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President: Jodi Nunnari
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San Diego Convention Center
San Diego, USA | December 8-12
ascb-embo2018.ascb.org | #ascbembo18
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CONTENTS
Meeting at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Professional Development Programs at a Glance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASCB Corporate Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASCB Annual Meeting Supporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
5
6
7
ASCB Executive Committee, Council, Staff, Ambassadors,
Committees, and Task Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
General Information
Registration Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Learning Center (Exhibit Hall). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Career Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Poster Presentation Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Attendee and Convention Center Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Speaker Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Accessibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Meeting Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Safety Tips and Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Hotel Information/Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Convention Center Maps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Travel Award Recipients
Education Committee Travel Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Childcare Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Minorities Affairs Committee Travel Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
International Travel Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22
22
22
23
Scientific Program
Saturday Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Sunday Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Monday Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Tuesday Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Wednesday Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Exhibitors
Learning Center (Exhibit Hall) Floor Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Exhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Exhibitor Product Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Abstract Author Index (Oral Presentations). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Abstract Author Disclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Note
The poster listings and poster author index are in a separate publication, the Poster Guide.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
1
MEETING AT A GLANCE
Sunday
Saturday
7:30 am
Registration Open
7:30 am
Registration Open
8:30 am
Special Interest Subgroups – Morning
A.
5th Biannual Frontiers
in Cytokinesis
8:00 am
Symposium 1: Nuclear Organization
8:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Cell data in the classroom: Using the
Allen Cell Explorer for high school and
college education
B.
Building the Cell 2018
C.
Cell Biology in Cancer Immunity
D.
Evolutionary Cell Biology
E.
Intracellular Cargo Transport by
Molecular Motors: What a Mesh!
F.
Mechanisms of DNA Repair in
Maintenance of Genome Integrity
G.
Spatial and Temporal Analytical
Tools for Cell Atlases
H.
Systems and Synthetic Biology
of Decoding Complex Cellular
Rhythms
I.
The Many Functions of
Cytoskeletal Proteins in the
Cell Nucleus
J.
10:30 am
Wnt Signaling in Development
and Cancer
Getting into Graduate School:
The Do’s, the Don’ts, and the What If’s
9:00 am
Getting the Most out of Your
Thesis Committee
1:30 pm
Special Interest Subgroups – Afternoon
K.
Bottom-Up Cell Biology
L.
Cellular Organization of
Metabolism: Biology, Structure,
and Function of Enzyme Polymers
M.
Cilia and Cell Signaling in
Development and Tissue
Regeneration
N.
Emerging Model Systems
O.
Machine Learning in Cell Biology
P.
Neuronal Cytoskeleton:
A Complex Interplay of
Cytoarchitecture and Dynamics
Q.
Next Generation Correlative
Microscopy: Biological
Applications and Emerging
Techniques
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Celldiscoverer 7 and 3D-Cell Culture
- High Resolution meets Screening;
Structured illumination microscopy
(SIM) with two-dimensional illumination patterns
Career Coaching
Career Options for Cell Biologists
Data Driven Approaches to Improving
Teaching and Mentoring
Understanding the NIH Grant Review Process
9:30 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Using 3D organoid culture to assess
disease aggressiveness in genetically
engineered mouse models
of prostate cancer
Navigating the Faculty Job Search at an
R1 Institute
12:15 pm
Minorities Affairs Committee Awards
Reception (by invitation only)
1:00 pm
Career Discussion and Mentoring
Roundtables
Morning Refreshment Break
9:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Unbiased Functional Identification
& Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor
Neoantigens and Exploiting a Novel
Cell Death Mechanism for Selective
Killing of Cancer Cells Upregulating
Homologous Recombination
Symposium 2: Cell Migration
Symposium 3: Neuronal Cell Biology
10:00 am
EMBO Lab Leadership: Roles, Values,
and Expectations
First Timer? Making the Most of the
Annual Meeting
Foundational Cell Biology Workshop:
Using Primary Literature to Teach Biology
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Visualizing intracellular organelle and
cytoskeletal interactions at nanoscale
resolution on millisecond time scales
Green Cards for Scientific Researchers:
How to Win Your EB-1A/NIW Case
10:45 am
11:00 am
In-Booth Presentation
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom
cell microenvironments with PRIMO
contactless and maskless photopatterning system
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D
super-resolution light sheet and single
molecule imaging and tracking
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cells-to-CT™: A fast way to kill your
cells for gene expression analysis
E.E. Just Award Lecture: Guillermina (Gigi)
Lozano
Science Discussion Tables
Microsymposia
1.
Cell Cycle and Signaling
1:15 pm
Meet the Committees
1:30 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
Afternoon Refreshment Break
1:45 pm
Meet the Editor of CBE—Life Sciences
Education
2:00 pm
2.
Centrosome and Cilia Dynamics
Faculty Research and Education Development (FRED) Mentoring Program Mock Grant
Review Panel Session (by invitation only)
The Mechanics and Membrane
Dynamics of the Nuclear
Envelope
3.
Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
How to Review a Paper
4.
Membrane Architecture
and Structure
Research Careers in Biotechnology
S.
Patterning the Cytoskeleton PTMs, MAPs, ABPs
5.
Polarity, Junctions, and Tissue
Structure
T.
The Midbody: From Cytokinesis
to Signaling Organelle
6.
Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 1
R.
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Andor Technology
Dragonfly: Subcellular SRRF-Stream
Super-resolution to Big Specimen
Imaging with Imaris Stitcher
Labviva
A New and Unique Approach for
Relevant Scientific Information
Advocacy Toolbox I: The Two-Minute
Speech
2:00 pm
Hit the Ground Running: Early Success
in Graduate School
3:15 pm
Judged Poster Session
6:00 pm
Keynote Lecture: Sean Morrison
International Funding Session from
APOCB, China, and FAPESP, the São Paulo
Research Foundation, Brazil
Immediately
Following
Keynote
Opening Night Reception
MD-PhD, Is it Right for Me?
8:00 pm
International Research and Training
Exchange Fair
3:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
ALVEOLE
Fine-tuning the mechanical and
biochemical properties of in vitro
microenvironments with a versatile
and contactless photopatterning
technology: PRIMO
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Super Resolution Confocal Scanner
Unit CSU-W1 Sora
3:15 pm
2
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Bitplane -IMARIS
Analysis of 3D/4D Microscopy Images
in Cell Biology – Imaris innovations
advance the processing and analysis
of complex datasets with a comprehensive and batchable environment
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Innovations in Genome Editing
Delivery and Transfection in Primary
and Immune Cells
Planning Your Exit from Graduate School
11:45 am
12:00 pm
Keith R. Porter Lecture: Ruth Lehmann
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
MEETING AT A GLANCE
Monday
Sunday
4:15 pm
Subgroup U: The Cell and Physics:
2018 and Beyond
Microsymposia
1.
Biology of Stem Cells
2.
Cell Adhesion Motility
and Mechanics
3:
Cellular Stress Responses
4.
Microbes and the Cytoskeleton
5.
Nucleus
6.
7:30 am
Registration Open
8:00 am
Symposium 4: Cytoskeletal Dynamics
8:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing an all new microscopic
toolbox for functional imaging
8:30 am
An Organellar Perspective
on Disease
Education Minisymposium: EvidenceBased Education: Promoting Excellence
through an Inclusive Environment
8:45 am
7:00 pm
Panel Discussion and Reception: Janelia is
Looking for a Scientis with a Big New Idea.
Could That Be You?
8:00 pm
Education Happy Hour
8:30 pm
Ask a Scientist Bar Night
Upcoming Meetings
9:00 am
Important Numbers
ASCB Exhibit Management
619-525-6253
Lost & Found
619-525-6250
First Aid
House Phone ext. 5911
12:00 pm
Careers in Science: Academic Core Facilities
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Cellecta, Inc.
Combining Cell Barcoding and CRISPR
sgRNA Libraries with Targeted Gene
Expression for Single Cell Genetic
Analysis
1:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
MilliporeSigma
Winning Westerns: Proven Strategies
to Optimize Your Western Blots
Career Discussion and Mentoring
Roundtables
1:30 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
Afternoon Refreshment Break
In-Booth Presentation
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom
cell microenvironments with PRIMO
contactless and maskless photopatterning system
2:00 pm
GE Healthcare
EDGE confocal: A new line scanning
confocal technique for improved
resolution and contrast
LGBTQ+ Science, Diversity,
and Networking Session
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Olympus America Inc.
The Olympus FV3000RS Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope: Speed and
Sensitivity for Live Cell Imaging and
Beyond
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
A spectrum of light sheet instruments optimized for different imaging
demands
In an emergency use the nearest house phone and
dial x5911.
Careers in Scientific Consulting
Statistical Thinking in Undergraduate
Biology (STUB) Network:
Coordinating Teaching and Assessment
From an outside line or mobile phone,
call 619-525-5490.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
ASCB Member Forum/Business Meeting
Funding Opportunities from the European
Research Council: Supporting Top
Researchers from Anywhere in the World
Do NOT call 911 directly.
Regulation of Membrane Trafficking
Advocacy Toolbox II: Practice Being an
Advocate for Science
EMBO Lab Leadership: Communication
and Feedback
Exhibitor Tech Talk
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
Fluorescent Probes for Cell Biology
Cytoskeleton and Disease
12.
Synthego
CRISPR-Engineered Cells For Your
Research
Symposium 6: Regeneration and Morphogenesis
10:45 am
Cell Mechanics
11.
Writing Your Science Story: How to Get
Everyone Else Excited about Your Work
Symposium 5: Metabolism
Careers in Scientific Editing, Writing,
and Communications
Cell Division and Mitosis
10.
Starting a Laboratory at an R1 Institution
Morning Refreshment Break
10:00 am
9.
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing a fully integrated Cryo
Electron Tomography workflow for
your lab
Bio-Rad Laboratories
The Best Practices and the New Best
Fluorophores for the Best Western
Blots
9:45 am
Cell Biology of the Nucleus
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Andor Technology
NEW: Sona, a new back-illuminated
sCMOS camera for the highest-sensitivity & largest field-of-view imaging—Protecting your specimen from
photobleaching & toxicity; maximizing
sampling & throughput
Career Coaching
9:30 am
8.
Organoids: The Future of Life Science
Research
For Faculty Members: National Institute of
General Medical Sciences Undergraduate
and Predoctoral Grant Programs
Attendee/ Membership Services
619-525-6252
ASCB Meeting Management
619-525-6250
Microsymposia
Advances in Mechanisms
7.
of Cellular Stress
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D
super-resolution light sheet and single
molecule imaging and tracking
2019
Washington, DC
December 7–11
2020
Philadelphia, PA
December 5–9
The Cost and Benefit of Reproducibility
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Mizar Imaging
Bringing you the advantages of lightsheet for your live-cell fluorescence
microscopy applications, now at high-/
super-resolution
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Introduction to Fennik Life Sciences &
TheraKan™ System for 3D Cell Culture
Analysis
Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence
in Science Education: Erin Dolan
Open Forum: Giving and Receiving Feedback
Publishing Cell Biology Classroom Activities
in CourseSource
Workshop: New Fluorescent Probes and
HTP Imaging Approaches
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Bruker Corporation
Multiplexed quantitative single
molecule localization microscopy with
the Vutara 352
11:00 am
2:30 pm
Meet the Committees
3
MEETING AT A GLANCE
Tuesday
Monday
3:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Horizon Discovery Ltd
Cell line engineering with CRISPR-Cas9
- tips and tricks to maximize success
Allen Institute for Cell Science
From images to information: new
machine-learning based image
processing toolbox for cellular
organization
3:15 pm
EMBO Gold Medal Ceremony and Lectures: Marek Basler and Melina Schuh
4:15 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Nanolive SA
Label-free, long-term 3D analysis of
organelles in living mammalian cells
shows pre-mitotic organelle spinning:
mitochondria, nucleus and lipid
droplets in the spotlight
7:30 am
Registration Open
8:00 am
Symposium 7: Organelle Communication
8:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Leica Microsystems Inc.
NEW Leica THUNDER Imagers –
Decode 3D biology in real time
8:30 am
Minisymposia
7.
Motors in Transport and
Cytoskeleton Remodeling
8.
Neural Development
and Neurodegeneration
9.
Patterning Tissue Morphogenesis
10.
Phase Transitions in the Cell
11.
Spindle Mechanics and
Chromosome Segregation
9:30 am
Elevator Speech Videotaping/Coaching
Session
5:30 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
NanoSurface Biomedical, Inc.
Biomimetic Cell Culture Platforms
for Enhancing Cell Biology Studies
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Advances in Image Processing
Automation in Amira
7:15 pm
Navigating Negotiation in Science:
A Panel and Networking Reception
Share your experience
at this year's annual
meeting.
#ASCBEMBO18
4
Social Media for Science Communication
1:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Sapphire North America
ReZolve Scientific Photostable
Fluorophores for live cell imaging by
fluorescence microscopy and more
Science Discussion Tables
Careers in Biotech Beyond the Bench
Celldance Video Premiere and Elevator
Speech Awards
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Bruker Corporation
Cellular Imaging with Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: Ultra Gentle,
High-resolution Imaging of Living Samples
1:15 pm
Meet the Committees
9:45 am
Louis-Jeantet Prize Lectures: Christer
Betsholtz and Antonio Lanzavecchia
1:30 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
10:00 am
ASCB MAC Visiting Professors Program
(by invitation only)
2:00 pm
Afternoon Refreshment Break
Faculty Search and Starting a Lab at a
Primarily Undergraduate Institution
How to Boost Your Research Project
with Support of International Research
Infrastructures
10:45 am
WICB Awards and Mentoring Theater:
Let’s Make a Deal: The Art of Negotiating
for Success
11:00 am
GenScript USA Inc.
Using CRISPR Technologies in Cell Line
Engineering
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Bruker Corporation
Advances in dye development and
microscopy for live cell super
resolution microscopy with the
Vutara 352
ChromoTek GmbH
One for All: Small Affinity-Tag &
Nanobody for Multiple Capture
& Detection Applications
Microsymposia
Molecular Mechanisms of
13.
Metabolic Reprogramming
14.
Motility
15.
Neuronal Cell Biology
16.
Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 2
17.
The Story of Life: Survival and
Death
18.
Tissue Architecture and Mechanics
Careers in Science Policy
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Bruker Corporation
Cell Mechanics with Atomic Force
Microscopy (AFM): From Modulus
Mapping to Measuring Cell-Surface
Interactions
EMBO Lab Leadership: Teamwork
and Conflict in the Lab
Special Interest Subgroup W: Organelle
Interactome and Cell Plasticity Control
5:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
MilliporeSigma
Dynamic Live Cell Imaging of Mammalian Cells Using CellASIC® ONIX2
Microfluidic Platform
Morning Refreshment Break
NCI-ASCB Emerging Topic Symposium:
A New Nuclear-Nexus in Cancer Cell Biology
Workshop: Screening Approaches
in Human Cells and CRISPR Methods
Dissecting Job Ads and Tailoring Your
Résumé
How to Thrive as a New Faculty Member:
Strategies for Research and Mentoring
Success
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cryo-tomography: a new imaging
technique for cell biology to peer
at the inner workings of cells
4:30 pm
How to Deliver an Effective Chalk Talk
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
Barriers Removed: Manuscript Transfer
Reception
ASCB MAC Linkage Fellows Program
(by invitation only)
Exhibitor Tech Talk
The next generation of imaging
standards for fluorescence microscopy
9:00 am
12:00 pm
Helping the Next Generation of Researchers: Navigating the Challenges and
Answering the Call for Change
In-Booth Presentation
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom
cell microenvironments with PRIMO
contactless and maskless photopatterning system
3:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
MilliporeSigma
Duolink® PLA: A Powerful Tool to
Study Protein-Protein Interactions and
Signaling Pathways
3:15 pm
E.B. Wilson Medal Presentation
and Address: Barbara J. Meyer
4:15 pm
Workshop: Electron Cryo-Tomography and
Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy
(CLEM)
Subgroup X: New Tools and Resources
for Studies of Stem Cell Biology
Minisymposia
Biomechanics
12.
Creating Inclusive Biology Education
Environments
How to Improve Research Assessment
for Hiring and Funding Decisions
Moving (Rapidly) toward Open Data
for All and by All
7:00 pm
13.
Cell Biology of the Neuron
14.
Cell Size, Cell Division,
and Contractility
15.
Cytoskeleton, Motility,
and Cell Mechanics: Tracks
16.
Organelle Homeostasis
17.
Regulation of Autophagy
Reception: Enabling Persistence in
Science: Creating Inclusive Environments
through Microaffirmations
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
MEETING AT A GLANCE
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AT A GLANCE
Wednesday
8:30 am
Minisymposia
18.
Autophagy and Protein Quality
Control
19.
Biological Insights from Organoid
Models of Health and Disease
20.
Cellular Metabolism
21.
Centrosomes, Cilia and Flagella
22.
Host-Pathogen Interactions
23.
Organelle Zones
Subgroup Y: The Cellular and Molecular
Basis of Invasive Metastatic Cancer
Subgroup Z: Cell Biology of Marine Protists: Toward Functional Genomic Tools for
Diverse New Model Organisms
11:20 am
Symposium 8: Quality Control
2:00 pm
Genetic Tool Development in Marine
Protists: Emerging New Model Organisms
for Cell Biology
Saturday
Sunday
Data Driven Approaches to
Improving Teaching and Mentoring
8:30-9:30 am
ASCB MAC Linkage Fellows Program (by invitation only)
12:00-12:50 pm
Navigating the Faculty Job Search
at an R1 Institute
9:00-9:50 am
How to Deliver an Effective Chalk
Talk
12:15-1:00 pm
Minorities Affairs Committee Awards
Reception (by invitation only)
9:00-9:50 am
How to Thrive as a New Faculty
Member: Strategies for Research
and Mentoring Success
10:00-11:00 am
ASCB MAC Visiting Professors
Program (by invitation only)
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership: Teamwork
and Conflict in the Lab
10:00-10:50 am
Faculty Search and Starting
a Lab at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution
10:00-10:50 am
How to Boost Your Research Project with Support of International
Research Infrastructures
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Career Discussion and
Mentoring Roundtables
1:45-2:30 pm
Meet the Editor of
CBE—Life Sciences Education
2:00-6:00 pm
Faculty Research and Education
Development (FRED) Mentoring
Program Mock Grant Review
Panel Session (by invitation only)
2:00-2:50 pm
How to Review a Paper
2:00-2:50 pm
Research Careers in Biotechnology
4:15-7:00 pm
Education Minisymposium:
Evidence-Based Education:
Promoting Excellence through
an Inclusive Environment
8:00-10:00 pm
Education Happy Hour
8:30 pm
Ask a Scientist Bar Night
10:30-11:30 am
Getting into Graduate School: The Do’s,
the Don’ts, and the What If’s
10:30-11:30 am
Planning Your Exit from Graduate
School
8:30-10:00 am
11:45 am-12:45 pm
Getting the Most out of Your Thesis
Committee
Publishing Cell Biology Classroom
Activities in CourseSource
9:00-9:50 am
2:00-3:00 pm
Hit the Ground Running: Early Success
in Graduate School
Careers in Science:
Academic Core Facilities
9:00-9:50 am
3:15-5:45 pm
Judged Poster Session
8:00-9:00 pm
International Research and Training
Exchange Fair
For Faculty Members: National
Institute of General Medical
Sciences Undergraduate and
Predoctoral Grant Programs
Sunday
8:15-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Cell data in the classroom: Using the
Allen Cell Explorer for high school
and college education
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Coaching
9:00-9:50 am
Career Options for Cell Biologists
9:00-9:50 am
Understanding the NIH Grant Review
Process
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership: Roles, Values,
and Expectations
10:00-10:50 am
Monday
10:45 am-12:00 pm
WICB Awards and Mentoring
Theater: Let’s Make a Deal:
The Art of Negotiating for Success
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Creating Inclusive Biology Education Environments
11:00 am-12:00 pm
How to Improve Research
Assessment for Hiring and
Funding Decisions
12:00-12:50 pm
Dissecting Job Ads and Tailoring
Your Résumé
12:00-12:50 pm
Social Media for Science
Communication
1:00-1:50 pm
Careers in Biotech Beyond the
Bench
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Coaching
1:00-1:50 pm
10:00-10:50 am
Careers in Scientific Editing,
Writing, and Communications
Celldance Video Premiere
and Elevator Speech Awards
2:00-2:50 pm
Careers in Science Policy
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership:
Communication and Feedback
2:00-2:50 pm
Helping the Next Generation of
Researchers: Navigating the
Challenges and Answering the
Call for Change
10:00-10:50 am
Funding Opportunities from the
European Research Council:
Supporting Top Researchers from
Anywhere in the World
10:45 am-12:00 pm
LGBTQ+ Science, Diversity,
and Networking Session
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Bruce Alberts Award for
Excellence in Science Education:
Erin Dolan
First Timer? Making the Most of the
Annual Meeting
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Open Forum:
Giving and Receiving Feedback
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Foundational Cell Biology Workshop: Using Primary Literature to Teach Biology
12:00-12:50 pm
Starting a Laboratory at an
R1 Institution
10:00-10:50 am
Green Cards for Scientific Researchers:
How to Win Your EB-1A/NIW Case
12:00-12:50 pm
11:00 am-12:00 pm
E.E. Just Award Lecture: Guillermina
(Gigi) Lozano
Writing Your Science Story:
How to Get Everyone Else Excited
About Your Work
1:00-2:00 pm
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Advocacy Toolbox I: The Two-Minute
Speech
Advocacy Toolbox II: Practice
Being an Advocate for Science
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
11:00 am-12:00 pm
International Funding Session from
APOCB, China, and FAPESP, the São
Paulo Research Foundation, Brazil
Career Discussion and Mentoring
Roundtables
2:00-2:50 pm
Careers in Scientific Consulting
MD-PhD, Is it Right for Me?
