
1. Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline
2. BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts
3. BACB® Experience Standards
4. Most recent BACB® Task List Content
5. Health Plan Coverage of Applied Behavior Analysis Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Return to Folder Index
9
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
I.
Use the professional and ethical guidelines with colleagues and
clients
Tab 1: Demonstrate knowledge of ethical, responsible, professional and
disciplinary guidelines
1st Year
Students
I.
Supervision contract
A. Review BACB® website on “Standards of Conduct”, “Appropriate
Activities”, “Appropriate Clients”, “Supervision Qualification” and
“Nature of Supervision”
B. Develop and sign a contract between supervisor and supervisee
a. Click Here for Sample Contracts
b. The contract must specify each party’s specific role (click here
for recommended responsibilities for supervisor and supervisee)
C. Include a copy of the contract in the ‘Contracts & Important Forms’ Tab
II.
Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review and discuss with supervisor
• Responsible conduct of a behavior analyst
• The behavior analyst’s responsibility to clients
• Assessing behavior
• The behavior analyst and the individual behavior change program
• The behavior analyst as teacher and/or supervisor
• The behavior analyst and the workplace
• The behavior analyst’s ethical responsibility to the field of behavior
analysis
• The behavior analyst’s responsibility to colleagues
• The behavior analyst’s ethical responsibility to society
• The behavior analyst and research
B. Obtain Supervisors Signature certifying that you have read and
discussed with your supervisor all ethical guidelines listed above
III.
IV.
• Supervisor Name:
Signature:
Review BACB® task list-4th edition
A. Use suggested readings to learn how the Task List was formulated, training
and certification matters related to behavior analysts, and the importance of
maintaining the integrity and future of BCBA certification
B. Obtain Supervisors Signature certifying that you have read and discussed
with your supervisor the BACB® 4th Edition task list
Date:
• Supervisor Name:
Signature:
Date:
Topics for Group Supervision
A. Read Bailey & Burch (2009)
a. Chapter 1 (First Impressions Count, pages 3-6)
b. Chapters 17 & 18 (Time Management & Become a Trusted Professional)
10
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
c. Chapters 20 (Knowing when to Seek Help-Feedback)
d. Chapter 8 (Interpersonal Communication)
B. Discuss assigned readings
a. Importance of feedback
b. How to seek and respond to feedback
c. How to become a trusted professional
d. Interpersonal communication skills
C. Establish Performance expectations (should be placed in supervision contract)
D. Make professional conduct performance goals
a. Have supervisee develop short-term and long-term objective and measureable goals
b. Review and revise goals, if necessary, for supervision
c. Offer feedback on professional conduct goals throughout supervision
d. Make note of improvements
 Suggested Readings
• Bailey, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics in Behavior Analysis (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.
• Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2009). 25 Essential Skills and Strategies for the Professional Behavior
Analyst: Expert Tips for Maximizing Consulting Effectiveness. New York: NY, Routledge
• Cooper J.O, Heron T.E, Heward W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson.
• Shook, G.L., Johnston, J.M., & Melichamp, F. (2004). Determining Essential Content for Applied
Behavior Analyst Practitioners. The Behavior Analyst, 27, 67-94.
• Shook, G.K., Rosales, S.A., & Glenn, S. (2004). Certification and Training of Behavior Analyst
Professionals. Behavior Modification, 26 (1), 27-48.
• Shook, G., & Neisworth, J. (2005). Ensuring Appropriate Qualifications for Applied Behavior Analyst
Professionals: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Exceptionality, 13(1), 3-10.
Return to Folder Index
11
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
I. Use the professional and ethical guidelines with colleagues and
clients
Tab 2: Demonstrate knowledge of HIPPA and confidentiality rules
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review and discuss with supervisor
• The behavior analyst’s responsibility to clients
II.
HIPPA and confidentiality
A.
Obtain information regarding HIPPA Guidelines and Confidentiality that
pertain to the state you are going to complete your supervised BACB®
competences
B.
Obtain information regarding HIPPA Guidelines and Confidentiality that
pertain to your current place of work
C.
Discuss with supervisor:
• Record keeping
• E-MAIL and any electronic transmission of confidential information
• Use of smart phones and protection of electronic files
D.
Include all documents in this tab
III.
Consent
A. Discuss with supervisor:
• Informed, surrogate, guardian, and conservator consents
B. Discuss with supervisor the difference between consent and assent. Discuss
when consent and assent should be used
C. Obtain and review consent and assent forms used at your current place of
employment or internship (Click here to see examples of Consent and Assent
Forms)
D. Place the sample consent and assent forms in this tab
IV.
Obtain informed consent
A. Before your first use of Consent procedure
a. Role-play with supervisor the following:
i. Introducing the forms
ii. Explaining the forms using non-technical verbal behavior
iii. Obtaining the signature from client(s)
B. Obtain immediate feedback and practice till criteria set by supervisor is met
 Suggested Readings
• Bailey, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics in Behavior Analysis (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.
• Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2009). 25 Essential Skills and Strategies for the Professional Behavior
Analyst: Expert Tips for Maximizing Consulting Effectiveness. New York: NY, Routledge
• Cooper J.O, Heron T.E, Heward W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson.
Return to Folder Index
12
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods, record and
analyze data
Tab 3: Select & define target behavior for change
(Click to see sample of a Performance Monitoring Tool)
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review and discuss with supervisor
• Ethical practices in selecting and assessing potential target behaviors
II.
Develop and use worksheets to prioritize target behaviors
A. Evaluating the social significance of potential target behaviors
B. Prioritizing potential target behaviors
III.
Define target behaviors in observable and measurable terms (I-01)
A. Define behavior topographically (define at least 10 different behaviors) in
measurable and observable terms
1. Discuss definitions with supervisor and make necessary changes
2. Include the final written operational definitions in this tab
B. Define behavior functionally (define at least 10 different behaviors) in
measurable and observable terms
1. Discuss definitions with supervisor and make necessary changes
2. Include the final written operational definitions in this tab
C. Describe and explain behavior, including private events, in behavior-analytic
(non-mentalistic) terms (G-05)
 Suggested Readings
• Bailey, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics in Behavior Analysis (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.
• Cooper J.O, Heron T.E, Heward W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson.
• O’Neil, R. E., Horner, R. H., Albin, R. W., Sprague, J. R., Sorey, K., Newton, J. S. (1997). Functional
Assessment and Program Development for Problem Behavior: A Practical Handbook. Pacific Grove,
Ca.: Brooks/Cole Publishers
• Umbreit, J., Ferro, J., Liaupsin, C. J., & Lane, K. L. (2006). Functional Behavioral Assessment and
Function‐Based Intervention: An Effective, Practical Approach. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
• Wolf M.M., (1978). Social Validity: The Case for Subjective Measurement or How Applied Behavior
Analysis is Finding its Heart. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 203-214.
I.
Return to Folder Index
13
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods, record and
analyze data
Tab 4: Measure target behaviors using various direct observation measurement
methods to collect baseline data
(Click to see sample of Performance Monitoring Tool)
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review and discuss with supervisor
• Ethical practices relevant to data collection and data based decision
making
II. Select a measurement system to obtain representative data given the dimensions of the behavior and
the logistics of observing and recording (H-01)
A. Create a basic table for the advantages and disadvantages of using
continuous and discontinuous measurement procedures
• Discuss the summary table with supervisor and include the final product
in this tab
B. When conducting assessments or developing treatment plans, select an
appropriate measurement method and design data collection forms for the
measurement methods listed below
• Discuss your selection and the data collection forms with supervisor,
obtain feedback and include the final product in this tab
 Design continuous measurement procedures (A-12)
1. Frequency/Rate
2. Duration
3. Latency
4. IRT
5. Percent of occurrence
6. Trials to criterion
 Design discontinuous measurement procedures (A-13)
7. Partial interval recording
8. Whole interval recording
9. Momentary time sampling
10. Planned activity check
11. Permanent product (e.g. number of math facts completed)
III. Select a schedule of observation and recording periods and measure target behavior for change (H02)
A. When conducting assessments or monitoring progress during intervention
phase, select appropriate observation periods and collect baseline or
intervention data using appropriate measurement procedure
• Discuss your selection with supervisor and obtain feedback
B. Collect data and share the results with supervisor
• Evaluate if changes need to be made to your data sheet and make
necessary changes
C. Graph the results and obtain feedback from supervisor
 Implement continuous measurement procedures (A-12)
I.
14
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
A-02
1. Measure frequency/rate
A-03
2. Measure duration
A-04
3. Measure latency
A-05
4. Measure IRT
A-06
5. Measure percent of occurrence
A-07
6. Use trials to criterion
 Implement discontinuous measurement procedures (A-13)
7. Use partial interval recording
8. Use whole interval recording
A-13
9. Use momentary time sampling
10. Measure behavior by permanent product
 Suggested Readings
• Baily, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics in Behavior Analysis (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.
• Cooper J.O, Heron T.E, Heward W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson.
• Gast, D.L. (2010). Single Subject Research Methodology in Behavioral Sciences. New York, NY,
Routledge.
• Johnson, J. M., & Pennypacker, H. S. (2008). Strategies and Tactics in Behavioral Research (3rd Ed).
New York, NY: Routledge
Return to Folder Index
15
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods, record and
analyze data
Tab 5: Assess quality of behavioral measurement (Accuracy & Reliability)
1st Year 2nd Year
Students Students
I.
Create a basic table that summarizes threats to measurement accuracy, validity and reliability
A. Include a table in this tab that summarizes the variables that could threaten:
• Validity of behavioral data
• Reliability of behavioral data
• Accuracy of behavioral data
II.
Assess and interpret inter-observer agreement (A-08)
A. Determine appropriate method to obtain (sample) inter-observer data for given data
collection method
• Discuss the chosen method with the supervisor and make necessary changes
B. Create a summary table that includes
• Type of IOA
• Method of calculation for each type of IOA
• Acceptable level of IOA
• Format for reporting IOA
C. Conduct, interpret and report inter-observer agreement
• When collecting baseline or intervention data use IOA to evaluate the
accuracy and reliability of data and measurement procedures
• When supervising implementation of treatment plans use IOA to evaluate
the accuracy and reliability of data collection
• Calculate IOA using appropriate method for given data & report the IOA
data
• Use IOA data to make changes to measurement procedures or use Behavior
Skills Training (See Tab 27) to improve data collection skills of
implementers
Use Total Count IOA and report the results
Use Total Duration IOA and report the results
Use Mean Duration per occurrence IOA and report the results
Use Interval by Interval IOA and report the results
Use Scored and Unscored Interval IOA and report the results
Use Trial by Trial IOA and report the results
 Suggested Readings
 Baer, D. M. (1977). Reviewer’s comment: Just because it’s reliable doesn’t mean that you can use it.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 10, 117–119.
 Johnson, J. M., & Pennypacker, H. S. (2008). Strategies and Tactics in Behavioral Research (3rd Ed). New
York, NY: Routledge
 Repp, A. C., Deitz, D. E. D., Boles, S. M., Deitz, S. M., & Repp, C. F. (1976). Technical article:
Differences among common methods for calculating inter-observer agreement. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 9, 109-113.
 Watkins, M.W., & Pacheco, M. (2000). Inter-observer Agreement in Behavioral Research: Importance and
Calculation. Journal of Behavioral Education, 10, 205–212.
Return to Folder Index
16
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
II. Develop and use behavior measurement methods, record and
analyze data
Tab 6: Graph & analyze gathered information
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review ethical guidelines relevant to data collection, visual display and
analysis
B. Discuss the guidelines with supervisor
II.
Design, plot, and interpret data
A. Plot data using equal-interval graphs (A-10)
o Use Excel or other graphing tools to generate





B.
C.
D.
E.
Bar Graphs
Multiple Baseline Graphs
Multiple Probe Graphs
ABAB Graphs
Alternating Treatments
• Multi-element
• Simultaneous
 Chaining Criterion Graphs
Plot and interpret data using Standard Celeration Charts (SCC)
Plot data using a cumulative record (A-11)
Interpret visually displayed data using baseline logic (A-10 and 11)
o Draw level and trend lines
o Evaluate changes in level, trend, and variability
o Measure Effect Size using
 Points of Non-Overlap
 Dual-Criterion Method
Print and place all graphs in this tab
 Suggested Readings
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bailey, J., & Burch, M. (2011). Ethics in Behavior Analysis (2nd ed). New York, NY: Routledge.
Cooper J.O, Heron T.E, Heward W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson.
Dixon, M. R., Jackson, J. W., Small, S. L., Horner–King, M.J., Mui Ker Lik, N., Garcia, Y., &
Rosales, R. (2009). Creating single–subject design graphs in Microsoft Excel 2007. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 277-293.
Fisher, W. W., Kelley, M. E., & Lomas, J. E. (2003). Visual aids and structured criteria for
improving visual inspection and interpretation of single-case designs. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 36, 387–406.
Gast, D.L. (2009). Single Subject Research Methodology in Behavioral Sciences. New York, NY:
Routledge.
Hagopian, L. P., Fisher, W. W., Thompson, R. H., Owen-DeSchryver, J., Iwata, B. A., & Wacker, D.
P. (1997). Toward the development of structured criteria for interpretation of functional analysis data.
17
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 313–326.
Johnson, J. M., & Pennypacker, H. S. (2008). Strategies and Tactics in Behavioral Research (3rd Ed).
New York, NY: Routledge
Kazdin, A.E. (2011). Single-Case Research Designs: Methods for Clinical and Applied Settings (2nd
ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
Return to Folder Index
18
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
III. Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior
Assessment, Preference Assessment, Reinforcer Assessment)
Tab 7: Conduct comprehensive functional behavior assessments
Click here for examples of Performance Monitoring Tools for conducting functional
analysis (Attention, Escape, Play Conditions)
Click here for example of FBA Rubric
1st Year 2nd Year
Students Students
Review BACB® ethical guidelines 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 and discuss with supervisor
A. Ethical practices in conducting behavior assessments
B. Discuss with supervisor the ethical practices and the importance of
practicing within one’s limits of professional competence and obtaining
consultation, supervision, training, or making referrals as necessary
II.
Conduct a preliminary assessment in order to identify the referral problem (G-03)(Click here for
example of Performance Monitoring Tool)
A. Obtain informed consent for assessment (Click here for examples of Informed Consents)
B. Identification of the problem
1. Conduct Indirect Assessment (Click here for example of Performance
Monitoring Tool)
• Review records and available data (G-01)
• Conduct interviews using semi structured format (e.g. FAI)
• Use rating scales
i. FAST
ii. MAS
iii. SIT
• Consider biological/medical variables that may be affecting the
client (G-02)
• Include completed Indirect Assessment forms and notes on your
interview under this tab
2. Observe the client in the natural environment
• Identify variables that could have evocative effect on target
behaviors
C. Develop a hypothesis statement based on the preliminary assessment of the client
For each target behavior identify potential
i.
Biological/medical variables that may affect the client
ii. Immediate antecedents
iii. Consequences
D. Define target behaviors in observable and measurable terms
 Operationally define target behaviors in measurable and observable terms
before conducting direct assessment (I-01)
 Discuss the definitions with supervisor and make necessary changes
III. Use direct observation to collect baseline data
A. Select observation periods to obtain baseline data given the dimensions of the
behavior and the logistics of observing and recording (H-01)
• Use Scatter Plot data to select observation periods, or
• Use information obtained from interviews to select observation periods
(H-02)
B. Select a measurement system to obtain baseline data given the dimensions of the
19
I.
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
behavior and the logistics of observing and recording
 Create a basic table (see Table 4.1 in Cooper) incorporating:
o Fundamental measures (e.g., count, duration, temporal locus)
o Procedures for measuring behavior (e.g., event recording, time
sampling)
o Examples of behaviors you may measure using each method and
procedure of data collection
 For each measurement system develop data recording sheets to be used for
data collection
C. Directly observe target behavior(s)
 Use data recording sheet to obtain baseline data given the dimensions
of the behavior.
o Obtain baseline data
o Discuss baseline data with supervisor
o Conduct IOA (See tab 5)
o Evaluate if changes need to be made to your data collection method or
recording sheets
D. Select and use a data display that effectively communicates relevant
quantitative relations (H-03)
 Use excel to generate graphs to display results of baseline data
 Graphs must include
o Correctly labeled Y and X axis
o Title
o Correct data points and markers
o Figure captions
 Analyze, and interpret observed data (H-04 and I-05)
IV.
Identify variables that influence the occurrence of problem behavior
A. Create a basic table that includes uses and limitations of
o ABC recording and Functional Analysis
o Response Dependent ABC recording and Response Independent
(scheduled observation) ABC recording
o Discuss with supervisor what information can be obtained from ABC
recording
o Discuss with supervisor the many limitations of ABC recording and why
behavior analysts cannot draw accurate conclusions regarding function
when using descriptive assessments
o If ABC recording is used
o Define environmental variables in observable and measurable
terms (I-02) (e.g. define antecedents and consequences)
o Evaluate temporal relations between observed variables (H-05)
B. Design and Conduct Functional Analysis (I-04)
Click here for examples of Performance Monitoring Tools for conducting functional
analysis (Attention, Escape, Play Conditions)
 Create a table that includes
o Various types of Functional Analysis (FA) Procedures
o Examples of target behaviors assessed using each type of FA
procedure
o Limitations of each type of FA procedure
20
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
 Choose Functional Analysis Procedure appropriate for given target behavior
o Discuss with supervisor the risks associated with the assessment
o Discuss how to reduce the risks
o Propose FA procedure that is most appropriate for given target
behavior and minimizes risk to client
 Obtain informed consent to conduct FA from caregiver or client (see sample
informed consent)
 Conduct Functional Analysis under direct supervision of supervisor
o Graph and analyze the results of the functional analysis (I-05)
o Evaluate temporal relations between observed variables (H-05)
V.
Write functional behavior assessment report
 The FBA should include the following components
A. Reason for referral (see scoring rubric)
B. Background information
C. Behavior-analytic description of reported target behaviors and
environmental variables that could influence the target behaviors
D. Hypothesis statement for each target behavior
E. Baseline data
F. Functional analysis results
G. Summary
H. Recommendations
o Make recommendations regarding behaviors that must be
established, maintained, increased, or decreased (I-06)
i. State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms
(J-01)
o Identify potential interventions based on assessment results and the
best available scientific evidence (J-02)
• Include the completed FBAs in this tab (De-identify client information first)
 Suggested Readings
• Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2011). Ethics for Behavior Analysts (2nd ed.). New York, NY:
Routledge.
• Dixon et.al., 2009. Creating Single-Subject Design Graphs in Microsoft Excel 2007. JABA, 42, 277293.
• Ellignson, Miltenberger, & Long (1999). A Survey of the Use of Functional Assessment Procedures in
Agencies Serving Individuals with Developmental Disabilities, Behavior Interventions, 14, 187-198.
• Fox, J. & Davis, C. (2005). Functional Behavior Assessments in Schools: Current Research Findings
and Future Directions, Journal of Behavioral Education, 14, 1-4.
• Hanley, G.P., 2012. Functional Assessment of Problem Behavior: Dispelling Myths, Overcoming
Implementation Obstacles, and Developing New Lore. Behavior Analyst in Practice, 5, 54-72.
• Hanley, G.P., Iwata, B.A., McCord, B. E. (2003). Functional analysis of problem behavior: A review,
JABA, 36 (2), 147-185.
• Iwata, B. A., Dorsey, M. F., Slifer, K. J., Bauman, K. E., & Richman, G. S. (1994). Toward a
functional analysis of self-injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27 , 197–209.
• Iwata, B.A., & Dozier, C.L. (2008). Clinical Application of Functional Analysis Methodology.
Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 3-9.
• O’Neil, R. E., Horner, R. H., Albin, R. W., Sprague, J. R., Sorey, K., Newton, J. S. (1997). Functional
Assessment and Program Development for Problem Behavior: A Practical Handbook. Pacific Grove,
Ca.: Brooks/Cole Publishers
21
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
•
Repp, A.C., & Horner, R. (1998). Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior: from Effective
Assessment to Effective Support. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing.
Thompson & Iwata (2007). A comparison of outcomes from descriptive and functional analyses of
problem behavior, JABA, 40, 333-338.
Touchette, P. E., MacDonald, R. F., & Langer, S. N. (1985). A scatter plot for identifying stimulus
control of problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 343–351.
Return to Folder Index
22
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
III. Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior
Assessment, Preference Assessment, Reinforcer Assessment)
Tab 8: Conduct preference assessments (I-07)
Click here for examples of Performance Monitoring Tool for Paired-Choice & MSWO
Assessment
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
Design and conduct preference assessments to identify putative reinforcers (A-14)
A. Create a basic table that includes uses and limitations of:
o Indirect preference assessment
o Direct observation (Approach-based)
o Systematic assessment of preferred stimuli
o Multiple stimulus presentations without replacement (MSWO)
o Multiple stimulus presentations with replacement (MSW)
o Paired stimulus presentation (PS)
B. Design and Conduct Preference Assessment
i.
Taking the resources in the setting, type of stimuli being examined, and
client’s level of functioning into consideration, design a preference
assessment for a client
ii. Discuss the designed preference assessment with supervisor
C. Conduct MSWO, PS and Approach-Based preference assessments under direct
supervision of supervisor
D. Develop a performance monitoring checklist to evaluate the fidelity of
preference assessments and have the supervisor use the form to rate and give
feedback on conducting preference assessments (See Tab 24)
E. Include the completed checklist with feedback in this tab and tab 24
I.
II.
Write summary of preference assessment results
 Summarize the preference assessment results using the appropriate visual
display
 Present the summary of the preference assessment results to the supervisor and
make necessary changes
 Share the results with parents or teachers
 Suggested Readings
 Daly, III et al., 2009. Evaluation of the multiple-stimulus without replacement preference assessment
method using activities as stimuli. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 563-574.
 DeLeon, I. G., & Iwata, B. A. (1996). Evaluation of a multiple-stimulus presentation format for
assessing reinforcer preferences. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 519-532.
 Hagopian, L.P., Long, E.S., Rush, K.S. (2004). Preference Assessment Procedures for Individuals with
Developmental Disabilities, Behavior Modification, 28, 668-677.
 Piazza, Fisher, Roane, and Hilker (1999). Predicting and Enhancing the Effectiveness of Reinforcers
and Punishers in Repp & Horner (Eds) Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior.
Return to Folder Index
23
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
III. Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior
Assessment, Preference Assessment, Reinforcer Assessment)
Tab 9: Conduct reinforcer assessments
1st Year 2nd Year
Students Students
I.
