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Progression in Sentence Types - Non-fiction

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Progression in Sentence Types (non-fiction) – Using Alan Peat’s Sentence Types
Terminology pupils should be introduced to is in bold
Year
Group
1&2
Sentence type
Examples
Name – adjective pair – sentences
Works on a show and tell basis where name and
details form the main clause
Achilles – fiery and ferocious – led the
Myrmidons into battle. (1)
Recycling – household and industrial – is a
crucial element in conserving our
environment. (2)
HISTORICAL REPORT (1)
PERSUASIVE (2)
First word last sentences
Start with a key word, expand upon that key
word, then repeat the same key word at the end
of the sentence
REPORT
Then and now sentences
The first part of the sentence is a time related
statement which describes the state of things
as they were then (positive, negative or
informative). The second part presents the
opposing perspective which describes how things
are now.
PERSUASION
Adverb from adjective sentences
Two part sentence. This first part is a
descriptive statement which includes an
adjective. The second part adds further detail
using an adverb.
REPORT
So… sentences
Used to create tension.
Impressive…the view from the top of the
mountain is truly impressive.
Additional points to be taught through the
sentence type
Adjectives
Can use alliteration also
Repetition
Months ago I used to eat meat, but now I
am a vegetarian
The people in this part of the country are
sad and they go off sadly to work every day.
Adjective
Adverb
Cold – coldly
Brave – bravely
Delightful - delightfully
I had never seen anything so… terrible.
Ellipsis
DIARY
Position + place, subject + action sentences
Opens with a subordinate clause describing the
position and place of an action in specific terms.
RECOUNT
INSTRUCTIONS
At the top of the Wellington Arch, I looked
out to see the Horse Guards approaching.
Subordinate clause
Command
2
3&4
Getting worse/getting better sentences
Used to dramatically heighten a text.
PERSUASION (1)
REPORT OR EXPLANATION (2)
Does not/does (will not/will) sentences
Double sentences
PERSUASION (1)
BALANCED ARGUMENT (2)
Subject – 3 examples – are all sentences
An example of a three-part sentence. The
subject opens the sentence, followed by three
examples of the subject (with a dash before and
a dash after). Finally the third part is
introduced by the words ‘are all’.
REPORT or PERSUASION (1)
DIARY (2)
(v) ed next (v) ed sentences
First part of the sentence describes an initial
action using a past tense verb (with an ed
ending). The second part of the sentence
describes a subsequent action which occurs as a
direct result of the first action. Another past
How would you feel if your child was hurt,
maimed or even killed by a car? (1)
(Each word in bold gets progressively more
dramatic – sad, worse, even worse)
Steam engines were good, combustion
engines were even better, but hydrogenpowered engines are set to change the
world. (2)
I’ve known people who say that dropping a
sweet wrapper does not matter. What does
matter is the fact that if everyone thought
like this then the world would be a dreadful
place. (1)
Some scientists have said that global
warming will not negatively affect life on
Earth. Others, however, are certain that it
will. In this essay we will consider both
sides of the debate. (2)
Extreme sports – motocross, base jumping
and white-water rafting – are all equally
dangerous! (1)
Parties – with friends, colleagues, or even
people I’ve never met before – are all just
as traumatic for me. (2)
The mourners lifted the coffin and carried
it slowly towards the church.
Connective
3
tense verb - (v) ed – follows the connective ‘and’
NEWSPAPER ARTICLE
Description, which + simile sentences
A simile is used in the second part which
elaborates on the description in the first part.
EXPLANATION
This is that sentences
An example of a metaphor.
REPORT
With a(n) action, more action sentences
Starts with a subordinate clause which starts
with the phrase ‘with a(n), followed by an action
and a comma.
INSTRUCTIONS
Action as if sentences
Opens with an action which is usually quite
intense in nature. This is followed by the words
‘as if’, then a description of the character’s
intent, which serves to explain the action and
provides an insight into their motivations and
desires.
FORMAL LETTER OF COMPLAINT
As_ly sentences
Opens with an action description which starts
with the word ‘As’ and ends with an adverb (_ly)
The valleys have crooked ravines, which
curve around like the blade of a scimitar.
Simile
The explorers knew they were standing on
the shoulders of giants.
Metaphor
With a final dash of pepper, the dish will be
ready to serve.
Subordinate clause
You talk about the construction of this road
as if it will have no impact on the lives of
the locals.
The difference between structures typical
of informal speech and structures
appropriate for formal speech and writing
(such as the use of question tags, e.g.
He’s your friend, isn’t he?, or the use of
the subjunctive in some very formal writing
and speech and speech, e.g. If I were or
Were they to come)
As the water heats up quickly, a change of
state happens called ‘evaporation’.
Adverb
EXPLANATION
4
5&6
Tell: show 3; examples sentences
Two part sentence. First part tells reader a
fact. This is followed by a colon. After the
colon a list of three examples follows. As this is
a phrase lies (not single words) semi-colons are
used.
REPORT
Object/person (aka…) sentences
aka (ay-kay-ay) is an abbreviation for ‘also known
as’
INSTRUCTION OR EXPLANATION
Then and now sentences
The first part of the sentence is a time related
statement which describes the state of things as
they were then (positive, negative or
informative). The second part presents the
opposing perspective which describes how things
are now.
Henry VIII was a ruthless king: divorcing
unwanted wives; beheading others;
executing many who opposed him.
Colon
A good grill pan (aka griddle or chargrill) is
an essential item of kitchen equipment.
Brackets
Acronyms
When_; when_; when_; then_. sentences
Ends with a statement, which is preceded by
three examples of occurrences, which, when
combined, lend credibility/prove/predict the
final statement.
Great striking paragraph or opening.
At first Werner von Braun thought it was a
normal assignment, but soon he realised it
was something much more dangerous.
Variations:
Years ago… but now…
Back then… today…
Even though then… now it seems…
Although… now…
People once thought…however…
Initially…Now, however…
When you look at the remains of
Tutankhamen; when you examine the damage
to his skull; when you look at the motives of
his advisors, then it is clear that the young
Pharoah’s death should be treated as
suspicious.
REPORT
Most important – in short sentences
Useful as a conclusion after several sentences
about the same topic. The end of the sentence is
summative.
Above all the sea is feared by many for the
distance it places sailors from safety – in
short, it is a vast and often dangerous place.
(1)
BIOGRAPHICAL RECOUNT
Semi-colon in a list
5
REPORT (1)
BALANCED ARGUMENT (2)
PERSUASIVE (3)
Emotion – consequence sentences
Starts with the description of an emotion,
followed by a dash and a description of the
consequence of that feeling.
BIOGRAPHY (1)
REPORT (2)
The question is: sentences
Composed of two sentences. The first is a short
description of an action or statement of fact.
The second begins with the phrase ‘The question
is’ followed by an intriguing question which draws
the reader into the text.
Above all, the debate about whether foxhunting should be banned or not will run and
run – in short, everyone has strong opinions
on the matter. (2)
Above all, fox hunting should be banned
because of the extreme cruelty involved in
the chase and the kill – in short, it is
barbaric. (3)
King Henry was furious - he ordered the
execution of his wife. (1)
Dash
Captain Smith was determined – he
continued through the ice despite the
warning telegraphs. (2)
An area of forest equivalent to thirty-six
football fields is cut down every minute.
The question is: how can we stop this?
PERSUASION
6
7
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