5:00-6:00 pm
Elevator Speech Videotaping/
Coaching Session
11:00-11:50 am
Tuesday
12:00-12:50 pm
7:15-8:45 pm
7:00-8:30 pm
Reception: Enabling Persistence
in Science: Creating Inclusive
Environments through
Microaffirmations
Navigating Negotiation in Science:
A Panel and Networking Reception
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
5
The ASCB is grateful to its 2018 Corporate Members*
Gold
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Nikon Instruments
Silver
Chroma Technology Corporation
Bronze
Okolab SRL
6
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
The ASCB thanks the following organizations for supporting the
2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting*
3i Intelligent Imaging Systems
Subgroup
General Support
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Advocacy Circle and Special Interest Subgroup
Biogen
Minisymposium
Biology Open
Minisymposium
International Center for Genetic Engineering and
Biotechnology
Travel Awards
Bruker Corporation
Subgroup
National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
Travel Awards
Burroughs Wellcome Fund
MAC/WICB Programs
Nikon Instruments Inc.
Lanyards, General Support, and
Careers in Science: Academic Core Facilities
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Keynote
Pfizer
General Support
Springer Nature Publishing Group
Childcare Grants
CBE—Life Sciences Education
Education Minisymposium and Foundational Cell
Biology Workshop
The Anatomical Record and the
American Association of Anatomists
Symposium
Chroma Technology Corporation
Travel Awards
The Kavli Foundation
Minisymposium
Company of Biologists
Travel Awards
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Travel Awards
Getson & Schatz
The ASCB is grateful to its 2018 Doorstep Meeting Supporters*
Biogen
Frequency Therapeutics
*As of October 31, 2018
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
7
Job Hunting?
Hiring?
ASCB Members get
50% OFF
job postings
Post a job, find a job on
the new ASCB job board
jobs.ascb.org
8
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
President
President-Elect
President-Elect Designate
Past President
Secretary
Treasurer
Chief Executive Officer, ex officio
Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis
Andrew Murray, Harvard University
Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley
Pietro De Camilli, Yale University School of Medicine/HHMI
Kerry Bloom, University of North Carolina
Gary Gorbsky, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Erika Shugart, American Society for Cell Biology
COUNCIL
Angelika Amon, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Michael Ehlers, Biogen
Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
J.K. Haynes, Morehouse College
Rebecca Heald, University of California, Berkeley
Erika Holzbaur, University of Pennsylvania
Janet Iwasa, University of Utah School of Medicine
George Langford, Syracuse University College of Arts & Sciences
Wallace Marshall, University of California, San Francisco
Anne Spang, University of Basel-Biozentrum
Julie Theriot, University of Washington
Ora Weisz, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
ASCB STAFF
Ben Anawalt, Director of IT
Eric Baker, Journals Manager
Fabi Chacon, Program Coordinator
Azra Chughtai, Director of HR & Administration
Thea Clarke, Director of Education & Communications
Beth Esquerre, Director of Finance
Alison Harris, Director of Meetings
Anna Hatch, DORA Community Manager
Leeann Kirchner, Marketing & Design Manager
Mark Leader, Director of Publications
Lynn Marquis, Director of CLS
Kelly McManus, Accounting Manager
Will Pierce, WordPress Developer
Ashley Sarris, Meeting Manager
Ruth Sims, Staff Accountant
Erika Shugart, Chief Executive Officer
Mary Spiro, Science Writer and Social Media Manager
Brian Theil, Director of Membership
Kevin Wilson, Director of Public Policy and Media Relations
AMBASSADORS
Abdulbaki Agbas
Noveera Ahmed
Wolfram Antonin
Jane Antony
Adriana Bankston
Kenneth Belanger
Marvin Bentley
Hilde Bortier
Anthony Brown
Kim Caldwell
Michael Cammer
Susan Chapman
Pei-Wen Chen
Karen Crasta
Santiago Di Pietro
Lena Diaw
Ivanka Dilova
Kevin Edwards
Sylvia Fromherz
Anne Grove
Peter Gunning
Volker Haucke
Triscia Hendrickson
Nolan Hoffman
Yi-Ren Hong
Matus Hornacek
Lukas Huber
Aron Jaffe
Dong-Yan Jin
Robert Kao
Christine Kasper
Dong-Hwee Kim
Yulia Komarova
Geri Kreitzer
Marie Kveiborg
Nathan Lanning
Alyssa Lesko
Song-Tao Liu
G.W. Gant Luxton
Rebecca Lyczak
Laura Machesky
Haniam Maria
Ichiro Maruyama
Andreas Merdes
Ram Mishra
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Yuko Miyamoto
Mary Munson
Kumiko Nakada-Tsukui
Leocadia Paliulis
Erwin Peterman
Joe Ramos
Stephen Royle
Juha Saarikangas
Sarah Sabatinos
Kirsten Sadler Edepli
Alan Schoenfeld
Michael Schrader
Tomohiro Shima
Takashi Shimoike
Mi Hye Song
Wenxia Song
Radu Stan
Dhanendra Tomar
Jorge Torres
Pamela Tuma
David Tumbarello
Daniel Ungar
Elizabeth Vallen
Patricia Wadsworth
Vassie Ware
Ayumu Yamamoto
Assaf Zaritsky
Dennis Zimmermann
9
THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY
COMMITTEES
Development
Thoru Pederson, Chair
Robin Kleiman
Jennifer LippincottSchwartz
Andrew Murray
Jodi Nunnari
Laura Pajak
Patrick Schneider
Education
Erin Dolan, Co-Chair
Melanie Styers, Co-Chair
Scott Gehler
Tracie Gibson
Jennifer Hood-DeGrenier
Lalitha Jayant
Leocadia Paliulis
Amy Prunuske
Amy Rice Doetsch
George Risinger
Anne Rosenwald
Shannon Seidel
Ex-Officio
Susan Wick
Associates
Marina Crowder
Dean Dawson
Carmen Inda
Mahasin Osman
Susan Walsh
Liaisons
Christina King-Smith
Ashley Lakoduk
Finance & Audit
Gary Gorbsky, Chair
Jodi Nunnari
Andrew Murray
Angelika Amon
Yvonne Appiah
Ira Male
Keith Mostov
Konrad Schweitzer
Greenfield Sluder
Jason Stumpff
Governance
Gary Gorbsky, Chair
David Asai
Jennifer DeLuca
Mary Munson
Scott Wilkinson
Linda Wordeman
International Affairs
Lawrence Banks, Co-Chair
Xuebiao Yao, Co-Chair
10
Ranan Aktas
Buzz Baum
Roberto Bruzzone
Maria Antonietta De
Matteis
William Earnshaw
Celia Garcia
Fernanda Leite
Paul Mungai
Rytis Prekeris
Ronen Zaidel-Bar
Hong Zhang
Associate
Hernandes Carvalho
Liaison
Roberta Sala
Daya Mena
Membership
Kerry Bloom, Chair
Prachee Avasthi
Sue Biggins
A. Malcolm Campbell
Iain Cheeseman
Andrew Ewald
Andrew Holland
Erika Holzbaur
Geri Kreitzer
Kandice Tanner
Michael Way
Sarah Wignall
Ex-Officio
Kathleen Green
Liaison
Sushama Sivakumar
Minorities Affairs
Franklin Carrero-Martinez,
Co-Chair
Veronica Segarra, Co-Chair
Michael Boyce
Andrew Campbell
Benjamin Clarke
Giovanna GuerreroMedina
Latanya Hammonds-Odie
Tama Hasson
Christina King-Smith
Brian Lewis
Sandra Murray
James Olzmann
Blake Riggs
Ahna Skop
Jim Vigoreaux
MariaElena Zavala
Ex-Officio
David Asai
Michael Leibowitz
Leticia Vega
Associates
Deepali Bhandari
Tameka Clemons
Ernest Heimsath, Jr.
Alexis Rodriguez
Brenda Schoffstall
Liaisons
Derek Applewhite
Margherita Perillo
Nominating
Arshad Desai, Chair
Denise Montell
Max Nachury
Jody Rosenblatt
Gia Voeltz
Peter Walter
Committee for Postdocs
& Students (COMPASS)
Alyssa Lesko, Co-Chair
Courtney Schroeder,
Co-Chair
Paulo Caceres
Gaia Cantelli
Anupam Das
Arunika Das
Brooke Gardner
Rocio Gomez
Amanda Haage
Ashley Lakoduk
Chenshu Liu
Margherita Perillo
Ashley Rowland
Sushama Sivakumar
Valerie Tutwiler
Scott Wilkinson
Sara Wong
Peter Yu
Dennis Zimmerman
Associates
Matthew Akamatsu
Jane Antony
Caitlyn Blake-Hedges
Catherine Carbone
Sam Dundon
Ginger Hunter
Aniket Jana
Ankita Bachhawat
Jaykumar
Ashley Marsh
Roberta Sala
Emily Summerbell
Subbulakshmi Suresh
Krishnakumar Vasudevan
Ashtyn Zinn
Program
Thomas Langer, Co-Chair
Samara Reck-Peterson,
Co-Chair
William Bement
Magdalena Bezanilla
Stirling Churchman
Ralph DeBerardinis
Arshad Desai
Alexander Dunn
Adam Frost
Judith Frydman
Ramanujan Hegde
Anna Huttenlocher
Juergen Knoblich
Ulrike Kutay
Laura Machesky
Sandra Murray
Antonina Roll-Mecak
Thomas Schwarz
Anne Spang
Tobias Walther
Ex-Officio
Jodi Nunnari
Public Information
Lee Ligon, Chair
Quyen Aoh
William Bement
Mar Carmena
Stanley Cohn
Heidi Hehnly
Janet Iwasa
Soni Lacefield
Ryoma Ohi
David Pruyne
Richard Sever
Callie Wigington
Associates
Lorena Benedetti
Steven Burden
Bruno Da Rocha-Azevedo
Barbara Sorkin
Liaison
Ashley Rowland
Douglas Koshland
Jodi Nunnari
Thomas Pollard
Associates
Adriana Bankston
John Hanna
Colin Johnson
Liaisons
Lee Ligon
Mary Munson
Alexis Rodriguez
Melanie Styers
Scott Wilkinson
Women in Cell Biology
Diane Barber, Chair
D. Page Baluch
Mary Dasso
Erin Goley
Rebecca Heald
Daniel Kiehart
Sophie Martin
Edwin Munro
Kirsten Sadler Edepli
K. Schmeidler-Sapiro
Associates
Julie Brill
Jessica Feldman
Phyllis Hanson
Emily Mace
Sandra Masur
Mark McNiven
Yuko Miyamoto
Mary Munson
Tricia Serio
Sanford Simon
Matthew Welch
Liaisons
Sam Dundon
MariaElena Zavala
Public Policy
Connie Lee, Chair
Simon Atkinson
Charles Easley
Daniel Fletcher
Holly Goodson
Sue Jaspersen
Tony Koleske
Mark Peifer
Jessica Polka
Ex-Officio
Pietro De Camilli
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
TASK FORCES
Annual Meeting Scientific Tracks
Task Force
Sandra Schmid, Chair
Larry Goldstein
Erika Holzbaur
Wallace Marshll
Tom Misteli
Andrew Murray
Ryan Petrie
Ora Weisz
Annual Meeting Abstract
Programming Task Force
Page Baluch
Marvin Bentley
Jose Javier Bravo-Cordero
Tracy Brennan
Dylan Burnette
Peter Cavnar
Pei-Wen Chen
Qian Chen
Bruno Da Rocha-Azevedo
Lena Diaw
Ruslan Dmitriev
Laura Dyer
Yaniv Elkouby
Prachi Ghule
Kristen Gorman
John Goss
Taran Gujral
Melissa Hendershott
Tomohito Higashi
Michael Kareta
Adam Kwiatkowski
Jennifer Kwong
Maria Isabel Larre
Ellen LeMosy
Laura Lowery
Emily Mace
Steven Markus
Kara McKinley
Ben Montpetit
Joshua Morgan
Tammy Morrish Morrish
Irina Mueller
Saikat Mukhopadhyay
Catherine Neary
Patrick Oakes
James Olzmann
Valeria Padovano
Ryan Petrie
Gabriel Pineda
Sergey Plotnikov
Christine Priano
Jeni Prosperi
Padmini Rangamani
Gina Razidlo
Stefanie Redemann
Yasunori Saheki
Todd Strochlic
Juli Unternaehrer
Susan Walsh
Julie Welburn
Smita Yadav
Shengyu Yang
Governance Task Force
Gary Gorbsky, Chair
David Asai
Jennifer (Jake) DeLuca
Mary Munson
Scott Wilkinson
Linda Wordeman
Industry Advisory Task Force
Cherry Ignacio, Co-Chair
Kevin Simpson, Co-Chair
Amy Butler
Michael Ehlers
Molly McQuilken
Paul Millman
Tito Serafini
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
LGBTQ+ Task Force
Bruno Da Rocha-Azevedo,
Co-Chair
Lee Ligon, Co-Chair
Derek Applewhite
Fred Chang
Ashley Lakoduk
Alfonso Lopez Coral
Gary McDowell
Alex Valm
Associate
Daya Samantha Mena
Professional Development
Task Force
Bob Goldstein, Co-Chair
Clare E. Walczak, Co-Chair
James Guenther
Rebecca Heald
Kellyann Jones-Jamtgaard
Connie Lee
Melissa Mendez
Ryan O'Quinn
Vinay Ramabhadran
Valerie Tutwiler
Sara Wong
Kathryn ZavalaB469
11
ASCB EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Jodi Nunnari
President
Andrew Murray
President-Elect
Eva Nogales
President-Elect
Designate
Pietro De Camilli
Past President
Kerry Bloom
Secretary
Gary Gorbsky
Treasurer
Erika C. Shugart
Chief Executive
Officer, ex-officio
ASCB COUNCIL
Angelika Amon
Michael Ehlers
Bob Goldstein
J.K. Haynes
Rebecca Heald
Erika Holzbaur
Janet Iwasa
George Langford
Wallace Marshall
Ann Spang
Julie Theriot
Ora Weisz
ASCB COMMITTEE CHAIRS, CO-CHAIRS
Alyssa Lesko
COMPASS
Courtney
Schroeder
COMPASS
Erin Dolan
EDUCATION
Melanie Styers
EDUCATION
Gary Gorbsky
FINANCE
AND AUDIT
Lawrence Banks
INTERNATIONAL
AFFAIRS
Xuebiao Yao
INTERNATIONAL
AFFAIRS
Kerry Bloom
MEMBERSHIP
Franklin CarreroMartínez
MINORITIES
AFFAIRS
Veronica Segarra
MINORITIES
AFFAIRS
Arshad Desai
NOMINATING
Lee Ligon
PUBLIC
INFORMATION
Connie Lee
PUBLIC POLICY
Thomas Langer
PROGRAM
Samara ReckPeterson
PROGRAM
Diane Barber
WOMEN IN
CELL BIOLOGY
12
CBE—LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL
Erin L. Dolan
Editor-In-Chief
David G. Drubin
Editor-In-Chief
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
GENERAL INFORMATION
REGISTRATION INFORMATION
Scientific Registration
619-525-6262
LEARNING CENTER
Lobby D
Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 pm-5:00 pm
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-7:00 pm
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-11:30 am
Exhibitor Registration
619-525-6260
Lobby D
Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:00 pm-5:00 pm
Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-7:00 pm
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
Badges
Badges are picked up onsite at the San Diego Convention Center. When
you receive your badge, you will be provided a lanyard and meeting
materials. Meeting badges must be worn at all times while in the
convention center.
Your badge functions as a name badge and an exhibit inquiry card so
exhibitors can scan your badge and then send you further information.
Attendee Guest Badges
A guest is a nonscientist family member or nonscientist friend of a
registered scientist. If a registered scientist would like a family member
or friend to see their invited talk or their poster presentation, the
registered scientist should request this onsite at the ASCB Meeting
Management Office, Room 23A, at the San Diego Convention Center.
The guest badge will only be valid for the day and time selected.
Badge Replacement Policy
You will be able to obtain a replacement badge onsite for a fee of $15
at the Badge Replacement Counter during registration hours. If you
lose the second badge and need a third, you will need to re-register
for the meeting and pay the onsite registration fee. A photo ID is
necessary in both cases.
Certificates of Attendance
Certificates of Attendance may be obtained at the Certificate of
Membership/Attendance Counter located in the Registration area next
to the Attendee Services Counter.
Exhibit Halls D-H
The Learning Center is the networking hub of the meeting. You can:
•
View thousands of posters
•
Learn the latest technology, and how to use it, from company
representatives through hands-on, in-booth demonstrations as
well as Tech Talks in dedicated theaters
Interact directly with leaders in the field at Science Discussion
•
Tables and Career Discussion and Mentoring Roundtables
•
Attend numerous professional development programs in
Theater 3, Theater 4, and Roundtable Central and take
advantage of one-on one career coaching at the Career Center
Network, network, network
•
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 pm-8:00 pm
Sunday-Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-8:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
Note: The exhibits are open Sunday through Tuesday from 9:30 am to
4:00 pm.
ASCB Booth
619-525-6258
Booth 623, Hall F
Stop by the ASCB Booth—your one-stop shop for all things ASCB.
Browse our selection of ever-popular t-shirts and merchandise, meet
some ASCB staff and committee members, and learn what ASCB can
do for you!
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
EMBO Booth
Booth 729, Hall F
Stop by the EMBO Booth—find out how EMBO can support you
at any stage of your career and stimulate the exchange of scientific
information.
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
Exhibit Sales & Management (SPARGO, Inc.)
619-525-6253
Friday, December 7: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saturday, December 8: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sunday, December 9: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monday, December 10: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuesday, December 11: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hall D
8:00 am – 4:30 pm
8:00 am – 4:30 pm
9:30 am – 4:00 pm
9:30 am – 4:00 pm
9:30 am – 4:00 pm
Tech Talks in Theater 1 (Hall E) and Theater 2 (Hall G), Learning Center
Tech talks will be presented in Theater 1 and Theater 2, Sunday
through Tuesday during the meeting. Check the daily schedules for
specific tech talk titles, presenters, dates, and times.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
13
Housing through Experient, Official 2019 Housing Partner
Hall D,
2019 Exhibit Sales and Housing Office
Book your hotel room for the 2019 ASCB|EMBO Meeting in
Washington, DC. It is suggested you book early for the best rates. No
deposit collected, and you can cancel up to 72 hours prior to arrival.
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Note: Have issues with your hotel? Ask the 2018 Official Housing
Partner, onPeak, for assistance in Lobby D of the convention center, or
call 619-525-6254, during registration hours.
CAREER DEVELOPMENT
The Learning Center offers a full lineup of networking and professional
development programs. You can attend talks about careers and
professional development, access job postings, and sign up for oneon-one career coaching.
Career Center
Hall D
You can view job postings in the Career Center whenever the Learning
Center is open. Free career coaching will take place during the
following hours:
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
Note: The coaching signup sheets for Sunday-Tuesday will be available
on Sunday morning. These spots fill up fast so sign up early if you are
interested in this opportunity.
Theater 3 and Theater 4
Hall H
Career enhancement and other non-scientific programming will take
place in these theaters on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday from 9:00 am
to 3:00 pm. Check the daily schedules for specific talk titles, presenters,
dates, and times.
Roundtable Central 1, 2, and 3
Hall H
Various networking and educational roundtable sessions will be held
at Roundtable Central Sections 1, 2, and 3, including Career Discussion
and Mentoring Roundtables, and Science Discussion Tables. Check the
daily schedules for specific program dates and times.
POSTER PRESENTATION INFORMATION
Poster Sessions
Halls D-H
Posters Open for Viewing:
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
Sunday-Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-8:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-4:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CLOSED
Poster Presentations:
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00 pm-3:00 pm
Odd-Numbered Presentations: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Even-Numbered Presentations: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:30 pm-3:00 pm
Note: On Tuesday, December 11, posters must be removed from
boards between 3:00 pm and 4:00 pm. Posters left on boards after
4:00 pm on Tuesday, December 11, will not be returned to presenters.
The ASCB and EMBO are not responsible for posters left on the boards
or poster containers left unattended. Meeting participants and poster
presenters are not allowed access to the Learning Center after 4:00 pm
on Tuesday, December 11, for safety reasons. No exceptions.
Poster Board Assignments
There is typically confusion between the presentation number and
board number when placing posters on assigned boards. To help clarify
this issue, the ASCB and EMBO have assigned all poster board numbers
with the letter “B” followed by a number. Please be sure to place your
poster on the board that corresponds with this number.
To help find your board number, please refer to the aisle signs hanging
in the Learning Center.
Online Poster/Abstract Viewing
From Thursday, December 6, through Wednesday, December 12,
registered meeting participants will be able to visit a passwordprotected website to search and view abstracts, oral presentation
slides, and uploaded posters. This will allow participants to view
posters they missed (or abstracts if a poster was not uploaded).