Design and conduct reinforcer assessments to identify putative reinforcers
A. Design a reinforcer assessment
i.
Conduct literature search and develop a procedure for reinforcer assessment
ii. Discuss with supervisor the procedure and make necessary changes
iii.
Include the procedure in this tab
B. Conduct a Reinforcer Assessment
i.
Conduct approved reinforcer assessment under direct supervision of
supervisor
C. Develop a performance monitoring checklist to evaluate the fidelity of
reinforcer assessments and have the supervisor use the form to rate and give
feedback on conducting the assessment (See Tab 24)
D. Include the completed checklist with feedback in this tab and tab 24
II. Write summary of reinforcer assessment results
 Summarize the assessment results using the appropriate visual display
 Present the summary of the reinforcer assessment results to the supervisor and
make necessary changes
 Share the results with parents or teachers
 Suggested Readings
 DeLeon, I. G., Fisher, W. W., Catter, V. R., Maglieri, K., Herman, K., & Marhefka, J. (2001).
Examination of relative reinforcement effects of stimuli identified through pretreatment and daily brief
preference assessment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 463-473.
 Hagopian, L.P., Long, E.S., Rush, K.S. (2004). Preference Assessment Procedures for Individuals with
Developmental Disabilities, Behavior Modification, 28, 668-677.
 Piazza, Fisher, Roane, and Hilker (1999). Predicting and Enhancing the Effectiveness of Reinforcers
and Punishers in Repp & Horner (Eds) Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior.
Return to Folder Index
24
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
III. Conduct behavior assessments (e.g., Functional Behavior
Assessment, Preference Assessment, Reinforcer Assessment)
Tab 10: Design and conduct parametric analysis (B-12)
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Design and conduct parametric analysis
A. Design Parametric Analysis
i.
Conduct literature search and develop a procedure for parametric analysis
for:
• Assessing the effects of various schedules of reinforcement on target
behaviors
• Assessing the effects of various magnitudes of reinforcement on
target behaviors
• Assessing the effects of various tasks (for escape maintained
behaviors) on target behaviors
ii. Discuss with supervisor the proposed design and make necessary changes
• Include the procedures in this tab
B. Conduct a Parametric Analysis
i.
Conduct parametric assessment under the direct supervision of supervisor
ii. Develop a performance monitoring checklist to evaluate the fidelity of
parametric assessments and have the supervisor use the form to rate and
give feedback on conducting the assessments (See Tab 24)
• Include the completed checklist with feedback in this tab and tab 24
II. Write summary of assessment results
i.
Summarize the parametric assessment results using the appropriate visual
display
ii. Present the summary of the assessment results to the supervisor and make
necessary changes
iii. Use the assessment results in treatment planning
iv.
Share the results with parents or teachers
 Suggested Readings
 Carr, J. E., Bailey, J. S., Ecott, C. L., Lucker, K. D., & Weil, T. M. (1998). On the effects of noncontingent delivery of differing magnitudes of reinforcement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis,
31, 313-321.
 DiGennaro Reed, F.D., Reed, D.D., Baez, C.N, & Maguire, N. (2011). A parametric analysis of errors
of commission during discrete-trial training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 611-615.
 Roscoe, E. M., Iwata, B. A., & Rand, M. S. (2003). Effects of reinforcer consumption and magnitude
on response rates during non-contingent reinforcement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 525–
539.
 Sy J.R., & John C. Borrero, J.C. (2009). Parametric analysis of presession exposure to edible and
nonedible stimuli. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 833-837.
Return to Folder Index
25
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
IV. Develop evidence-based intervention plans based on assessment
results and baseline data
Tab 11: Obtain, summarize, and evaluate research articles as part of
recommendations & development of intervention plans
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review and interpret articles from the behavior-analytic literature ( B-02)
A. Obtain and summarize research articles
i.
Search behavior analytic journals for peer reviewed articles that address:
i. Problem behaviors with similar functions as those identified in
treatment plans that you are implementing;
• Or
ii. Problem behaviors with similar functions that you are
developing a treatment plan for
iii. Skill acquisition for specific skill acquisition programs that you
are implementing
• Or
iv. Skill acquisition for specific skills that you are developing for
skill acquisition programs
B. Summarize the articles and include the summary for each article in this tab
i.
Summary should include:
i. Reference to the article in APA style
ii. Subjects
iii. Target behaviors with operational definitions
iv. Type of FBA conducted and results
v. Procedure used for intervention
vi. Results of the intervention
vii. Strengths and limitations of the articles
viii. How are you planning to use the information obtained from the
article for your case
 Suggested Readings
 Carr J. E. and Briggs, A. M. (2010) Strategies for Making Regular Contact with the Scholarly
Literature. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 3, 13–18.
 Dubuque, E.M. (2011). Automating Academic Literature Searches with RSS Feeds and Google
Reader. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 4, 63-69.
Return to Folder Index
26
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
IV. Develop evidence-based intervention plans based on assessment
results and baseline data
Tab 12: Recommend intervention strategies based on the assessment results and the
best available scientific evidence
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Recommend intervention strategies based on FBA results
A. Taking the client’s needs, best practices, available resources, FBA results and
the best available scientific evidence into consideration, recommend conceptually
systematic and effective strategies for intervention (see tab 11 for literature search)
B. The recommendations should include and not be limited to:
i.
Antecedent interventions to address identified MOs and/or SDs and
decrease problem behavior (provide reference)
ii. Consequence based interventions to increase socially acceptable
adaptive behaviors and decrease maladaptive behaviors (provide
reference)
iii. Appropriate initial reinforcement schedule and criteria for thinning
iv.
Shaping of replacement behaviors if not in the client’s repertoire (e.g.,
FCT; provide reference)
v.
How to address the problem behavior if it occurs during intervention
(provide reference)
vi.
Training of support staff and/or parents (provide reference)
vii. Monitoring fidelity of implementation (provide reference)
viii. Data collection, monitoring and data based decision making
II. Recommend intervention strategies based on skills assessment results (VB-MAPP results)
A. Taking the client’s needs, best practices, available resources, skills assessment
results, and the best available scientific evidence into consideration,
recommend conceptually systematic and effective strategies for skill acquisition
interventions (see tab 11 for literature search)
B. The recommendations should include and not be limited to:
i.
Goals for each skill deficit
ii. Appropriate teaching methods for each skill (DTT, NET)
iii. Appropriate chaining method
iv. Appropriate method of programming for generality
v.
Monitoring fidelity of implementation
vi.
Data collection, monitoring and data based decision making
 Suggested Readings
 Geiger, K.B., James E Carr, J. E., and LeBlanc, L.A. (2010). Function-Based Treatments for EscapeMaintained Problem Behavior: A Treatment-Selection Model for Practicing Behavior Analysts.
Behavior Analyst in Practice, 3, 22-32.
 Hagopian, L.P., Boelter, E.W., David P Jarmolowicz, D.P. (2011). Reinforcement Schedule Thinning
following Functional Communication Training: Review and Recommendations. Behavior Analyst in
Practice,4, 4–16.
 Iwata, B. A., Smith, R. G., & Michael, J. L. (2000). Current research on the influence of establishing
operations on behavior in applied settings. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 411-418.
27
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13




O’Neil, R. E., Horner, R. H., Albin, R. W., Sprague, J. R., Sorey, K., Newton, J. S. (1997) Functional
Assessment and Program Development for Problem Behavior: A Practical Handbook. Pacific Grove,
Ca.: Brooks/Cole Publishers.
Parsons M. B., Reid D. H. (2012). Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for Practitioners.
Behavior Analyst in Practice, 5, 2-11.
Reed, D. D., and Kaplan, B.A. (2011). The Matching Law: A Tutorial for Practitioners. Behavior
Analyst in Practice, 4, 15-24.
Van Houten, R., Axelrod, S., Bailey, J. S., Favell, J. E., Foxx, R. M., Iwata, B. A., & Lovaas, O. I.
(1988). The right to effective behavioral treatment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 381384.
Return to Folder Index
28
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VB-MAPP results)
Tab 13: Conduct formal assessment using VB-MAPP or ABLLS-R
1st Year
Students
Click here for example of FBA Rubric
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 and discuss with supervisor
A. Ethical practices in conducting behavior assessments
B. Discuss with supervisor the ethical practices and the importance of practicing
within one’s limits of professional competence and obtaining consultation,
supervision, training, or making referrals as necessary
II. Conduct formal assessment
A. Obtain informed consent for assessment
B. Administer the entire VB-MAPP or ABLLS-R
C. Develop a performance monitoring form to evaluate the administration of VBMAPP or ABLLS-R and have the supervisor use the form to give you feedback
on administration of VB-MAPP or ABLLS-R (See Tab 24)
i.
Include the feedback in this tab
D. Score and graph completed VB-MAPP or ABLLS-R
E. Discuss the results with the supervisor
III. Write assessment report
A. The skills assessment report should include the following components
 Reason for referral (see scoring rubric)
 Background information
 Results for each area assessed
 Summary
 Recommendations
B. Include the final product in this tab
Return to Folder Index
29
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VB
-MAPP results)
Tab 14A: Implement skills acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior, imitation
and discrimination using direct instruction (e.g. DTT), precision teaching and/or
natural environment/incidental teaching
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the ethical guidelines to
your work with the client
i. For example if you are implementing or developing behavior
change plans that are not part of a research, you would
review
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 3.0 Assessing Behavior
iv. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior
Change Program
v. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
vi. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
II. Implement skill acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior
A. Implement the listed skill acquisition programs and obtain at least 90 %
implementation fidelity on at least two consecutive performance
monitoring checklists for each program
o Include the completed performance checklists for each program
in this tab
 Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley,
1968) to evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are
behavior analytic in nature (B-01)
Teaching Method
 Discrete Trials (DTT) (F-03, D08)
BACB®
Skill Acquisition

Natural Environment /Incidental
Task list
Program
Teaching (NET/IT) (D-08)
#
 Precision Teaching (PT) (F-04)
 Other: ________________(____)
Echoic Training
D-10
D-11
and
F-07
F-08
Mand Training with various
topographies (at least two)
Speech
Pictures
ASL
Augmentative devices
30
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D-12
D-13
D-14
III.
D-04
Tact Training
Actions
Objects
Color and shapes
Using prepositions
Using adjectives
Using adverbs
Using complete sentences
Other
Other
Other
Intraverbal Training
What questions
When questions
Where questions
Who questions
Answering questions after
reading a story
Other
Other
Other
Listener Training
Attending to speaker
Following one component
actions
Following two component
actions
Selecting a stimulus in an array
Selecting stimuli based on
Function, Feature and Class
Following instructions involving
prepositions
Discriminating between different
adjectives
Following two to three step
directions
Other
Other
Implement skill acquisition programs to teach imitation and equivalence
Motor Imitation Training
Gross motor actions (e.g.
jumping)
Fine motor actions (e.g. wiggle
fingers)
Functional skills (e.g. using
spoon)
Other
31
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
E-02
E-06
E-13
IV.
E-11
D-02
D-03
E-12
D-21
Other
Other
Stimulus Equivalence and
Discrimination Training
Matching to sample
Sorting
Completing patterns and
sequences
Other
Other
Other
Use behavior change elements in skill acquisition programs
Use Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Use appropriate schedules of reinforcement
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning
Maintenance
Use of Prompts and Prompt Fading
Use Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
Use of differential reinforcement
Return to Folder Index
32
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VB-MAPP results)
Tab 14B: Develop skills acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior, imitation
and discrimination using direct instruction (e.g. DTT), precision teaching and/or
natural environment/incidental teaching
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop skill acquisition programs to teach verbal behavior
A. Select intervention strategies based on assessment results and the best
available scientific evidence (J-02)
i.
Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles
for selected intervention strategies
B. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i.
Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
C. Develop technological and conceptually systematic skill acquisition
programs for skills listed below
i.
State goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
ii. Program for stimulus and response generalization and
maintenance of the skills (J-11 and 12)
D. Have the supervisor use written program performance checklists to
evaluate whether the written programs are behavior analytic in nature and
give feedback (B-01)
i.
Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback
in this tab
E. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the
plans (See Tab 27)
i.
Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor
procedural integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See
Tab 24)
F. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data
33
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
collection and analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
BACB®
Task list
#
D-10
D-11
and
F-07
F-08
D-12
D-13
D-14
Skill Acquisition
Program




Teaching Method
Discrete Trials (DTT) (F-03, D-08)
Natural Environment /Incidental
Teaching (NET/IT) (D-08)
Precision Teaching (PT) (F-04)
Other: ________________(____)
Echoic Training
Mand Training with various
topographies (at least two)
Speech
Pictures
ASL
Augmentative devices
Tact Training
Actions
Objects
Color and shapes
Using prepositions
Using adjectives
Using adverbs
Using complete sentences
Other
Other
Other
Intraverbal Training
What questions
When questions
Where questions
Who questions
Answering questions after
reading a story
Other
Other
Other
Listener Training
Attending to speaker
Following one component
actions
Following two component
actions
Selecting a stimulus in an array
Selecting stimuli based on
Function, Feature and Class
Following instructions involving
34
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
prepositions
Discriminating between different
adjectives
Following two to three step
directions
Other
Other
Other
III. Develop skill acquisition programs to teach imitation and equivalence
Motor Imitation Training
Gross motor actions (e.g.
jumping)
Fine motor actions (e.g. wiggle
fingers)
D-04
Functional skills (e.g. using
spoon)
Other
Other
Other
Stimulus Equivalence and
Discrimination Training
Matching to sample
Sorting
E-02
E-06
Completing patterns and
E-13
sequences
Other
Other
Other
IV. Program behavior change elements in skill acquisition plans
E-11
Program Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Program appropriate schedules of reinforcement
Initial Implementation Phase
D-02
Thinning
Maintenance
Program use of Prompts and Prompt Fading
D-03
E-12
Program Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
D-21
Program use of differential reinforcement
 Suggested Readings
 Bosch, S., & Fuqua, R.W. (2001). Behavioral Cusps: A Model for Selecting Target Behaviors.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 34, 123–125.
 Grow, L., & LeBlanc, L. (2013). Teaching Receptive Language Skills: Recommendations for
Instructors. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 6, 56-75.
 Grow, L. L., Carr, J. E., Kodak, T., Jostad, C. M., & Kisamore, A. N. (2011). A comparison of
methods for teaching auditory-visual conditional discriminations to children diagnosed with
autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 475-498.
 Hall, G., & Sundberg, M. L. (1987). Teaching Mands by Manipulating Conditioned Establishing
Operations. The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 5, 41–53.
35
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13








Lovaas, O. I. (2003). Teaching Individuals with Developmental Delays: Basic Intervention
Techniques. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.
Rosales-Ruiz, J., & Baer, D. M. (1997). Behavioral cusps: A developmental and pragmatic
concept for behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 533-544.
Rosales, R., & Rehfeldt, R. (2007). Contriving transitive conditioned establishing operations to
establish derived manding skills in adults with severe developmental disabilities. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 40, 105-121
Smith, T., Mruzek, D. W., Wheat, L. A., & Hughes, C. (2006). Error Correction in
Discrimination Training for Children with Autism. Behavioral Interventions, 21, 245–263.
Sundberg, M.L., & Michael, J. (2001). The Benefits of Skinner’s Analysis of Verbal Behavior for
Children with Autism. Behavior Modification, 25, 698-724
Sundberg, M. L., & Partington, J. W. (1998). Teaching Language to Children with Autism or
other Developmental Disabilities. Pleasant Hill, CA: Behavior Analysts, Inc.
Taylor, B.A., & Fisher, J. (2010). Three Important Things to Consider When Starting
Intervention for a Child Diagnosed With Autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 3, 52-53.
Weiss, M.J., & Zane, T. (2010). Three Important Things to Consider When Starting Intervention
for a Child Diagnosed With Autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 3, 58-60.
Return to Folder Index
36
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VB-M
APP results)
Tab 15A: Implement daily living skills programs based on formal assessment
results
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement skill acquisition programs to teach daily living skills
A. Implement the listed skill acquisition programs and obtain at least 90 %
implementation fidelity on at least two consecutive performance
monitoring checklists for each program
 Include the completed performance checklists for each program in
this tab
B. Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley,
1968) to evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are
behavior analytic in nature (B-01)
Chaining Method
BACB®
• Forward
Daily Living Skills
Task list
Acquisition Program
• Backward
#
• Total Task
Dressing
Clothing selection appropriate for weather
Putting on and removing shirts, pants,
socks
D-05
Putting on and removing jackets
D-06
D-07
Putting on and removing shoes
Other
Other
Other
D-05
Toileting:
D-06
D-07
Personal Hygiene
D-05
D-06
Brushing teeth
37
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D-07
Washing hands and face
Showering
Combing Hair
Eating and Drinking
Using utensils
Drinking from a cup
D-05
Meal preparation
D-06
Use of kitchen appliances
D-07
Other
Other
Other
Household Chores
Cleaning
Making bed
Setting and cleaning table
D-05
D-06
Washing dishes
D-07
Feeding animals
Other
Other
Other
Laundry
Washing and drying clothes
D-05
D-06
Folding and putting away washed clothing
D-07
Other
Other
Safety Awareness
D-05
Abduction-Prevention
D-06
Crossing streets
D-07
Safety/Danger signs and signals
First Aid skills
D-05
Using Public Transportation
D-06
Money Management
D-07
Employment Skills
III. Use behavior change elements in skill acquisition programs
E-11
Use Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Use appropriate schedules of reinforcement
Initial Implementation phase
D-02
Thinning
Maintenance
D-03
Use Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-12
Use Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
D-21
Use of differential reinforcements
Return to Folder Index
38
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VBMAPP results)
Tab 15B: Develop daily living skills programs based on formal assessment results
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop skill acquisition programs to teach daily living skills
A. For each daily living skill listed below develop a task analysis (D-07)
i.
Establish Baseline using the task analysis
ii. Graph the baseline data using appropriate graphs
iii. Discuss with supervisor the assessment results and the graphs
iv.
Place task analysis with baseline data in this tab
B. Select intervention strategies based on task analysis results (J-03) and the
best available scientific evidence (J-02)
i. Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for
your selections
C. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
D. Develop technological and conceptually systematic daily living skill
acquisition programs for skills listed below
i. State goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
ii. Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance of
the skills (J-11 and 12)
E. Have the supervisor use written program performance checklists to evaluate
whether the written programs are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
i. Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in
this tab
F. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans
(See Tab 27)
i. Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor
procedural integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See
Tab 24)
39
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
BACB®
Task
list #
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
D-06
D-07
D-05
G. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection
and analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
Chaining Method
• Forward
Daily Living Skills
Acquisition Program
• Backward
• Total Task
Dressing
Clothing selection appropriate for weather
Putting on and removing shirts, pants,
socks
Putting on and removing jackets
Putting on and removing shoes
Other
Other
Other
Toileting
Personal Hygiene
Brushing teeth
Washing hands and face
Showering
Combing hair
Eating and Drinking
Using utensils
Drinking from a cup
Meal preparation
Use of kitchen appliances
Other
Other
Other
Household Chores
Cleaning
Making bed
Setting and cleaning table
Washing dishes
Feeding animals
Other
Other
Other
Laundry
Washing and drying clothes
Folding and putting away washed clothing
Other
Other
Safety Awareness
40
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
D-06
D-07
Abduction-Prevention
Crossing streets
Safety/Danger signs and signals
First Aid skills
D-05
Using Public Transportation
D-06
Money Management (e.g. banking skills)
D-07
Employment Skills
III. Program behavior change elements in skill acquisition programs
E-11
Program Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Program appropriate schedules of reinforcement
Initial Implementation Phase
D-02
Thinning
Maintenance
D-03
Program use of Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-12
Program Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
D-21
Program use of differential reinforcements
 Suggested Readings
 Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2011). Ethics for Behavior Analysts (2nd ed.). New York, NY:
Routledge.
 Bosch, S., & Fuqua, R.W. (2001). Behavioral Cusps: A Model for Selecting Target Behaviors.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 34, 123–125.
 Derrickson, J. G., Neef, N. A., & Parrish, J. M. (1991). Teaching self-administration of suctioning
to children with tracheostomies. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 24, 563-570.
 Lattimore, L.P., Parsons, M.B., & Reid, D.H. (2008). Simulation Training of Community Job Skills
for Adults with Autism: A Further Analysis. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 24-29.
 Libby, M.E., Weiss, J.S., & Ahearn, W.H. (2008). A Comparison of Most-to-Least and Least-toMost Prompting on the Acquisition of Solitary Play Skills. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 37-43.
 McDonnell, J., & Freguson, B. (1989). A comparison of time delay and decreasing prompt
hierarchy strategies in teaching banking skills to students with moderate handicaps. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 22, 85-91.
 Thompson, T. J., Braam, S. J., & Fuqua, R. W. (1982). Training and generalization of laundry
skills: A multiple probe evaluation with handicapped persons. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 15, 177-182.
 Rosales-Ruiz, J., & Baer, D. M. (1997). Behavioral cusps: A developmental and pragmatic concept
for behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 533-544.
Return to Folder Index
41
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on initial
assessment VB-MAPP results)
Tab 16A: Implement social and play skills programs based on formal assessment
results
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement skill acquisition programs to teach social and play skills
A. Implement the listed skill acquisition programs and obtain at least 90 %
implementation fidelity on at least two consecutive performance monitoring
checklists for each program
i. Include the completed performance checklists for each program in
this tab
B. Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley,
1968) to evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are
behavior analytic in nature (B-01)
Chaining Method
BACB®
• Forward
Daily Living Skills
Task list
Acquisition Program
• Backward
#
• Total Task
Independent Play skills
Functional play
Creative play
D-05
Independent indoor play
D-06
Independent outdoor play
D-07
Other
Other
Other
Social Play
Sharing toys
D-05
Turn taking
D-06
Initiating and sustaining indoor and
D-07
outdoor play activities with peers
Joining in an ongoing indoor or outdoor
42
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
play activity
Pretend play with peers
Team sports and sportsmanship
Other
Other
Other
Other
Social Interactions
Initiating and maintaining eye contact
Greetings
Beginning and ending intraverbal exchange
Intraverbal behavior with others on nonreinforcing topics
Giving and accepting compliments
D-05
Discriminating and tacting feelings of
D-06
others
D-07
Offering and receiving help
Negotiations
Perspective taking
Joint attention
Other
Other
Other
III. Program behavior change elements in skill acquisition programs
E-11
Program Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Program appropriate schedules of reinforcement
Initial Implementation Phase
D-02
Thinning
Maintenance
D-03
Program use of Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-12
Program Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
D-21
Program use of differential reinforcements
Return to Folder Index
43
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
V. Design and implement skill acquisition procedures based on formal
assessment results VB-MAPP results)
Tab 16B: Develop social and play skill programs
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop skill acquisition programs to teach daily living skills
A. For each social and play skill listed below develop a task analysis (D-07)
i.