Participants will be able to contact the presenter with any questions
directly through this website while viewing the poster. To search and
view the abstracts/posters visit: http://www.ascb.org /amabstract. A
login and password will be provided to all registered attendees.
ATTENDEE AND CONVENTION CENTER
RESOURCES
San Diego Convention Center
111 W. Harbor Drive
San Diego, CA 92101
ASCB Attendee/Membership Services
619-525-6252
Registration, Lobby D
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-7:00 pm
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-11:30 am
ASCB Meeting Management
619-525-6250
Room 23A
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-7:00 pm
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-1:00 pm
ATMs
The San Diego Convention Center has two onsite automatic teller
machines (ATMs) located in Lobby B2 and Lobby E.
Poster set up for Sunday viewing:
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 pm-6:00 pm
Business Center, FedEx Office
619-525-5450
Poster set up for Monday viewing:
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 pm-6:30 pm
The full-service business center offers a wide range of supplies,
services, and shipping, high-volume copying, large image printing,
faxing, etc.
Poster set up for Tuesday viewing:
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:00 pm-6:30 pm
Poster teardown on Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 pm-6:00 pm
Poster teardown on Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30 pm-6:00 pm
Poster teardown Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:30 pm-4:00 pm
14
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lobby D
9:00 am-5:00 pm
9:00 am-5:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
8:00 am-5:00 pm
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Childcare Arrangements
Onsite childcare services may be available through your hotel
concierge. Individual or group sitters may be arranged to provide inroom hotel childcare. Please check with your hotel well in advance of
your arrival date.
Note: It is the responsibility of the parent(s), guardian, legal guardian,
or individual requesting childcare services to screen caregivers and
to make a determination as to the appropriateness of the caregiver.
The ASCB and EMBO do not screen any of the childcare services and
assume no responsibility with respect to these services and accept no
liabilities.
Coat Check/Luggage/Poster Storage
$5 per item
Registration Area, Lobby D
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-10:30 pm
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-8:00 pm
Monday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-9:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-1:00 pm
Note: Luggage is not permitted in meeting rooms or in the Learning
Center (Exhibit Hall).
Concierge Desk/Restaurant Reservations
619-525-5610
Registration Area,
Lobby C/D
ASCB has partnered with the San Diego Convention and Visitors Bureau
to provide a complimentary concierge service for meeting participants
and exhibitors. These staff will be happy to make restaurant
recommendations and reservations as well as provide information
about shopping and local sightseeing.
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-6:00 pm
First Aid
619-525-6265
Ballroom 20 Lobby Box Office
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-10:00 pm
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-8:00 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-5:00 pm
In a life-threatening emergency, use a house phone (located throughout
the center) and call 5911. From an outside mobile phone dial 619-5255911. Do NOT call 911 directly. In a non-life-threatening emergency,
use the nearest house phone, located throughout the center and dial
Security/Guest Services at extension 5490 or from an outside line or
mobile phone call 619-525-5490.
Food and Beverage in the Convention Center
The following concessions will be open in the Convention Center
(hours are subject to change and stands are subject to closure based
on traffic):
(Subject to Change)
Saturday
Starbucks E, Lobby E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-5:30 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, Lobby D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, 20A Foyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 am-6:00 pm
Sunday
Starbucks E, Lobby E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, Lobby D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, 20A Foyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 am-6:00 pm
Learning Center, Stand E, Hall E* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00 am-2:30 pm
Learning Center, Stand F, Hall F* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:30 am-3:00 pm
Monday
Starbucks E, Lobby E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, Lobby D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, 20A Foyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 am-6:00 pm
Learning Center, Stand E, Hall E* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00 am-2:30 pm
Learning Center, Stand F, Hall F* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:30 am-3:00 pm
Tuesday
Starbucks E, Lobby E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, Lobby D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-5:00 pm
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, 20A Foyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00 am-6:00 pm
Learning Center, Stand F, Hall F* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:30 am-3:00 pm
Wednesday
Auntie Anne’s Pretzel, Lobby D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 am-1:00 pm
*Stands will sell beer and wine
Ground Transportation
Shuttles and taxis are a convenient way to navigate the city and are
ideal for airport pick-ups and drop-offs, as well as going to and from
the convention center.
Taxis
The list below contains contact information for some taxi companies in
the city. Call them directly with any questions or to request a pickup.
Not all taxi companies accept credit cards. If you would like to pay with
a credit card, request this when you call.
Yellow Cab of San Diego . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619-444-4444
American Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619-234-1111
Orange Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619-223-5555
San Diego Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619-226-8294 / 800-368-2947
USA Cab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619-231-1144
Note: The ASCB and EMBO do not screen any of the taxi services and
assume no responsibility with respect to these services and accept no
liabilities.
Housing, onPeak Official 2018 Housing Partner
619-525-6254
Registration area,
Lobby D
Have issues with your 2018 hotel? Did you book within the ASCB|EMBO
Housing Block? Ask onPeak for assistance.
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Housing, Experient Official
2019 Housing Partner
8:00 am-6:00 pm
9:00 am-5:00 pm
9:00 am-5:00 pm
9:00 am-5:00 pm
2018 Exhibit Sales Office, Hall D
Book your hotel room for the 2019 ASCB|EMBO Meeting in
Washington, DC. It is suggested you book early for the best rates. No
deposit collected, and you can cancel up to 72 hours prior to arrival.
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 am-4:00 pm
Infant Lounge
A nicely furnished permanent Infant Lounge is located in the Women’s
restroom behind Starbucks in the Hall E Lobby of the San Diego
Convention Center. Look for a sign with arrows pointing to it just
outside the Starbucks. The room has tables and chairs, electricity, and
water. The semi-private lounge, available for nursing mothers and
parents with infants, provides a comfortable and secure environment.
Parents and guardians are responsible for providing infant care
supplies. The infant lounge is unsupervised, and the ASCB and EMBO
are not responsible for any accidents or injuries that may occur.
The infant lounge is open whenever the San Diego Convention Center
is open.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
15
Internet Access, Wireless
Complimentary wireless Internet access will only be available in in
lobbies and corridors of the San Diego Convention Center. Paid wireless
internet is accessible in the ASCB Learning Center (Exhibit Hall) and
meeting rooms. If you wish to access the complimentary internet, set
the SSID (wireless network identifier) to “Free Internet” in the lower
lobby areas.
Metered street parking is available in some areas. Parking meters
are enforced Monday-Saturday, 8:00 am-6:00 pm, unless otherwise
posted. Metered spots are free on Sunday and designated holidays.
Meters accept nickels, dimes, quarters, and pay by app parking.
The fee is $12.95 per day, per device, to access paid internet in meeting
rooms.
If you ordered your poster through our official poster printing company,
Makesigns.com, you can pick it up during the following hours:
For exhibitors to access paid internet in the Exhibit Hall, the fee is
$79.99 per day, or $159.99 for 3 days.
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To connect to WiFi:
Open your browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, or other standard
browser).
If this is your initial purchase, enter your username (email address)
and password in the area shown on the left and click BUY NOW. Follow
additional prompts to complete your purchase or login. Refer to
service options and limitations shown to the right.
If you have already created an account and are returning for an
additional session, click LOGIN.
Meeting attendees who wish to use the service should bring their
own laptop computer or PDA, with a wireless 802.11b/g network
card installed. Onsite technical support will not be provided. Please
configure your wireless connection before coming to the meeting.
Remember to consider the security implications of using the wireless
network and protect your laptop accordingly.
Lost and Found
619-525-6250
ASCB Meeting Management Office, Room 23A
Items turned in are kept throughout the meeting until Wednesday,
December 12, at 12:00 pm. After this time, items will be turned over
to the San Diego Convention Center, where they are kept for 60 days
after the close of the meeting.
Mobile App
Visit the Google Play or Apple Store to download the 2018 ASCB|EMBO
Meeting App. Search ''ascbembo18'' to locate the app. The app has
the most up-to-date schedule available.
Non-Denominational Prayer Room
Room 18
Open to registered meeting participants and exhibitors looking for a
quiet place to meditate or pray.
Saturday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-7:30 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-1:00 pm
Parking
Onsite private vehicle parking is available at the San Diego Convention
Center’s 1,950-vehicle underground garage located below the building.
Enter the parking garage on Harbor Drive between First Ave. and Fifth
Ave. The daily rate varies, depending on event. Parking rates may range
from $15 to $35 on days when there is special event activity at PETCO
Park or other downtown events. Payment is due upon entry and there are
no in-and-out privileges. There are 31 ADA compliant parking stalls with
elevator access to the convention center. No overnight or RV parking is
permitted. Parking questions? Call ACE Parking at 619-237-0399.
Directly across the street from the center, on the corner of Harbor and
8th Ave., is another 2,000-space parking structure.
Poster Printing Service Pickup (Makesigns.com)
Registration Area,
Lobby D
8:00 am-7:00 pm
7:30 am-6:00 pm
7:30 am-6:00 pm
7:30 am-1:00 pm
Sales Tax
The sales tax in San Diego is 8.75%; city hotel tax is 12.5%; food and
beverage tax is 8.75%.
Shuttle Bus Service
ASCB does not provide shuttle service for this meeting. See "Ground
Transportation" for more information on how to get around.
Tipping
Tipping is standard. Here are a few tipping guidelines: wait staff, 1520%; taxi drivers, 15%; doormen, skycaps, and porters, $2 per bag;
hotel housekeeping, $2-$3 per room, per night.
What to Wear
Wear comfortable shoes—you’ll be doing a lot of walking. Most
attendees dress in jeans and casual wear. Bring a jacket or sweater
because it can get cold in some rooms in the convention center.
SPEAKER RESOURCES
Speaker Lounge
619-525-6259
Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-6:00 pm
Sunday-Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 am-6:30 pm
Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:30 am-11:00 am
All invited speakers are asked to stop by the Speaker Lounge
well in advance of their scheduled presentation, to allow time to
review, rehearse, upload their presentation to the system to be
sent electronically from the Speaker Lounge to the session room, if
applicable, and take care of any presentation concerns.
Speaker Briefings for Symposia and Minisymposia Chairs and Speakers
Speaker briefings in the Speaker Lounge are held for Symposia and
Minisymposia speakers and chairs only. There are no speaker briefings
for Subgroups or Microsymposia speakers. Speaker briefings are
held Saturday-Tuesday, 3:00 pm-3:30 pm. Symposia speakers and
Wednesday Minisymposia speakers should attend the briefing the day
before their session. All Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday Minisymposia
speakers and chairs should attend the speaker briefing on the day of
their session and then head from the speaker briefing to the session
room.
Note: If you are unable to attend your assigned speaker briefing, we
recommend you at least stop by the Speaker Lounge to check your
presentation well in advance of your session.
Offsite parking is available at numerous nearby parking lots and
garages in downtown San Diego; many are within walking distance
of the center. Lots and garages are individually owned and operated,
prices vary by location.
16
Room 22
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ACCESSIBILITY
The San Diego Convention Center is ADA compliant. In accordance
with the ADA, the Center is responsible for permanent premises access
accommodations, such as wheelchair lifts, elevator standards, door
width standards and restroom accessibility. The Center’s underground
parking garage also has 31 ADA compliant parking stalls and elevator
access.
There are two TTY phones in the Convention Center:
•
Admin Receptionist in the Administrative Office area, located
on mezzanine level by taking elevator in lobby E or upper level
by Room 21, to the mezzanine and exiting to the right
•
Lobby 6, bayside TTY is connected to one of the three remaining
payphones.
If you require special services, and did not mark the appropriate box
during the Meeting Registration process, please visit Room 23A, ASCB
Meeting Management, for assistance, or call 619-525-6250.
Scooter and Wheelchair Rental
Call 888-441-7575 to contact Scootaround, or visit http://locations.
scootaround.com/rentals/s/sandiego/events.htm. For additional rental
companies, view the ASCB|EMBO website: https://ascb-embo2018.
ascb.org/accessibility/.
LSA Interpretation Services
The ASCB|EMBO Meeting is presented in English. If you need
translation services, contact Language Services Associates (LSA)
directly at 800-305-9673 or www.LSAweb.com. Language Services
Associates is a nationwide full-service firm providing translators and
interpreters in 180 languages.
MEETING POLICIES
Anti-Harassment Policy
ASCB is committed to providing a welcoming, safe, productive,
harassment-free meeting environment for all participants, regardless
of gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, ability, ethnicity, race,
color, age, marital status, veteran status, socioeconomic status or
religion. Our members and meeting attendees are graduate students,
professors, and scientists who are conscious and protective of human
rights and dignity. Consequently, as a policy matter, all those present
at any ASCB event, venue, or meeting, including staff, members,
attendees, vendors, and exhibitors (“Participants”) are expected to
avoid engaging in improper conduct and incidents of harassment,
sexual harassment or misconduct, or bias. Violations of this policy can
result in removal from the event, with or without refund of fees, as
determined in the discretion of the ASCB Chief Executive Officer.
This policy applies to our Annual Meeting, other ASCB-run activities,
or events convened primarily to conduct ASCB business, and
covers harassment and discrimination by or toward all attendees
and participants, including scientists, educators, students, guests,
exhibitors, event staff, volunteers, vendors, venue staff, and
contractors.
Please report any harassment to Alison Harris in the ASCB Meetings
Management Office in Room 23A, 619-525-6250.
Recording, Photography, and Cell Phone Policy, and Session Etiquette
While you are in a session, please mute all cell phones and other
electronic devices. If necessary, please step out to the hallway to make
a call, or send an email or text. The back-lighting on electronic devices
is distracting in a dimmed room.
The Society does not permit photography or the electronic capture of
scientific sessions in meeting rooms or the Learning Center (Exhibit
Hall). This policy also includes photographing colleagues against the
backdrop of scientific posters on display without the express consent
of the presenting author(s).
These policies will be enforced by the Society. Individuals who do not
comply will be asked to leave the session or Learning Center floor
and not be allowed room re-entry. Repeat offenders will have their
meeting badge(s) revoked and will not be allowed to continue to
attend the meeting. This policy is necessary to respect the willingness
of presenters to share their data at the meeting as well as their
publication opportunities. If you have any questions regarding these
policies, please contact Alison Harris in Room 23A.
Children
Children of meeting participants are welcome to attend the meeting
with their parent or guardian as long as the child is under the
supervision of a parent or guardian at all times, and they do not
disrupt the event.
Strollers are allowed in the meeting rooms and the Learning Center
(Exhibit Hall) during meeting hours. Be aware that small children in
strollers are at the same level as someone carrying a poster tube, bag,
briefcase, umbrella, or other object.
Under no circumstances are children under the age of 17 allowed in
the Learning Center (Exhibit Hall) during set-up and dismantle times.
This includes children of exhibitors.
Drinking Policy
The ASCB, EMBO, and San Diego Convention Center encourage
responsible drinking for those drinking alcohol. Beer, wine, nonalcoholic beer, and soft drinks will be available at the Opening Night
Reception on Saturday, December 8, and throughout the meeting
dates. Alcohol will not be served to anyone under the age of 21; be
prepared to show photo identification. Alcoholic beverages are allowed
only in specific areas and must not be taken out of these areas.
Meeting Attendance Etiquette
Acceptance of your registration entitles you to a license (i.e.,
permission) to attend the meeting conditioned upon you not engaging
in conduct that interferes with the opportunity for others to attend,
enjoy, and derive value from the meeting. Attendees who ASCB or
EMBO determine in their discretion are disruptive to speakers, staff, or
other attendees are subject to having their registration and permission
to attend the meeting immediately revoked, without refund of their
registration fee.
Photo Release
The ASCB has hired an official photographer for the meeting.
Photographs taken at the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting may be used in
future ASCB or EMBO publications, on the ASCB or EMBO website, or
in other materials. By registering for this meeting, you agree to allow
the ASCB and EMBO to use your photo in any ASCB-related or EMBOrelated publication or website.
Session Room Behavior
If a session room becomes too crowded, follow instructions provided
by ASCB staff, Convention Center staff, or security. Instructions may
include not standing against the walls, not blocking the aisles, or
doors, or being denied entry if the room becomes too crowded.
The meeting organizers are obligated to abide by the guidelines
established by the Fire Marshal in the San Diego Convention Center.
If a room reaches full capacity and we do not have your cooperation,
the Fire Marshal has the authority to delay or terminate the meeting
until the problem has been corrected. We do our best to try to assign
appropriate sized rooms to each session, but sometimes sessions are
more popular than anticipated. We apologize for any inconvenience
this may cause.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
17
Smoking Policy
The San Diego Convention Center is a smoke-free facility. Please
refrain from smoking within 20 feet of the lobby doors. Smoking is
permitted only in designated smoking areas. Electronic cigarettes are
not permitted within the facility.
Social Media Policy
The ASCB and EMBO encourage the use of social media before, during,
and after the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting. Note the following guidelines
and accepted social media etiquette:
Do
•
•
•
•
•
Follow us on Twitter @ASCBiology. Use the hash tag
#ASCBEMBO18 for meeting-related tweets.
Follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/ASCBiology.
Blog and tweet about the meeting and what you are hearing
and seeing (but without sharing details of any data presented;
follow journal rules about data sharing).
Provide feedback to staff and the Program Committee—discuss
topics of interest and/or speakers for next year’s meeting,
make suggestions for Symposia, Minisymposia, or workshop
sessions, comment on the meeting format, etc.
Keep criticism constructive, and think about whether you’d like
your thoughts shared widely—because they may be.
Don’t
•
Use photographic or other recording devices—these
prohibited in scientific sessions, poster sessions, and in
Learning Center (Exhibit Hall).
•
Capture, transmit, or redistribute data presented at
meeting—this may preclude subsequent publication of
data in a scholarly journal.
are
the
the
the
SAFETY TIPS AND EMERGENCIES
The safety and security of participants and staff is the top priority. We
are committed to make every effort to ensure a safe and productive
event for everyone. We ask our participants to be aware of their
surroundings at all times and note the closest emergency exit in all
facilities.
Non-Life-Threatening Emergency: Use a house phone (located
throughout the center) to dial Security/Guest Services at extension
5490 or from an outside line or mobile phone, call 619-525-5490.
Life Threatening Emergency: Use a house phone to dial extension
5911; or from an outside line or mobile phone, call 619-525-5911.
For emergencies while in your hotel, please follow the hotel’s specific
instructions.
Safety Tips
Walk “smart” when you leave the convention center:
Know your destination and the best way to reach it.
•
•
Take off your name badge when exiting the building.
•
Travel along sidewalks in lighted areas at night, and don’t walk
alone.
•
Establish a “buddy” system with another participant.
•
Share schedules and check up on each other periodically.
•
Build your awareness of unknown surroundings by reviewing
local information.
•
Secure your laptop computer, which is an attractive, easy target
for thieves.
•
Women can wear jackets with pockets instead of carrying a
handbag that might get lost or stolen.
Speaker Disclosure
Views expressed by speakers at the 2018 ASCB|EMBO Meeting are
solely the views of the speaker. They do not necessarily represent
the views of the ASCB or EMBO. The ASCB and EMBO make no
representation concerning, and do not guarantee, the source,
originality, accuracy, completeness, or reliability of any statement,
information, data, finding, interpretation, advice, opinion, or view
presented by any speaker or poster presenter.
Waiver of Liability
Each individual attending the 2018 ASCB|EMBO assumes all risks
associated with his or her attendance and participation in on- and
offsite activities. Each individual attendee agrees to indemnify and
hold harmless the ASCB and EMBO, and their governing bodies,
officers, directors, employees, and/or agents from all loss, damage, or
liability arising out of or related to his or her attendance at the 2018
ASCB|EMBO Meeting.
18
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
2018 HOTEL INFORMATION
If you are having issues with your 2018 hotel, contact our official housing partner, onPeak,
for assistance or call 619-525-6254 during hours listed below.
Housing, onPeak Official 2018 Housing Partner
Registration, Lobby D
Saturday �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 8:00 am-6:00 pm
Sunday-Tuesday��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 9:00 am-5:00 pm
HOTEL MAP FOR 2018 ASCB|EMBO MEETING
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
19
CONVENTION CENTER MAPS
UPPER
LEVEL
MEZZANINE
LEVEL
LOWER/
EXHIBIT LEVEL
20
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
CONVENTION CENTER MAPS
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
21
ASCB|EMBO 2018 TRAVEL AWARD RECIPIENTS
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following faculty at
primarily teaching institutions were made
possible by generous support from the
Company of Biologists:
Jacob Adler
Alex Engel
Demelza Larson
Eric Lewellyn
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following faculty at
primarily teaching institutions were made
possible by generous support from ASCB:
Lydia Bright
Megan Dobro
Rou-Jia Sung
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following
postdoctoral students were made possible
by the Company of Biologists:
Battuya Bayarmagnai
Haig Eskandarian
Kelsey Gray
Matthew Greseth
Hidehiko Hashimoto
Melanie Laurin
Karla Otterpohl
Pearl Ryder
Julie Van De Weghe
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following
postdoctoral students were made
possible by the Worthington Biochemical
Corporation:
Nao Aoki
Christopher Edelmaier
Pattana Jaroenlak
Momo Morikawa
Aaron Tipton
Valerie Tutwiler
Stephen Tymanskyj
Katrina Velle
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following graduate
students were made possible by the ASCB:
Sonu Baral
Sarah Barger
Sara Blazejewski
Victoria Godieva
Sung-Hyun Hwang
Thomas Krzystek
Ruth Ndathe
Felicity Newton
Robert Skolik
Jasmine Shirazi
Glenn Walpole
Lin-Ing Wang
Yi Xie
Atena Zahedi
22
EDUCATION COMMITTEEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following graduate
students were made possible by Chroma
Technology Corporation:
Paula Bucko
Nicholas Day
Michael Fernandopulle
Lauren Foltz
Rachel Gilbert
Natalie Hager
Kimberly Haupt
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following graduate
students were made possible by generous
support from the Company of Biologists:
Annabel Vivian Almazan
Ashley Arthur
Caitlyn Blake-Hedges
Breane Budaitis
Gillian Dornan
Ashley Earle
Eleni Fegaras
Jessica Leung
Ira Male
Gabriel Muhire Gihana
Deepthi Raghu
Danielle Rhodes
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following
undergraduate students were made
possible by the ASCB:
Negar Balaghi
Selena Cholak
Marissa Galardi
Mitchell Lipke
Kara Romanowski
Allissah Rupert
Madalyne Sunday
CHILDCARE AWARDS
The ASCB Women in Cell Biology (WICB)
Committee has selected the following
individuals to receive childcare grant
travel awards, which are funded through a
generous grant from the Springer Nature
Publishing Group:
Fathima Zahra Abdul Nawaz
Jacob Adler
Joyce Belcher
Alexander Bradley
Daniel Booth
Lina Dahlberg
Megan Dobro
Biljana Ermanoska
Reto Gassmann
Jessica Henty-Ridilla
Jeonghan Kang
Lynn Kee
Hyun Lee
Dorothy Lerit
Chandrani Mishra
Sara Olson
Julia Pagan
Julia Rohrberg
Daiane Santana Alves
Rajalakshmi Santhanakrishnan
Daniela Stanga
Ying Yang
MINORITIES AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
TRAVEL AWARDS
The ASCB Minorities Affairs Committee
has selected the following students and
scientists to receive travel awards, which
are supported by an IPERT grant from
the National Institute of General Medical
Sciences, NIH:
Ariana Acevedo-Diaz
Leonardo Acuna
Tyler Allen
Francesca Aloisio
Andrea Ambrosio
Caomie Archelus
Christopher Arnette
Joyce Belcher
Ernest Canty
Lucinda Carnell
Carlos Castaneda
Samantha Cobos
Lisett Contreras
Cyan Cosby
Lissette Delgado-Cruzata
Jacqueline De Lora
Blanca Diaz-Rohrer
Amera Dixon
Safia Essien
Armond Franklin-Murray
Sahra Gabure
Jaye Gardiner
Rafael Garcia-Mata
Heran Getachew
Arianna Gomez
Abraham Gutierrez
Qualia Hooker
Farah Ismail
Candace Jones
Tia Jones
Jacqueline Jordan
Michelle Juarez
Lilian Kabeche
Ruth Kabeche
Roxanna Llinas
Damaris Lorenzo
Stephanie Maciuba
Patrick Martin
Daisha Martinez
Michael Martinez
Jennifer Martinez-Bocanegra
Michelle Martinez-Montemayor
Ghislaine Mayer
Rebecca Melton
Jasmine Moody
McKay Mullen
Micheal Munson
Kristin Noell
Martin Olmos
Gabriela Ortiz-Soto
Ashley Padilla
Eveliz Peguero-Pereira
Guillermina Ramirez-SanJuan
Yolanda Rivera-Cuevas
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ASCB|EMBO 2018 TRAVEL AWARD RECIPIENTS
Nicole Rodrigues
Crystal Rogers
Jimena Ruiz
Manuel Ruiz
Frederick Santana
Daiane Santana Alves
Camille Santiago Negron
Maria Santisteban
Roberto Segura
Jasmine Sims
Stacy Soriano
Natalie Speer
Bethanie Statler
Christina Termini
Mariana Torrente
Melanie Van Stry
Paulina Villanueva
Rachel Villareal
David Weir
Briana Whitehead
INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL AWARDS
Travel awards for the following were made
possible by generous support from the
ASCB:
Usienemfon Adia-Nimuwa
Liujuan Cui
Fenghui Guan
Mingzhu Huang
Zhengda Li
Yajun Liu
Liang Liu
Ling Li
Yuanyuan Li
XinYi Liu
Fernando Ruggiero
Bianbian Wang
Zhao Xuan
Fengrui Yang
Ying Yang
Felix Yemanyi
Yang Yue
Rufeng Zhang
Yiming Zheng
Wangting Zhou
Travel awards for the following were made
possible by generous support from EMBO:
Lauren Adams
Carmen Adriaens
Saima Aijaz
Krithika Badarinath
Jorge Barbazan
Vanessa Barone
Souparno Bhattacharya
Daniel Booth
Shujun Cai
Sabrya Carim
Grace Chan
Luca Cirillo
Deniz Conkar
Tommaso Cupido
Nabanita Das
Dipayan De
Lenaig Defachelles
Bipasha Dey
Gautam Dey
Helena Domingues
Lia Domingues
Federico Dona
Damian Dudka
Subarna Dutta
Pradeep Dwivedi
Cristina Ferras
Aastha Garde
Subhalakshmi Guha
Mansi Gujrati
Richa Gupta
Willow Hight-Warburton
Stefan Hinz
Connor Horton
Maren Huelsemann
Catia Janota
Tushna Kapoor
Martine Khataei Notabi
Noopur Khobrekar
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Vidhya Krishnamoorthy
Kamalesh Kumari
Bahtiyar Kurtulmus
Fernanda Leite
Ritankar Majumdar
Sreemita Majumdar
Hélène Moreau
Afsana Naaz
Vickky Pandit
Louisiane Perrin
Neha Pincha
Laurie Pinel
Chaitra Prabhakara
Nitya Ramkumar
Kai Richter
Alcina Rodrigues
William Roman
Chantal Roubinet
Paulomi Sanghavi
Rajalakshmi Santhanakrishnan
Anna-Lena Scheithauer
Viplendra Shakya
Kamil Soltysik
Stephanie Spannl
Sumana Sundaramurthy
Manalee Surve
Rajan Thakur
Eirini Tsekitsidou
Kotryna Vaidziulyte
Somya Vats
Rhian Walther
Travel awards for the following were made
possible by generous support from the
ICGEB:
Jian Bai
Om Basukala
Zhe Cao
Natalia Díaz Valdivia
Sodiq Lawal
Xu Liu
Yuli Magalhães
Chathura Priyadarshana
23
NOTES
24
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Member-only opportunities
to accelerate your personal
& professional growth:
CV review by senior scientists
Expand your knowledge
Career coaching and career
enhancement programs
Training and leadership
opportunities
Biotech courses for those
transitioning to industry
Gain recognition, make
connections, publish your
science
Discount on article publication
charges in MBoC
Year-round opportunities for visibility
and leadership including travel
awards, speaking opportunities at
local and global scientific events
Online access to ASCB’s nearly 8,000
members worldwide and their
scientific areas of interest
Accelerate your career
Cash awards for members at all
career levels
Organize an early career meeting at
your institution with ASCB funding
Attend the premier conference in
cell biology and biomedical
research at significant savings
Substantial discounts and travel
awards (members save more in
registration fees than ASCB
membership actually costs)
Advocacy and outreach—find
your voice, share your passion
Opportunities to gain valuable
leadership experience and make a
difference
Help ASCB ensure Congress and the
world hears the latest on science
policy issues
Bring Congress to your lab
Get funding for science outreach
find us:
/ascbiology
For more information on membership, or to become an ascb member, visit
ascb.org/membership
@ascbiology
ascb.org
vs 5_24_2018
S A T URD A Y– WE D N E S D A Y SCHED UL ES
The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is an inclusive, international
community of scientists in cell biology and biomedical research. We are
dedicated to advancing scientific discovery, advocating sound research
policies, improving education, promoting professional development, and
increasing diversity in the scientific workforce.
Membership
Stop by
ASCB Booth 623
to find out how you
can win a FREE
membership!
MBoC Special Issue “Forces On and Within Cells”
Team of Issue Editors led by Valerie Weaver
Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) Editor-in-Chief David Drubin
encourages you to submit your work to the third exciting Special Issue
on a very important area of cell biology.
Among the topics within the scope of the Special Issue are:
 Force-generating machines
 Force-detecting mechanisms
 Force regulation of cell and tissue phenotype:
 Receptor signaling
 Stem cell differentiation
 Cell migration
 Cell cycle regulation
 Cell survival
 Nuclear architecture
 Chromatin structure and gene expression
 Force regulation of tissue development and homeostasis
 Perturbed force in disease:
 Cardiovascular disease
 Cancer
 Degenerative diseases
 Measuring force at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level
 Manipulating force at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level
 Modeling force at the single cell and tissue level
The Special Issue will be published in summer 2019. Authors are encouraged to
submit manuscripts by February 1, 2019, to allow time for them to be reviewed and
revised by the deadline for the Special Issue.
You can see the most recent Special Issue at molbiolcell.org/toc/mboc/29/16
Questions? Contact [email protected]
Submit manuscripts at www.mbcpapers.org.
Stop waiting. Start publishing.
@mbocjournal
SATUR D A Y– WE D N E S D A Y S CH E D U L E S
Call for Papers
molbiolcell.org
Deadline to Submit:
February 1, 2019
Saturday
December 8, 2018
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
25
Daily Schedule—Saturday, December 8
26
7:30 am-7:00 pm
Registration Open
Registration Area
8:30 am-12:30 pm
Special Interest Subgroups – Morning
A.
5th Biannual Frontiers in Cytokinesis
Room 33B
B.
Building the Cell 2018
Room 30D
C.
Cell Biology in Cancer Immunity
Room 31B
D.
Evolutionary Cell Biology
Room 28D
E.
Intracellular Cargo Transport by Molecular Motors: What a Mesh!
Room 29B
F.
Mechanisms of DNA Repair in Maintenance of Genome Integrity
Room 29C
G.
Spatial and Temporal Analytical Tools for Cell Atlases
Room 28B
H.
Systems and Synthetic Biology of Decoding Complex Cellular Rhythms
Room 33C
I.
The Many Functions of Cytoskeletal Proteins in the Cell Nucleus
Room 31C
J.
Wnt Signaling in Development and Cancer
Room 30B
10:30-11:30 am
Getting into Graduate School: The Do’s, the Don’ts, and the What If’s
Room 15A
10:30-11:30 am
Planning Your Exit from Graduate School
Room 15B
11:45 am-12:45 pm
Getting the Most out of Your Thesis Committee
Room 15A
1:30-5:30 pm
Special Interest Subgroups – Afternoon
K.
Bottom-Up Cell Biology
Room 30D
L.
Cellular Organization of Metabolism: Biology, Structure,
and Function of Enzyme Polymers
Room 33C
M.
Cilia and Cell Signaling in Development and Tissue Regeneration
Room 29B
N.
Emerging Model Systems
Room 29C
O.
Machine Learning in Cell Biology
Room 31C
P.
Neuronal Cytoskeleton: A Complex Interplay of Cytoarchitecture
and Dynamics
Room 30B
Q.
Next Generation Correlative Microscopy: Biological Applications
and Emerging Techniques
Room 31B
R.
The Mechanics and Membrane Dynamics of the Nuclear Envelope
Room 33B
S.
Patterning the Cytoskeleton - PTMs, MAPs, ABPs
Room 28D
T.
The Midbody: From Cytokinesis to Signaling Organelle
Room 28B
2:00-3:00 pm
Hit the Ground Running: Early Success in Graduate School
Room 15A
3:15-5:45 pm
Judged Poster Session
Room 16A
6:00 pm
Keynote Lecture: Sean Morrison
Ballroom 20B
Immediately
Following Keynote10:00 pm
Opening Night Reception
Sails Pavilion
8:00-9:00 pm
International Research and Training Exchange Fair
Sails Pavilion
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Saturday, December 8
8:30 am-12:30 pm
The following member-organized sessions were selected by the ASCB Program Committee. All meeting attendees are welcome to
participate. Meeting registration is required.
Subgroup A: 5th Biannual Frontiers in Cytokinesis
Room 33B
Organizers: Julie C. Canman, Columbia University; Ulrike Eggert, King’s College London; Amy Shaub Maddox, University of
North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Douglas Robinson, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Dimitrios Vavylonis, Lehigh University; and
Jian-Qiu Wu, Ohio State University
Cytokinesis is a spectacular cell shape change process that requires coordination of complex cellular machinery over many scales
of space and time. Chemical and mechanical signaling pathways integrate the mitotic spindle with the cell cortex to position the
division plane and promote assembly of a contractile actomyosin network, leading to remodeling of the plasma membrane and
cortex. In a multicellular setting, cytokinesis also integrates cell-cell and cell-substrate communication. This geometrically simplified
cell shape change serves as a paradigm for numerous other shape change events, including those that take place during cell
migration and tissue morphogenesis. In this meeting, we bring together a group of investigators who use systematic genetic and
chemical methods, biophysical techniques, high resolution imaging, diverse model systems, and mathematical modeling.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:50 am
9:10 am
9:30 am
9:50 am
10:10 am
10:30 am
10:45 am
11:05 am
11:25 am
11:40 am
11:55 am
12:10 pm
12:25 pm
Introduction. Organizers
Control of cytokinesis by Plk1 in C. elegans. Sebastian Gomez-Cavazos, Oegema Lab, Ludwig
Institute for Cancer Research
Spindle to cortex communication in frog egg. Christine Field, Harvard University
Actions at microtubule plus ends in the phragmoplast for cytokinesis. Bo Liu, University of
California, Davis
Assembly and structure of the fission yeast cytokinetic ring. Kathy Gould, Vanderbilt University
A theory to predict the contraction rate of random cytoskeleton network. François Nedelec, EMBL
Work and dissipation in the cell cytoskeleton. Michael Murrell, Yale University
Break
The role of membrane shape in modulating cytokinetic furrow ingression. Jian Liu, National
Institute of Heart, Lung, and Blood
Flagella set the stage for myosin-independent cytokinesis in Giardia. Alex Paredez, University of
Washington, Seattle
Cleavage furrow formation without F-actin in Chlamydomonas. Masayuki Onishi, Pringle Lab,
Stanford University
Actin oxidoreduction as a novel component of the NoCut/abscission checkpoint. Jian Bai, Echard
Lab, Institut Pasteur
The role of calcium in Rho-dependent remodeling of epithelial tight junctions. Sara Varadarajan,
Miller Lab, University of Michigan
Asymmetric division, stem cell size heterogeneities and cell fate. Agathe Chaigne, Paluch Lab,
MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology. University College London, UK
Final remarks. Organizers
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
27
SATURDAY
Special Interest Subgroups – Morning
SATURDAY
OO
Subgroup B: Building the Cell 2018
Room 30D
Organizer: Susanne Rafelski, Allen Institute for Cell Science, Seattle WA
Modern cell biology has made great strides in understanding cell structure and function. As with any engineering problem, however,
there is a third important aspect that needs to be understood besides structure and function, and that is assembly. How are the
complex three-dimensional structures found within the cell specified by a one-dimensional genome? In this session we will explore
the mechanisms by which cellular structures are determined and regulated. Because this question lies at the interface of biology
and physics, this Building the Cell session will be highly interdisciplinary with speakers whose interests range from physics and
mathematical modeling to biochemistry and cell biology.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:40 am
9:00 am
9:20 am
9:40 am
10:00 am
10:20 am
10:40 am
11:00 am
11:20 am
11:40 am
12:00 pm
Introduction. Susanne Rafelski, Allen Institute for Cell Science
Creating a stem cell state landscape: integrated cellular reorganization during differentiation and
division of the human iPS cell. Susanne Rafelski, Allen Institute for Cell Science
Building artificial membranes. Neal Devaraj, UC San Diego
Understanding the heterotypic mitochondrial outer membrane fusion machine. Suzanne
Hoppins, University of Washington
The morphology space of yeast mitochondrial networks. Greyson Lewis, Wallace Marshall Lab, UC
San Francisco
Harnessing motors, flows, and fluctuations for intracellular transport. Elena Koslover, UC San
Diego
Break
A fundamental trade-off between information flow in single cells and cellular populations. Eric J.
Deeds, University of Kansas
Dynamic architecture of the microtubule cytoskeleton. Marija Zanic, Vanderbilt University
Super-resolution imaging of chromatin organization. Melike Lakadamyali, University of
Pennsylvania
Spreading of epigenetic silencing and activation in single cells. Lacramioara Bintu, Stanford
University
Design principles for self-organized cell polarity. Ed Munro, University of Chicago
Subgroup C: Cell Biology in Cancer Immunity
Room 31B
Organizers: Xiaolei Su, Yale University; and Enfu Hui, University of California, San Diego
Cancer immunotherapy aims to activate or release the inhibition of immune cells for the sake of killing tumors. A variety of signaling
molecules or immune effectors, including cell surface receptors, antibodies, and cytokines, have been targeted or engineered for
eliminating cancer cells. Despite the clinical success in various immunotherapies, including checkpoint blockade and CAR-T, the
cellular mechanism underlying how immune cells respond in those therapies remains unclear. This session will focus on recent
progress in understanding and manipulating signaling events, transcriptional program, and reorganization of cellular structures
that mediate immune cells’ responses to cancer antigens. It will not only advance our knowledge in understanding the molecular
mechanism underlying cancer immunity but also provide insights in designing new strategies for cancer therapy.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:55 am
9:15 am
9:35 am
9:55 am
10:15 am
10:30 am
28
Introduction. Xiaolei Su, Yale University, and Enfu Hui, University of California, San Diego
Phase Separation in Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Signaling. Xiaolei Su, Yale University
Engineering Next-Generation T Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy. Yvonne Chen, University of
California, Los Angeles
Engineering the Next-Generation of Immune Cell Therapies for Cancer. Kole Roybal, University of
California, San Francisco
TCR Catch Bonds with Antigenic pMHC Activate T Cell Signaling and Its Implication for Effective
Immunotherapy. Wei Chen, Zhejiang University
Mechanopotentiation at the Cytotoxic Immunological Synapse. Morgan Huse, Memorial SloanKettering Cancer Center
Break
Self-Cancellation of the PD-L1/PD-1 Pathway. Enfu Hui, University of California, San Diego
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
11:30 am
11:50 am
12:10 pm
Subgroup D: Evolutionary Cell Biology
Room 28D
Organizers: Holly V. Goodson, University of Notre Dame; and Margaret A. Titus, University of Minnesota
Evolutionary cell biology (ECB) encompasses research with two complementary goals: 1) using the perspectives and methods of
evolutionary biology to gain insight into cell biological processes; and 2) studying the biology and diversity of cells to gain insight
into the process of evolution. These goals are unified by the expectation that studying these questions in the context of cells the
basic units of life—should illuminate fundamental principles of living systems. Talks in this session were chosen from abstracts
submitted in response to a request sent to the ECB community. To build this community, we are compiling a list of ECB-related
talks and posters to distribute at this session. To include yours in this list, please send your presentation information to the session
organizers.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:55 am
9:15 am
9:25 am
9:45 am
10:05 am
10:25 am
10:45 am
10:55 am
11:05 am
11:25 am
11:35 am
11:55 am
12:05 pm
12:25 pm
Introduction. Holly V. Goodson, University of Notre Dame; Margaret A. Titus, University of
Minnesota
Conserved and divergent aspects of microtubule structure and dynamic instability. Sami Chaaban,
McGill University, Montreal, Canada (Gary Brouhard Lab)
How does a cell with no interphase microtubules build a mitotic spindle? Lillian Fritz-Laylin,
University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA
Emerging mechanisms generating cytoskeletal complexity in the aggregatively multicellular
Rhizarian amoeba Corallomyxa tenera. Sarah Guest, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (Scott
Dawson Lab)
Viral capsids traffic along tubulin filaments in Pseudomonas to reach the phage nucleus. Joseph
Pogliano, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA
Break
Organisation and evolution of the eukaryotic cell. Mark Field, University of Dundee, Dundee,
Scotland
Evolutionary origins of the nuclear pore complex and nucleus. Michael Rout, Rockefeller
University, New York, NY
The regulation of nuclear remodelling at mitotic exit. Gautam Dey, University College London,
London, England (Buzz Baum Lab)
Unraveling the origins of animal cell type differentiation. Sebastián R. Najle, Institute of
Evolutionary Biology, Barcelona, Spain (Iñaki Ruiz-Trillo Lab)
Break
Evolutionary adaptation to replication stress reveals plasticity in DNA metabolism. Marco
Fumasoni, Harvard University, Boston MA (Andrew Murray Lab)
A tale of two actins: significant functional overlap of divergent actin isoforms in the unicellular
green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Prachee Avasthi, University of Kansas Medical Center,
Kansas City, KS
The Hippo pathway, which regulates tissue size, is present in the closest unicellular relatives of
animals. Jonathan Phillips, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (DJ Pan Lab)
Evolution and engineering of allosteric regulation in protein kinases. Kimberly Reynolds,
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Closing remarks. Holly Goodson and Margaret Titus
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
29
SATURDAY
11:10 am
SATURDAY
Understanding T Cell Inhibition and Costimulation to Improve Cancer Immunotherapy. Alice
Kamphorst, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Integration of Signals for Activation and Inhibition of NK Cells. Eric Long, National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Biomimetic Nanoparticles for Anticancer Vaccination. Liangfang Zhang, University of California,
San Diego
Engineering Phagocytic Receptors to Dissect Engulfment Signaling and Target Cancer. Adam
Williamson, University of California, San Francisco
Using Microscopy to Inform the Engineering of Therapeutic Antibodies. Sally Ward, University of
Southampton/Texas A&M University Health Science Center
10:50 am
Subgroup E: Intracellular Cargo Transport by Molecular Motors: What a Mesh!