Establish Baseline using the task analysis
ii. Graph the baseline data using appropriate graphs
iii. Discuss with supervisor the assessment results and the graphs
iv.
Place task analysis with baseline data in this tab
B. Select intervention strategies based on task analysis results (J-03) and the best
available scientific evidence (J-02)
i.
Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for
your selections
C. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i.
Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
D. Develop technological and conceptually systematic daily living skill
acquisition programs for skills listed below
i.
State goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
ii. Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance of
the skills (J-11 and 12)
E. Have the supervisor use written program performance checklists to evaluate
whether the written programs are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
i.
Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in
this tab
F. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans
(See Tab 27)
i.
Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor
procedural integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See
Tab 24)
44
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
G. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection
and analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
Chaining Method
BACB®
•
Forward
Daily
Living
Skills
Task
Acquisition Program
• Backward
list #
• Total Task
Independent Play skills
Functional play
Creative play
D-05
Independent indoor play
D-06
Independent outdoor play
D-07
Other
Other
Other
Social Play
Sharing toys
Turn taking
Initiating and sustaining indoor and
D-05
outdoor play activities with peers
D-06
Joining in an ongoing indoor or outdoor
D-07
play activity
Pretend play with peers
Team sports and sportsmanship
Other
Other
Social Interactions
Initiating and maintaining eye contact
Greetings
Beginning and ending intraverbal exchange
Intraverbal behavior with others on nonreinforcing topics
Giving and accepting compliments
D-05
Discriminating and tacting feelings of
D-06
others
D-07
Offering and receiving help
Negotiations
Perspective taking
Joint attention
Other
Other
Other
III. Program behavior change elements in skill acquisition programs
E-11 Program Pairing Procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Program appropriate schedules of reinforcement
D-02
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning
45
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Maintenance
D-03 Program use of Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-12 Program Errorless Learning and Prompt Fading
D-21 Program use of differential reinforcements
 Suggested Readings
 Bailey, J. S., & Burch, M. R. (2011). Ethics for Behavior Analysts (2nd ed.). New York, NY:
Routledge.
 Bosch, S., & Fuqua, R.W. (2001). Behavioral Cusps: A Model for Selecting Target Behaviors.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 34, 123–125.
 Libby M. E., Weiss J. S., Bancroft S., Ahearn W. H. (2008). A Comparison of Most-to-Least and
Least-to-Most Prompting on the Acquisition of Solitary Play Skills. Behavior Analysis in Practice,
1, 37–43.
 McGee, G. G., Almeida, M. C., Sulzer-Azaroff, B., & Feldman, R. S. (1992). Promoting reciprocal
interactions via peer incidental teaching. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 117-126.
 Pierce, K., & Schreibman, L. (1995). Increasing complex social behaviors in children with autism:
Effects of peer-implemented pivotal response training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28,
285-295.
 Rosales-Ruiz, J., & Baer, D. M. (1997). Behavioral cusps: A developmental and pragmatic concept
for behavior analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 533-544.
Return to Folder Index
46
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures
Tab 17A: Implement antecedent based interventions
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and
before developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical
guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii.
2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii.
4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv.
6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v.
8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi.
9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii.
10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement antecedent-based interventions
A. Implement the listed interventions and obtain at least 90 %
implementation fidelity on at least two consecutive performance monitoring
checklists for each program
B. Include the completed performance checklists for each program in this
tab
C. Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley,
1968) to evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are
behavior analytic in nature (B-01)
®
BACB
Intervention
Task list
#
E-01
Identify and make changes to the physical environment (e.g. manipulate
G-08
discriminative stimuli)
Use Non-Contingent Reinforcement for behaviors maintained by
Attention
D-20
Escape
E-01
Access to tangibles
Automatic reinforcement
E-01
Use stimulus fading-in (e.g. food blending or for task refusal)
E-01
Use choice making
Use high- probability request sequences
E-09
Use task-interspersal (e.g. academic work completion)
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
Use Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-02
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
47
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D-03
D-18
E-08
Use Prompts and Prompt Fading
Use Extinction
Use the matching law and recognize factors influencing choice
Return to Folder Index
48
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures
Tab 17B: Develop antecedent-based interventions
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop antecedent-based interventions
A. Select potential antecedent-based intervention or combination of
interventions (e.g., NCR with stimulus fading in) based on assessment results
and the best available scientific evidence (J-02)
i.
Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for
your choice
ii. Discuss the limits of each procedure with supervisor and address the
limits in the plan
iii. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
B. Propose an appropriate single subject design that will allow evaluation of the
effectiveness of the behavioral programs (See Tab 23)
C. Develop technological and conceptually systematic treatment plan(s) for
given problem behavior(s) (developing plans for all areas listed below is
strongly recommended)
i.
State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
ii. Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance
(J-11, 12)
iii. Combine antecedent-based procedures with reinforcement and
extinction procedures
iv. Design and include a data collection form to obtain representative
data given the dimensions of the behavior and the logistics of
observing and recording (See Tab 4)
D. Have the supervisor use a written program performance checklist to evaluate
whether the written treatment plans are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
i.
Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in
this tab
E. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans
(See Tab 27)
49
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor
procedural integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See
Tab 24)
F. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection
and analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
i.
BACB®
Task
list #
E-01
G-08
Antecedent Interventions
Identify and make changes to the physical environment (e.g. manipulate
discriminative stimuli).
Use Non-Contingent Reinforcement for behaviors maintained by
Attention
D-20
Escape
E-01
Access to tangibles
Automatic reinforcement
E-01 Use stimulus fading-in (e.g. food blending or for task refusal)
E-01 Use choice making
Use high- probability request sequences
E-09
Use task-interspersal (e.g. academic work completion)
Other
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
Use Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-02
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
D-03 Use Prompts and Prompt Fading
D-18 Use Extinction
E-08 Use the matching law and recognize factors influencing choice
 Suggested Readings
• Bancroft S. L, Bourret J. C. (2008). Generating variable and random schedules of reinforcement
using Microsoft Excel macros. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 41, 227–235.
• Ducharme, J. M.,& Worling, D. E. (1994). Behavioral momentum and stimulus fading in the
acquisition and maintenance of child compliance in the home. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 27, 639-647.
• Fisher, W. W., & Mazur, J. E. (1997). Basic and applied research on choice responding. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 387–410.
• Hanley, G.P. (2010). Toward Effective and Preferred Programming: A Case for the Objective
Measurement of Social Validity with Recipients of Behavior-Change Programs. Behavior Analysis
in Practice, 3, 13-21.
• Hanley, G. P., Piazza, C. C., & Fisher, W. W. (1997). Non-contingent presentation of attention and
alternative stimuli in the treatment of attention-maintained destructive behavior. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 30, 229-237.
• Luiselli, J. K., & Cameron, M. J. (Eds.). (1998). Antecedent Control: Innovative Approaches to
Behavioral Support. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
• Luiselli, J. K. (Ed.). (2006). Antecedent Assessment and Intervention: Supporting Children and
50
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
Adults with Developmental Disabilities in Community Settings. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.
Michael, J. L. (1982). Distinguishing between discriminative and motivational functions of stimuli.
Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 37, 149–155.
Smith, R. G., & Iwata, B. A. (1997). Antecedent influences on behavior disorders. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 343–376.
Return to Folder Index
51
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures (MPP results)
Tab 18A: Implement consequence-based interventions
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement consequence-based interventions
A. Implement the listed interventions and obtain at least 90 % implementation
fidelity on at least two consecutive performance monitoring checklists for each
program
B. Include the completed performance checklists for each program in this tab
C. Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968) to
evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are behavior analytic
in nature (B-01)
BACB®
Intervention
Task list
#
D-01
Implement treatment plans using positive and negative reinforcement
Differential Reinforcement of Alternative/Incompatible Behavior
(DRA/DRI)
Functional communication training (F-07)
Differential Negative Reinforcement of Alternative/Incompatible
Behavior (DNRA/DNRI)
Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior (DRO)
D-21
Differential Reinforcement of High Rates of Behavior (DRH) (e.g.
F-07
Reading Fluency)
Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Behavior (DRL)
Full Session DRL
Interval DRL
Spaced Responding DRL
E-10
Implement treatment plans using the Premack principle
F-02
Implement treatment plans using token economy
D-18
Implement treatment plans using extinction
Implement treatment plans using positive and negative punishment
Identify and use punishers
D-15
Time out
Response cost
52
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
Reprimands
Response blocking
Overcorrection
Implement treatment plans using combinations of reinforcement,
D-19
punishment and extinction
Other
Other
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation of treatment plans
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-02
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
E-11
Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-17
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment
D-03
Use prompts and prompt fading
Return to Folder Index
53
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures MPP r
Tab 18B: Develop consequence-based interventions
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop and implement consequence-based interventions
A. Select potential consequence-based intervention or combination of interventions
(e.g., DRO with token economy and response cost) based on assessment results and the
best available scientific evidence (J-02)
o Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for your
choice
o Discuss the limits of each procedure with supervisor and address the limits
in the plan
o Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
B. Before developing treatment plans discuss with supervisor and plan for possible
unwanted effects of:
o Reinforcement (C-01)
o Punishment (C-02)
o Extinction (C-03)
o Plan for behavioral contrast effects ( E-07)
C. Develop technological and conceptually systematic treatment plans for given
problem behavior(s) (developing plans for all areas listed below is strongly
recommended)
o State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
o When a behavior is to be decreased, select an acceptable alternative
behavior to be established or increased (J-10)
o Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance (See
Tabs 21 & 22)
o If reinforcement and extinction procedures are not effective, consider least
restrictive punishment procedure(s)
o Design and include a data collection form to obtain representative data
given the dimensions of the behavior and the logistics of observing and
recording (See Tab 4)
54
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D. Have the supervisor use a written program performance checklist to evaluate
whether the written treatment plans are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
o Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this
tab
E. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans (See
Tab 27)
o Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor procedural
integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See Tab 24)
F. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection and
analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
BACB®
Task list
#
D-01
Consequence-Based Intervention
Develop treatment plans using positive and negative reinforcement
Differential Reinforcement of Alternative/Incompatible Behavior
(DRA/DRI)
Functional communication training (F-07)
Differential Negative Reinforcement of Alternative/Incompatible Behavior
(DNRA/DNRI)
Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior (DRO)
D-21
F-07
Differential Reinforcement of High Rates of Behavior (DRH) (e.g.
Reading Fluency)
Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Behavior (DRL)
Full Session DRL
Interval DRL
Spaced Responding DRL
E-10
Develop treatment plans using the Premack principle
F-02
Develop treatment plans using token economy
E-11
Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-18
Develop treatment plans using extinction
Develop treatment plans using positive and negative punishment
Identify and use punishers
Time out
D-15
Response cost
Reprimands
Response blocking
Overcorrection
Develop treatment plans using combinations of reinforcement, punishment
D-19
and extinction
Other
Other
Other
Other
III. Incorporate behavior change elements into the treatment plans
D-02
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
55
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
D-20
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
E-11
Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-17
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment
D-03
Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-08
Consider matching law and recognize factors influencing choice
 Suggested Readings
• Bancroft S. L, Bourret J. C. (2008). Generating variable and random schedules of reinforcement using
Microsoft Excel macros. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 41, 227–235.
• Geiger, K.B., Carr, J.E., & LeBlanc, L.A (2010). Function-Based Treatments for Escape-Maintained
Problem Behavior: A Treatment-Selection Model for Practicing Behavior Analysts. Behavior Analysis in
Practice, 3, 22-32.
 Hagopian, L. P., Fisher, W. W., Sullivan, M. T., Acquisto, J., & LeBlanc, L. A. (1998). Effectiveness of
functional communication training with and without extinction and punishment: A summary of 21
inpatient cases. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 31, 211-235.
 Hagopian, L.P., Boelter, E.W., & Jarmolowicz, D.P. (2011). Reinforcement Schedule Thinning
Following Functional Communication Training: Review and Recommendations. Behavior Analysis in
Practice, 4, 4-16.
 Hanley, G.P. (2010). Toward Effective and Preferred Programming: A Case for the Objective
Measurement of Social Validity with Recipients of Behavior-Change Programs. Behavior Analysis in
Practice, 3, 13-21.
 Harding, J.W., Wacker, D.P., Berg, W.K., Lee, J.F., Dolsezal, D. (2009). Conducting Functional
Communication Training in Home Settings: A Case Study and Recommendations for Practitioners.
Behavior Analysis in Practice, 2, 21-31.
 Harper, J. M., Iwata, B.A., & Camp, E.M. (2013). Assessment and Treatment of Social Avoidance.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 147–160.
 Lerman, D. C., Kelley, M. E., Vorndran, C. M., Kuhn, S. A. C., & LaRue, R. H., Jr. (2002).
Reinforcement magnitude and responding during treatment with differential reinforcement. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 29-48.
 Lerman, D. C., & Vorndran, C. M. (2002). On the status of knowledge for using punishment:
Implications for treating behavior disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 431-464.
 Patel, M. R., Piazza, C. C., Martinez, C. J., Volkert, V. M., & Santana, C. M. (2002). An evaluation of
two differential reinforcement procedures with escape extinction to treat food refusal. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 35, 363-374.
 Reed, D.D., & Kaplan, B.A. (2010). The Matching Law: A Tutorial for Practitioners. Behavior Analysis
in Practice, 4, 15-24.
 Tiger, J.H., Hanley, G., Bruzek, J. (2008). Functional Communication Training: A Review and Practical
Guide. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 16-23.
Return to Folder Index
56
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures MPP results)
Tab 19A: Implement group contingences
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and discuss
with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement group contingences
A. Implement the listed group contingences and obtain at least 90 % implementation
fidelity on at least two consecutive performance monitoring checklists for each program
B. Include the completed performance checklists for each program in this tab
C. Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968) to
evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are behavior analytic in
nature (B-01)
BACB®
Group Contingency
Task list
#
Use independent group contingencies.
E-05
Use interdependent group contingencies
Use dependent group contingencies
Other
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation of treatment plans
Use positive and negative reinforcement
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
D-01
D-02
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
D-03
Use prompts and prompt fading
E-11
Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-17
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment
D-18
Use extinction
IV. Data collection and display
• During implementation of interventions, collect appropriate data and
generate graphs
• Discuss the visually displayed data with supervisor
• Make necessary changes and include the final graph for each skill in this
57
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
A-02
To
A-05
A-10
B-04
B-05
B-07
B-08
tab
Collect data on
Rate/Frequency
Duration
Latency
IRT
Plot, and interpret data using equal-interval graphs
Use withdrawal/reversal designs (B-04 and B-05)
Use changing criterion designs (B-07)
Use multiple baseline designs (B-08)
Return to Folder Index
58
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures MPP results)
Tab 19B: Develop group contingences
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop group contingences
A. Select potential group contingency intervention(s) based on assessment results and
the best available scientific evidence (J-02)
a. Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for your
choice
b. Discuss the limits of each procedure with supervisor and address the limits
in the plan
c. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
B. Before developing treatment plans discuss with supervisor and plan for possible
unwanted effects of:
a. Reinforcement (C-01)
b. Punishment (C-02)
c. Extinction (C-03)
d. Plan for behavioral contrast effects ( E-07)
C. Develop technological and conceptually systematic treatment plans for given
problem behavior(s) (developing plans for all areas listed below is strongly
recommended)
a. State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
b. Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance (J-11,
12)
D. If reinforcement and extinction procedures are not effective, consider least
restrictive punishment procedure(s)
E. Have the supervisor use a written program performance checklist to evaluate
whether the written treatment plans are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
a. Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this
tab
F. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans (See
59
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
Tab 27)
a. Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor procedural
integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See Tab 24)
G. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection and
analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
BACB®
Group Contingency
Task list
#
Develop plans using independent group contingencies.
E-05
Develop plans using interdependent group contingencies
Develop plans using dependent group contingencies
Other
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation of treatment plans
Use positive and negative reinforcement
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
D-01
D-02
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
D-03
Use prompts and prompt fading
E-11
Use pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-17
Use appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment.
D-18
Use extinction
 Suggested Readings
 Greenwood, C. R., Hops, H., Delquadri, J., & Guild, J. (1974). Group contingencies for group
consequences in classroom management: A further analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 7,
413-425.
 Speltz, M. L., Shimamura, J. W., & McReynolds, W. T. (1982). Procedural variations in group
contingencies: Effects on children's academic and social behaviors. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 15, 533-544.
 Switzer, E. B., Deal, T. E., & Bailey, J. S. (1977). The reduction of stealing in second graders using a
group contingency. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 10, 267-272.
Return to Folder Index
60
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures MPP r
Tab 20A: Implement self-management strategies and contingency contracts
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Implement self-management procedures and contingency contracts
A. Implement the listed interventions and obtain at least 90 % implementation fidelity
on at least two consecutive performance monitoring checklists for each program
B. Probe for generalization and maintenance
C. Include the completed performance checklists for each program in this tab
Use the dimensions of applied behavior analysis (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968) to
evaluate whether interventions you are asked to implement are behavior analytic in
nature (B-01)
BACB®
Task list
#
Intervention
Implement Self-Management plans addressing the following behaviors
Task completion
Reducing problem behaviors
Following schedules (e.g. time management)
F-01
Weight management and diet
Exercise
Repetitive (not self-injurious) behaviors maintained by automatic
reinforcement
Medication management (e.g. insulin administration)
Other
Other
Other
Other
E-04
Implement and monitor contingency contracts
Implement treatment plans using combination of self-management
D-19
strategies and contingency contracts
Other
Other
III. Use behavior change elements during implementation
61
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D-02
D-20
F-02
E-11
D-17
D-03
E-01
E-03
E-08
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
Token economies and other conditioned reinforcement systems
Pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
Use of appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment
Prompts and Prompt Fading
Use of antecedent manipulation, such as motivating operations and
discriminative stimuli
Use of instructions and rules
Consider matching law and recognize factors influencing choice
Return to Folder Index
62
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VI. Design and implement behavior reduction procedures MPP r
Tab 20B: Develop self-management strategies and contingency contracts
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop consequence-based interventions
A. Select potential self-management intervention or combination of self-management
intervention with a behavior contract based on assessment results and the best available
scientific evidence (J-02)
a. Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for your
choice
b. Discuss the limits of each procedure with supervisor and address the limits
in the plan
c. Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
B. Before developing treatment plans discuss with supervisor and plan for possible
unwanted effects of:
a. Reinforcement (C-01)
b. Punishment (C-02)
c. Extinction (C-03)
d. Plan for behavioral contrast effects ( E-07)
C. Develop technological and conceptually systematic treatment plans for given
problem behavior(s) (developing plans for all areas listed below is strongly
recommended)
i.
State intervention goals in observable and measurable terms (J-01)
ii. When a behavior is to be decreased, select an acceptable alternative
behavior to be established or increased (J-10)
iii. Program for stimulus and response generalization and maintenance (J-11,
12)
iv.
Use instructions and rules (E-03)
v.
If antecedent, reinforcement and extinction procedures are not effective,
consider least restrictive punishment procedure(s)
vi.
Design and include a data collection form to obtain representative data
given the dimensions of the behavior and the logistics of observing and
63
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
recording (See Tab 4)
D. Have the supervisor use written program performance checklists to evaluate
whether the written treatment plans are behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
i.
Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this
tab
E. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans (See
Tab 27)
i.
Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor procedural
integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See Tab 24)
F. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection and
analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
BACB®
Intervention
Task list
#
Develop Self-Management plans addressing the following behaviors
Task completion
Reducing problem behaviors
Following schedules (e.g. time management)
F-01
Weight management and diet
Exercise
Repetitive (not self-injurious) behaviors maintained by automatic
reinforcement
Medication management (e.g. insulin administration)
Other
Other
Other
Other
E-04
Develop and monitor contingency contracts
Develop treatment plans using combination of self-management
D-19
strategies and contingency contracts
Other
Other
III. Incorporate behavior change elements into the treatment plans
Appropriate parameters and schedules of reinforcement
Fixed and Variable Time Schedules
D-02
D-20
Initial Implementation Phase
Thinning the Schedules
F-02
Token economies and other conditioned reinforcement systems
E-11
Pairing procedures to establish new conditioned reinforcers
D-17
Use of appropriate parameters and schedules of punishment
D-03
Prompts and Prompt Fading
E-01
Use of antecedent manipulation, such as motivating operations and
discriminative stimuli
E-03
Use of instructions and rules
E-08
Consider matching law and recognize factors influencing choice
 Suggested Readings
64
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13




















Allen, K. D. (1998). The Use of an Enhanced Simplified Habit-Reversal Procedure to Reduce Disruptive
Outbursts during Athletic Performance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 31, 489–492
Briesch, A. M., & Chafouleas, S. M. (2009). Review and Analysis of Literature on Self-Management
Interventions to Promote Appropriate Classroom Behaviors (1988–2008). School Psychology Quarterly,
24, 106-118.
Christian, L., & Poling, A. (1997). Using self-management procedures to improve the productivity of
adults with developmental disabilities in a competitive employment setting. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 30, 169-172.
Craig. A. R. (2010). Self-Administered Behavior Modification to Reduce Nail Biting: Incorporating
Simple Technology to Ensure Treatment Integrity. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 3, 38-41.
Dixon, M.R., & Holcomb, S. (2000). Teaching Self-Control to Small Groups of Dually Diagnosed Adults.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 611–614.
Dixon, M. R., & Cummings, A. (2001). Self-control in children with autism: Response allocation during
delays to reinforcement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 491-495.
Dixon, M. R., Horner, M. J., & Guercio, J. (2003). Self-control and the preference for delayed
reinforcement: An example in brain injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 371-374.
Epstein, R. (1997). Skinner as self-manager. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 545-568.
Fowler, S. A., & Baer, D. M. (1981). Do I have to be good all day? The timing of delayed reinforcement
as a factor in generalization. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 14, 13-24.
Fritz, J., Iwata, B.A., Rolider, N.U., Camp, E.M., & Neidert, P.L. (2012). Analysis of self-recording in
self-management interventions for stereotypy. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 45, 055-068.