Room 29B
Organizers: Gulcin Pekkurnaz, University of California San Diego; Sandra Encalada, The Scripps Research Institute;
and David M. Warshaw, University of Vermont
Molecular motors are nanomachines that transport intracellular cargoes along a complex highway of cytoskeletal tracks that are
composed of microtubules and actin filaments. How motor proteins deliver their cargo to its destination while overcoming physical
challenges imposed by these complex filament meshworks is far from certain. Specifically, at every filament track intersection, motors
are directionally challenged to navigate their cargo through this obstacle or barrier to transport. This special interest subgroup will
bring together biophysicists and cell biologists interested in the molecular mechanisms that govern motor cargo transport using
in vitro, in silico, and in vivo systems. Questions to be addressed include regulation of navigational motor decisionmaking, motor
team work at filament intersections, the physical constraints imposed on motors and their cargo in crowded cellular environments,
and how the interplay between motor, track, and cargo determine transport outcomes in both health and disease.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:45 am
9:15 am
9:45 am
10:15 am
10:30 am
11:00 am
11:30 am
12:00 pm
Welcome. Sandra Encalada, The Scripps Research Institute
Introduction. Gulcin Pekkurnaz, University of California San Diego
Shedding new light on intracellular transport regulation with super-resolution microscopy. Melike
Lakadamyali, University of Pennsylvania
Microtubule network topology and its implications for cargo routing. Michael Vershinin,
University of Utah
Mechanisms of bi-directional microtubule-based motility. Sam Reck-Peterson, University of
California, San Diego
Break
A cytoskeletal handoff regulates mitochondrial motility in dividing cells. Erika Holzbaur, University
of Pennsylvania
MAP7 recruits kinesin-1 to microtubules to target bidirectional cargoes to the plus end. Adam
Hendricks, McGill University
Cargo crowding leads to local traffic jams. Sandhya Koushika, Tata Institute of Fundamental
Research
In vitro model of myosin cargo transport in a 3D actin network. David M. Warshaw, University of
Vermont (and Closing remarks)
Subgroup F: Mechanisms of DNA Repair in Maintenance of Genome Integrity
Room 29C
Organizers: Ryan Jensen, Yale University School of Medicine; and Eli Rothenberg, New York University School of Medicine
The efficient maintenance of genome integrity and stability is vital for normal cellular functions and for prevention of diseases such
as cancer. This session features research presentations from leaders in the field focusing on the intersection between DNA repair
and DNA replication, genome stability, chromatin remodeling, cellular signaling, control of cell cycle checkpoints and cell death,
and their implications for cancer etiology and treatment. Speakers will represent a diverse spectrum of approaches including: live
cell imaging, biochemically reconstituted systems using purified proteins, super resolution microscopy to study nuclear dynamics
of DNA repair complexes, replication stress and repair of DNA DSBs at stalled or collapsed replication forks, chromatin structure,
and new technologies for studying DNA repair at the cellular and single molecule level.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:55 am
9:15 am
9:35 am
9:55 am
10:15 am
30
Opening and Intro. Ryan Jensen, Yale University, and Eli Rothenberg, NYU
Fork Dynamics Determine Therapy Response in Hereditary Breast Cancer. Sharon Cantor,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Maintaining the Integrity of the Genome within Chromatin. Kyle Miller, University of Texas at
Austin
Break Induced Replication: An unusual type of DNA synthesis promoting genomic instability. Anna
Malkova, University of Iowa
Illuminating the molecular functions of BRCA2. Ryan Jensen, Yale University School of Medicine
Repair of DNA Nicks: Implications for Cancer, Applications to Gene Therapy. Nancy Maizels,
University of Washington
Break
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
11:05 am
11:25 am
11:45 am
12:05 pm
12:25 pm
Subgroup G: Spatial and Temporal Analytical Tools for Cell Atlases
Room 28B
Organizers: Richard Conroy, National Institutes of Health; Jonah Cool, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative; and Sean Hanlon, National
Institutes of Health
The rapid emergence of technologies for multiplexed and high throughput molecular mapping and phenotypic analysis of cells is
driving development of multiscale, multidimensional cell atlases. New tools and common coordinate systems will be required to
analyze and interpret these large datasets, and in particular to understand the role of spatial organization and temporal trajectories
of the cells in a complex 3D tissue environment. In this session we will discuss emerging approaches and tools that provide robust,
scalable, interoperable analysis of molecular and phenotypic information and are supporting community efforts to model cell-cell
interactions, cell lineage and perturbations. There will be discussions with all speakers addressing challenges related to building
interoperability between the datasets generated by different cell atlas initiatives.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:40 am
9:10 am
9:40 am
10.10 am
10:30 am
11:00 am
11:30 am
12:00 pm
Introduction. Richard Conroy, National Institutes of Health, Jonah Cool, Chan Zuckerberg
Initiative, Sean Hanlon, National Institutes of Health
Kun Zhang, University of California, San Diego
Emma Lundberg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Long Cai, Caltech
Break
Junhyong Kim, University of Pennsylvania
Joe Gray, Oregon Health & Science University
Leeat Keren, Stanford University
Dana Pe’er, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Subgroup H: Systems and Synthetic Biology of Decoding Complex Cellular Rhythms
Room 33C
Organizer: Qiong Yang, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Cell-autonomous oscillators, from sub-second action potentials to 24-hour circadian clocks, are fundamental and prevalent
throughout living systems, exhibiting complicated oscillations, waves, and patterns. Despite their diversity and complexity,
technology development in systems and synthetic biology triggers enormous interest and enables characterization of this universal
phenomenon. In this session, a group of theorists and experimentalists will meet and discuss important topics on cellular rhythms
from various perspectives crossing disciplines, e.g., principles shared among oscillators, synthetic clocks of minimal design and
desired functions, tools for reconstituting more complicated dynamics and sub-cellular organization, and emerging spatiotemporal
patterns from coupled oscillators. This subgroup, by bringing together biologists, physicists, and engineers with shared interests
who rarely meet each other, will provide an opportunity to forge a new network of potential collaborators.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:50 am
9:10 am
Introduction. Qiong Yang, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
From molecules to development: how clocks function and coordinate. Qiong Yang, University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor
Cell cycles on cell trees. Stanislav Shvartsman, Princeton University
Trigger waves in cell signaling. James Ferrell, Stanford University
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
31
SATURDAY
10:45 am
Understanding how error-prone DNA polymerases regulate the replication stress response. Tony
Huang, NYU School of Medicine
DNA Damage Response at the Crossroads of Repair and Apoptosis. Faye Rogers, Yale University
School of Medicine
Etiology of Chromosomal Rearrangements. Jeremy Stark, City of Hope
Active or not – activity dependent mobility during DNA damage responses. Shan Zha, Columbia
University
Targeting the ATR Checkpoint in Cancer Therapy. Lee Zhou, Harvard Medical School
Visualizing the cellular dynamics and organization of DNA repair proteins. Eli Rothenberg, NYU
School of Medicine
Concluding remarks.
SATURDAY
10:25 am
9:30 am
9:50 am
10:10 am
10:30 am
10:50 am
11:10 am
11:30 am
11:50 am
12:10 pm
Lilianna Solnica-Krezel, Washington University in St. Louis
Cell cycle in early embryo development and the onset of zygotic genome activation. Matt Good,
University of Pennsylvania
Engineering DNA programmed dynamical systems using a cell-free expression toolbox. Vincent
Noireaux, University of Minnesota
Genetic oscillations in a spatially extended synthetic microbial consortium. Matthew Bennett,
Rice University
Oscillatory hormonal control of mammalian cell differentiation. Mary Teruel, Stanford University
Functional roles of inorganic ions in the cell. Gürol M. Süel, University of California, San Diego
Scaling of oscillation-based pattern. Sean Megason, Harvard Medical School
From single-cell oscillations to aggregates: Identifying the key control parameters driving
collective signaling in Dictyostelium. Allyson Sgro, Boston University
Signaling oscillations during embryonic patterning. Alexander Aulehla
Subgroup I: The Many Functions of Cytoskeletal Proteins in the Cell Nucleus
Room 31C
Organizers: Piergiorgio Percipalle, New York University Abu Dhabi; and Maria Vartiainen, Institute of Biotechnology,
University of Helsinki
The emerging role of cytoskeletal proteins in the cell nucleus has become a new frontier in cell biology. Actin and actin-binding
proteins regulate chromatin and gene expression, but importantly they are beginning to be essential players in genome organization in
both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. These global actin-based functions contribute to genome stability and integrity while affecting
DNA replication and global transcription patterns. This is likely to occur through interactions of actin with nuclear components
including nuclear lamina and subnuclear organelles. An exciting future challenge is to understand how these actin-based genomewide mechanisms may regulate development and differentiation by interfering with the mechanical properties of the cell nucleus
and how regulated actin polymerization plays a role in maintaining nuclear architecture. This session will bring together scientists
from different angles and disciplines to discuss and elucidate—possibly through unpublished, ongoing work—how cytoskeletal
proteins act to consolidate nuclear architecture for sustained gene expression or silencing during the acquisition of cellular identity.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:55 am
9:15 am
9:35 am
9:55 am
10:15 am
10:55 am
11:15 am
11:45 am
12:05 pm
12:25 pm
32
Introduction. Piergiorgio Percipalle, New York University Abu Dhabi, and Maria Vartiainen,
Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki
Functional interactions between actin, ARPs and chromatin. Masahiko Harata, Tohoku University,
Sendai, Japan
Function of nuclear actin in genome stability. Kenji Shimada, Friedrich Miescher Institute for
Biomedical Research, Basel
Nuclear actin in chromatin organization and nuclear reprogramming. Piergiorgio Percipalle,
New York University Abu Dhabi
Actin polymerization in reprogramming nuclear structures. Kei Miyamoto, Kindai University
Actin’ on transcription. Maria Vartiainen, University of Helsinki
Nuclear WASp regulates transcription networks in developing T cells by interaction with TCF1.
Lisa Westerberg, Karolinska Institute
Break
Generation of DNA repair domains. Jean Gauthier, Columbia University
Highways for repair: nuclear F-actin and myosins drive relocalization of heterochromatic DNA
damages. Irene Chiolo, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Exploring the world of nuclear actin and actin PTMs. Xuetong Shen, MD Anderson Cancer Center
Viral mobilization of nuclear actin. Matthew Welch, University of California, Berkeley
Concluding Remarks
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Room 30B
This session focuses on Wnt signaling pathway and its role in embryonic development and cancer. Wnt family proteins are growth
factors that play critical roles in proliferation, migration, and invasion. Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling has been implicated in
a variety of human developmental disorders and in malignancies of the colon, breast, liver, skin, brain, and prostate. We will hear
from leading experts who study the role of Wnt in normal development and in disease states.
Presentations:
8:30 am
8:35 am
9:00 am
9:25 am
9:50 am
10:15 am
10:35 am
11:00 am
11:25 am
11:50 am
12:15 pm
OO
Introduction.
Intestinal Wnt signaling. Calvin Kuo, Stanford University, University
WNT-FZD specificity in stem cells. Karl Willert, University of California, San Diego
New insights into Wnt signaling, vertebrate development, and stem cells. Xi He, Harvard Medical
School
Wnt Signaling Connections to Stem Cells and Invasion in Colon Cancer. Marian Waterman,
University of California, Irvine
Break
Ubiquitin-mediated regulation of the Wnt Pathway. Ethan Lee, Vanderbilt University
Wnt-er tales: Post genomic regulation of Wnt responsive cells by modulation of Cul4/DDB1/
DCAF4 ubiquitin ligase activity. Timothy F. Lane, University of California, Los Angeles
Non-canonical Wnt signaling in Cancer. Taran Gujral, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Mechanisms of Wnt5a-Ror signaling in development and disease. Henry Ho, University of
California, Davis
Closing. General Questions and Answers
Getting into Graduate School: The Do’s, the Don’ts, and the What If’s
10:30-11:30 am
Room 15A
Tama Hasson, Assistant Vice Provost for Undergraduate Research, University of California, Los Angeles
Leticia Vega, Associate Professor, Barry University
This session is designed specifically to inform undergraduate attendees about the ins and outs of applying to and getting into
graduate school (MS or PhD) or MD/PhD programs. Topics addressed will include timelines for admission, requesting letters of
recommendation, crafting personal statements, the interview process, and potential pitfalls in the application process. The speakers
have years of experience mentoring undergraduates through the application process and will answer students’ questions to help
them become stronger applicants.
Outcomes:
1. Acquire broad-based knowledge regarding the process of applying to graduate school or MD/PhD programs, including
the application timeline.
2. Gain an understanding of the importance of a diversity statement in your personal statements.
3. Appreciate the importance of the ASCB in your professional development.
Target audience: undergraduates, postbaccalaureates, MS students, and their mentors
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
33
SATURDAY
Organizers: Henry Ho, University of California, Davis; and Taran Gujral, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
SATURDAY
Subgroup J: Wnt Signaling in Development and Cancer
OO
Planning Your Exit from Graduate School
10:30-11:30 am
Room 15B
Moderators:
Ahna Skop, Faculty, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jim Vigoreaux, Associate Provost & Faculty; University of Vermont
Giovanna Guerrero-Medina, Director, Yale University & Ciencia Puerto Rico
Postdocs:
Elisabeth Marnik, MDI Biological Laboratory
Gaia Gantelli, Duke University
Krishnakumar Vasudevan, Stanford University
Transitioning out of graduate training, whether it’s into postdoctoral training or the workforce, can be a daunting prospect
for graduate students. It requires forethought and planning—with time to network, interview, and settle on next steps—and
organizational skills to accomplish all of this while conducting research or writing a thesis. In this session, panelists will discuss:
timelines for planning; the importance of networking, as well as strategies, tips and platforms for networking; the role of research
advisors and other mentors; tools, such as the IDP, to help prioritize options, identify needs, and plan to work toward career
objectives; preparing for interviews for postdoctoral and professional positions; juggling research and graduation responsibilities
with exiting priorities; and managing challenges related to mentors or graduate program requirements.
Students will receive a worksheet to help them plan and organize their exit from graduate school. Panel members will demonstrate
a diversity of gender, social identity, career outcomes (e.g., postdoc/academic, industry, non-research) and stages (junior to senior).
Outcomes:
1. Gain an understanding of the ideal timelines and steps required to successfully exit graduate school and transition into
the next academic or professional step.
2. Acquire concrete strategies and resources to explore your career objectives and to work toward them.
3. Demonstrate increased confidence in your ability to manage tasks related to exiting graduate school.
Target audience: late-stage graduate students
OO
Getting the Most out of Your Thesis Committee
11:45 am-12:45 pm
Room 15A
Sarah Cohen, Assistant Professor, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Ernest Heimsath, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Brian Lewis, Associate Professor , Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School
James Olzmann, Assistant Professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley
A graduate student’s thesis committee, a requirement for most programs, is an incredibly important factor in a graduate student’s
training and career advancement. Ideally, the committee will be a resource for scientific and career advice, mentorship, sponsorship,
oversight, and potentially advocacy. While the importance of the thesis committee is evident, advice on how to select, interact
with, and leverage committee members is often implicit. A dynamic presentation, utilizing polls and pair-shares to encourage active
learning, will provide a brief overview of: the thesis committee’s role, considerations in selecting committee members, strategies
for effective thesis committee meetings, and strategies for productive relationships with committee members. Following the
presentation, the panel will further discuss these topics and provide lived-insights, advice, and context.
34
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Target audience: graduate students
OO
Special Interest Subgroups – Afternoon
1:30-5:30 pm
The following member-organized sessions were selected by the ASCB Program Committee. All meeting attendees are welcome to
participate. Meeting registration is required.
Subgroup K: Bottom-Up Cell Biology
Room 30D
Organizers: Daniel A. Fletcher, University of California, Berkeley; and Matthew C. Good, University of Pennsylvania
In vitro reconstitution of biological processes from their component molecular parts is a mainstay of biochemistry and has emerged
over the last decade as a powerful tool in cell biology. Recent studies have shown that cell-like structures with micron-scale
organization can be reconstituted from nanometer-scale parts by combining purified proteins and cytoplasmic extracts with cell-like
boundary conditions. By identifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for assembly, these ‘bottom-up’ studies provide new
mechanistic insight that complements more traditional ‘top-down’ cell biology. Rapid progress in micropatterning, microfluidics,
and microfabrication, coupled with continued advancements in biochemistry and molecular biology, raise the possibility of creating
more complete cellular reconstitutions that may one day rival the complexity of live cells. Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:50 pm
2:10 pm
2:30 pm
2:50 pm
3:10 pm
3:30 pm
3:50 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Introduction: Matt Good, University of Pennsylvania, and Dan Fletcher, University of California,
Berkeley
Dissecting the proofreading mechanisms of endocytosis through reconstitution. Min Wu, National
University of Singapore
Reconstitution of an active actin-membrane composite. Satyajit Mayor, NCBS, Bangalore
Reconstitution of the dynamic steady state of actin networks. Laurent Blanchoin, BBI, Grenoble
Reconstitution and biophysical study of functional kinetochores. Chip Asbury, University of
Washington
How cells sense micron-scale curvature using the septin cytoskeleton. Amy Gladfelter, University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Self-organization of the bacterial cell division machinery. Martin Loose, IST, Austria
Reconstituting the Molecular Mechanisms of Membrane Traffic. Jeanne Stachowiak, University of
Texas
Autonomously Self-regulating Giant Vesicles. Atul Parikh, University of California, Davis
Buckling of epithelium growing under spherical confinement. Aurelien Roux, University of Geneva
Reconstructing phase transitions and kinetic proof reading in the T cell receptor signaling system.
Jay Groves, University of California, Berkeley
Reconstitution of dendritic cell function. Michael Dustin, New York University
Synthetic Notch circuits to direct multicellular organization. Wendell Lim, University of California,
San Francisco
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
35
SATURDAY
SATURDAY
Outcomes:
1. Gain a better understanding of the potential impact a thesis committee can have on thesis research progress.
2. Acquire strategies for selecting a thesis committee, establishing mentoring relationships with its members, and preparing
for and holding a thesis committee meeting.
3. Gain increased confidence in the ability to utilize the thesis committee for scientific and academic success.
Subgroup L: Cellular Organization of Metabolism: Biology, Structure, and Function of Enzyme Polymers
Room 33C
Organizers: Justin Kollman, University of Washington; and Jeffrey Peterson, Fox Chase Cancer Center
An increasing number of enzymes dynamically and reversibly assemble into cellular structures in response to changes in
nutrient availability or other environmental cues. These structures represent a novel non-membrane-bound mechanism for
compartmentalization and localization of enzymatic activity. Many of the enzymes that undergo dynamic reorganization are metabolic
enzymes (e.g., CTP synthase, inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphofructokinase). The discovery of complex and
dynamic spatial organization of enzymes opens an exciting new field at the interface between cell biology and metabolism. Most
examples of dynamically reorganizing metabolic structures remain functionally uncharacterized, but the few examples that are
characterized suggest that this larger scale organization plays fundamental roles in enzyme activity and for maintaining cellular
homeostasis. Important questions remain for many metabolic enzyme structures: What are their mechanisms of assembly and
disassembly? What is their biological function? How is assembly regulated? The presentations in this subgroup will discuss recent
advances in addressing these questions, both in vitro and in vivo, for a variety of polymerizing enzymes.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:50 pm
2:10 pm
2:30 pm
2:50 pm
3:10 pm
3:30 pm
3:50 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Emergent physical and cellular properties of synthetic, infinite protein assemblies. Emmanuel
Levy, Weizmann Institute
Supramolecular Assembly of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Chalongrat Noree,
Mahidol University
Controlling the activity of eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylases: conformational locking and
polymerization. Timm Maier, University of Basel
Filament formation by the Phosphofructokinase-1, the gatekeeper of glycolysis. Bradley Webb,
West Virginia University
Metabolite regulation of stress granule composition and assembly. James Wilhelm, University of
California, San Diego
Histidine-mediated protein methylation and CTPS compartmentalization. Li-Mei Pai, Chang Gung
University
Break
The structural basis for regulation of nucleotide biosynthesis enzymes by polymerization. Justin
Kollman, University of Washington
The assembly of the cytoophidium. Ji-Long Liu, Shanghai Tech University
IMPDH assembly during T cell activation. Jeffrey Peterson, Fox Chase Cancer Center
Immune response-dependent assembly of IMP dehydrogenase filaments (rods/rings structures).
Edward Chan, University of Florida
The role of rods and rings in neurodegeneration. Naiara Akizu, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Subgroup M: Cilia and Cell Signaling in Development and Tissue Regeneration
Room 29B
Organizers: Peter Jackson, Stanford University; and Jeremy Reiter, University of California, San Francisco
Primary and motile cilia provide critical sensory, neuroendocrine, and metabolic control in specific tissues. Studies of the cell
biology of cilia, from model systems and human ciliopathies, has led to considerable insight into ciliary function, demonstrating
the importance of cilia both in early development and also in controlling degeneration of tissue in pediatric and adult settings.
This regenerative role is exemplified by signaling in the Sonic Hedgehog pathway, but less well understood defects lead to liver/
kidney fibrosis, airway epithelia, skin, mesenchymal tissue, brain degeneration and cancer. Here we present speakers with new
understanding of signaling mechanisms and structures, the elucidation of cilia signaling pathways, and animal models reflecting
the importance of cilia in stem cells, tissue regeneration, and tissue pathogenesis.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:50 pm
2:10 pm
2:30 pm
2:50 pm
36
Introduction, New Signaling Mechanisms in Cilia. Peter Jackson, Stanford University
Specification of cilia subtypes required for developmental signaling. Chris Kintner, Salk Institute
Feel the beat – multi-ciliated cell formation in the airway epithelium. Aron Jaffe, Novartis
The role of cilia in melanoma. Lukas Sommer, University of Zurich
Ciliary signaling in development and disease. Saikat Mukhopadhyay, University of Texas
Southwestern
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
3:40 pm
3:55 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Subgroup N: Emerging Model Systems
Room 29C
Organizers: Mansi Srivastava, Harvard University; and Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Many fascinating questions in cell biology have been set aside for generations because they involve phenomena that aren’t
found in well-established model systems. But this situation is improving, as techniques developed in popular model systems are
increasingly applied to other organisms—leading to a recent flowering of emerging and re-emerging models suited to answering
diverse questions. Moreover, the study of diverse non-model organisms has led to the discovery of new phenomena that may
have widespread importance. In this session, speakers will present cutting-edge results from diverse emerging model systems. This
session will feature all new speakers and emerging model systems than in the two earlier incarnations of this subgroup session. The
session will end with a Q&A panel in which all speakers will answer questions about topics relevant to studying emerging model
systems, for example challenges in getting started with a new model, approaches for sharing organisms and methods, strengths
and limitations of emerging models, funding, and career development prospects.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:52 pm
2:09 pm
2:26 pm
2:43 pm
3:00 pm
3:17 pm
3:35 pm
3:52 pm
4:09 pm
4:26 pm
4:43 pm
5:00 pm
Introduction. Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Mansi Srivastava,
Harvard University
The cellular basis for structural color in butterflies. Nipam Patel, Marine Biological Laboratory,
Woods Hole
Developing model systems to study organelle biology in bacteria. Arash Komeili, University of
California at Berkeley
The Hawaiian bobtail squid: a model organism for studying host-microbe interactions. Spencer
Nyholm, University of Connecticut
Rising tide: exploring biology within the sea with brown algae. Siobhan Braybrook, University of
California, Los Angeles
Plasticity of meiotic mechanisms: insights from the nematode Pristionchus pacificus. Abby
Dernburg, University of California, Berkeley
Studying aging and diapause in vertebrates using the short-lived African killifish. Anne Brunet,
Stanford University
Break
Spiny mice as an emerging model to investigate the cellular regulation of mammalian
regeneration. Ashley Seifert, University of Kentucky
Embryonic origins and cell cycling behavior of annelid stem cells. B. Duygu Özpolat, Marine
Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole
The sex lives of parasitic schistosomes: it’s complicated. James Collins, University of Texas
Southwestern
Stem cell differentiation in Hydra at single cell resolution. Celina Juliano, University of California,
Davis
Life in flatland: Linking tissue architecture, mechanics and morphogenesis in a simple metazoan
model, Trichoplax adhaerens. Manu Prakash, Stanford University Question and answer session
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
37
SATURDAY
3:25 pm
Loss of primary cilia drives Hedgehog to Ras pathway switching in resistant basal cell carcinoma.
Francois Kuonen, Stanford University
Omega-3 fatty acid activation of ciliary FFAR4 receptors on perivascular preadipocyte stimulates
adipogenesis. Keren Hilgendorf, Stanford University
Break.
Ciliary subdomains and signaling. Jeremy Reiter, University of California, San Francisco
Structure and function of the BBSome. Maxence Nachury, University of California, San Francisco
Cilia Assembly and Maintenance in Chlamydomonas. Karl Lechtreck, University of Georgia
Cilia maintain the synaptic architecture of excitatory cortical neurons. Piali Sengupta, Brandeis
University
Ciliary extracellular vesicles: from biogenesis to bioactivity. Maureen Barr, Rutgers University
SATURDAY
3:10 pm
Subgroup O: Machine Learning in Cell Biology
Room 31C
Organizer: Kwonmoo Lee, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Quantitative cell biology underwent dramatic growth over the last decade due to a wide range of image analysis algorithms as well
as advanced microscopy. This enables researchers to quantitatively measure cellular and subcellular phenomena in unpreceded
detail, and build various datasets of cell biological processes, including cell motility, cytoskeleton, and membrane-bound organelles.
Recently, machine learning has been making tremendous progress and has shown that computers can outperform humans in
the analysis of complex high dimensional datasets. Thus, machine learning has great potential to extract hidden information
from heterogeneous cell image datasets and provide detailed mechanistic biological insights. The session will showcase exciting
applications of machine learning in various cell biological problems and present novel machine learning techniques that can be
applied in cellular image analysis.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
2:00 pm
2:25 pm
2:50 pm
3:15 pm
3:25 pm
3:50 pm
4:15 pm
4:40 pm
5:05 pm
Introduction. Kwonmoo Lee, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Machine learning of the assembly instructions of a cell. Robert Murphy, Carnegie Mellon
University
Inferring cell state dynamics with machine learning methods. Jacob Kimmel, Calico Life Sciences
and University of California, San Francisco
Deconvolution of subcellular protrusion heterogeneity by machine learning-based live cell
analysis. Kwonmoo Lee, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
A machine learning framework for modeling the structure and function of a cell. Trey Ideker,
University of California, San Diego
Break
Machine learning for cell organization: new methods to capture variation and integrate
observations. Greg Johnson, Allen Institute for Cell Science
High-resolution characterization of complex organelle morphology using deep convolutional
networks. Ge Yang, Carnegie Mellon University
Machine learning and computer vision approaches for phenotypic profiling in yeast. Brenda
Andrews, University of Toronto
Live cell histology for classification of melanoma cell population based on single cell actions.
Assaf Zaritsky, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and University of Texas Southwestern Medical
Center
Context-aware predictions for tracking and segmentation. Jan Funke, Howard Hughes Medical
Institute Janelia Farm
Subgroup P: Neuronal Cytoskeleton: A Complex Interplay of Cytoarchitecture and Dynamics
Room 30B
Organizers: Kassandra Ori-McKenney, University of California, Davis; and Le Ma, Thomas Jefferson University
The architecture of the neuronal cytoskeleton powers the development and plasticity of a functional nervous system. This is
accomplished through cytoskeletal-generated forces that power morphological changes in neurons, including neuronal migration,
axon outgrowth, dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis. In addition, the neuronal cytoskeleton provides tracks for intracellular
membrane and organelle transport and delivery, which can be regulated by cytoskeletal-associated proteins. Advanced molecular,
genetic, and imaging techniques allow for molecular interrogation and analysis of cytoskeletal architecture and dynamics as well
as intracellular trafficking in the neuron with high spatial and temporal resolution. This session will highlight novel findings and
mechanistic insights into this exciting area of neuronal cell biology, and how these programs may go awry in neurodevelopmental
and neurodegenerative disease.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:55 pm
2:15 pm
38
Introduction. Kassandra Ori-McKenney, University of California, Davis; and Le Ma, Thomas
Jefferson University
New insights into organization and dynamics of axonal actin. Subhojit Roy, University of Wisconsin.
Patterning of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton. Shaul Yogev, Yale University.
Coordinating membrane and actin cytoskeleton remodeling at the synapse. Avital Rodal, Brandeis
University
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
3:15 pm
3:35 pm
3:50 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Subgroup Q: Next Generation Correlative Microscopy: Biological Applications and Emerging Techniques
Room 31B
Organizers: Ori Avinoam, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel; and Yannick Schwab, European Molecular Biology
Laboratory, Heidelberg Germany
Gaining a molecular level understanding of biological processes depends on developing the capability to visualize the molecules
involved relative to their location within the cell at high resolution. However, obtaining such high-resolution information on dynamic
processes in situ often requires the application of more than one imaging technology to the exact same substrate by correlative
microscopy. At the crossroad of multidisciplinary approaches, correlative microscopy brings together biologists, image analysts,
and engineers, leading to powerful workflows that are applied to an ever-increasing number of biological questions and models.
This session will highlight the most recent advances in correlative microscopy and their application to unravel cellular organization
and the molecular function of protein machineries in their subcellular context.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:40 pm
2:10 pm
2:30 pm
2:50 pm
3:10 pm
3:30 pm
3:50 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:20 pm
Introduction. Ori Avinoam, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, and Yannick Schwab,
European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg Germany
Transcytosis balances apical-basal membrane sorting during subcellular lumen formation: what
do we learn from CLEM. Maria Leptin, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany
Large volume correlative light electron microscopy to obtain functional insights on
endomembrane organization and its subversion by pathogens. Jost Enninga, Institut Pasteur,
Paris, France
Life, imaged Live: monitoring early metastatic events with intravital and correlative microscopy.
Matthia Karreman, Germany Cancer Research Institute (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany
Combining cryo fluorescence microscopy with cryo electron tomography to study native cellular
membranes. Wanda Kukulski, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK
Break
New insights to cellular composition by scanning transmission electron cryo-microscopy. Michael
Elbaum, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Correlated cryofluorescent and soft x-ray tomography. Carolyn Larabell, University of California,
San Francisco
A multimodal imaging approach to dissect the role of endocytosis during secretion. Kamalesh
Kumari, Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Comulus, a new network to bridge (pre) clinical imaging and light electron microscopy. Perrine
Paul-Gilloteaux, CNRS France-BioImaging, Nantes, France
Large volume electron microscopy imaging and its correlation to cryo-fluorescence microscopy.
Harald F. Hess, Janelia Research Campus
Question and answer panel with all speakers
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
39
SATURDAY
2:55 pm
Role of microtubule acetylation and aTAT1 in shaping neuronal development. Jill Wildonger,
University of Wisconsin
Cytoskeletal reorganization in response to stroke and other acute neuronal injuries. Shelley
Halpain, University of California, San Diego
Doing more work with less F-actin during chemotropic growth responses: new perspectives on
the molecular clutch hypothesis. Paul Forscher, Yale University
Break
Doublecortin defines a zone of microtubule nucleation and regrowth in growth cones. Gary
Brouhard, McGill University
MAP7 regulates microtubule stability and organelle transport during axon branch development.
Stephen Tymanskyj, Thomas Jefferson University
Lattice gating by microtubule-associated proteins differentially directs neuronal motor transport.
Kassandra Ori-McKenney, University of California, Davis
Multiple families of motors act independently to drive the axonal transport of vesicles to the
synapse. Sandra Encalada, The Scripps Research Institute
Novel roles for cytoplasmic dynein adaptor proteins (RDDs). Richard Vallee, Columbia University
SATURDAY
2:35 pm
Subgroup R: The Mechanics and Membrane Dynamics of the Nuclear Envelope
Room 33B
Organizers: Christian Schlieker, Yale University; and Shirin Bahmanyar, Yale University
It has become clear that the textbook definition of the nuclear envelope as a stable structure is no longer accurate. Nuclear envelope
dynamics, which includes membrane fusion, rupture and repair, and budding, allows for nuclear pore complex insertion, constricted
cell migration, and viral proliferation. Defects in nuclear envelope dynamics are associated with heterogeneous diseases including
muscular dystrophy, movement disorders, aging, and cancer. By bringing together researchers from diverse fields that intersect in
nuclear envelope biology, we will explore the mechanics and dynamics of the nuclear envelope and how mis-regulation of these
processes contributes to disease. The insight gained will provide a more comprehensive view of nuclear envelope function that
extends well beyond its long-assumed role as a static barrier between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:55 pm
2:15 pm
2:35 pm
2:55 pm
3:15 pm
3:35 pm
3:50 pm
4:10 pm
4:30 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Opening Remarks. Christian Schlieker, Yale University, and Shirin Bahmanyar, Yale University
Crosstalk between chromatin and nuclear mechanics. Megan King, Yale School of Medicine
Nuclear envelope rupture, DNA damage, and DNA damage response activation as drivers of
lamin-associated muscular dystrophy. Jan Lammerding, Cornell University
The great nuclear escape: mechanism of membrane budding during the nuclear egress of
herpesviruses. Katya Heldwein, Tufts University
New insight into nuclear pore complex assembly. Guillaume Holzer (Antonin Lab), Aachen University
Torsin ATPases and nuclear envelope dynamics. Christian Schlieker, Yale University
The ER-resident AAA+ ATPase TorsinA and its unusual oligomerization. Thomas Schwartz,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Break
The nuclear envelope surveillance machinery is segregated by and directly monitors the nuclear
transport system. Patrick Lusk, Yale School of Medicine
Coordinating dynamic events of nuclear assembly. Katie Ullman, University of Utah
Coordinating ER membrane biogenesis with nuclear envelope dynamics. Shirin Bahmanyar, Yale
University
Lipid metabolism of the inner nuclear membrane. Alwin Kohler, University of Vienna
Concluding remarks
Subgroup S: Patterning the Cytoskeleton - PTMs, MAPs, ABPs
Room 28D
Organizers: Antonina Roll-Mecak, National Institutes of Health; and Kristen Verhey, University of Michigan
The cytoskeleton consists of three interconnected filamentous networks—microtubules, actin filaments, intermediate filaments—
that play critical roles in cell structure, division, migration, and intracellular trafficking. All microtubules are assembled from tubulin
subunits and all actin filaments are assembled from actin monomers. Yet cells can generate specialized microtubule and actin
filament structures with distinct spatial and temporal patterns and distinct functional outputs. How these specialized filaments
are generated by cells and then “read” by filament-associated proteins is an area of active research. Recent work has shown that
diversity in filament architecture can be provided by different actin or tubulin isotypes as well as chemically diverse posttranslational
modifications (PTMs). In addition, diverse filament architectures are specified and regulated by a large number of accessory factors
such as microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) and actin binding proteins (ABPs). In this subgroup, we will explore a variety of
mechanisms for generating specific cytoskeletal structures (PTMs, MAPs, ABPs) as well as the functional output of these structures
in a variety of experimental systems (yeast, flies, worms, mice, cell culture).
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:35 pm
1:55 pm
2:15 pm
2:35 pm
40
Introduction. Antonina Roll-Mecak, National Institutes of Health
Self-organization of the actin cytoskeleton for diverse functions in fission yeast. Dave Kovar,
University of Chicago
Site-specific oxidation by Mical primes actin for rapid disassembly. Elena Grintsevich, University
of California, Los Angeles
Reversible Redox post-translational modification of actin to control cellular form and function.
Jonathan Terman, University of Texas Southwestern
Microtubules Gate the Condensation of Tau to Locally Regulate Microtubule Function. Rick
McKenney, University of California, Davis
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Subgroup T: The Midbody: From Cytokinesis to Signaling Organelle
SATURDAY
3:15 pm
3:35 pm
3:55 pm
4:15 pm
4:35 pm
4:55 pm
5:15 pm
SATURDAY
MAP6 proteins: from microtubule stabilization to actin dynamics in neurons. Annie Andrieux,
CNRS Grenoble
Break
Microtubule organization during anaphase in human cells. Tarun Kapoor, Rockefeller University
How to find readers of the tubulin code? Carsten Janke, Institute Curie, Paris
Methylation versus acetylation at alpha tubulin K40. Kristen Verhey, University of Michigan
Tubulin PTMs and their regulation of the heartbeat. Ben Prosser, University of Pennsylvania
Microtubule dynamics away from the tips. Antonina Roll-Mecak, National Institutes of Health
General discussion with all speakers
2:55 pm
Room 28B
Supported by Bruker Corporation and 3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Organizers: Ahna R. Skop, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Arnaud Echard, Institut Pasteur, Paris
The relatively new field of midbody biology is attracting intense interest beyond its role in cytokinesis, as midbodies have been
recently implicated in the fundamental control of cell architecture, fate, polarity, tumorigenicity, and pluripotency. And yet some
of the most basic questions about midbody function remain unclear and at times controversial: How are midbodies generated
during cytokinetic abscission? Do midbodies have post-mitotic functions and, if so, what are they and how are they regulated?
How much variation in midbody function exists among distinct cell types? What proportion of post-mitotic midbodies are inherited
intracellularly versus extracellularly? Do midbodies mediate informational transfer via an intracellular mechanism, an extracellular
mechanism, neither, or both? What roles do midbody protein play in promoting cancer cell fate and pluripotency? It is necessary
that models of midbody function must become more detailed, mechanistically speaking, to distinguish among these options. In
this session, we will highlight the current research on the midbody in hopes to uncover many of these questions.
Presentations:
1:30 pm
1:45 pm
2:10 pm
2:35 pm
3:00 pm
3:25 pm
3:45 pm
4:00 pm
4:25 pm
4:50 pm
5:10 pm
Introduction: what is the midbody and why should you care? Ahna Skop, University of WisconsinMadison
From the contractile ring to the midbody ring: a maturation process. Gilles Hickson, Université de
Montréal
The midbody remnant proteome or Flemmingsome reveals new proteins required for cytokinetic
abscission and post-abscission events. Arnaud Echard, Institut Pasteur – CNRS, Paris, France
Characterization of the midbody interactome reveals roles for PP1 phosphatases in late
cytokinesis. Paolo D’Avino, University of Cambridge, UK
The last chance saloon: The midbody-associated C. elegans LEM-3 nuclease mends multiple DNA
intermediates just before cells divide. Anton Gartner, University of Dundee
The role of post-mitotic midbodies in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Rytis
Prekeris, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Break
Midbody transcriptome and function. Ahna Skop, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Midbody function in morphogenesis. Christian Pohl, Goethe University Medical School
Midbody function in epithelia architecture and polarity. Maja Köhn University of Freiburg,
Germany
Midbody formation and abscission in the developing brain. Noelle Dwyer, University of Virginia
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
41
OO
Hit the Ground Running: Early Success in Graduate School
2:00-3:00 pm
Room 15A
Michael Boyce, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, Duke University, School of Medicine (co-organizer)
Ben Clarke, Associate Professor of Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, Duluth (co-organizer)
Shaimar Gonzales, Graduate Student, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Marina Holz, Dean, Graduate School of Basic Medical Sciences, New York Medical College
Jeannette Huaman, Graduate Student, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Kwabena Badu-Nkansah, Department of Cell Biology, Duke University
This highly interactive panel discussion will help attendees improve the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in the first two to
three years of graduate school. Panelists will discuss considerations such as choosing a research lab, advisor, and project; bolstering
scientific and professional confidence; early-stage strategies for long-term professional success; integrating into local and national
scientific and academic communities; and work-life balance. Panelists include both current faculty and senior graduate students in
order to provide a range of perspectives on early graduate education. After brief introductory remarks by the panelists, the session
will be driven by audience questions and discussion.
Outcomes:
1. Discuss the skills needed to succeed in the first two to three years of graduate school.
2. Receive tips and advice on such topics as: choosing a lab/advisor/project, integrating into the academic community, coping
with stress.
3. Learn strategies to build scientific professional skills and confidence.
4. Engage in an interactive Q&A session driven by attendee interests.
Target audience: advanced undergraduates and early-stage graduate students
OO
Judged Poster Session
3:15-5:45 pm
Room 16A
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
The Minorities Affairs Committee (MAC) in partnership with the Education Committee offer a judged poster session for MAC travel
grant awardees and undergraduate authors on abstracts. At this event postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate posters are
judged by volunteer faculty and postdocs. This event is an opportunity for networking between our diverse and up-and-coming
ASCB meeting attendees and the membership at large. The experience offers professional development opportunities for presenters
and professional service opportunities for poster judges.
Outcomes:
1. Communicate your laboratory findings with a diverse group of peers and more senior cell biologists attending ASCB from
around the world.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the processes involved in the generation of new knowledge, including the scientific
method, data collection and analysis.
3. Demonstrate the ability to ask and respond to questions about your research.
Target audience: all MAC travel awardees, undergraduate authors on abstracts, all attendees
42
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Keynote Lecture: Sean Morrison
Ballroom 20B
Supported by the Allen Institute for Cell Science
Niches for Stem Cells in Bone Marrow
Sean J. Morrison, Director, Children’s Medical Center Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center/HHMI
OO
Opening Night Reception
Immediately Following Keynote-10:00 pm
Sails Pavilion
Join us in celebrating the start of another great meeting! Meet new people, find old friends and colleagues, and start having fun.
All registered meeting attendees and exhibitors are invited to the buffet reception. Cash bar available.
OO
International Research and Training Exchange Fair
8:00-9:00 pm
Sails Pavilion
Coordinator: Xuebiao Yao, University of Science & Technology of China
As a feature of the Opening Night Reception, the fair will allow attendees to learn about research, training, and other opportunities
in countries around the world; encourage students and postdocs to think about possibilities in other countries; and open up
exchanges between labs for international collaboration. Tables will be set up displaying information from various countries and
regions around the world, and representatives will be available to answer questions. Make sure to check out this event while you
enjoy refreshments and collegiality during the Opening Night Reception!