Koegel, L.K., Harrower, J. K., & Koegel, R. L. (1999). Support for Children with Developmental
Disabilities in Full Inclusion Classrooms through Self-Management. Journal of Positive Behavior
Interventions, 1, 26-34.
Mancina, C., Tankersley, M., Kamps, D., Kravits, T., & Parrett, J. (2000). Brief Report: Reduction of
Inappropriate Vocalizations for a Child with Autism Using a Self-Management Treatment Program.
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 599-606.
Mann, R. A. (1972). The behavior-therapeutic use of contingency contracting to control an adult behavior
problem: Weight control. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 5, 99-109.
Mooney, P. Ryan, J.B., Uhing, B. M., Reid, R., & Epstein, M. H. (2005). A Review of Self-Management
Interventions Targeting Academic Outcomes for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.
Journal of Behavioral Education, 14, 203–221.
Pierce, K. L., & Schreibman, L. (1994). Teaching daily living skills to children with autism in
unsupervised settings through pictorial self-management. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27, 471481.
Schillinger, D. (2011). Supporting Self-Management – a Necessity in Diabetes Healthcare. Patient
Education and Counseling, 85, 131-132.
Shapiro, E. S., DuPaul, G. J., & Bradley-Klug, K. L. (1998). Self-management as a strategy to improve
the classroom behavior of adolescents with ADHD. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 31, 545-555.
Stahmer, A. C., & Schreibman, L. (1992). Teaching children with autism appropriate play in unsupervised
environments using a self-management treatment package. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 447459.
Thomas, J. D. (1976). Accuracy of self-assessment of on-task behavior by elementary school children.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 9, 209-210.
Welch, S. J., Holborn, S. W. (1988). Contingency contracting with delinquents: Effects of a brief training
manual on staff contract negotiation and writing skills. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 357368.
Return to Folder Index
65
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VII. Program and probe for generalization and maintenance
Tab 21: Program and probe for stimulus and response generalization
1st Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and discuss
with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Plan for generalized behavior change
A. For each skill acquisition or behavior reduction plan, choose a strategy to program
for generalized behavior change based on assessment results and the best available
scientific evidence (J-02)
• Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for your
choice
• Discuss the limits of each procedure with supervisor and address the limits in
the plan
• Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
B. Incorporate technological and conceptually systematic procedures for achieving
generality in your skills acquisition and behavior reduction plans
• Develop observable and measurable goals that will address generality (J-01)
• Incorporate naturally existing contingences in the plans
i.
Involve significant others and caregivers in your plan for
generalization
ii. Use one or combination of strategies listed below to support stimulus
and response generality across people and settings:
a. Teach sufficient examples (stimulus and response) (e.g. tact
or mand training)
b. General case analysis (e.g. doing laundry)
c. Programming common stimuli (e.g. job training)
d. Program indiscernible contingences
e. Use “Don’t do it” teaching examples
f. Program behavior traps
g. Incorporate self-management skills
C. Have the supervisor use a written program performance checklist to evaluate
whether the generalizations are behavior analytic in nature and give feedback (B-01)
• Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this tab
66
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
2nd Year
Students
D. Use Behavior Skills Training to train the staff on how to implement the plans (See
Tab 27)
i.
Develop and use performance monitoring checklists to monitor procedural
integrity during implementation of treatment plans (See Tab 24)
E. Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions through ongoing data collection and
analysis and make data based decisions (See Tab 23)
 Suggested Readings
 Barton, E. J., Ascione, F. R. (1979). Sharing in preschool children: Facilitation, stimulus generalization,
response generalization, and maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12, 417-430.
 Chandler, L. K., Lubeck, R. C., Fowler, S. A. (1992). Generalization and maintenance of preschool
children's social skills: A critical review and analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 415-428.
 Ducharme, D. E.,& Holborn, S. W. (1997). Programming generalization of social skills in preschool
children with hearing impairments. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 639-651.
 Fragale, C.L., O'Reilly, M. F., Aguilar, J., Pierce, N., Lang, R., Sigafoos, J., & Lancioni, G. (2012). The
influence of motivating operations on generalization probes of specific mands by children with autism.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 45, 565-577.
 Hughes, C., Harmer, M. L., Killian, D. J.,& Niarhos, F. (1995). The effects of multiple-exemplar selfinstructional training on high school students' generalized conversational interactions. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 28, 201-218.
 Mesmer, E.M., Duhon, G. J., & Dodson, K. G. (2007). The effects of programming common stimuli for
enhancing stimulus generalization of academic behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40, 553557.
 Sprague, J. R., Horner, R. H. (1984). The effects of single instance, multiple instance, and general case
training on generalized vending machine use by moderately and severely handicapped students. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 17, 273-278.
 Stevenson, H. C., Fantuzzo, J. W. (1984). Application of the generalization map to a self-control
intervention with school-aged children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 17, 203-212.
 Stokes, T. F., Baer, D. M. (1977). An implicit technology of generalization. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 10, 349-367.
 Young, J. M., Krantz, P. J., McClannahan, L. E.,& Poulson, C. L. (1994). Generalized imitation and
response-class formation in children with autism. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27, 685-697.
Return to Folder Index
67
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VII. Program and probe for generalization and maintenance
Tab 22: Program and probe for maintenance
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Before beginning to work with your first client (as an implementer) and before
developing your first treatment plan, review the following ethical guidelines and
discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Plan for and probe for maintenance
A. For each skill acquisition or behavior reduction plan, choose a strategy to maintain
behavior change in the natural environment using the best available scientific
evidence (J-02)
• Consult with supervisor and offer rational and supporting articles for your
choice
• Discuss with supervisor and take into account:
i. Client’s preferences and current repertoires (J-04 and J-05)
ii. Environmental and resource constraints (J-07)
iii. Social validity of the intervention (J-08)
B. Incorporate technological and conceptually systematic procedures for achieving
maintenance of socially appropriate behaviors
• Develop observable and measurable goals that will address maintenance
(J-01)
• Incorporate naturally existing contingences in the plans
• Involve significant others and caregivers in your plans
C. Have the supervisor use written program performance checklist to evaluate
whether the strategies are appropriate, behavior analytic in nature and give
feedback (B-01)
i.
Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this
tab
D. Develop performance monitoring checklists that include measurable components
of maintenance plan (K-04 and K- 05)
i.
Have the supervisor use performance monitoring checklists to evaluate
the objectivity of performance checklist and give feedback
ii. Make needed changes and place the final product and the feedback in this
tab
 Suggested Readings
 Barton, E. J., & Ascione, F. R. (1979). Sharing in preschool children: Facilitation, stimulus
generalization, response generalization, and maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12, 417430.
68
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13








Baer, R. A., Blount, R. L., Detrich, R., & Stokes, T. F. (1987). Using intermittent reinforcement to
program maintenance of verbal/nonverbal correspondence. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 20,
179-184.
Chandler, L. K., Lubeck, R. C., & Fowler, S. A. (1992). Generalization and maintenance of preschool
children's social skills: A critical review and analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 415428.
Cuvo, A. J., Leaf, R. B., & Borakove, L. S. (1978). Teaching janitorial skills to the mentally retarded:
Acquisition, generalization, and maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 345-355.
Durand, V. M., & Carr, E. G. (1991). Functional communication training to reduce challenging behavior:
Maintenance and application in new settings. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 24, 251-264.
Durand, V. M., & Carr, E. G. (1992). An analysis of maintenance following functional communication
training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 777-794.
Lamm, N., Greer, R. D. (1988). Induction and maintenance of swallowing responses in infants with
dysphagia. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 143-156.
O'Reilly, M. F., Aguilar, J., Fragale, C.L., Lang, R., Edrisinha, C., Sigafoos, J., Lancioni, G., & Didden,
R. (2012). Effects of a motivating operation manipulation & the maintenance of mands. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 45, 443-447.
Rusch, F. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (1981). Toward a methodology of withdrawal designs for the assessment
of response maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 14, 131-140.
Return to Folder Index
69
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
Tab 23: Evaluate the effectiveness of the behavioral programs (K-07)
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Effectiveness of treatment plan, data collection, display and data based decision making
A. For each written treatment plan, propose an appropriate design that will allow
evaluation of the effectiveness of the behavioral programs (K-07)
 Example: Suppose you are using an intervention to address a
problem behavior that occurs in two different settings. You
would purpose a multiple probe or baseline across settings
design to evaluate if there is a functional relationship between
your intervention and the problem behaviors.
o Discuss the proposed design with supervisor and obtain feedback
o Make necessary changes to the designs and include the final products
in this tab
 Use the title of treatment plans to label each design
B. Use the proposed design to systematically arrange interventions (IV) and to
demonstrate their effects on target behaviors (DV) (B-03)
C. Provide for ongoing documentation of behavioral services (K-01)
o During implementation of interventions, collect appropriate data and
generate graphs
o Obtain feedback on construction of graphs
o Make necessary changes and include the revised graphs in this tab
D. Base decision-making on data displayed in various formats (J-15)
o Discuss the visually displayed ongoing treatment data with supervisor
E. Using Baseline logic, evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments and make
changes to the treatment plans
III. Experimental designs
Indicate “Yes” or “No” for each design
B-04
Used withdrawal designs
B-05
Used reversal designs
B-06
Used alternating treatments (i.e., multi-element)
designs
B-07
Used changing criterion designs
B-08
Used multiple baseline designs
B-09
Used multiple probe designs
70
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
B-10
F-04
A-11
Used combinations of design elements
Used standard celeration charts (SCC)
Used cumulative record
 Suggested Readings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Allen, K. D., & Evans, J. H. (2001). Exposure-based treatment to control excessive blood glucose
monitoring. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 497-500.
Hains, A. H., & Baer, D. M. (1989). Interaction effects in multi-element designs: Inevitable,
desirable, and ignorable. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 22, 57-69.
Hall, R. V., Cristler, C., Cranston, S. S., & Tucker, B. (1970). Teachers and parents as researchers
using multiple baseline designs. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 3, 247-255.
Hartmann, D. P., & Hall, R. V. (1976). The changing criterion design. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 9, 527-532.
Horner, R. D., & Baer, D. M. (1978). Multiple-probe technique: A variation of the multiple baseline.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 189-196.
Marholin, D. II, Touchette, P. E., & Stewart, R. M. (1979). Withdrawal of chronic chlorpromazine
medication: An experimental analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12, 159-171.
Rusch, F. R., & Kazdin, A. E. (1981). Toward a methodology of withdrawal designs for the
assessment of response maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 14, 131-140.
Shore, B. A., Iwata, B. A., Vollmer, T. R., Lerman, D. C., & Zarcone, J. R. (1995). Pyramidal staff
training in the extension of treatment for severe behavior disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 28, 323-332.
Wacker, D., McMahon, C., Steege, M., Berg, W., Sasso, G., & Melloy, K. (1990). Applications of a
sequential alternating treatments design. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 23, 333-339.
Return to Folder Index
71
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
Tab 24: Conduct treatment fidelity checks
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change
Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Design and use effective performance monitoring systems (K-04 and K- 05)
A. For each written treatment plan, design a performance monitoring checklist
for monitoring procedural integrity
o Obtain feedback from supervisor and make needed changes
o Include the final product in this tab
B. Use performance monitoring checklists to evaluate implementation of the
skills acquisition and behavior reduction programs in the field
o Provide corrective feedback
o Obtain supervision during use of checklists and feedback
o Use performance monitoring checklists during scheduled supervision
visits with implementers
o Include the completed checklists in this tab (make sure to de-identify
personal information)
C. Use performance monitoring checklists to evaluate fidelity of data
collection in the field
o Include the completed checklists in this tab (make sure to de-identify
personal information)
D. Use performance monitoring checklists to evaluate fidelity of preference
assessment in the field
o Include the completed checklists in this tab (make sure to de-identify
personal information)
 Suggested Readings
•
•
•
•
Alavosius M. P., & Sulzer-Azaroff B. (1990). Acquisition and maintenance of health-care routines as
a function of feedback density. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 23, 151–162.
Brackett L., Reid, D. H, Green, C. W. (2007). Effects of reactivity to observations on staff
performance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40, 191–195.
Burgio, L. D., Engel, B. T., Hawkins, A., McCormick, K., Scheve, A., & Jones, L. T. (1990). A staff
management system for maintaining improvements in continence with elderly nursing home residents.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 23, 111-118.
Codding, R.S., Feinberg, A. B., Dunn, E.K., & Pace, G.M. (2005). Effects of immediate performance
feedback on implementation of behavior support plans. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 38,
205-219.
72
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
•
•
•
Parsons, M. B., & Reid, D. H. (1995). Training residential supervisors to provide feedback for
maintaining staff teaching skills with people who have severe disabilities. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 28, 317-322.
Parsons M. B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid D. H., (2012). Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for
Practitioners. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 2-11.
Reid D. H., & Parsons M. B. (1995). Comparing choice and questionnaire measures of the
acceptability of a staff training procedure. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28, 95–96.
Richman, G. S., Riordan, M. R., Reiss, M. L., Pyles, D. A. M., & Bailey, J. S. (1988). The effects of
self-monitoring and supervisor feedback on staff performance in a residential setting. Journal of
Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 401-409.
Vollmer, T.R., Sloman, K.N., & St. Peter Pipkin, C. (2008). Practical Implications of Data Reliability
and Treatment Integrity Monitoring. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 4-11.
Return to Folder Index
73
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
Tab 25: Evaluate effectiveness of components of an intervention package
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Conduct a component analysis to determine the effective components of an intervention package (B11)
A. For treatment plans that consist of multiple procedures design a component
analysis to determine the effectiveness of different components of the intervention
package
B. Discuss the proposed design with supervisor and obtain feedback
o Make necessary changes to the designs and include the final products
in this tab
• Use the title of treatment plans to label each design
C. Use the proposed design to systematically arrange different components to
demonstrate their effects on target behaviors
o Collect appropriate data and generate graphs (See Tab 4)
o Obtain feedback on construction of graphs
o Make necessary changes and include the revised graphs in this tab
D. Base decision-making on data displayed in various formats (J-15)
o Discuss the visually displayed ongoing treatment data with supervisor
E. Using Baseline logic evaluate the effectiveness of the different components
and make changes to the treatment plans
III. Experimental designs
Indicate “Yes” or “No” for each design
B-04
Used withdrawal designs
B-05
Used reversal designs
B-06
Used alternating treatments (i.e., multi-element)
designs
B-07
Used changing criterion designs
B-08
Used multiple baseline designs
B-09
Used multiple probe designs
B-10
Used combinations of design elements
Used standard celeration charts (SCC)
Used cumulative record
 Suggested Readings
• Cooper, L. J., Wacker, D. P., McComas, J. J., Brown, K., Peck, S. M., Richman, D., Drew, J.,
Frischmeyer, P., & Millard, T. (1995). Use of component analyses to identify active variables in
74
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
•
•
treatment packages for children with feeding disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28,
139-153.
Hanley, G. P., Iwata, B. A., Thompson, R. H., & Lindberg, J. S. (2000). A component analysis of
"stereotypy as reinforcement" for alternative behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33,
285-297.
Millard, T., Wacker, D. P., Cooper, L. J., Harding, J., Drew, J., Plagmann, L. A., Asmus, J.,
McComas, J., & Jensen-Kovalan, P. (1993). A brief component analysis of potential treatment
packages in an outpatient clinic setting with young children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis,
26, 475-476.
Mazaleski, J. L., Iwata, B. A., Vollmer, T. R., Zarcone, J. R., & Smith, R. G. (1993). Analysis of the
reinforcement and extinction components in DRO contingencies with self-injury. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 26, 143-156.
Ward-Horner, J., & Sturmey, P. (2010). Component analyses using single-subject experimental
designs: A review. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 685-704.
Return to Folder Index
75
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
VIII. Conduct ongoing assessment of interventions
Tab 26: Compare effectiveness of different treatments
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Conduct a component analysis to determine the effective components of an intervention package (B-11)
A. Design an intervention that uses alternating treatment design to establish
effectiveness of two or more treatments on the DV
B. Discuss the proposed design with supervisor and obtain feedback
o Make necessary changes to the designs and include the final products in this
tab
• Use the title of treatment plans to label each design
C. Use the proposed design to alternate different treatments to demonstrate their effects
on target behaviors
o Collect appropriate data and generate graphs (See Tab 4)
o Obtain feedback on construction of graphs
o Make necessary changes and include the revised graphs in this tab
D. Base decision-making on data displayed in various formats (J-15)
o Discuss the visually displayed ongoing treatment data with supervisor
E. Using Baseline logic evaluate the effectiveness of the different components and
make changes to the treatment plans
III. Experimental designs
Indicate “Yes” or “No” for each design
B-06
Multi-element design
Simultaneous design
 Suggested Readings
• Ahearn, W. H., Kerwin, M. E., Eicher, P. S., Shantz, J., & Swearing, W. (1996). An alternating treatments
comparison of two intensive interventions for food refusal. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 321332.
• Barlow, D. H., & Hayes, S. C. (1979). Alternating treatments design: One strategy for comparing the
effects of two treatments in a single subject. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12, 199-210.
• Barlow, K.E., Tiger, J.H., Slocum, S.K., & Miller, S.J. (2013). Comparing Acquisition of Exchange-Based
and Signed Mands with Children With Autism. Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 29, 59–69.
• Hains, A. H., & Baer, D. M. (1989). Interaction effects in multi-element designs: Inevitable, desirable, and
ignorable. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 22, 57-69.
• Sisson, L. A., & Barrett, R. P. (1984). An alternating treatments comparison of oral and total
communication training with minimally verbal retarded children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 17,
559-566.
• Wacker, D., McMahon, C., Steege, M., Berg, W., Sasso, G., & Melloy, K. (1990). Applications of a
sequential alternating treatments design. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 23, 333-339.
Return to Folder Index
76
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
IX. Train another individual to conduct a procedure
Tab 27: Design and use competency based training for persons who are responsible
for carrying out behavior change procedures
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop an evidence-based staff training (K-03)
A. Design competency based trainings for direct staff that includes the following
components:
o Description of the target skill and purpose
o Technological written plan describing how to perform the target skill
o Demonstration of the target skill
o Opportunity for trainees to practice the target skills
o How performance feedback is going to be given during practice
o Set a clear criteria for mastery of the skill in training setting
o Set a clear criteria for mastery of the skills on the job
B. Obtain feedback from supervisor and make needed changes
o Include the final product in this tab
C. Conduct small group training using the competency based training
o Include participant ratings of the group training
III. Provide on the job training and supervision for behavior-change agents (K-06)
A. Conduct on the job behavior skills trainings after small group instruction
o Use the performance monitoring checklists to evaluate implementation
of skills in the field. See example performance monitoring tool
o Give feedback to implementers using the checklists
o Obtain supervision during on the job behavior skills training
B. Provide weekly supervision to direct staff that includes
o Data collection
o Monitoring procedural integrity and corrective feedback
o Data analysis and data based decision making
o Modification of existing programs
o Development and implementation of new programs
o Orderly termination of services when they are no longer required (K-10)
IV. Develop professional presentations (optional)
A. Submit an abstract for consideration to a professional conference or organization (Click here to see
sample Performance Monitoring Tool)
B. Present empirical research findings, a conceptual paper, or professional topic at professional
conference or organization (Click here to see sample Performance Monitoring Tool)
77
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
 Suggested Readings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Arnal, L., Fazzio, D., Martin, G. L., Yu, C. T., Keilback, L., & Starke, M. (2007). Instructing university
students to conduct discrete-trials teaching with confederates simulating children with autism.
Developmental Disabilities Bulletin, 35(1-2), 131-137.
Ducharme, J. M., Feldman, M. A. (1992). Comparison of staff training strategies to promote
generalized teaching skills. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 25, 165-179.
Brodhead, M.T., & Higbee, T.S. (2012). Teaching and Maintaining Ethical Behavior in a Professional
Organization. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 82-88.
Iwata, B. A., Wallace, M. D., Kahng, S., Lindberg, J. S., Roscoe, E. M., Conners, J., Hanley, G. P.,
Thompson, R. H., & Worsdell, A. S. (2000). Skill acquisition in the implementation of functional
analysis methodology. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 181-194.
McGimsey J. F., Greene B. F., Lutzker J. R. (1995). Competence in aspects of behavioral treatment
and consultation: Implications for service delivery and graduate training. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 28, 301–315.
Miles N. I., Wilder D. A. (2009). The effects of behavioral skills training on caregiver implementation
of guided compliance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 405–410.
Parsons, M. B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid D. H., (2012). Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for
Practitioners. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 2-11.
Roscoe, E.M., & Fisher, W.W. (2008). Evaluation of an efficient method for training staff to
implement stimulus preference assessments. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 41, 249-254.
Sarokoff, R.A., & Sturmey, P. (2004). The Effects of Behavioral Skills Training on Staff
Implementation of Discrete-Trial Teaching. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 37, 535–538
Shore, B. A., Iwata, B. A., Vollmer, T. R., Lerman, D. C., & Zarcone, J. R. (1995). Pyramidal staff
training in the extension of treatment for severe behavior disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior
Analysis, 28, 323-332.
Wolery, M., & Garfinkle, A. N. (2002). Measures in intervention research with young children who have
autism. Journal of Autism And Developmental Disorders, 32(5), 463-478. doi:10.1023/A:1020598023809
Return to Folder Index
78
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
X. Develop and present a training module to individuals unfamiliar
with behavior analysis
Tab 28: Develop and present a training module to individuals unfamiliar with
behavior analysis
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Develop an evidence-based staff training (K-03)
A. Design and conduct competency based trainings for parents and/or teachers
using combination of presentations, demonstrations and opportunities for trainees
to practice the target skills
o Set a clear criteria for mastery of the skill in training setting
o Set a clear criteria for mastery of the skills in the natural environment
o Provide feedback in all settings
B. Assess learning outcomes through tests and demonstrations
o Include assessment results in this tab
C. Obtain feedback from supervisor and make needed changes
 Suggested Readings
• Gardner J. M. (1972). Teaching behavior modification to nonprofessionals. Journal of Applied
Behavior Analysis, 5, 517–521.
• Kazdin. A.D., & Warzak, W. J. (2000). The problem of parental non-adherence in clinical behavior
analysis: Effective treatment is not enough. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 373-391.
• Neef, N. A. (1995). Pyramidal parent training by peers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28,
333-337.
• Noell G. H, Witt J. C, LaFleur L. H, Mortenson B. P, Ranier D. D, LeVelle J. (2000). Increasing
intervention implementation in general education following consultation: A comparison of two
follow-up strategies. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 271–284.