Target audience: all ASCB attendees interested in scientific opportunities around the world
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
43
SATURDAY
6:00 pm
SATURDAY
OO
NOTES
44
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Sunday
December 9, 2018
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
45
7:30 am-6:00 pm
Registration Open
Registration Area
8:00-9:30 am
Symposium 1: Nuclear Organization
8:15-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Ballroom 20BC
Theater 1, Learning Center
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Cell data in the classroom: Using the Allen Cell Explorer for high school and college education
8:15-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Daily Schedule—Sunday, December 9
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Innovations in Genome Editing Delivery and Transfection in Primary and Immune Cells
46
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Coaching
Career Center, Learning Center
9:00-9:50 am
Career Options for Cell Biologists
Theater 3, Learning Center
9:00-9:50 am
Understanding the NIH Grant Review Process
Theater 4, Learning Center
9:30-10:30 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Using 3D organoid culture to assess disease aggressiveness in genetically engineered mouse models
of prostate cancer
9:30-11:00 am
Morning Refreshment Break
Learning Center
9:45-10:45 am
Symposium 2: Cell Migration
Ballroom 20BC
9:45-10:45 am
Symposium 3: Neuronal Cell Biology
Ballroom 20A
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership: Roles, Values, and Expectations
10:00-10:50 am
First Timer? Making the Most of the Annual Meeting
Room 25C
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Foundational Cell Biology Workshop: Using Primary Literature to Teach Biology
10:00-10:50 am
Green Cards for Scientific Researchers: How to Win Your EB-1A/NIW Case
Theater 4, Learning Center
10:45-11: 45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Theater 3, Learning Center
Room 32B
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D super-resolution light sheet and single molecule imaging and tracking
10:45-11: 45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cells-to-CT™: A fast way to kill your cells for gene expression analysis
11:00 am-12:00 pm
E.E. Just Award Lecture: Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Science Discussion Tables
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Microsymposia
Room 31B
Roundtable Central Section 3,
Learning Center
1
Cell Cycle and Signaling
Room 28B
2
Centrosome and Cilia Dynamics
Room 28D
3
Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
Room 29B
4
Membrane Architecture and Structure
Room 29C
5
Polarity, Junctions, and Tissue Structure
Room 30B
6
Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 1
Room 30C
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Advocacy Toolbox I: The Two-Minute Speech
Room 25B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
International Funding Session from APOCB, China, and FAPESP, the São Paulo
Research Foundation, Brazil
Room 33B
11:00-11:50 am
MD-PhD, Is it Right for Me?
12:00-1:30 pm
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
Theater 3, Learning Center
Learning Center
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
12:00-12:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bitplane -IMARIS
Analysis of 3D/4D Microscopy Images in Cell Biology – Imaris innovations advance the
processing and analysis of complex datasets with a comprehensive and batchable environment
12:00-12:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Celldiscoverer 7 and 3D-Cell Culture - High Resolution meets Screening; Structured illumination
microscopy (SIM) with two-dimensional illumination patterns
12:00-12:50 pm
Data Driven Approaches to Improving Teaching and Mentoring
12:00-12:50 pm
Navigating the Faculty Job Search at an R1 Institute
12:15-1:00 pm
Minorities Affairs Committee Awards Reception (by invitation only)
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Career Discussion and Mentoring Roundtables
1:00-1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 4, Learning Center
Theater 3, Learning Center
Roundtable Central Section 3,
Learning Center
Roundtable Central Sections
1-2, Learning Center
Theater 1, Learning Center
1:00-1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Visualizing intracellular organelle and cytoskeletal interactions at nanoscale resolution on millisecond
time scales
1:00-1:30 pm
In-Booth Presentation
Booth 1019, Learning Center
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless and maskless
photopatterning system
ASCB Booth 623,
Learning Center
1:15-1:45 pm
Meet the Committees
1:30-3:00 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
Learning Center
1:30-3:30 pm
Afternoon Refreshment Break
Learning Center
1:45-2:30 pm
Meet the Editor of CBE—Life Sciences Education
2:00-6:00 pm
Faculty Research and Education Development (FRED) Mentoring Program
Mock Grant Review Panel Session (by invitation only)
2:00-2:50 pm
How to Review a Paper
Theater 4, Learning Center
2:00-2:50 pm
Research Careers in Biotechnology
Theater 3, Learning Center
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
ASCB Booth 623,
Learning Center
Room 24C
Daily Schedule—Sunday, December 9
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Unbiased Functional Identification & Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor Neoantigens and Exploiting a Novel
Cell Death Mechanism for Selective Killing of Cancer Cells Upregulating Homologous Recombination
Andor Technology
Dragonfly: Subcellular SRRF-Stream Super-resolution to Big Specimen Imaging with Imaris Stitcher
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Labviva
A New and Unique Approach for Relevant Scientific Information
3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
ALVEOLE
Fine-tuning the mechanical and biochemical properties of in vitro microenvironments with a versatile
and contactless photopatterning technology: PRIMO
3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Super Resolution Confocal Scanner Unit CSU-W1 Sora
3:15-4:00 pm
Keith R. Porter Lecture: Ruth Lehmann
4:15-6:50 pm
Subgroup U: The Cell and Physics: 2018 and Beyond
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Ballroom 20BC
Ballroom 20A
47
4:15-6:50 pm
Minisymposia
1
Biology of Stem Cells
2
Cell Adhesion Motility and Mechanics
Room 29C
3
Cellular Stress Responses
Room 28C
4
Microbes and the Cytoskeleton
Room 31B
5
Nucleus
6
An Organellar Perspective on Disease
Ballroom 20BC
Ballroom 20D
Room 30C
4:15-7:00 pm
Education Minisymposium: Evidence-Based Education: Promoting Excellence
through an Inclusive Environment
Room 26B
4:15-6:50 pm
Workshop: New Fluorescent Probes and HTP Imaging Approaches
Room 33B
4:15-5:15 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Daily Schedule—Sunday, December 9
Bruker Corporation
Multiplexed quantitative single molecule localization microscopy with the Vutara 352
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7:00-9:00 pm
Panel Discussion and Reception: Janelia is Looking for a Scientist
with a Big New Idea. Could That Be You?
8:00-10:00 pm
Education Happy Hour
8:30 pm
Ask a Scientist Bar Night
Omni Hotel Salon C, D, E
Half Door Brewing Company
Lobby D, Registration
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Sunday, December 9
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Symposium 1: Nuclear Organization
8:00-9:30 am
Ballroom 20BC
Chair: Stirling Churchman, Harvard Medical School
S1
8:30 am
S2
9:00 am
S3
Super-resolution imaging of transcription in living mammalian cells. I.I. Cissé1; 1Physics, MIT,
Cambridge, MA
Genome Architecture Mapping: discovering 3D chromatin contacts in rare cell types.
A. Pombo1,2, A. Kukalev1, W. Winick-Ng1, R. Kempfer1,2, I. Harabula1,2, G. Loof1,2, R.A. Beagrie1, C.
Thieme1, T.M. Sparks1,2; 1Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology, Max Delbruck Centrum fur
Molekulare Medizin, Berlin, Germany, 2Institute of Biology, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin,
Germany
Mechanisms of Transcriptional Bursting. C. Bartman1, C. Jiang2, G. Blobel3,4, A. Raj5; 1Immunology
Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2Cell and Molecular Biology
Graduate Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Pediatric Hematology, Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, 4Perelman School of Medicine, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 5Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:15-9:15 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Cell data in the classroom: Using the Allen Cell Explorer for high school and college education
Presenters: Carlos C. Goller, Thomas Martinez, Eric A. Shelden, Kaitlyn Casimo, Graham T. Johnson
Level: Introductory
The Allen Cell Explorer (allencell.org) is the Allen Institute for Cell Science data portal. It provides an unprecedented view into
the organizational diversity of human stem cells, giving public access to large-scale 3D imaging data, predictive models, detailed
methods, cell lines, and analysis tools. Three educators using various features of allencell.org in their classrooms will present
their curricula and data applications. At the high school (AP Biology) level, we guide students through human cell image data on
allencell.org that show variation in cell shape, structure, and dynamics. These lessons enhance the proteins and cellular pathways
unit of the AP Biology curriculum with research-grade data and a view into the process of real-life science. At the introductory
college level, we expose students to high-throughput approaches (HTA) and high-content microscopy datasets to engage them in
the analysis of novel data. Students demonstrate applications of HTA via the analysis of image datasets from allencell.org during
their transition from classroom-based learning to research positions. Advanced college/early graduate school students conduct
virtual experiments using image-based cell data. In one virtual experiment, students analyze fluorescence microscopy images to
categorize cells into cell cycle phases. They must then calculate the relative durations of the cell cycle phases while recommending
experimental design parameters to maximize the accuracy of this approach.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:15-9:15 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Innovations in Genome Editing Delivery and Transfection in Primary and Immune Cells
Presenter: Shikha Mishra
Level: Intermediate
The talk will cover our latest transfection innovations for CRISPR genome editing, immune cell and in vivo delivery applications.
Topics included in the talk: Nucleic acid delivery solutions for hard-to-transfect and primary & immune cells; Delivery of genome
editing tools, including cas9 protein with electroporation or transfection reagents; High-titer production solutions for Lentivirus;
In vivo delivery of mRNA and siRNA with Invitrogen™ Invivofectamine™ reagents.
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SUNDAY
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8:00 am
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Career Coaching
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Center, Learning Center
Jean Branan, Program Coordinator, Career & Postdoctoral Services, The Scripps Research Institute
Virginia Hazen, Program Manager, Postdoc Professional Development, Office of Postdoctoral and Visiting Scholar Affairs,
University of California, San Diego
Nisha Cavanaugh, Manager, Postdoctoral & Academic Programs Office of Education, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery
Institute
Joe Cribari, Founder and CEO, JC3 Consulting
Sharon Schendel, Project Manager and Science Writer, Viral Immunotherapeutic Consortium, The Scripps Research Institute
Andrew Bankston, Program Manager, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery
Institute
Christine Kelly, Director of Career Development, Claremont Graduate University
Phil Sheridan, COO, Business Facilitator and Co-Founder, Bio4Front Inc.
Tricia Wright, Postdoctoral Scholar Advisor, Salk Institute for Biological Sciences
Joel Tolson, Graduate Student Career Advisor, Career Center, University of California, San Diego
The career coaching program offers one-on-one 40-minute meetings with career development professionals. The goal is for students
and postdocs to have an opportunity to speak to a professional about the wide range of careers available to them and receive
individualized advice including, but not limited to, strategies for choosing a career and review of application materials. This service
will be especially useful for trainees from smaller universities with limited access to career offices and resources.
Outcomes:
1. Obtain professional one-on-one mentorship catered toward pursuing a career in science.
2. Gain insight into the career options available in the life sciences.
3. Learn individualized strategies to search and apply for job opportunities in your career of choice.
4. Gain critical advice on improving resumes, CVs, and application materials.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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Career Options for Cell Biologists
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Joel Tolson, Graduate Student Career Advisor, University of California, San Diego
This session will provide an overview of the variety of career options available to cell biologists. While PhDs are earned in an
academic setting, many scientists will eventually transition outside of academia. However, graduate students and postdocs often
are not exposed to the variety of career opportunities available to them. This session will cover the variety of careers available,
helping attendees to choose which focused career panels they want to attend later during the meeting.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about career options available to cell biologists across a variety of sectors.
2. Understand how to begin strategically planning your career path.
3. Develop informed questions for panels during the remainder of the meeting.
Target audience: undergraduates and graduate students
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The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Understanding the NIH Grant Review Process
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Joe Gindhart, Chief, Developmental and Cellular Processes Branch, Division of Genetics and Molecular, Cellular, and
Developmental Biology, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH
Obtaining an NIH grant is one of the fundamental and most sought after mechanisms for ensuring funding to conduct biomedical
research. This session will discuss strategies for applying for NIH funding, including the different institutions, mechanisms of how
grants are evaluated and scored, and the decisions on funding levels.
SUNDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn which NIH Institute you should submit your grant to.
2. Understand the role of the program officer, scientific review officer, and grant management specialists.
3. Understand how a study section will review your grant and how to interpret the score.
4. Learn strategies for effective grant writing.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, and junior faculty members
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
9:30-10:30 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Using 3D organoid culture to assess disease aggressiveness in genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer
Presenter: Kristine M Wadosky, PhD
Level: Intermediate
Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) patients who are resistant to targeted therapy can develop aggressive variants with neuroendocrine
features. Our laboratory has published a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) that lacks Rb1 tumor suppressor and
recapitulates this clinical course. Ezh2 histone methyltransferase is overexpressed in Rb1-deficient PCa and we made a new PCa
GEMM that lacks Rb1 and Ezh2. Loss of Ezh2 increases PCa aggressiveness—unexpected since Ezh2 has been shown to be an
oncogene. However, loss of one allele of Ezh2 appears to increase survival in Rb1-deficient PCa. These data indicate that Ezh2’s effect
on PCa aggressiveness is dose-dependent. We have established PCa organoids from our original Rb1-deficient GEMM and those that
lack one or both alleles of Ezh2. Using organoid imaging techniques, we are further investigating the differences in aggressiveness
between our Rb1- and Ezh2-deficient PCa GEMMs. We are also using methods from neural cell culture to assess neuroendocrine
characteristics of these PCa organoids and how Ezh2 expression affects these features. Finally, 3D organoid culture is allowing us
to investigate molecular mechanisms driving PCa aggressiveness in the context of Ezh2 loss—a far less work-intensive approach
than mouse genetics. This research can model the methods necessary to establish a 3D organoid culture system to simulate the
tumor characteristics of GEMMs for any cancer type.
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Morning Refreshment Break
9:30-11:00 am
Join us for complimentary coffee and tea while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Learning Center
51
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Symposium 2: Cell Migration
9:45-10:45 am
Ballroom 20BC
Chair: Alexander Dunn, Stanford University
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9:45 am
S4
10:15 am
S5
Imaging leukocyte dynamics in vivo. A. Huttenlocher1,2; 1Medical Microbiology and Immunology,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 2Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison,
Madison, WI
Principles of leukocyte locomotion and navigation. M. Sixt1; 1Institute of Science and Technology
Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria
Symposium 3: Neuronal Cell Biology
9:45-10:45 am
Ballroom 20A
Chair: George Langford, Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences
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9:45 am
S6
10:15 am
S7
Dynamics of autophagy in neuronal homeostasis and neurodegeneration. E.L. Holzbaur1;
Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia,
PA
Disturbance of Phase Transitions in Neurological Disease. J. Taylor1; 1Cell and Molecular Biology,
Howard Hughes Medical Institute/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital , Memphis, TN
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EMBO Lab Leadership: Roles, Values, and Expectations
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 25C
Samuel Krahl, Project Coordinator, EMBO Lab Management, Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Lebenswissenschaften Heidelberg
GmbH
What is good leadership and why is it important for your lab? Explore your own leadership role and sub-roles and identify your
current strengths and areas where you need to develop. In addition, see how the interaction of your own expectations and those
of other people on you influence your leadership. Shared values help us work effectively together, so where do values come from?
How can you establish values for your lab?
We encourage participants to attend all three sessions in this series (the other two are on Monday and Tuesday) because they are
interrelated and build on each other.
Outcomes:
1. Learn the foundations of good leadership and how leadership and management are different but complementary types
of work.
2. Learn to identify your current roles and sub-roles and look for areas of strength and possible derailers to success.
3. Learn how to establish values in the lab environment and how to identify and talk about those values.
Target audience: group leaders (PIs), senior postdocs with responsibility for lab supervision or who are about to set up their
own lab
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First Timer? Making the Most of the Annual Meeting
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Natalie Lundsteen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Assistant Dean for Career and Professional Development,
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Michael Matrone, PhD, Postdoctoral Affairs Officer, Oregon Health & Science University
COMPASS Officers
Outcomes:
1. Practice introductions and build communication skills
2. Learn about events and opportunities during the meeting
3. Meet other first-time conference attendees
4. Learn networking strategies
Target audience: first-time attendees
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Foundational Cell Biology Workshop: Using Primary Literature to Teach Biology
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 32B
Supported by CBE—Life Sciences Education
Molly Bolger, Associate Professor, University of Arizona
Melissa McCartney, Assistant Professor, Florida International University
Ella Tour, Associate Teaching Professor, University of California, San Diego
Primary literature offers rich opportunities for students to learn the process of science, understand experimental design, and
analyze data. This workshop focuses on approaches and resources for using primary literature in all levels of undergraduate biology
courses. An expert panel will present their experience in developing and implementing approaches using primary literature in the
classroom, such as Science in the Classroom (SitC) and Teaching Real Data Interpretation with Models (TRIM). Participants will then
spend a majority of the time developing student learning objectives for using primary literature in a current or future course and
exploring how to achieve those objectives using the approaches and resources presented. Participants are encouraged to bring
a journal article they use or are considering using for a course.
Outcomes:
1. Articulate the benefits of using primary literature in the classroom to emphasize real science and build scientific literacy.
2. Compare and contrast approaches for using primary literature across varying course levels, size, and structures.
3. Develop a lesson plan and learning objectives focused on using primary literature in a course.
4. Identify challenges students face when approaching primary literature and resources available to help overcome these
challenges.
Target audience: all attendees
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SUNDAY
You made it to San Diego! Join us to create your meeting strategy, learning how to maximize your time and seize opportunities.
Over the next few days, you will build science knowledge, but you can also grow your network of contacts, learn about potential
career fields, and start conversations that could lead to a fantastic research collaboration or career development opportunity. In
this session, we will discuss taking advantage of meeting situations and interactions, including making a great impression, what
to ask employers and industry reps, practice delivering introductions, and planning for follow-up communication. Members of
the ASCB Committee for Postdocs and Students (COMPASS) will describe meeting events/opportunities to meet other students/
postdocs and network. You will connect with other first-time conference attendees and build your network just by attending this
session! Please bring questions, a positive attitude, business cards (if you have them*), as well as something for note-taking.
*If you need basic business cards, check out VistaPrint online or visit a Staples or OfficeMax for card-printing in the $10 range.
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Green Cards for Scientific Researchers: How to Win Your EB-1A/NIW Case
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Brian Getson, U.S. Immigration Lawyer
Brian Getson is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School with 20 years of experience. He is a leading U.S. immigration
lawyer who represents scientific researchers in applying for green cards and is the principal of a boutique immigration law firm
based in Philadelphia. Mr. Getson has given presentations on “Green Cards for Scientific Researchers” at numerous major scientific
conferences, the Wistar Institute, and at universities. Mr. Getson often provides a money back guarantee to qualified applicants,
giving clients confidence that they will get results. See his website, researchergreencard.com, for more information.
Outcomes:
This session will help foreign scientists learn how to win a green card in the USA through the EB-1A and NIW categories and how
to avoid costly immigration mistakes.
Target audience: international researchers
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D super-resolution light sheet and single molecule imaging and tracking
Presenter: Anurag Agrawal, PhD
Level: Introductory
Conventional 3D-light microscopy has allowed for keen insights into biological questions, but it is often limited in spatial resolution,
imaging depth, or speed. Here, we introduce Double Helix Light Engineering™, which offers a library of engineered point-spread
functions (PSFs) for a variety of extended depth 3D imaging applications. Our SPINDLE® optical module, along with this library of
phase masks, is designed to seamlessly integrate with existing microscope platforms. This module currently enables nanometerscale extended depth single molecule imaging and 4D particle tracking, and is compatible with illumination techniques including
HiLo, TIRF, and Light Sheet. Further live cell imaging modalities are being developed, with the aim to extend imaging depths while
reducing sample photo damage. Our 3DTRAX™ analytics software—designed as an easy to use ImageJ/Fiji plugin—has been
optimized to provide detailed 3D structure and tracking information. This integrated platform is able to achieve average localization
precision values below 20 nm laterally and below 25 nm axially with a 3-5x extension in depth range. We show 3D super-resolution
reconstructions of subcellular structures, including actin, tubulin, stress granule cores and viral replication centers. In addition
to these applications, we show how Double Helix Light Engineering can be used for extremely high-depth molecule and particle
tracking with 7-10 times the depth of conventional methods.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cells-to-CT™: A fast way to kill your cells for gene expression analysis
Presenter: Laura Chapman
Level: Introductory
You’ve taken painstaking measures to care for your cells, to keep them healthy and thriving. But now it’s time to crack them open
and see what’s going on inside! Cultured cells are a powerful tool for in vitro analysis of gene expression. Researchers use cells to
screen gene modulation technologies or small molecule effects on gene expression and phenotypes. Cells are an excellent tool for
screening and often lead to large experiments with many plates. Thus, a quick and easy solution is preferred, while maintaining
sample integrity. At Thermo Fisher Scientific, we have a solution specifically for this: the Cells-to-CT™ product line. Cells-to-CT™ is
very fast RNA preparation, 7 minutes, and user friendly, with only 2 pipetting steps done in the culture plate at room temperature.
This “direct lysis” overcomes RNA loss by skipping the “purification,” and improves sensitivity with optimized reagents for lysis,
RT and qPCR. The lysates go directly into qRT-PCR, providing gene expression data in 40 minutes for 1-Step or 90 minutes for
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The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
2-Step. In this Tech Talk, we will review gene expression applications for Cells-to-CT™ samples: siRNA transfection, single cell
ESC differentiation, and targeted RNA Sequencing with AmpliSeq™ by NGS. The Cells-to-CT™ kits offer flexibility for low or high
throughput sample preparation and are highly amenable to liquid handlers. Save your time and get your answers quicker, without
diminishing your sample integrity with Cells-to-CT™.