• Phaneuf, L., & Lee McIntyre., L. (2007) Effects of individualized video feedback combined with
group parent training on inappropriate maternal behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 40,
737-741.
• Sanders, M. R., & Glynn, T. (1981). Training parents in behavioral self-management: An analysis of
generalization and maintenance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 14, 223-237.
• Seiverling, L., Williams, K., Sturmey, P., & Hart, S. (2012). Effects of behavioral skills training on
parental treatment of children’s food selectivity. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 45, 197-203.
Return to Folder Index
79
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
X. Develop and present a training module to individuals unfamiliar
with behavior analysis
Tab 29: Explain behavioral concepts using nontechnical language
1st Year
Students
2nd Year
Students
I. Review BACB® ethical guidelines
A. Review the following ethical guidelines and discuss with supervisor
i. 1.0 Responsible Conduct of a Behavior Analyst
ii. 2.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients
iii. 4.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Individual Behavior Change Program
iv. 6.0 The Behavior Analyst and the Workplace
v. 8.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Colleagues
vi. 9.0 The Behavior Analyst’s Ethical Responsibility to Society
vii. 10.0 The Behavior Analyst and Research
II. Provide behavior-analytic services in collaboration with others who provide services to your clients (G06).
A. Collaborate with other professionals who provide services to your client
o Reducing problem behaviors to allow other professionals to work on
skill acquisition
o Providing treatment data to parents to share with physicians for clients
that are taking psychotropic medications
B. Explain behavioral concepts using nontechnical language
o During meetings with other professionals and parents use non-technical
language to explain:
 Assessment results
 Treatment plans
 Data analysis and progress
 Suggested Readings
•
•
•
Jarmolowicz, A., et al., 2008. Effects of conversational versus technical language on treatment preference and
integrity. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 46, 190-199.
Rolider, A., & Axelrod, S. (2005). The effects of ‘‘behavior-speak’’ on public attitudes toward behavioral
interventions. A cross-cultural argument for using conversational language to describe behavioral interventions.
In Focus on behavior analysis in education (pp. 283– 293). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill Prentice
Hall.
Rolider, A., Axelrod, S., & Van Houten, R., 1998. Don't Speak Behaviorism to Me: How to Clearly and
Effectively Communicate Behavioral Interventions to the General Public. Child & Family Behavior Therapy,
20, 39-56.
Return to Folder Index
80
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
MS in Applied Behavior Analysis Program
Department of Psychology
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences &
The Tseng College
SAMPLE
CONTRACT BETWEEN SUPERVISEE & SUPERVISOR
EXPERIENCE AS BEHAVIOR ANALYST
This agreement defines a relationship of supervision between
____________________________________ and _________________________________
(name of supervisee)
(name of supervisor)
Category of Supervised Experience:
___________________________
Amount of Supervised Experience Required:
___________________________
Amount of Supervision Required:
___________________________
Supervisor’s Qualifications (see below):
____________________________
Site(s) of Supervision:
____________________________
____________________________
____________________________
******************************************************************************
Nature of the Contract:
This contract is to establish a supervisor-supervisee relationship between the parties named above. Should either
party not adhere to their responsibilities, this contract may be terminated by either party upon written notice,
immediately.
Standards of Conduct:
Both parties attest to adhere to the BACB® Guidelines for Responsible Conduct. The supervisor is to be
considered the client of the applicant. Parties should pay particular attention to Sections 1 (Responsible Conduct
of a Behavior Analyst), 2 (The Behavior Analyst’s Responsibility to Clients), and 3 (Assessing Behavior) of the
Guidelines set by BACB®.
Onset of Experience (from www.BACB.com):
Supervisee may not start accumulating experience until they have begun the coursework required to meet the
BACB® coursework requirements. The supervisee will provide proof of coursework upon the written request of
the supervisor. Additionally, the supervisee must complete a registration process with the BACB® in which they
must pass an online, competency-based training module on BACB® experience standards before beginning
coursework and accumulating experience.
Appropriate Activities (from www.BACB.com):
The supervisee’s primary focus should be on learning new behavior analytic skills related to the BACB® Third
Edition Task List. Activities must adhere to the dimensions of applied behavior analysis identified by Baer,
Wolf, and Risley (1968) in the article Some Current Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis published in the
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Supervisees are encouraged to have experiences in multiple sites and
with multiple supervisors.
Appropriate experience activities include:
1. Direct implementation of behavior programs may not count for more than 50% (BACB® will monitor
and audit)
2. Supervisees are strongly encouraged to have multiple experiences (e.g., sites, populations) and multiple
supervisors
81
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
3. Conducting assessment activities related to the need for behavioral interventions (e.g., Functional
Behavior Assessments, Preference Assessments)
4. Designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients
5. Overseeing the implementation of behavior analysis programs by others
6. Training and managing others
7. Other activities normally performed by a behavior analyst that are directly related to behavior analysis
such as case consultation, attending planning meetings regarding the behavior analysis program,
researching the literature related to the program, talking to individuals about the program; plus any
additional activities related to oversight of behavioral programming such as behavior analyst supervision
issues, or evaluation of behavior analysts' performance. The supervisor will determine if activities
qualify.
Examples of activities that are not appropriate as experience activities include: attending meetings with little or
no behavior analytic content, providing interventions that are not based in behavior analysis, doing nonbehavior analytic administrative activities, or any other activities that are not directly related to behavior
analysis.
Temporal Distribution of Experience
Supervisees may accrue no fewer than 10 hours, no more than 30 hours, each week. Start-date and end-date of
supervision may not be more than 5 years apart (effective as of December 31, 2014; see www.BACB .com)
Appropriate Clients (from www.BACB.com):
Clients may be any persons for whom behavior analysis services are appropriate. However, the applicant may
not be related to the client or the client’s primary caretaker. Applicants must work with multiple clients during
the experience period.
Supervisor Qualifications (from www.BACB.com):
During the experience period, the supervisor must be:
A Board Certified Behavior Analyst in good standing and the supervisor may not be the applicant's relative,
subordinate or employee during the experience period. The supervisor will not be considered an employee of
the applicant if the only compensation received by the supervisor from the applicant consists of payment for
supervision.
New BACB® Requirements as of December 31, 2014 require that BCBAs supervising individuals pursuing
certification must:
a) Complete a post-certification, competency-based training program on supervision (i.e., minimum of 8-hr
supervision training) AND
b) Pass an online, competency-based training module on BACB experience standards (at
www.BACB.com; scheduled for release September 30, 2013) AND
c) Obtain 3 hours of CE’s in supervision each certification cycle
82
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Nature of Supervision (from www.BACB.com):
The supervisor must observe the applicant engaging in behavior analytic activities in the natural environment at
least once every two weeks. The supervisor must provide specific feedback to applicants on their
performance. During the initial half of the total experience hours, observation should concentrate on applicantclient interactions. This observation may be conducted via web-cameras, videotape, videoconferencing, or
similar means in lieu of the supervisor being physically present. Supervision may be conducted in small groups
of 10 or fewer participants for no more than half of the total supervised hours in each supervisory period. The
remainder of the total supervision hours in each supervisory period must consist of direct one-to-one
contact. Supervision hours may be counted toward the total number of experience hours required.
Acceptable activities include
– Development of performance expectations
– Observations, BST, and delivery of PF
– Modeling technical, professional, & ethical behavior
– Guiding behavioral case conceptualization repertoires
– Review of written materials
– Oversight and evaluation of the effects of behavioral service delivery
– Ongoing evaluation of the effects of supervision
Acceptable structure
– Supervisor must observe and provide feedback to supervisee on behavior-analytic activities with a
client in natural environment during each supervisory period
– Supervision may be conducted in small groups for half of the total supervised hours.
• Small groups 2-10 supervisees
• If non-supervisees are present, their participation should be limited
Documentation of Supervision (from www.BACB.com):
Supervisors are responsible for providing documentation for each supervisory period on a feedback form
provided by the BACB®. The feedback form will require documentation of number of hours of experience,
number of supervised hours, feedback on the applicant’s performance, the supervisor for each supervisory
period, and signatures of the applicant and supervisor. The supervisor must review the completed feedback
forms with the applicant and provide a copy for the applicant each supervisory period. The supervisor and the
applicant are responsible for retaining their copies of the forms (in the event of a disagreement regarding
experience, the BACB® will need documentation from each party). The BACB® reserves the right to request
this documentation at any time following an individual’s application to take the certification exam. In addition,
the supervisor will be required to verify the applicant’s supervision on the Experience Verification Form that is
provided within the application for examination.
I have read the above and agree to the provisions set forth in this contract.
_________________________________________
Supervisor’s Signature
Date
__________________
_________________________________________
Supervisee’s Signature
Date
__________________
Return to Contracts and Important Forms
83
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
November 6, 2013
®
BACB Sample Supervision Contract for a University Practicum
To download and edit, go to www.BACB.com
The following sample contract pertains to supervision conducted or coordinated through a university practicum. The sample terms
provided herein are for general reference and information purposes only. These terms are intended to comply with the requirements
for supervised experience of applicants to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (“BACB®”). Nothing herein shall be construed
as legal advice. The BACB does not warrant or guarantee the legal enforceability of any provision contained in this sample
agreement. Contracts should be drafted by individuals familiar with local and state laws and requirements. Please note that it is the
responsibility of the supervisor and supervisee to ensure that the contract meets all the requirements outlined by the BACB in the
BACB Experience Standards policy. Please also note that this contract will need to be edited for supervisees pursuing the BCaBA
credential.
This sample agreement is not designed to serve as a course syllabus. University policies and provisions typically found in a syllabus,
such as grading, academic dishonesty, student disability policy, etc. should be covered in a separate syllabus document and may be
attached to this sample agreement as an appendix.
This Supervision agreement is made on the date indicated below by and between _____ (supervisor) and _____
(supervisee) for supervision of the delivery of applied behavior analysis services in the supervisee’s Practicum
experience through _____, including the following activities:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Conducting assessment activities related to the need for behavioral interventions;
Designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients;
Overseeing the implementation of behavior analysis programs by others;
Training, designing behavioral systems, and performance management; AND
Other activities normally performed by a behavior analyst that are directly related to behavior analysis, such
as attending planning meetings regarding the behavior analysis program, researching the literature related to
the program, talking to individuals about the program; plus any additional activities related to oversight of
behavioral programming such as behavior analyst supervision issues, or evaluation of behavior analysts'
performance. The supervisor will determine if activities qualify.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND AGREEMENTS
1. Supervisor and supervisee agree to work together to facilitate in-depth discussion/understanding of issues
affecting practice – both personally and professionally – and developing a high level of behavior-analytic
expertise.
2. Supervisor agrees to provide specific feedback to supervisee on performance in Supervisee-client
interaction; this may be conducted via web-camera, videotape, videoconferencing, or similar means in lieu
of the supervisor being physically present.
3. Both parties agree to protect the time and space for supervision, by keeping to agreed appointments and the
time allotted. Privacy will be respected and interruptions avoided. Any party requiring a variance in
schedule will notify the other party at the earliest possible time of variance to determine an appropriate time
to reschedule.
4. Supervision may be conducted in a small group for no more than half of the total supervised hours, per
BACB standards. The rest of the hours of supervision must be conducted as direct one-to-one supervision.
5. Supervisee and supervisor will meet at least once every week for 7.5% of the total hours spent in Supervised
Independent Fieldwork.
6. A Supervision Documentation Form will be completed at each supervisory interaction.
7. Supervisee agrees to accumulate the required minimum of 10 hours and maximum of 30 hours per week to
meet the total 1000 hours needed to complete the BACB Practicum requirement approximately within one
year.
84
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
8. In addition to supervision meetings, supervisee is required to attend additional professional meetings
relevant to the case, such as school meetings, case conferences, and parent meetings, which may not count
towards BACB eligible supervised experience.
9. Supervisee agrees to begin Practicum only after supervisee has started attending courses required to meet
the BACB coursework requirements.
10. Supervisee and supervisor both agree to maintain a copy of each signed supervision document including all
feedback forms identified in Clause 11, below, and this signed contract for supervision.
11. During the supervision period, there will be progress reviews conducted after every 100 hours of
supervision have been acquired. At these reviews, the supervisor will provide feedback to the supervisee
and document whether adequate progress is being made. After two progress reviews during which
inadequate progress has been made, the supervisor must determine whether supervision should continue,
and provide in writing the required steps to allow for continued supervision. If the determination is made
that supervision should stop, the supervisor must provide in writing to the supervisee what areas were
lacking adequate progress and determine if any of the hours during that period should be counted toward
supervision. As such, there is no guarantee that the supervisor will sign off on hours accrued during the 100hour period during which supervisee performance was inadequate.
12. The Experience Verification Form will be signed by the supervisor when either of the following occur:
a. All experience hours are completed satisfactorily.
b. The supervisor-supervisee relationship is terminated under positive conditions (e.g.,).
13. The following circumstances would justify a supervisor refusing to sign off on a supervisee’s accrued hours
on the Experience Verification Form (i.e., even though those hours were tracked through individual
Supervision Documentation Forms).
a. Supervisee does not receive a passing grade.
b. Supervisee receives ___ unsatisfactory performance evaluations.
c. Egregious violation of the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts (see
language below) and/or behavior that jeopardizes the well-being of clients or other team members.
d. Supervisee fails to:
If Practicum services are to be delivered off-campus, it is strongly recommended that the supervisor and supervisee meet with relevant
personnel (e.g., directors, supervisor, employer) in the supervisee’s practice settings to (a) ensure that all provisions in this contract
can be faithfully executed in the setting, (b) familiarize the supervisor with setting-specific rules, regulations, and practices, (c)
identify if and how the supervisor’s recommendations will be incorporated into the setting, and (d) identify potentially challenging
dual relationship (e.g., supervision) issues and develop a plan to address them. It might be advantageous to incorporate some of this
content into the supervision contract and include a section for setting personnel to formally agree to contract content via signature.
RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT
1. Both supervisor and supervisee herein referred to as “both parties” agree to adhere to high standards of
professional behavior. This includes behavioral discussions grounded in scientific and professionally
derived knowledge.
2. The supervisor will provide supervision to the supervisee only within the boundaries of his/her competence.
3. Both parties agree to maintain confidentiality in accordance with the guidelines for responsible conduct and
all pertinent legal regulations.
4. Both parties have read, understood, and will adhere to the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for
Behavior Analysts. Particular attention will be given to sections 1 through 6 as it relates to conduct,
responsibility to clients, and assessing behavior.
RELEASE AND INDEMNIFICATION
Supervisee agrees to release, defend, indemnify, and hold harmless _____, its officers, agents, and employees,
from and against any and all claims, damages and expenses, including costs and attorneys’ fees, arising from or
85
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
alleged to arise from (a) any asserted deficiencies or defects in the behavior analysis services rendered by or to
be rendered by the supervisee in accordance with this agreement; (b) any breach of any term set forth in this
agreement; AND (c) any act or omission of supervisee in connection with supervisee’s business operations and
the behavior analysis services provided by supervisee.
CONFIDENTIALITY
Confidential Information. On and after the date of this agreement, supervisor and supervisee shall keep
confidential all information relating to current or potential clients including, but not limited to, any medical or
clinical information, in whatever form.
Supervisor Records. All _____ records including, but not limited to the information described and copies
thereof, are and shall remain the property of _____. Supervisee shall not, except in the ordinary and usual
course of his/her duties and obligations under this agreement, remove from supervisor’s premises, copy, or
retain any of _____’s records. Upon termination of the agreement, supervisee agrees to return promptly to
_____ any of _____’s records, copies of records and all other property that are in supervisee’s possession or
under supervisee’s control or custody.
Supervisor and supervisee shall be jointly responsible for ensuring that clients have consented to the
observation of services delivery and sharing of confidential client information.
TERM AND TERMINATION
Term. This agreement shall be effective on _____ and shall remain in effect until either party terminates this
agreement by ___ day’s advance written notice to the other of the intention to terminate. In the event of
termination Clause 12 shall survive and remain valid.
REMEDIES
Injunctive Relief. The supervisee acknowledges that a breach of any of the covenant or obligations contained in
this agreement may result in material and irreparable injury to _____, or its affiliates or subsidiaries for which
there is no adequate remedy at law and that injury and damages to _____, its affiliates or its subsidiaries
resulting from a breach will be immeasurable. Without limiting any other rights or remedies, both legal and
equitable, available to supervisor in the event of an actual or threatened breach, supervisor shall be entitled to
seek and obtain a temporary restraining order and/or a preliminary or permanent injunction against supervisee
that shall prevent supervisee from engaging in any activities prohibited by this agreement, or to seek and obtain
such other relief against supervisee as may be required to specifically enforce any of the covenants or
obligations contained in this agreement.
Supervisee hereby agrees and consents that injunctive relief may be sought ex parte in any court of record in the
jurisdiction in which the violation occurs, or any other court of competent jurisdiction, at the election of
supervisor.
Costs and Attorneys’ Fees. In addition to any other relief to which it may be entitled, _____ shall be entitled to
recover from supervisee the costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees it may incur in any action it brings to enforce
this agreement in which it prevails.
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
86
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Entire agreement. This agreement contains the entire agreement between the Parties hereto with respect to the
subject matter hereof.
This section is reserved for selected miscellaneous provisions regarding topics important to contract
interpretation and enforcement. Research into enforceable contracts in your state should help you select contract
provisions to address the following provisions:
Modifications – Identify who may make changes to the agreement and whether they need to be in
writing or via electronic format, if permitted by your state law. Identify the addresses where changes
should be sent.
Waiver - Do the parties have the right to waive a clause in the agreement? How should other clauses be
treated?
Severability – If one clause is stricken by implication of law, may the remaining clauses of the contract
be still considered valid? May a stricken clause be reconstrued so as to be enforceable?
Governing law and venue – Which law will govern the interpretation of the agreement? Do you desire
arbitration or mediation prior to litigation? Are court costs and legal fees desired remedies?
Notice under this agreement by one Party to another Party shall be in writing and considered effectively given if
personally delivered or deposited via postal service, postage prepaid, certified or registered, return requested,
and addressed to the recipient as follows:
-------------------------------------------------------------------The responsibilities described in this document will be carried out in accordance with the BACB’s Guidelines
for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and Professional Disciplinary and Ethical Standards.
All parties agree to the stipulations herein:
Supervisee Name (printed): ____________________
Supervisee signature: ____________________
Date: _______
Supervisor Name & Credentials (printed): ____________________
Supervisor signature: ____________________
Date: __________
Return to Contracts and Important Forms
87
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
January 15, 2014
®
BACB Supervision Contract for Independent Supervision
To download and edit, go to www.BACB.com
The following sample contract describes a relationship between a supervisor and a supervisee who is acquiring Supervised
Independent Fieldwork toward an eligibility requirement for a BACB credential. This contract pertains specifically to situations in
which the supervisor and supervisee DO NOT work in the same service-delivery environment. The sample terms provided herein are
for general reference and information purposes only. These terms are intended to comply with the requirements for supervised
experience of applicants to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (“BACB®”). Nothing herein shall be construed as legal advice.
The BACB does not warrant or guarantee the legal enforceability of any provision contained in this sample agreement. Contracts
should be drafted by individuals familiar with local and state laws and requirements. Please note that it is the responsibility of the
supervisor and supervisee to ensure that the contract meets all the requirements outlined by the BACB in the BACB Experience
Standards policy. Please also note that this contract will need to be edited for supervisees pursuing the BCaBA credential.
This Supervision agreement is made on the date indicated below by and between _____ (supervisor) and _____
(supervisee) for supervision of the delivery of applied behavior analysis services, including the following
activities:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Conducting assessment activities related to the need for behavioral interventions;
Designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients;
Overseeing the implementation of behavior analysis programs by others;
Training, designing behavioral systems, and performance management; AND
Other activities normally performed by a behavior analyst that are directly related to behavior analysis, such
as attending planning meetings regarding the behavior analysis program, researching the literature related to
the program, talking to individuals about the program; plus any additional activities related to oversight of
behavioral programming such as behavior analyst supervision issues, or evaluation of behavior analysts'
performance. The supervisor will determine if activities qualify.
Direct implementation of behavioral programs may not count for more than 50% of accrued experience hours.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND AGREEMENTS
1. Supervisor and supervisee agree to work together to facilitate in-depth discussion/understanding of issues
affecting practice – both personally and professionally – and developing a high level of behavior-analytic
expertise.
2. Supervisor agrees to provide specific feedback to supervisee on performance in Supervisee-client
interaction; this may be conducted via web-camera, videotape, videoconferencing, or similar means in lieu
of the supervisor being physically present.
3. Both parties agree to protect the time and space for supervision, by keeping to agreed appointments and the
time allotted. Privacy will be respected and interruptions avoided. Any party requiring a variance in
schedule will notify the other party at the earliest possible time of variance to determine an appropriate time
to reschedule.
4. Supervision may be conducted in a small group for no more than half of the total supervised hours, per
BACB standards. The rest of the hours of supervision must be conducted as direct one-to-one supervision.
5. Supervisee and supervisor will meet at least once every 2 weeks for 5% of the total hours spent in
Supervised Independent Fieldwork.
6. A Supervision Documentation Form will be completed at each supervisory interaction.
7. Supervisee agrees to accumulate the required minimum of 10 hours and maximum of 30 hours per week to
meet the total 1500 hours needed to complete the BCBA Supervised Independent Fieldwork requirement
88
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
approximately within one year. _____ agrees to provide supervisee with the work opportunities necessary to
meet this requirement.
8. In addition to supervision meetings, supervisee is required to attend additional professional meetings
relevant to the case, such as school meetings, case conferences, and parent meetings, which may not count
towards BACB eligible supervised experience.
9. Supervisor is to be compensated at an hourly rate of $___ to be paid immediately upon conclusion of each
supervision session or by a mutual agreement arranged at the onset of the supervisory relationship. Payment
for supervision rendered is a necessary but insufficient condition for the submission of a signed Experience
Verification Form to the BACB. Adequate progress and payment must be completed before such
documentation is signed.
10. Supervisor agrees to accept no remuneration from supervisee above the negotiated hourly consultant rate or
salary.
11. Supervisee agrees to begin Supervised Independent Fieldwork only after supervisee has started attending
courses required to meet the BACB coursework requirements.
12. Supervisee and supervisor both agree to maintain a copy of each signed supervision document including all
feedback forms identified in Clause 13, below, and this signed contract for supervision.
13. During the supervision period, there will be progress reviews conducted after every 100 hours of
supervision have been acquired. At these reviews, the supervisor will provide feedback to the supervisee
and document whether adequate progress is being made. After two progress reviews during which
inadequate progress has been made, the supervisor must determine whether supervision should continue,
and provide in writing the required steps to allow for continued supervision. If the determination is made
that supervision should stop, the supervisor must provide in writing to the supervisee what areas were
lacking adequate progress and determine if any of the hours during that period should be counted toward
supervision. As such, there is no guarantee that the supervisor will sign off on hours accrued during the 100hour period during which supervisee performance was inadequate.
14. The Experience Verification Form will be signed by the supervisor when either of the following occur:
a. All experience hours are completed satisfactorily.
b. The supervisor-supervisee relationship is terminated under positive conditions (e.g.,).
15. The following circumstances would justify a supervisor refusing to sign off on a supervisee’s accrued hours
on the Experience Verification Form (i.e., even though those hours were tracked through individual
Supervision Documentation Forms).
a. Supervisee receives ___ unsatisfactory performance evaluations.
b. Egregious violation of the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts (see
language below) and/or behavior that jeopardizes the well-being of clients or other team members.
c. Supervisee fails to:
It is strongly recommended that the supervisor and supervisee meet with relevant personnel (e.g., directors, supervisor, employer) in
the supervisee’s practice settings to (a) ensure that all provisions in this contract can be faithfully executed in the setting, (b)
familiarize the supervisor with setting-specific rules, regulations, and practices, (c) identify if and how the supervisor’s
recommendations will be incorporated into the setting, and (d) identify potentially challenging dual relationship (e.g., supervision)
issues and develop a plan to address them. It might be advantageous to incorporate some of this content into the supervision contract
and include a section for setting personnel to formally agree to contract content via signature.
RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT
1. Both supervisor and supervisee herein referred to as “both parties” agree to adhere to high standards of
professional behavior. This includes behavioral discussions grounded in scientific and professionally
derived knowledge.
2. The supervisor will provide supervision to the supervisee only within the boundaries of his/her competence.
89
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
3. Both parties agree to maintain confidentiality in accordance with the guidelines for responsible conduct and
all pertinent legal regulations.
4. Both parties have read, understood, and will adhere to the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for
Behavior Analysts. Particular attention will be given to sections 1 through 6 as it relates to conduct,
responsibility to clients, and assessing behavior.
CONFIDENTIALITY
Confidential Information. On and after the date of this agreement, supervisor and supervisee shall keep
confidential all information relating to current or potential clients including, but not limited to, any medical or
clinical information, in whatever form. Supervisor and supervisee shall be jointly responsible for ensuring that
clients have consented to the observation of service delivery and sharing of confidential client information.
Supervisor Records. All records related to the activities described in this contract are and shall remain the
property of _____. Supervisee shall not, except in the ordinary and usual course of his/her duties and
obligations under this agreement, remove from supervisor’s premises, copy, or retain any of _____’s records.
Upon termination of the agreement, supervisee agrees to return promptly to _____, any of _____’s records,
copies of records and all other property that are in supervisee’s possession or under supervisee’s control or
custody.
TERM AND TERMINATION
Term. This agreement shall be effective on _____ and shall remain in effect until either party terminates this
agreement by ___ day’s advance written notice to the other of the intention to terminate. In the event of
termination Clause 14 shall survive and remain valid.
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
Entire agreement. This agreement contains the entire agreement between the Parties hereto with respect to the
subject matter hereof.
This section is reserved for selected miscellaneous provisions regarding topics important to contract
interpretation and enforcement. Research into enforceable contracts in your state should help you select contract
provisions to address the following provisions:
Modifications – Identify who may make changes to the agreement and whether they need to be in
writing or via electronic format, if permitted by your state law. Identify the addresses where changes
should be sent.
Waiver - Do the parties have the right to waive a clause in the agreement? How should other clauses be
treated?
Severability – If one clause is stricken by implication of law, may the remaining clauses of the contract
be still considered valid? May a stricken clause be reconstrued so as to be enforceable?
Governing law and venue – Which law will govern the interpretation of the agreement? Do you desire
arbitration or mediation prior to litigation? Are court costs and legal fees desired remedies?
90
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Notice under this agreement by one Party to another Party shall be in writing and considered effectively given if
personally delivered or deposited via postal service, postage prepaid, certified or registered, return requested,
and addressed to the recipient as follows:
-------------------------------------------------------------------The responsibilities described in this document will be carried out in accordance with the BACB’s Guidelines
for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and Professional Disciplinary and Ethical Standards.
All parties agree to the stipulations herein:
Supervisee Name (printed): ____________________
Supervisee signature: ____________________
Date: _______
Supervisor Name & Credentials (printed): ____________________
Supervisor signature: ____________________
Date: __________
Return to Contracts and Important Forms
+
91
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
September 30, 2014
®
BACB Supervision Contract for “Within Agency” Supervision
To download and edit, go to www.BACB.com
The following sample contract describes a relationship between a supervisor and a supervisee who is acquiring practical experience
toward an eligibility requirement for a BACB credential. This contract pertains specifically to situations in which the supervisor and
supervisee work in the same service-delivery environment. The sample terms provided herein are for general reference and
information purposes only. These terms are intended to comply with the requirements for supervised experience of applicants to the
Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (“BACB®”). Nothing herein shall be construed as legal advice. The BACB does not warrant or
guarantee the legal enforceability of any provision contained in this sample agreement. Contracts should be drafted by individuals
familiar with local and state laws and requirements. Please note that it is the responsibility of the supervisor and supervisee to ensure
that the contract meets all the requirements outlined by the BACB in the BACB Experience Standards policy. Please also note that this
contract will need to be edited for supervisees pursuing the BCaBA credential.
This supervision agreement is made on the date indicated below by and between _____ (supervisor) _____ and
_____ (supervisee) for supervision of the delivery of applied behavior analysis services, including the following
activities:
6. Conducting assessment activities related to the need for behavioral interventions;
7. Designing, implementing, and monitoring behavior analysis programs for clients;
8. Overseeing the implementation of behavior analysis programs by others;
9. Training, designing behavioral systems, and performance management; AND
10. Other activities normally performed by a behavior analyst that are directly related to behavior analysis, such
as attending planning meetings regarding the behavior analysis program, researching the literature related to
the program, talking to individuals about the program; plus any additional activities related to oversight of
behavioral programming such as behavior analyst supervision issues, or evaluation of behavior analysts'
performance. The supervisor will determine if activities qualify.
RESPONSIBILITIES AND AGREEMENTS
16. _____
17. Supervisor and supervisee agree to work together to facilitate in-depth discussion and understanding of
issues affecting practice – both personally and professionally – and developing a high level of behavioranalytic expertise.
18. Supervisor agrees to provide specific feedback to supervisee on performance in supervisee-client
interaction; this may be conducted via web-camera, videotape, videoconferencing, or similar means in lieu
of the supervisor being physically present.
19. Both parties agree to protect the time and space for supervision, by keeping to agreed appointments and the
time allotted. Privacy will be respected and interruptions avoided. Any party requiring a variance in
schedule will notify the other party at the earliest possible time of variance to determine an appropriate time
to reschedule.
20. Supervision may be conducted in a small group for no more than half of the total supervised hours, per
BACB standards. The rest of the hours of supervision must be conducted as direct one-to-one supervision.
21. Supervisee and supervisor will meet at least once every 2 weeks for 5% of the total hours spent in
Supervised Independent Fieldwork.
22. A Supervision Documentation Form will be completed at each supervisory interaction.
23. Supervisee agrees to accumulate the required minimum of 10 hours and maximum of 30 hours per week to
meet the total 1500 hours needed to complete the Supervised Independent Fieldwork requirement
approximately within one year. ___________ agrees to provide supervisee with the work opportunities
necessary to meet this requirement.
92
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
24. Supervisor agrees to accept no remuneration from supervisee or _____, above their negotiated hourly
consultant rate or salary.
25. Terms for payment of supervisee, if applicable.
26. In addition to supervision meetings, supervisee is required to attend additional professional meetings
relevant to the case, such as school meetings, case conferences, and parent meetings, which may not count
towards BACB eligible supervised experience.
27. Supervisee agrees to begin Supervised Independent Fieldwork only after supervisee has started attending
courses required to meet the BACB coursework requirements.
28. Supervisee and supervisor both agree to maintain a copy of each signed supervision document including all
feedback forms identified in Clause 14, below, and this signed contract for supervision.
29. During the supervision period, there will be progress reviews conducted after every 100 hours of
supervision have been acquired. At these reviews, the supervisor will provide feedback to the supervisee
and document whether adequate progress is being made. After two progress reviews during which
inadequate progress has been made, the supervisor must determine whether supervision should continue,
and provide in writing the required steps to allow for continued supervision. If the determination is made
that supervision should stop, the supervisor must provide in writing to the supervisee what areas were
lacking adequate progress and determine if any of the hours during that period should be counted toward
supervision. As such, there is no guarantee that the supervisor will sign off on hours accrued during the 100hour period during which supervisee performance was inadequate.
30. The Experience Verification Form will be signed by the supervisor when either of the following occur:
a. All experience hours are completed satisfactorily.
b. The supervisor-supervisee relationship is terminated under positive conditions (e.g.,).
31. The following circumstances would justify a supervisor refusing to sign off on a supervisee’s accrued hours
on the Experience Verification Form (i.e., even though those hours were tracked through individual
Supervision Documentation Forms).
a. Supervisee receives ___ unsatisfactory performance evaluations.
b. Egregious violation of the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts (see
language below) and/or behavior that jeopardizes the well-being of clients or other team members.
c. Supervisee fails to:
RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT
5. Both supervisor and supervisee herein referred to as “both parties” agree to adhere to high standards of
professional behavior. This includes behavioral discussions grounded in scientific and professionally
derived knowledge.
6. The supervisor will provide supervision to the supervisee only within the boundaries of his/her competence.
7. Both parties agree to maintain confidentiality in accordance with the guidelines for responsible conduct and
all pertinent legal regulations.
8. Both parties have read, understood, and will adhere to the BACB’s Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for
Behavior Analysts. Particular attention will be given to sections 1 through 6 as it relates to conduct,
responsibility to clients, and assessing behavior.
RELEASE AND INDEMNIFICATION
Supervisee agrees to release, defend, indemnify, and hold harmless _____, its officers, agents, and employees,
from and against any and all claims, damages and expenses, including costs and attorneys’ fees, arising from or
alleged to arise from (a) any asserted deficiencies or defects in the behavior analysis services rendered by or to
be rendered by the supervisee in accordance with this agreement; (b) any breach of any term set forth in this
agreement; AND (c) any act or omission of supervisee in connection with supervisee’s business operations and
93
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
the behavior analysis services provided by supervisee.
CONFIDENTIALITY
Confidential Information. On and after the date of this agreement, Representatives of ____ and supervisee shall
keep confidential all information relating to current or potential clients including, but not limited to, any
medical or clinical information, in whatever form serviced in the course of this agreement and any of _____’s
accounting, marketing, financial, strategic, or any other business information in whatever form. The Parties
agree this is intended to supplement, but not displace, _____’s applicable corporate legal rights.
Supervisor Records. All _____ records related to the activities described in this contract, including, but not
limited to the information described and copies thereof, are and shall remain the property of _____. Supervisee
shall not, except in the ordinary and usual course of his/her duties and obligations under this agreement, remove
from _____’s premises, copy, or retain any of _____’s records. Upon termination of the agreement, supervisee
agrees to return promptly to _____, any of _____’s records, copies of records and all other property that are in
supervisee’s possession or under supervisee’s control or custody.
Supervisor and supervisee shall be jointly responsible for ensuring that clients have consented to the
observation of services delivery and sharing of confidential client information.
TERM AND TERMINATION
Term. This agreement shall be effective on _____ and shall remain in effect until either party terminates this
agreement by ___ day’s advance written notice to the other of the intention to terminate. In the event of
termination Clause 15 under Responsibilities and Agreements shall survive and remain valid.
REMEDIES
Injunctive Relief. The supervisee acknowledges that a breach of any of the covenant or obligations contained in
this agreement may result in material and irreparable injury to _____, or its affiliates or subsidiaries for which
there is no adequate remedy at law and that injury and damages to _____, its affiliates or its subsidiaries
resulting from a breach will be immeasurable. Without limiting any other rights or remedies, both legal and
equitable, available to supervisor in the event of an actual or threatened breach, supervisor shall be entitled to
seek and obtain a temporary restraining order and/or a preliminary or permanent injunction against supervisee
that shall prevent supervisee from engaging in any activities prohibited by this agreement, or to seek and obtain
such other relief against supervisee as may be required to specifically enforce any of the covenants or
obligations contained in this agreement.
Supervisee hereby agrees and consents that injunctive relief may be sought ex parte in any court of record in the
jurisdiction in which the violation occurs, or any other court of competent jurisdiction, at the election of
supervisor.
Costs and Attorneys’ Fees. In addition to any other relief to which it may be entitled, _____ shall be entitled to
recover from supervisee the costs and reasonable attorneys’ fees it may incur in any action it brings to enforce
this agreement in which it prevails.
MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
Entire agreement. This agreement contains the entire agreement between the Parties hereto with respect to the
subject matter hereof.
94
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
This section is reserved for selected miscellaneous provisions regarding topics important to contract
interpretation and enforcement. Research into enforceable contracts in your state should help you select contract
provisions to address the following provisions:
Modifications – Identify who may make changes to the agreement and whether they need to be in
writing or via electronic format, if permitted by your state law. Identify the addresses where changes
should be sent.
Waiver - Do the parties have the right to waive a clause in the agreement? How should other clauses be
treated?
Severability – If one clause is stricken by implication of law, may the remaining clauses of the contract
be still considered valid? May a stricken clause be reconstrued so as to be enforceable?
Governing law and venue – Which law will govern the interpretation of the agreement? Do you desire
arbitration or mediation prior to litigation? Are court costs and legal fees desired remedies?
Notice under this agreement by one Party to another Party shall be in writing and considered effectively given if
personally delivered or deposited via postal service, postage prepaid, certified or registered, return requested,
and addressed to the recipient as follows:
-------------------------------------------------------------------The responsibilities described in this document will be carried out in accordance with the BACB’s Guidelines
for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and Professional Disciplinary and Ethical Standards.
All parties agree to the stipulations herein:
Supervisee Name (printed): ____________________
Supervisee signature: ____________________
Date: _______
Supervisor Name & Credentials (printed): ____________________
Supervisor signature: ____________________
Return to Contracts and Important Forms
Date: __________
Return to Tab 1
95
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Recommended Responsibilities for Supervisors & Supervisee
Student Responsibility
• Register for 3 units of XBEH-903
• Adhere to the course syllabus and “MS-ABA Internship Student Agreement”
• Commit at least 1 academic year to the Internship Site
• Meet weekly with field supervisor for supervision meetings
• Protect the time and space for supervision, by keeping to agreed appointments and the time allotted
• Attend all group meetings prepared for group supervision
• Select a site by applying and interviewing for internship positions with university approved sites
• Comply with all requirements of the approved clinical site
• Student must submit, to the CSUN group supervisor, monthly evaluations from the site-supervisor
• Document the activities of the practicum as related to the practicum goals and objectives
• Maintain documentation for all individual and group practicum supervision hours and activities
• Provide the supervisor completed supervision forms after each supervision meeting
• Adhere to BACB® guidelines with regards to experience hours
• Update CSUN Supervision Folder
o Keep copies of signed supervision forms in the folder
o Keep records of all experience hours accrued. BACB® asks that you keep these records for 7years. If you or your supervisor is audited, you will be expected to provide the signed
copies.
BACB® Guidelines for Field Supervisors
The purpose of field supervision (the majority of which is in-person, onsite observation) is to improve and
maintain the behavior analytic, professional, and ethical repertoires of the supervisee and facilitate the delivery
of high-quality services to his/her clients.
• According to BACB®, effective behavior-analytic supervision should include:
• Develop performance goals with supervisee
• Provide supervisee with opportunities to perform listed competences (Note* it is likely that some
competencies will not be met).
• Observe the supervisee in the field and use performance feedback to give corrective feedback
• Use Behavior Skills Training to teach and improve supervisees’ skills
• Model technical, professional and ethical behavior
• Guide and give feedback on behavioral case conceptualization, problem-solving, program
development and decision-making repertoires
• Review data and written materials (e.g., behavior programs, data sheets, reports)
• Monitor and evaluate the effects of behavioral service delivery
• Conduct weekly evaluation of supervisees’ performance and effects of supervision
Practicum Instructor Responsibility
The purpose of practicum is to improve behavior analytic, professional, and ethical repertoires of the supervisee
and monitor supervisees’ performance in the field. Group supervision may count for no more than half of the
total supervised hours each supervisee receives in a one week period.
The practicum supervisor will:
• Execute a written contract prior to on-set of experience
• Develop performance goals with supervisee
96
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use Behavior Skills Training to teach and improve supervisee’s skills in group setting
Model technical, professional and ethical behavior
Guide and give feedback on behavioral case conceptualization, problem-solving, program development
and decision-making repertoires in group setting
Review data and written materials (e.g., behavior programs, data sheets, reports) and provide specific
feedback
Meet with field supervisors to conduct monthly evaluation of supervisee’s experience, performance and
effects of supervision (this only applies to CSUN approved supervisors, Option II Practica)
Observe supervisee in-field a minimum of once each semester
Provide specific feedback to supervisee on performance in group supervision
Protect the time and space for supervision, by keeping to agreed appointments and the time allotted.
Notify supervisee, at the earliest possible time, of any changes to schedule that may result in
rescheduling a meeting.
Return to Tab 1
97
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Supervisee: _____________________________________ Supervisor: _______________________________
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring
Tab 3: Select and Define Target Behaviors for Change
Competency
I.
Criterion
Rating
Review BACB® ethical guidelines 2.0 and 3.0 and discuss with supervisor
A. Ethical practices in
assessing and selecting
potential target behaviors
•
B. Include a written
summary of ethical
practices in selection of
target behaviors in this tab
Presented a written summary of ethical
practices in selection of target behaviors
that included:
A. Definition of client
B. Responsibility to client and
others
C. Consultation and third party
requests for services
D. Client rights
□
Met the criterion as it is
written
□
Did not meet the
criterion as it is written
II. Show competency developing and using worksheets to prioritize target behaviors
• Correctly used a worksheet to evaluate
□ Met the criterion as it is
social significance of potential target
behaviors at least on two different
occasions
A. Evaluating the social
significance of potential
target behaviors
•
B. Prioritizing potential
target behaviors
III.
Performance
Feedback
Correctly used the worksheet to
evaluate social significance of potential
target behaviors at least on two
different occasions
Define behavior in observable and measurable terms
•
1. Show competency
defining behavior
topographically (define
at least 5 different
behaviors) in
measurable and
observable terms
The topographical definitions of all 5
target behaviors must be
o Technological (passed the
stranger rule)
o Observable (Pass the Dead
Man’s test)
o Measurable (includes
measurable dimension of the
behavior)
o If necessary, include
exclusionary factors (e.g. a
student can leave his or her seat
if given permission)
o Parsimonious (e.g. aggression,
self-injury and elopement are
defined separate behaviors and
not as a part of a “tantrum”)
98
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
written
□
□
□
□
□
Given on
___/____/___
Given on
___/____/___
Did not meet the
criterion because the
worksheet was not
completed correctly
Met the criterion as it is
written
Given on
___/____/___
Did not meet the
criterion because the
worksheet was not
completed correctly
Met the criterion
(definition included all
the components
described in the criterion
for this competency)
Did not meet the
criterion (definition did
not include one or more
of the components
described in the criterion
for this competency)
Given on
___/____/___
2. Show competency
defining behavior
functionally (define at
least 5 different
behaviors) in
measurable and
observable terms
•
The functional definitions of all 5 target
behaviors must be:
• Technological (passed the
stranger rule)
• Observable (Pass the Dead
Man’s test)
• Measurable (includes
measurable dimension of the
behavior)
• If necessary, include
exclusionary factors (e.g. a
student can leave his or her seat
if given permission)
• Parsimonious (e.g. aggression,
self-injury and elopement are
defined as separate behaviors
and not as part of a “tantrum”)
3. Included revised operational definitions for each behavior reviewed
with the supervisor in the supervision folder under Tab 3
□
Met the criterion
(definition included all
the components
described in the criterion
for this competency)
□
Did not meet the
criterion (definition did
not include one or more
of the components
described in the criterion
for this competency)
□
Met the criterion as it is
written
□
Did not meet the
criterion as it is written
Given on
___/____/___
Given on
___/____/___
Student must show 100 % accuracy for this competency
Date
Total Number of Criterion
“Met as it is written”
Accuracy
(Total number “Met” / 8)
Return to Tab 3
99
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Supervisor’s
Initials
Supervisee’s
Initials
University
Based
Practicum
Supervisor
Initials
Supervisee: _____________________________________ Supervisor: _______________________________
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring Checklist
Tab 4: Use various direct observation methods to collect baseline data
Please rate each competency area using the given criterion. If the supervisee does not meet the set criterion, give
feedback using the space provided in this performance checklist and re-evaluate that competency. Use the
“Needs to Improve” section to provide supervisee with observable and measurable targets that will support meeting
the specific competences.
II.
Competency
Criterion
Rating 1 Rating 2
®
Review BACB ethical guidelines relevant to data collection and discuss with supervisor
A. Ethical practices
for data collection
B. Include a written
summary of
ethical practices
for data collection
•
Presented a written summary of ethical practices when
using various data collection methods that included all
of the following listed below:
 Ongoing data collecting and record keeping
 Documenting professional and scientific work
Rating 3
□
Yes
□
Yes
□
Yes
□
No
□
No
□
No
III. Create a basic table for the advantages and disadvantages of using continuous and discontinuous
measurement procedures
A. Created a table that summarized the advantages and disadvantages for using
continuous and discontinuous measurement procedures to collect data. The table
must include correct information on the following:
1. Advantages of using continuous and discontinuous measures
2. When to use continuous and discontinuous measures
3. Disadvantages of using continuous and discontinuous measures
□
Yes
□
Yes
□
Yes
□
No
□
No
□
No
Student must show 100 % accuracy for this competency
Date of
Evaluation
Total Number “Yes”
Accuracy (Total number “Yes” / 2)
Needs to Improve:
Date of Evaluation
100
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Field Supervisor
Initials
Supervisee
Initials
University Based
Practicum
Supervisor Initials
Supervisee: _____________________________________ Supervisor: _______________________________
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring Checklist
Tab 4: Use various direct observation methods to collect baseline data
Please rate each competency area using the given criterion. If the supervisee does not meet the set criterion, use the
“Needs to Improve” section to provide supervisee with observable and measurable targets that will support meeting
the specific competency. Re-evaluate the competency after each feedback.
Competency
Criterion
Rating 1
Rating 2
Rating 3
III. Directly observe target behavior for change, select a measurement method and develop a data
collection form to obtain representative data
•
A. Select a
measurement
method and
develop a data
collection form
Developed individual data
collection sheets that captured
necessary variables for each of
the following measures:
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
Frequency/Rate
Duration
Latency
IRT
Momentary time sampling
Partial interval recording
Whole interval recording
Trials to criterion
Percent of occurrence
Planned Activity Check
After initial data collection made
necessary changes to the form
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Student must show 100 % accuracy for this competency
Date
Total Number “Yes”
Accuracy
(Total number “Yes” / 11)
101
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Supervisor’s
Initials
Supervisee’s
Initials
University Based
Practicum
Supervisor
Initials
Needs to Improve:
Criterion
Date of
Evaluation
Feedback
Frequency
Duration
Latency
IRT
Time
Sampling
Momentary
Partial
Whole
Trials to
Criterion
Percent of
Occurrence
Planned
Activity
Check
102
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Supervisee: _____________________________________ Supervisor: _______________________________
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring Checklist
Tab 4: Use various direct observation methods to collect baseline data
Please rate each competency area using the given criterion. If the supervisee does not meet the set criterion, use
the “Needs to Improve” section to provide supervisee with observable and measurable targets that will support meeting
the specific competency. Re-evaluate the competency after each feedback.
Competency
Criterion
Rating 1
Rating 2
IV. Use data recording forms and directly measure target behavior for change
A. Use of
technology
□
•
B. Data
Collection
Used stopwatch with count up and down
options or appropriate smartphone
application with similar options
Collected data using every measurement
method listed below with 90 % IOA.
Used each measurement method at least
twice with 90 % IOA.
Frequency/Rate
Duration
Latency
IRT
Momentary time sampling
Partial interval recording
Whole interval recording
Trials to criterion or Percent of
occurrence
Planned Activity Check
□
Yes
□ No
□
IOA 1
Yes
Measurement
Method
□
IOA 2
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
Average IOA
Yes
□ No
IOA 3
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
Student must use each measurement method twice with 90 % average IOA
Date
Completed
□ No
Rating 3
Initials
Supervisor’s
Initials
Supervisee’s
Initials
University
Based
Practicum
Supervisor
Initials
Supervisee: _____________________________________ Supervisor: _______________________________
103
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Needs to Improve:
Criterion
Date of
Evaluation
Feedback
Frequency
Duration
Latency
IRT
Time
Sampling
Momentary
Partial
Whole
Trials to
Criterion
Or
Percent of
Occurrence
Planned
Activity
Check
Return to Tab 4
104
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Attention Condition (pg. 1)
Client:_________________________
Date:___________________
Assessors:______________________
Supervisor:_____________________
Setting: ___________________
Instructions:
1. Before assessment the supervisor must check
a. The operational definitions of target behaviors
b. Assessment setting
2. During assessment:
a. Use the data collection sheet to rate the assessors performance for each session
b. Give feedback as needed
3. After the assessment
a. Use the data from the data collection sheet to complete the Performance Checklist
b. Check IOA and graphs (data and graphs)
c. Give feedback, discuss goals for next performance
Scoring Guide: Y = Correct N= Incorrect NA = No opportunity to observe
Preference Assessment
Time Frame
Conducted within 1 week and the results are
present at the time of the FA
Y/N/NA
Target Behavior: ________________________________
Operational Definition
Y/N/NA
Observable
Feedback
Feedback
Measurable
Parsimonious
Assessment Setting:
Setting Instructions
1. Electrical outlets are protected.
2. All doors are closed.
3. The room is free of any stimuli that could
confound the assessment results.
4. Ensure that the Assessor has the moderately
preferred items (no less than two items)
available based on the preference
assessment.
Y/N/NA
105
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Feedback
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Attention Condition (pg. 2)
Assessment:
Start time:______________ End Time_________________
Mark “1” for Yes and mark “0” for No NA= No opportunity to record
Task Analysis
Y/N/NA
S1 S2 S3
1. Assessor checked if the data collector was
ready.
2. Assessor provided the client with moderately
preferred items.
3. Had the client attend to the items.
4. Assessor said: “I am going to do some work,
you can play with these.”
5. Assessor turned away from the client and
pretended to be busy.
6. In 100 % of opportunities, contingent on hand
biting, Assessor provided social attention in a
form of a verbal reprimand (E.g. “Don’t do
that.” “Stop it.”) and light physical contact.
7. Used a natural tone when providing verbal
attention.
8. In 100 % of opportunities, after delivering the
attention, the Assessors turned away from the
client and pretended to be busy.
9. In 100 % of opportunities, any other behavior
(inappropriate or appropriate) was ignored by
the Assessor.
10. Condition was completed within set time
interval.
106
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Feedback
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Attention Condition (pg. 3)
Data Collection sheet for steps 6, 7 and 9
• Mark “1” for Yes
• Mark “0” for No
• NA= No opportunity to record
Session/trial 1
Opportunities
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Problem
Behavior
Attention
Delivered
Turn Away
Ignored all
other
Behaviors
Session/trial 2
Opportunities
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Problem
Behavior
Attention
Delivered
Turn Away
Ignored all
other
behaviors
Goals for the next session:
1.______________________________
2.______________________________
3.______________________________
___________________________
Supervisor Signature
Return to Tab 7
___________________________
Assessor Signature
107
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Escape Condition (pg. 1)
Client:_________________________
Date:___________________
Assessors:_______________________________________________
Supervisor:_____________________
Setting: ___________________
Instructions:
1. Before assessment the supervisor must check
a. The operational definitions of target behaviors
b. Assessment setting
2. During assessment:
a. Use the data collection sheet to rate the assessors performance for each session
b. Give feedback as needed
3. After the assessment
a. Use the data from the data collection sheet to complete the Performance Checklist
b. Check IOA and graphs (data and graphs)
c. Give feedback, discuss goals for next performance
Scoring Guide: Y = Correct N= Incorrect NA = No opportunity to observe
Target Behavior: ________________________________
Operational Definition
Y/N/NA
Observable
Measurable
Parsimonious
Assessment Setting:
Setting Instructions
1. Room is safe.
2. The room is free of any stimuli that could
confound the assessment results.
3. Ensure that the Assessor has the nonpreferred activity/task (e.g., homework,
coloring, etc.) available based on descriptive
analysis.
Data and Graphs:
Data collection and graphs
1. IOA for data for all sessions was > 90 %
2. The results were graphed correctly
Y/N/NA
Feedback
Y/N/NA
Feedback
108
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Feedback
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Escape Condition (pg. 2)
Start time:______________ End Time_________________
Y = Correct N= Incorrect NA = No opportunity to observe
Task Analysis
S1
S2
Sessions
S3
S4
S5
1. Before beginning the condition, the therapist checked
if the data collector was ready
2. Therapist had the client sit on a chair at the table
3. Therapist presented the non-preferred activity/task
4. If client complied within 5s, therapist provided
verbal praise (e.g., Good job! Awesome work!)
5. If the client did not comply within 5s, therapist
demonstrated correct response using LTM prompts
6. Contingent on target behavior, therapist removed the
non-preferred activity/task and turned away for 30s
7. After 30s, therapist re-delivered non-preferred
activity/task
8. All other behaviors were ignored by the therapist
9. Condition was completed within set time interval
Percent Correct:
Feedback:
1. ______________________________________________________________________
2. ______________________________________________________________________
3. ______________________________________________________________________
Goals for the next session:
1. ______________________________
2. _____________________________
3. ______________________________
___________________________
Supervisor Signature
___________________________
Therapist Signature
109
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Escape Condition (pg. 3)
Data Collection Sheet:
•
Instructions: Mark “1” for Yes and mark “0” for No NA= No opportunity to observe
Session 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
5
6
7
8
9
10
Task presented
Compliance
No Compliance
within 5 seconds
Provided verbal praise
Continued presenting demands
Used LTM prompts to have the
client engage in task
Did not provide praise
Removed the task
Target Behavior
Turned away for 30s (no
interaction)
After 30s, re-delivered nonpreferred activity/task
Ignored all other behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Session 2
1
2
3
4
Task presented
Compliance
No Compliance
within 5 seconds
Provided verbal praise
Continued presenting demands
Used LTM prompts to have the
client engage in task
Did not provide praise
Removed the task
Target Behavior
Turned away for 30s (no
interaction)
After 30s, re-delivered nonpreferred activity/task
Ignored all other behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
110
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Escape Condition (pg. 4)
Session 3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
5
6
7
8
9
10
Task presented
Compliance
No Compliance
within 5 seconds
Provided verbal praise
Continued presenting demands
Used LTM prompts to have the
client engage in task
Did not provide praise
Removed the task
Target Behavior
Turned away for 30s (no
interaction)
After 30s, re-delivered nonpreferred activity/task
Ignored all other behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Session 4
1
2
3
4
Task presented
Compliance
No Compliance
within 5 seconds
Provided verbal praise
Continued presenting demands
Used LTM prompts to have the
client engage in task
Did not provide praise
Removed the task
Target Behavior
Turned away for 30s (no
interaction)
After 30s, re-delivered nonpreferred activity/task
Ignored all other behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Return to Tab 7
111
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Play Condition (pg.1)
Client:_________________________
Date:___________________
Assessor:______________________
Supervisor:_____________________
Setting: ___________________
Instructions:
1. The Assessor must complete each item listed in the setting instructions.
2. If the step is completed correctly put a Y. If the step is completed incorrectly, or is ignored put an N.
3. Use NA for steps that there was no opportunity to observe
4. Provide feedback when necessary
Preference Assessment:
Time Frame
Conducted within 1 week and the results are
present at the time of the FA
Y/N/NA
Feedback
Y/N/NA
Feedback
Target Behavior:
Operational Definition
Observable
Measurable
Parsimonious
Assessment Setting:
Setting Instructions
1. Electrical outlets are protected.
2. All doors are closed.
3. The room is free of any stimulus that could
cofound the assessment results.
4. Ensure that the Assessor has the moderately
preferred items (no less than two items)
available based on the preference assessment.
112
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Y/N/NA
Feedback
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Play Condition (pg. 2)
Start time:______________ End Time_________________
Task Analysis
Y/N/NA
S1 S2 S3
Feedback
1. Assessor checked if the data collector was
ready.
2. Assessor provided the client with moderately
preferred items.
3. The client had access to multiple preferred
items.
4. Assessor said: “it is time to play”.
Use data collection sheet below to complete 5, 6, 7, 8
5. Assessor provided social praise every 30
seconds (FT 30-s) in the absence of target
behaviors.
6. Used a natural tone when providing social
praise.
7. Assessor ignored all targeted behaviors and
other inappropriate behaviors.
8. No demands were presented to the client.
9. Condition was completed within set time
interval.
Goals for the next session:
1.______________________________
2.______________________________
3.______________________________
___________________________
Supervisor Signature
___________________________
Assessor Signature
113
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitor Checklist
Functional Analysis: Play Condition (pg.3)
Data Collection Sheet:
•
Instructions: Mark “1” for Yes and mark “0” for No NA= No opportunity to observe
Session/Trial 1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
5
6
7
8
9
10
5
6
7
8
9
10
Task presented
No Problem
Behaviors
Target Behavior
Provided attention every 30
seconds
No demands were presented
Ignored problem behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Session/Trial 2
1
2
3
4
Task presented
No Problem
Behaviors
Target Behavior
Provided attention every 30
seconds
No demands were presented
Ignored problem behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Session/Trial 3
1
2
3
4
Task presented
No Problem
Behaviors
Target Behavior
Provided attention every 30
seconds
No demands were presented
Ignored problem behaviors
Percent Correct
Note: When calculating percent correct do not count NA in the total.
Return to Tab 7
114
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Below, please see the general guide we developed for writing FBAs. We recognize the formatting of FBAs may
differ based on the requirements of third party payees. We also recognize that assessments and interventions
will differ based on the referral problem. However, we expect the assessment procedures, interpretations, and
intervention recommendations to meet BACB® Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts
(e.g., 1.01. Reliance on Scientific Knowledge, 2.10. Treatment Efficacy, etc.).
Functional Behavior Assessment
Criteria for Components of the FBA
•
•
Identifying information
Reason for Referral
a. Source of referral clearly stated (teacher, parent, Regional Center)
b. The reason child/adolescent was referred, which includes general description of problem (target) behaviors
(e.g. elopement or tantrum).
c. If the target behaviors have been present in the past, included information on worsening or improvement in
target behavior to justify the need for assessment
• The purpose of the FBA
a. Gather baseline (e.g. frequency, duration) data on target behavior(s)
b. Identify setting events that could support occurrence of the problem behavior(s)
c. Identify antecedents that evoke the target behavior(s)
d. Identify the function(s) of the target behavior(s)
e. Recommend intervention strategies that address necessary environmental changes, function based
interventions and also teaching strategies that will increase occurrence of socially acceptable behaviors and
decrease occurrence of the problem behaviors
Reason for referral sentence structure
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
• Includes information about the methods used to obtain background information:
• If records are available
 Record review and interviews with parents and or teacher(s) must be included as methods in this
section
Format of Family History
Content of Family History
a. Family members with whom the child/adolescent lives
b. Primary care taker and their availability for parent training
c. History of household changes including changes in family members
d. Recent moves
e. Home Language
f. Regional Center involvement
• Home base behavior services
g. Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) Involvement
• Placement in Foster home
Format of Medical History
Medical History (In a paragraph format)
a. Any health, vision and hearing issues that might impact learning and current behaviors
b. Relevant medication information
c. History of hospitalizations and recent injures
Format of Educational History
Educational History (In a paragraph format)
a. History of schools attended
b. Date of initial IEP and Eligibility (if applicable)
c. Instructional setting(s) and past and current services
d. History of specific behavior difficulties (e.g. difficulties that are documented in school records)
• Frequency, duration and intensity of each behavior
• Include all problem behaviors documented in school records with appropriate references
o Example: according to IEP dated 11/14/2011 John exhibited aggressive behaviors towards peers and
adults.
115
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
Discipline history
o Office Discipline Referrals (ODR)
o Suspensions or expulsions
• Include a graph, if there is available data, to visually show the occurrence of problem behaviors over time.
e. Brief discussion on current achievement history to document impact of behavior on access to academic curriculum:
a. Report card information (if available)
b. Current work samples and classroom test performance (if available)
Intervention history
Summary of Indirect Assessments
• Includes information about the methods used to obtain indirect assessment information:
• If records are available
 Record review and interviews with parents and or teacher(s) must be included as methods in this
section
 Use of a structured interview and/or rating scales (e.g., FAI, FAST, MAS, QABF) or unstructured
interview (provide a sample of questions)
 Relevant dates of interviews included
• The table for identification of the problem behaviors must include:
a. Behavior (general description is ok)
b. Occurrence (could have a range)
c. Duration
d. Severity
• Possible response class hierarchy is described if the indirect assessment results show that the parents or the teachers
observe sequence of behaviors ranging from less severe to more severe.
• Appropriate behaviors
a. Appropriate behaviors in the child’s repertoire (including any basic verbal operant, adaptive and social
skills) are clearly described
• Immediate Antecedents
• The table for identifying possible antecedents must include:
a. Behavior (from indirect assessment)
b. Immediate antecedents (from indirect assessment)
• Possible Maintaining Consequences
• The table for identifying possible consequences must include:
a. Behavior (from indirect assessment)
b. Consequences (from indirect assessment)
• Setting Events Effecting Problem Behavior
a. The setting events are described using language that is not technical
•
a.
Setting Events Effecting Problem Behavior
If specific setting events are identified the report should address the following for each setting event:
I.
List the setting events identified and possible factors that could have evocative effect on the behavior
II.
The possible relationship between the setting event and the target behavior is addressed (e.g. poor sleep: On
days when John gets less than 8 hours of sleep, the frequency and duration of tantrums have been reported to
increase)
I.
Setting events are possible correlates. Without an experimental test, authors should refrain from
making causal statements.
• Summary of Indirect Assessments and Hypothesized Predictor(s) (setting events and immediate antecedents)
and potential function(s) of problem behavior(s) table must include for each target behavior:
a. Setting events related to each target behavior
b. Immediate antecedents that could evoke the target behavior
c. Possible function(s) (from indirect assessments)
DIRECT ASSESSMENT
• The table describing direct observation session must include:
a. The observer
b. The dates and times of each observation session
116
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
•
Operational Definition of Target Behaviors
a. Definition is objective, clear, and discriminates between what is and what is not an instance of Target
Behavior
b. Definitions are observable and measurable. Definitions are situation specific and individualized
I.
Target behaviors are defined topographically or functionally
•
Baseline Data for Target behaviors
a. Average level is reported
b. References to graphs included
c. Graphs are present and axes are correctly labeled (based on data collection method)
d. Data is correctly plotted
DESCRIPTIVE ASSESSMENT (DA)
• Description of DA method (e.g., ABC data, event recording) is technological
• Results
a. Data is summarized using an appropriate measure (e.g., conditional probabilities for ABC data)
b. Graphs of results are included and correctly labeled
• Summary
a. Summary statements are relevant to the Indirect Assessment and the data collected in the DA
b. Hypotheses about function are tentative
FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (FA)
The procedures for FA are technological
a. You can act out the procedure without having any questions about how to do it
b. Procedure includes a reference to an article that was used as a reference for the assessment
If parametric analysis is used the procedure is technological
a. You can act out the procedure without having any questions about how to do it
b. The materials used during the analysis are clearly described
c. Procedure includes a reference to an article that was used as a reference for the assessment
For severe problem behaviors (e.g. self injury, elopement, aggression) the FA procedure describes how the child’s
safety was addressed. Also, the assessor lists that consent was obtained and by whom.
Results of Functional Analysis (see task analysis for sample)
• For each Target behavior:
a. Reference to the graph is made
b. Function is stated and matches the results shown on the graph
c. Antecedent evoking the TB is stated (antecedent manipulated during the FA)
FA graph
a. All axis are correctly labeled
b. Data is correctly plotted
c. All graphing requirements (see Cooper) are met (e.g. black data points, conditions are labeled…)
SUMMARY of FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIOR ASSESSMENT
Summary has three separate paragraphs
First paragraph includes the following:
a. Referral question
b. School of attendance, grade and class
c. Eligibility of special education and current services
d. Current academic performance
e. Previous and current interventions and their effectiveness
f. Medical history
Second paragraph includes the following:
a. Reported setting events match the setting events included in the report.
b. Reported Baseline data matches the baseline data included in the report.
Third paragraph includes the following:
• For each behavior
a. Antecedents that have most control over the behavior
b. Consequence that maintains the behavior
RECOMMENDATION
• Recommended antecedent interventions are evidence-based
• Recommendations for antecedent interventions do not need to be technological but have to meet the following
117
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
criteria:
a. For each setting event there is an antecedent intervention that addresses the setting event
b. For each problem behavior there is a recommended antecedent intervention
c. All antecedent interventions include specific details (does not have to be technological) that will help in
development of the intervention plans.
i. Procedure for initial implementation
ii. Use of prompts (if needed)
iii. How to fade in and out the antecedent stimulus (criteria for fading)
• Recommended Consequence interventions are evidence-based
Consequence based interventions do not need to be technological but have to meet the following criteria:
a. For each problem behavior there is a recommend function based consequence based intervention
b. Least intrusive interventions is recommended
c. If recommending punishment strategies (time out or response cost)
I.
There is a statement as to why the assessor recommends a more restrictive intervention (e.g., research
evidence that the intervention is most effective with the presenting problem or evidence that evidencebased less restrictive interventions were used but were ineffective)
II.
Punishment procedures are combined with reinforcement procedures (i.e., research based interventions
that combined punishment strategies with reinforcement procedures).
d. All consequence based interventions must include specific details that will help in development of the intervention
plans.
I.
The initial schedule of reinforcement (based on the baseline data)
II.
Specific items or actions to be used as possible reinforcers (from preference assessment)
III.
Use of prompts
IV.
When to thin the schedule of reinforcement
Data collections and analysis
a. How often data should be collected
b. Data collection forms (include sample in the Appendix)
c. Person responsible for data entry and analysis
d. Clear criterion for review of effectiveness of the plan is set
We suggest reviewing the following selected references:
1. Baer, D. M., Wolf, M. M., & Risley, T. R. (1968). Some current dimensions of applied behavior analysis. Journal
of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 91-97.
2. Bijou, S. W., Peterson, R. F., & Ault, M. H. (1968). A method to integrate descriptive and experimental field
studies at the level of data and empirical concepts. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 175-191.
3. Bloom, S. E., Iwata, B. A., Fritz, J.N., Roscoe, E.M.& Carreau, A. B. (2011). Classroom application of trialbased functional analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44(1), 19-32.
4. Broussard, C. D., & Northup, J. (1995). An approach to functional assessment and analysis of disruptive behavior
in regular education classrooms. School Psychology Quarterly, 10, 151-164.
5. Camp, E. M., Iwata, B. A., Hammond, J. L., & Bloom, S. E. (2009). Antecedent vs. consequent events as
predictors of problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 469-483.
6. Carr, E. G. (1977). The motivation of self-injurious behavior: A review of some hypotheses. Psychological
Bulletin, 84, 800-816.
7. Carr, E.G., & Durand, V.M. (1985). Reducing behavior problems through functional communication
training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 111-126.
8. Durand, V. M., & Crimmins, D. B. (1988). Identifying the variables maintaining self-injurious behavior. Journal
of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 18, 99-117.
9. Gable, R. A. (1996). A critical analysis of functional assessment: Issues for researchers and practitioners.
Behavioral Disorders, 22, 36-40.
10. Hanely, G.P. (2012). Functional assessment of problem behavior: Dispelling myths, overcoming implementation
obstacles, and developing new lore. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5(1), 54-72.
11. Hanley, G.P., Iwata. B.A., & McCord, B.E. (2003). Functional analysis of problem behavior: A review. Journal
of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36(2), 147-185.
118
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
12. Iwata, B. A & Dozier, C.L. (2008). Clinical Application of Functional Analysis Methodology, Behavior
Analyst in Practice, 3-9.
13. Iwata, B. A., Dorsey, M. F., Slifer, K. J., Bauman, K. E., & Richman, G. S. (1994). Toward a functional analysis
of self-injury. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27, 197-209. Reprinted from Analysis and Intervention in
Developmental Disabilities, 1982, 2, 3-20.
14. Iwata, B. A., Pace, G. M., Dorsey, M. F., Zarcone, J. R., Vollmer, T. R., Smith, R. G., Rodgers, T. A., Lerman, D.
C., Shore, B. A., Mazaleski, J. L., Goh, H., Cowdery, G. E., Kalsher, M. J., & Willis, K. D. (1994). The functions
of self-injurious behavior: An experimental-epidemiological analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27,
215-240.
15. Kahng, S., Iwata, B. A., Fischer, S. M., Page, T. J., Treadwell, K. R. H., Williams, D. E., & Smith, R. G. (1998).
Temporal distributions of problem behavior based on scatter plot analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis,
31, 593-604.
16. Lerman, D. C., & Iwata, B. A. (1993). Descriptive and experimental analyses of variables maintaining selfinjurious behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 26, 293-319.
17. Marion, S.D., Touchette, P.E., & Sandman, C.A. (2003). Sequential analysis reveals a unique structure for selfinjurious behavior. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 108, 301-313.
18. Matson, J. L., Bamburg, J. W., Cherry, K. E., & Paclawskyj, T. R. (1999). A validity study on the Questions
About Behavioral Function (QABF) scale: Predicting treatment success for self-injury, aggression, and
stereotypies. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 20, 163-176.
19. Pence, S. T., Roscoe, E. M., Bourret, J. C., & Ahearn, W. H. (2009). Relative contributions of three descriptive
methods: Implications for behavioral assessment. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 42, 425-446.
20. Smith, R. G., & Churchill, R. M. (2002). Identification of environmental determinants of behavior
disorders through functional analysis of precursor behaviors. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 35, 125-136.
21. Sturmey, P. (1994). Assessing the functions of aberrant behavior: A review of psychometric instruments. Journal
of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 24, 293-304.
22. Thomason-Sassi, J. L., Iwata, B. A., Neidert, P. L., & Roscoe, E. M. (2011). Response latency as an index of
response strength during functional analyses of problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 5167.
23. Thompson, R. H., & Iwata, B. A. (2001). A descriptive analysis of social consequences following problem
behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34, 169-178.
24. Touchette, P. E., MacDonald, R. F., & Langer, S. N. (1985). A scatter plot for identifying stimulus control of
problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 343-351.
25. Vollmer, T. R., Borrero, J. C., Wright, C. S., Van Camp, C., and Lalli, J. S. (2001). Identifying possible
contingencies during descriptive analyses of severe behavior disorders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34,
269-287.
26. Vollmer, T. R., Marcus, B. A., Ringdahl, J. E., & Roane, H. S. (1995). Progressing from brief assessments to
extended experimental analyses in the evaluation of aberrant behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 28,
561-576.
27. Worsdell, A. S., Iwata, B. A., Conners, J., Kahng, S., & Thompson, R. H. (2000). Relative influences of
establishing operations and reinforcement contingencies on self-injurious behavior during functional analyses.
Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 33, 451-461.
28. Zarcone, J. R., Rodgers, T. A., Iwata, B. A., Rourke, D., & Dorsey, M. F. (1991). Reliability analysis of the
Motivation Assessment Scale: A failure to replicate. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 12, 349-360.
In addition to the above, we strongly recommend the Special Issue of JABA, Spring 2013,
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jaba.v46.1/issuetoc
Return to Tab 7
Return to Tab 13
119
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Informed Consent & Assent
Informed consent is a legal, moral and ethical responsibility to us and our clients; hereby consent is
given based upon a clear appreciation and understanding of the facts, implications and future
consequences of an action.
• See the BACB® Task List and BACB® Code of Ethics
Elements of Informed Consent
Capacity to decide
• Surrogate consent
• Guardian consent
Voluntary decision
Knowledge of the treatment
Treatment without consent
Confidentiality and its limits
See Cooper, John O., Heron, Timothy E., Heward, William L. (2007). Applied
Behavior Analysis (2nd edition, pp. 672). New Jersey: Pearson Education.
Keep in mind the elements of informed consent and recognize that
your “informed consent discussion” must be in language that is
clear, simple and jargon-free. That discussion must include:
•
•
•
•
•
the nature of the decision /procedure/ intervention
any reasonable alternatives to the proposed decision/
procedure/ intervention
the relevant risks, benefits, and uncertainties related to each
alternative
assessment of client/ caregiver/ family/ guardian/ surrogate
understanding
and their acceptance of the decision/ procedure/ intervention.
* Written documentation is required.
Return to Tab 2
Return to Tab 7
120
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Informed Assent
This informed assent form explains all terms and conditions for the services that will be provided by ______________ under the
supervision of _________________________________.
I, ____________________understand that my parents /guardian have/has given permission (said it’s okay) for
me to get direct services (help with work completion, planning, organization) from ____________________.
I understand that I have the following rights:
• I understand that any personal information I share with __________________ will be kept confidential
unless I break the law and/or there’s a direct danger to myself or others.
• I have the right to get information regarding my treatments, services, or tests, including risks and
benefits of the treatments, services or tests.
• I have the right to get enough information to make the best decision about accepting or refusing the
treatments, services, or tests.
• I have the right to have ________________________ give me a written and/or oral explanation of any
and all treatments, services, or tests in a way that I can fully understand and that includes the following:
o Test results
o Nature of the treatments, services, and/or tests/procedures;
o Dosage or frequency of services
o Expected end of services
o Any expected benefits
o Known side effects and risks
o Whether other services are available
o Information on what can happen if treatments, services, and/or tests are not used
Services will be on________________________________________(Day(s) of the week & Time Frame).
If __________________ have to cancel a session they will call my parents /guardian and let them know that
they will be cancelling the session for the day at least 30 minutes before the session starts.
____________________ will also let my parents know when they plan on rescheduling the session.
If I or my parents have to cancel the session, my parents will let _________________ know at least 30 minutes
before the session starts for that day. I promise to let my parents know if I have to cancel a session so that they
can let the _________________ know as soon as possible.
Contact Information
If you have any questions, comments, or concerns please feel to contact the case supervisors
Dr. Peter Adzhyan, L.E.P., BCBA-D
[email protected]
(818) 677-7724
Sierra Tower 306
California State University, Northridge
Dr. Ellie Kazemi, BCBA-D
[email protected]
(818) 677- 7224
Sierra Tower 306
California State University, Northridge
121
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Student interns’ contact information:
XXXXXXXXXX
Graduate Student, MS-ABA
[email protected]
(XXX) XXXX
California State University, Northridge
XXXXXXXXXX
Graduate Student, MS-ABA
[email protected]
(XXX) XXXXXX
California State University, Northridge
I am taking part in these services because I want to and because I understand the risks and benefits.
Signature _______________________
Student Intern Signature _____________
Date ____________________
Student Intern Signature _____________
Return to Tab 2
Return to Tab 7
122
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Informed Consent
This informed consent form explains all terms and conditions for the services that will be provided by _________________________
under the supervision of Dr. Kazemi and Dr. Adzhyan.
Information Sheet
Description of Services:
__________________________ (client’s name) will receive direct services provided by
____________________________________ under the direct supervision of Dr. Ellie Kazemi and Dr. Peter Adzhyan.
These services may include the following: initial and ongoing assessment, academic remediation, interventions based on
the assessment results and parent training. ____________________________ (client’s name) is the primary client and
services will be designed primarily for their benefit. Any other individuals or agencies (e.g., family, school professionals)
that may be affected by the direct services are considered secondary clients. The direct services that will be provided focus
on increasing pivotal skills, therefore the first several sessions will consist of assessment activities designed to (a)
evaluate current skills (e.g., curricular assessments) and (b) determine which instructional strategies and interventions are
likely to prove most effective (e.g., preference assessments, assessment of prompting strategies). The parent(s) may be
asked to assist in gathering some of this information by participating in interviews, providing previous records, and
recording problem behavior as it occurs. Prior to implementation, parent(s) will receive a printed copy of the results of
any assessment and of any proposed instructional procedures or behavior intervention plans for approval. The contents of
those documents will be explained in full and any questions will be answered to the parents’ satisfaction. Behavior
analysts are ethically obligated to provide treatments that have been scientifically supported as most effective. Other
interventions that parents pursue may affect the client’s response to treatment. Thus, it is important to make the treatment
team aware of those interventions and to partner with them to evaluate any associated therapeutic or detrimental effects of
those interventions.
Services will be provided on ____________________________________ (Day(s) of the week and Time Frame).
Cancellations:
In the event that ______________________ is not able to fulfill a session, he/she will inform the parent(s) at least 30
minutes before the session start time. ____________________ will telephone the parent(s) and supervisors to inform
them of the cancellation. _________________________ will confirm the cancellation through email and subsequently
offer parent(s) times for rescheduling the cancelled session.
In the event that client and/or the parent(s) must cancel a session, the parent(s) will inform
_____________________________ at least 30 minutes before the session start time. Parent(s) will also inform the
supervisors when a session must be cancelled.
Confidentiality:
All personal information, including videos, obtained will be kept confidential. Files will be kept in a locked filing cabinet
in a room at CSUN designated for the Assessment and Treatment Evaluation Clinic. Only the interns and supervisors will
have access to the files. All video tapes will be deleted after supervision meetings and all files with identifying
information will be de-identified or destroyed after one year of service. Any personal information that is given to the
student volunteers and/or the supervisors by client will not be shared with the parents unless it involves criminal activity
and/or puts client and/or others in danger.
Cost, duration and withdrawal:
The parent(s) will not be charged for the services that will be provided. Services will begin _________(Month & Year)
and end at a time agreed upon by both parties. You have the right to withdraw or stop participating at any time, decline to
answer any question(s), or decline to participate in any procedure for any reason.
Videotaping:
In order to provide effective supervision to the interns, upon parental agreement, all sessions will be videotaped. The
recorded material will be used only by the student interns, Dr. Kazemi, and Dr. Adzhyan. The recorded material will be
123
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
used for ongoing assessment and supervision purposes only. You have the right to decline the recording of sessions at any
time.
Client(s) Rights:
The parent has the right to:
1. Receive information regarding prescribed treatments, services, or tests, including risks and benefits of the prescribed
treatments, services, or tests.
2. Obtain information in sufficient detail to be able to make an informed decision regarding consent or refusal of the
treatments, services, or tests.
3. Have the behavioral provider make available written and/or oral explanation of any and all prescribed treatments,
services, or tests in language the individual fully understands, and that typically includes the following:
a. Assessment results;
b. Nature of the treatments, services, and/or tests/procedures;
c. Dosage or frequency of intervention
d. Expected recovery schedule for procedures;
e. Any expected benefits;
f. Known side effects and risks;
g. Whether alternatives are available;
h. Prognosis if prescribed treatments, services, and/or tests are not utilized
Contact Information
If you have any questions, comments, or concerns please feel to contact the case supervisors
Dr. Ellie Kazemi, PhD, BCBA-D
Dr. Peter Adzhyan, L.E.P., BCBA-D
[email protected]
[email protected]
(818) 677-7724
(818) 677- 7224
Sierra Tower 306
Sierra Tower 306
California State University, Northridge
California State University, Northridge
Student volunteers’ contact information:
XXXXXXXXXX
Graduate Student, MS-ABA
[email protected]
(XXX) XXX- XXXXX
California State University, Northridge
XXXXXXXX
Graduate Student, MS-ABA
[email protected]
(818) XXX- XXXX
California State University, Northridge
Certificate of Consent
I have read the foregoing information, or it has been read to me. I have had the opportunity to ask questions about it
and any questions that I have asked have been answered to my satisfaction.
Print Name of Parent or Guardian _________________________________ Date______________________
Signature of Parent or Guardian___________________________________ Time _____________________
Relation to the Child_____________________________________________
Print Name of Assessor __________________________________________ Date______________________
Signature of Assessor_____________________________________________
Supervisor’s Signature ________________________________ Supervisor’s Signature __________________________
Return to Tab 2
Return to Tab 7
124
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring
Competency 11: Use indirect measures of behavior & summarize findings
Performance
Feedback Given
Competency
Criterion
Rating
on ___/____/___
1. Select and discuss a
case when meeting with
supervisor in order to
select target behavior for
change.
2. Operationally define a
target behavior based on
its function or topography
that include measurable
dimension of the behavior
(Occurrence, Frequency,
Intensity, Duration,
Latency)
•
The operational definition is:
•
•
•
•
3. Choose the most
•
valid and reliable
rating scale available
to the supervisee
4. Presenting the
rating scale to the
target individual
•
•
•
•
5. Scoring, graphing
and writing
interpretation of
rating scale
results
•
Brought and discussed a case
•
•
•
•
Technological (passed the
stranger rule)
Observable (Pass the Dead
Man’s test)
Measurable (includes
measurable dimension of the
behavior)
Includes exclusionary factors
(e.g. a student can leave his or
her seat if given permission) if
needed
Used literature review to choose a
rating scale that is the most valid from
the available rating scales
Discussed the purpose of the rating
scale with the target person
Explained how to complete the form
by going over each item
Asked for questions and answered the
questions posed correctly
Asked the target person to complete
the first 5 items
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Scored the form correctly
Correctly graphed the results using an
appropriate graph
o Graph included the following
components:
 Correctly plotted
DV
 Y and X axis labels
 Chart Title
Wrote the interpretation of the results
by following the provided guidelines
for write-up by supervisor
Made the corrections within timelines
set by the supervisor
125
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Met the criterion (at least 90 % of
the trials)
Did not meet the criterion
Met the criterion (at least 90 % of
the trials)
Did not meet the criterion
Met the criterion (at least 90 % of
the trials)
Did not meet the criterion
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
To meet the criterion 4 Yes’s must
be scored in two consecutive
meetings
•
•
•
•
•
•
Did not meet the criterion
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
•
Yes
No
•
Yes
No
•
To meet the criterion 8 Yes’s must
be scored in two consecutive
meetings
6. Interviewing the
target individual
•
•
7. Writing
interpretation of
interview results
•
•
•
Before interview
o Discussed the purpose of the
interview with the target
person
o Explained the interview
process
o Asked for questions
During interview
o Asked open ended question
o Asked the questions in the
order provided in the
interview form
o Asked clarifying questions
(e.g. can you tell me more
about ……)
o Asked less than 3 leading
questions
o Asked less than 3 Yes or No
questions
o Gave clear signal that
interview was complete (e.g.
Thanked the target individual
for his or her time).
Wrote the interpretation of the results
by following the provided guidelines
for write-up by supervisor
Made the corrections within timelines
set by the supervisor
•
Yes
No
•
•
Yes
Yes
No
No
•
•
Yes
Yes
No
No
•
Yes
No
•
•
•
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
•
To meet the criterion 9 Yes’s must
be scored in two consecutive
meetings
•
Did not meet the criterion
•
Yes
No
•
Yes
No
•
To meet the criterion 2 Yes’s must
be scored in two consecutive
meetings
•
Return to Tab 7
126
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Did not meet the criterion
Did not meet the criterion
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring Check List for Multiple Stimulus Preference Assessment
(MSWO)
Scoring key:
• 1 = step completed correctly
• 0 = step completed incorrectly
• NA = No opportunity to observe
Task Analysis
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 %
correct
Seven items selected for the assessment
The table was clear of all stimuli before presenting the
items
All seven items are presented simultaneously in an arch
After child selected an item, the therapist removed all the
items
Recorded the selection of the item
The assessor let the child play with selected item for 10
seconds before presenting the next pair
The remaining items are presented again and the items at
the corners are switched (item to the assessors left is
moved to the assessors right and the item on the
assessors right is moved to assessors left)
If child reached for more than one item, the therapist
blocked access to items
If reached for both items, after clocking, waited 5
seconds and represented the same items
If child did not select item, the therapist removed items
after 5 seconds and presented the entire array again by
switching the corners
All steps completed correctly
1 = all steps in the trial are completed correctly
0 = any of the steps in the trial are missed
Feedback:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Goals for the next session:
1.________________________________________________________________________________________
2.________________________________________________________________________________________
3.________________________________________________________________________________________
Supervisor Signature: _____________________
Date: ___________________
Therapist Signature: ______________________
Return to Tab 8
Date: ___________________
127
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring Check List for Paired-Choice Preference Assessment
Scoring key:
• 1 = step completed correctly
• 0 = step completed incorrectly
• NA = No opportunity to observe
Task Analysis
Had a randomization matrix ready with all items
listed or data sheet created based on randomized
matrix
Assessor cleared the table of all stimuli before
presenting the items
Presentation of the items matched the matrix or data
sheet
The items presented 1 feet apart
After child selected item, the therapist removed other
item and recorded data
The therapist let the child play with selected item for
10 seconds before presenting the next pair
If child reached both items, the therapist blocked and
removed items
After both items were removed, waited 5 seconds and
represented the same items
If child did not select item, the therapist removed
items after 5 seconds and presented a new pair
All steps completed correctly
1 = all steps in the trial are completed correctly
0 = any of the steps in the trial are missed
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 % correct
Feedback:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Goals for the next session:
1.________________________________________________________________________________________
2.________________________________________________________________________________________
3.________________________________________________________________________________________
Supervisor Signature: _____________________
Date: ___________________
Therapist Signature: ______________________
Date: ___________________
128
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
SAMPLE
Performance Monitoring
CSUN Social Validity Project
Supervisee:_______________________
Supervisor:_____________________
Checklist Item
Task Analysis
• Arrived ≥ 5 min before appointment
First
Impressions
• Arrived professionally dressed
•
•
•
Came Prepared
to the Interview
by Bringing…
•
•
•
•
•
Clinical
Professionalism
•
•
Informed
Consent
Demographic
Form
PDDBI
•
•
•
•
Business cards to give to caregiver(s)
Response sheet to facilitate responding
Copy of Pervasive Developmental
Disorders Behavior Inventory Protocol
(PDDBI)
Copy of Caregiver Satisfaction with
Behavioral Services
Copy of Treatment Acceptability Rating
Form- Revised (TARF-R)
The Consumer’s Assessment Packet
Gray boxes of demographic form were filled
prior to the interview
Criterion
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
Adhered to training protocol when
(to
meet
this criterion
introduced self to the caregiver(s)
must
meet
all tasks in
□ Introduced self with eye contact
this category)
□ Reminded caregiver of telephone
conversation and appointment
□ Introduced others (e.g. supervisor or
shadow) in attendance
□ Asked if caregiver is ready for the
interview
□ Asked where the caregiver would
like to hold the interview
□ Yes □ No
Gave a copy to the caregiver
□ Yes □ No
Adhered to training protocol for consent
(to
meet
this criterion
□ Project Description
must
meet
all tasks in
□ Interviewer’s Position
this category)
□ Confidentiality
□ Case Review and Submittal
□ Cost, Duration, and Withdrawal
□ Contact Information
□ Asked if Caregiver has Questions
□ Obtained Signature
□ Yes □ No
Left a copy for the caregiver
Read all questions clearly and recorded □ Yes □ No
Clarified questions asked by caregivers □ Yes □ No □ NA
□ Yes □ No
Placed Response Sheet in-front of
caregiver
129
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Date: __________
Performance Feedback
Caregiver
Satisfaction
with Behavioral
Services
TARF-R
Transition
between forms
and
interviewing
skills
•
Read all questions clearly and recorded
•
Clarified questions asked by caregivers
•
•
Use transition words between scales
Placed Response Sheet in-front of
caregiver
•
Read all questions clearly and recorded
•
Clarified questions asked by caregivers
•
Placed copy of TARF-R in-front of
caregiver
•
Read all questions clearly and recorded
•
Clarified questions asked by caregivers
•
•
Thanked and introduced the next form
Gave eye contact when posing
questions
Posed questions and clarifications
objectively (not leading questions)
Completed the interview within
appropriate (between 60 to 90 minutes)
time frame
Thanked caregiver for time and effort
Informed the caregiver that
□ Someone might call them to
assess the quality of the
interview
□ For questions or concerns use
the number on the business
card
□ They will be contacted for
follow-up interviews
Filled in duration of interview, on
demographic sheet, at end of interview
•
•
•
•
End Interview
•
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No □ NA
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No □ NA
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No □ NA
□ *Yes □ No
□ *Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
□ Yes □ No
(to meet this criterion
must meet all tasks in
this category)
□ Yes □ No
Total Yes/ 33
= _______%
Total
*Consider ≥75% of the time a “yes”. Use feedback box to give examples of correct and incorrect responses and/or capture % of
correct responding.
My supervisor and I discussed my performance, based on the rubric above, and I understand the criterion I met are my
areas of strengths and the criterion I did not meet are areas in which I need to improve. During review of my
performance, I asked any questions I had and obtained satisfactory answers from my site supervisor.
______________________________________
(Signature of supervisor)
______________________________________
(Signature of supervisee)
Return to Tab 7
Return to Tab 27
130
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
___________________
Date
SAMPLE
Klab Performance Feedback: Abstracts for Conference Submission
Criteria
Met
(yes or no)
Descriptive Feedback
Picked a title that accurately reflects the
presentation but is also creative and fun
Used a min of 100 words and max of 250
words (JABA requires 150 words or less)
Began with a succinct summary of the
problem at hand, most important point of
study, or purpose of research
• Tip: use this opportunity to set up the context of
the study and demonstrate your understanding of
current literature. It helps if you can demonstrate
that your question or issue is interesting and
worth answering.
Accurately reflected the purpose of the study
Provided a brief summary of the methodology
(including participants and design)
Provided a brief summary of the research
results
Provided a brief summary of conclusions and
implications of the research
•
Tip: you need to convince the reader that your
research is significant and that you deserve the
time to present it.
Used active instead of passive voice
Used past tense to describe completed actions
(but present tense may be used to describe
conclusions and implications)
Acronyms or abbreviated words were defined
Did not use outside sources
•
Tip: The only time that outside sources should be
noted in an abstract is if the research study
replicates or expands a prior study or if the
reference is seminal or cutting edge.
To save space, all numbers in abstracts were
presented as digits, not words, except if they
occurred as the first word of a sentence
References for further review
1.
2.
3.
4.
See www.calaba.org or www.abainternational.org for submission requirements
Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue offers an APA formatting and style guide at
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
APA provides a free ONLINE TUTORIAL for APA 6th Edition http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basicstutorial.aspx?imw=Y
See APA manual, 6th edition, p. 12
Return to Tab 27
131
CSUN MS-ABA Program rev 11-12-13
Download