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E.E. Just Award Lecture: Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 31B
SUNDAY
Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano, Hubert L. Olive Stringer Distinguished Chair in Oncology in Honor of Sue Gribble Stringer, Professor
and Chair, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
A1
Regulating wild type and mutant p53 and the consequences on tumor evolution. G. Lozano1;
1The University of MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
Presented by the ASCB Minorities Affairs Committee to memorialize early 20th-century biologist E.E. Just and to recognize
outstanding scientific achievement by an underrepresented minority scientist.
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Science Discussion Tables
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Roundtable Central Section 3, Learning Center
Take advantage of this special networking opportunity! Select your interest area and bring your questions to the ASCB Learning Center.
Table
Presenter
Topic
1����������������������Matthew Gibson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Developmental and Cell Biology
2����������������������Erin Goley
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bacterial Cell Biology
3����������������������Guangshuo Ou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cytoskeleton and Developmental Biology
4����������������������Michael Wangler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peroxisomes and Disease
5����������������������Aron Jaffe
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Epithelial Cell Fate Decisions/Discovery-Based Research in Industry
6����������������������J. Paul Taylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Phase Transitions in Biology
7����������������������Hans Clevers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Stem Cells Organoids
8����������������������Anne Spang
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cellular Sub-Compartmentalization
9����������������������Kerry Bloom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Modeling Biological Processes
10 ������������������Samara Reck-Peterson . . . . . . . . . . . Intracellular Transport
11 ������������������Xavier Trepat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanobiology
12��������������������Meng Wang
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lysosome Signaling, Aging Biology, Lipid Metabolism
13��������������������Shaeri Mukherjee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pathogens
14��������������������Martin Graef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Autophagy
15��������������������Radhika Subramanian . . . . . . . . . . . Cytoskeleton
16��������������������Jan Skotheim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cellular Signal Processing
17��������������������Iva Tolic
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mitotic Spindle, Microtubules, Motors
18��������������������Michael Sixt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cell Motility
19 ������������������Cherry Ignacio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bioinformatics
20��������������������Rachel Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ribosomes and Quality Control
21 ������������������Nihal Altan-Bonnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crossing Scientific Disciplines: Challenges and Benefits
22 ������������������Janet Iwasa
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Animating Cell Biology
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Microsymposium 1: Cell Cycle and Signaling
11:00 am-12:00 pm
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11:00 am
E1
11:10 am
E2
11:20 am
E3
11:30 am
E4
11:40 am
E5
11:50 am
E6
Room 28B
Moderator: Sam Dundon, Yale University
Cell-cycle dependent Golgi positioning. I. Kaverina1, K. Frye1, M. Fomicheva1, X. Zhu1, F. Renda2,
V. Magidson2, A. Khodjakov2; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville,
TN, 2Wadsworth Center, Albany, NY
Aurora kinases may control regeneration checkpoints in Stentor. A. Lin1, S. Reiff1, W.F. Marshall1;
1
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco,
CA
Freezing Time: visualizing cyanobacterial circadian clock complexes with cryo-electron
tomography. S. Golden1,2, V. Lam1, E. Villa1; 1Division of Biology, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Center
for Circadian Biology, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Investigating the role of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex in the differentiation of the
invasive phenotype. J.J. Smith1, D.Q. Matus1; 1Cell Biology and Biochemistry, SUNY at Stony Brook,
Stony Brook, NY
Individual mammalian kinetochores count attached microtubules in a switch-like, highly sensitive
manner to control cell cycle progression. J.A. Kuhn1, S. Dumont1,2,3; 1Tetrad Graduate Program,
University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2Cell and Tissue Biology, University of
California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of
California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Evolutionary adaptation to replication stress reveals plasticity in DNA metabolism. M. Fumasoni1,
A.W. Murray1; 1Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Microsymposium 2: Centrosome and Cilia Dynamics
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 28D
Moderators: Caitlyn Blake-Hedges, Florida State University; and Krishnakumar Vasudevan, Stanford University
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11:00 am
E7
11:10 am
E8
11:20 am
E9
11:30 am
E10
11:40 am
E11
11:50 am
E12
Now you see it, now you don’t: dynamics and mechanisms of primary cilia disassembly. M.
Mirvis1, K.A. Siemers1,2, W.J. Nelson1,2, T. Stearns2,3; 1Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, 2Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 3Genetics, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA
Super-resolution Detection of PI(4,5)P2 in the Ciliary Pocket: Toward Mechanisms of Pocket Form
and Function. G. Garcia1, J.F. Reiter1; 1Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Cell specific effects of cilia loss on drug-induced and motivated behaviors. J.C. McIntyre1, K.
Jasso1, J. Roberts1, B. Setlow2; 1Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Psychiatry,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Genetic and functional approaches highlight a novel ciliary complex implicated in Joubert
syndrome. J.C. Van De Weghe1, T.D. Rusterholz2, B. Latour3, A.E. Gomez1, R. Roepman3, R.
Bachmann-Gagescu2, D. Doherty1; 1Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2Institute
of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland, 3Department of Human
Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands
Molecular architecture of a cylindrical self-assembly at human centrosomes. L. Zhang1, J.I. Ahn1,
T. Kim1, Y. Chen1, R. Ghirlando2, K.S. Lee1, J. Park1; 1Metabolism, National Institutes of Health, NCI,
Bethesda, MD, 2Molecular Biology, National Institutes of Health, NIDDK, Bethesda, MD
A free-running oscillator times and executes centriole biogenesis. M.G. Aydogan1, T.L. Steinacker1,
A. Wainman1, L. Gartenmann1, S. Saurya1, M.A. Boemo1, J.W. Raff1; 1Sir William Dunn School of
Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Microsymposium 3: Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29B
Moderator: Ashley Rowland, University of Colorado, Boulder
E13
11:10 am
E14
11:20 am
E15
11:30 am
E16
11:40 am
E17
11:50 am
E18
Mitochondrial Stress Disassembles Nuclear Architecture through Proteolytic Activation PKCδ and
Lamin BI phosphorylation in Neuronal Cells: Implications for Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease.
A.G. Kanthasamy1, A. Charli1, J. Luo1, B. Palanisamy1, E. Malovic1, H. Jin1, V. Anantharam1, A.
Kanthasamy1; 1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
Phosphoinositide deficiency underlies enhanced neuronal excitability in NPC disease. O. Vivas1,
S.A. Tiscione1, J. Horvath1, R. Dixon1, S. Cologna2, D.S. Ory3, E.J. Dickson1; 1Department of
Physiology and Membrane Biology, University of California, Davis, CA, 2Department of Chemistry,
University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School
of Medicine , St. Louis, MO
Extracellular Tau Can Be Taken Up by Neurons And Microglia Involving M1 and M3 Receptors
With Opposite Effects: Normal Tau Promotes Growth of Neurites Whereas Pathological Leads
to Neurodegeneration. V. Morozova1,2, A.D. Alonso1,2, L. Cohen1; 1Biology and Center for
Developmental Neurosciences, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY, 2Biology, CUNY, The
Graduate Center, New York, NY
Activation of STAT3 by IL-6 confers drug resistance in Medulloblastoma. L. Sreenivasan1,2, H.
Wang3, S. Yap1,3, C. Liu1,2, P. Leclair2,3, C. Liu2,3; 1Experimental Medicine, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver, BC, 2Michael Cuccione Childhood Cancer Research Program, BC Children’s
Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, 3Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
UNC-16/JIP3 primes the axon for regeneration and supports regrowth after axotomy through
regulation of DLK-1 dependent and DLK-1 independent cytoskeletal dynamics. S.S. Kulkarni1, V.
Sabharwal2, S. Sheoran1, A. Basu3, K. Matsumoto4, N. Hisamoto4, A. Ghosh Roy3, S.P. Koushika2;
1
Neurobiology, NCBS-TIFR, Bangalore, India, 2Biological Sciences, DBS-TIFR, Mumbai, India, 3NBRC,
Gurgaon, India, 4Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
ALS-linked SOD1 Mutants Induce Enhanced Outgrowth, Branching, and Filopodia Formation in
Adult Motor Neurons. Z. Osking1, J.I. Ayers2, R. Hildebrandt3, K. Skruber1, H. Brown2, D. Ryu2, A.R.
Eukovich1, T.E. Golde2, D. Borchelt2, T.A. Read1, E.A. Vitriol1; 1Anatomy and Cell Biology, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Neuroscience, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 3Molecular
Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Microsymposium 4: Membrane Architecture and Structure
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29C
Moderators: Ashley Lakoduk, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas; and Matthew Akamatsu, University of
California, Berkeley
11:00 am
E19
11:10 am
E20
11:20 am
E21
11:30 am
E22
11:40 am
E23
Developmental regulation of an organelle tether coordinates mitochondrial remodeling in
meiosis. E.M. Sawyer1, P.R. Joshi1, L.E. Berchowitz2, E. Ünal1; 1Department of Molecular and
Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Department of Genetics and
Development, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
The functional architecture of the endocytic coat analyzed by FRET. M. Skruzny1,2, E. Pohl1,2, S.
Gnoth1,2, G. Malengo1,2, V. Sourjik1,2; 1Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg,
Germany, 2LOEWE Center for Synthetic Microbiology (SYNMIKRO), Marburg, Germany
Architecture of interfaces between lipid droplets revealed by electron cryo-tomography. I.
Ganeva1, K. Lim2, D. Savage2, W. Kukulski1; 1Cell Biology, MRC LMB, Cambridge, United Kingdom,
2
Institute of Metabolic Sciences, Cambridge, United Kingdom
AP-3 vesicle budding regulates Golgi structure in yeast. G. Odorizzi1, R.L. Plemel2, M. West1, A.J.
Merz2; 1Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO,
2
Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Structural and mechanistic bases of Drp1-cardiolipin interactions in mitochondrial fission. B.
Lu1, M. Mahajan1, A. Mandal2, N. Bharambe1, B. Kennedy1, P. van der Wel2, M. Buck1, X. Qi1,
R. Ramachandran1; 1Physiology & Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH,
2
Structural Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
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11:00 am
11:50 am
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E24
Regulation of mtDNA synthesis in human cells. S.C. Lewis1, L. Uchiyama1, M. Besprozvannaya1, Y.
Shi2, M. Falkenberg2, J. Nunnari1; 1Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis,
CA, 2Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Microsymposium 5: Polarity, Junctions, and Tissue Structure
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 30B
Moderators: Alyssa Lesko, University of Virginia School of Medicine; and Margherita Perillo, Brown University
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11:00 am
E25
11:10 am
E26
11:20 am
E27
11:30 am
E28
11:40 am
E29
11:50 am
E30
A surprising role for components of epithelial adherens junctions in promoting attachment
between neurons and glia. E.R. Cebul1,2, P.N. Perrat3, C.Y. Bénard3,4, M.G. Heiman1,2; 1Genetics,
Harvard University, Boston, MA, 2Genetics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, 3Neurobiology,
UMass Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4Biological Sciences, University of Quebec at Montreal,
Montreal, QC
Intracellular trafficking sets stratified Wingless concentration gradients in Drosophila wing
imaginal disc. C. Prabhakara1, T. Saunders2, S. Mayor1,3; 1National Centre for Biological Sciences,
Bangalore, India, 2Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore,
Singapore, 3Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, India
Molecular asymmetries establish tissue boundaries during Drosophila axis elongation. J.C. Yu1,2,
R. Fernandez-Gonzalez1,2,3,4; 1Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University
of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 2Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, University of Toronto, Toronto,
ON, 3Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 4Developmental and Stem Cell
Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON
Apical-basolateral polarity establishment in the C. elegans embryonic intestinal epithelium. M.
Pickett1, J.L. Feldman1; 1Biology, Stanford, Stanford, CA
Topological transitions of epithelial surfaces. K. Ishihara1,2,3, E. Gromberg4, M.N. Shahbazi5, M.
Zernicka-Goetz5, J. Brugués1,2,3, F. Julicher2,3, E.M. Tanaka4; 1Max Planck Institute of Molecular
Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany, 2Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex
Systems, Dresden, Germany, 3Center for Systems Biology Dresden, Dresden, Germany, 4Research
Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria, 5University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Interaction of Casein Kinase 1 delta/epsilon and Dishevelled within puncta in a novel cortical
domain at the vegetal pole specifies egg and embryo polarity in sea urchins. W. Wu1, L. Wang2,
L. Smith1, J.H. Henson3, A. Wikramanayake1; 1Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL,
2
Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Biology, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA
Microsymposium 6: Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 1
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 30C
Moderators: Courtney Schroeder, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; and Valerie Tutwiler, University of Pennsylvania
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11:00 am
E31
11:10 am
E32
11:20 am
E33
11:30 am
E34
Shaping actin cables at the yeast bud neck: a collaboration of septins, formins, and the F-BAR
protein Hof1. M. Garabedian1, O.S. Sokolova2, B.L. Goode1; 1Biology Dept., Brandeis University,
Waltham, MA, 2Bioengineering Dept., Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Retrograde flow-induced biased distribution of actin probes in live cells. S. Yamashiro1,2, D.
Taniguchi2, S. Tanaka2, T. Kiuchi2, D. Vavylonis3, N. Watanabe1,2; 1Graduate School of Biostudies,
Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, 2Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan,
3
Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA
Pointed- and barbed-end filament binding by Spire bridges networks of filaments in vitro. A.O.
Bradley1, C.L. Vizcarra2, M.E. Quinlan1; 1Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA,
2
Chemistry, Barnard College, New York, NY
Arp2/3 complex-dependent spatial organization of the BCR impacts immune synapse formation,
BCR signaling and B cell activation. M. Bolger-Munro1, K. Choi1, L. Abraham1,2, R. Chappell2,
J. Scurll2, D. Sheen1, M. Dang-Lawson 1, X. Wu3, D. Coombs2, J.A. Hammer III3, M.R. Gold1;
1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology , University of British Columbia , Vancouver,
BC, 2Department of Mathematics, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, BC, 3Cell Biology
and Physiology Center, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD
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11:40 am
E35
11:50 am
E36
Label-free tracking of immunological synapse kinetics using optical diffraction tomography. M.
Lee1,2, Y. Lee1, C. Kim3, Y. Park1,4; 1Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
(KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea, 2KAIST Institute for Health Science and Technology, Daejeon, South
Korea, 3Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon,
United States, 4TOMOCUBE Inc., Daejeon, South Korea
Superresolution microscopy reveals that PAR and Crumbs groups of proteins pattern the epithelial
tight junction region to organize its cytoskeleton. P. Mangeol1, D. Massey-Harroche1, P. Lenne1, A.
Le Bivic1; 1Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, IBDM, Marseille, France
Advocacy Toolbox I: The Two-Minute Speech
Room 25B
Kerry Bloom, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Holly Goodson, University of Notre Dame
Kathleen J. Green, Northwestern University
Rebecca Heald, University of California, Berkeley
Connie Lee, University of Chicago; Chair, ASCB Public Policy Committee
Dyche Mullins, University of California, San Francisco
Tom Pollard, Yale University
Sadie Wignall, Northwestern University
How do you explain your science to the new neighbors next door? What do you tell the chatty guy sitting next to you on the plane
about the research in your lab? As scientists, we all need to be better advocates for the importance of scientific research and the
funding for science, whenever and wherever we get the chance. Join us for this session to hone your advocacy skills and practice
your own two-minute speech with help from experienced science policy advocates. Participants will also have the opportunity to
use their new skills in the Elevator Speech Contest as well as the Advocacy Toolbox II session.
Outcomes:
1. Improved ability to explain research to government officials and the public.
2. Increased confidence in science advocacy.
3. Elevator Speech contest will encourage people to practice their scientific pitch.
4. Elevator Speech contest highlights good examples of scientific research.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, and others interested in improving science advocacy skills
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International Funding Session from APOCB, China, and FAPESP, the São Paulo Research Foundation, Brazil
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 33B
Marie Anne Van Sluys, Adjunct Advisor in Life Sciences, Cell Biology Research, São Paulo Research Foundation FAPESP
Zhengjun Chen, Scientific Meetings in China: Annual Meetings and Mountain Meetings
Yeguang Chen, Scientific Meetings in China: Annual Meetings and Mountain Meetings
Gregory Adams, Scientific Collaborations in China
Xing Liu, Scientific Collaborations in China
Yu Qin, Scientific Publications in China
Lei Cheng, Scientific Publications in China
As a forum to promote global collaboration in cell biology, this session will allow attendees to learn about research, training,
collaboration, and job opportunities in countries around the world; encourage students, postdocs and faculty members to think
about possibilities in other countries with diversified culture and settings; and open up exchanges between labs for international
collaboration.
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11:00 am-12:00 pm
Outcomes:
1. Facilitate the connection of attendees with various funding agencies and provide opportunities for face-to-face
communication.
2. Provide a synergistic and detailed discussion for planning a future ASCB/APOCB joint annual meeting.
3. Provide information on funding opportunities on international collaboration, job openings, postdoc fellowships, international
collaboration funds, and exchange student fellowships in China and Brazil.
Target audience: all attendees
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MD-PhD, Is it Right for Me?
11:00-11:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Paul Insel, University of California, San Diego
Neil Chi, University of California, San Diego
Mary Lewinski, University of California, San Diego
Andrea Dickey, University of California, San Diego
This session will demystify the physician scientist career and the application process to pursue an MD-PhD degree. It will be
presented by members of the MD-PhD GREAT Section of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The presentation focuses
on common features of MD-PhD training programs. Topics will include information on the careers of MD-PhDs, how students train
to become MD-PhD physician-scientists, how to apply to MD-PhD training programs, and credentials of competitive applicants.
The session includes time for Q&A, including advice from MD-PhD students attending the meeting.
Outcomes:
1. Learn how undergraduates and postbaccalaureates should prepare for MD-PhD training.
2. Gain an understanding of the application process and interviewing for MD-PhD training programs.
3. Learn about MD-PhD student training programs and what typical MD-PhD training programs and timelines are like.
4. Learn what types of students matriculate into MD-PhD programs, and what careers MD-PhD graduates pursue.
Target audience: undergraduates and postbaccalaureates and health career professionals and research advisors
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Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
12:00-1:30 pm
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Learning Center
Exhibitor Tech Talk
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bitplane -IMARIS
Analysis of 3D/4D Microscopy Images in Cell Biology – Imaris innovations advance the processing and analysis of complex
datasets with a comprehensive and batchable environment
Presenter: Meredith Price, Product Manager, Imaris
Level: Intermediate
Recent releases of Imaris improved the performance when counting, tracking, and measuring morphological features of cells and
other objects within large microscopy images. This Tech Talk will highlight 1) those Imaris innovations, 2) the newest Imaris family
member, Imaris Stitcher, which aligns and stitches tiled images, and 3) the advances to be released in Imaris 9.3. Imaris 9.3 will
provide a workflow for users who require automated image processing and analysis of their datasets within one comprehensive
software environment. The features introduced in the new version are relevant to users segmenting cells, tissues, organs; tracking
cells or organelles; or to those who are analyzing the relationship of one population of biological objects to another. We will illustrate
Imaris’ unique, user-friendly tools for preparing a workflow complete with the comparison of results across groups of images.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Celldiscoverer 7 and 3D-Cell Culture - High Resolution meets Screening; Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with twodimensional illumination patterns
Presenters: Dr. René Buschow and Dr. Rainer Heintzmann
Level: Intermediate
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Data Driven Approaches to Improving Teaching and Mentoring
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Kimberly Tanner, Professor, San Francisco State University
Erin Dolan, Professor, University of Georgia
Alison Crowe, Principal Lecturer, University of Washington
Alexandra Schnoes, Associate Director, Career and Professional Development, iBiology
Teachers and mentors exist along the full spectrum of academic career stages: Not only do PIs have teaching and mentoring
responsibilities, but even postdocs and students are frequently required to mentor other trainees or teach undergraduates. A
number of studies discuss how teaching and mentoring strategies can be improved, including research published in ASCB’s CBE—
Life Sciences Education journal, yet often people are unaware of the data on how to be the best teacher/mentor you can be. This
session will be a panel discussion focused on how published data can be used to improve your teaching or mentoring styles.
Outcomes:
1. Learn where to find data that will suggest optimal strategies for curriculum development and teaching styles. 2. Learn where to find studies that discuss how to be the best mentor.
3. Learn key strategies for being a successful teacher and mentor.
4. Learn how teachers and mentors can experiment to develop their best teaching/mentoring styles.
Target audience: all attendees
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Please join ZEISS for three informative talks discussing relevant topics from leaders in microscopy and cell biology. From 12:0012:30 Dr. René Buschow will discuss using the imaging and analysis pipeline he and his team have developed to image 3D cell
cultures using the ZEISS Celldiscoverer 7 automated imaging platform. From 12:30-1:00 pm Dr. Rainer Heintzmann will discuss
theoretical and experimental results obtained from imaging live cells with two-dimensional structured illumination patterns. In
our other Tech Talk from 1:00-1:30 Dr. Eric Betzig will discuss results obtained with a newly developed gentle, high speed, high
resolution imaging technique called grazing incidence structured illumination (GI-SIM). For more detailed information, please visit
www.zeiss.com/microscopy/ascb
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Navigating the Faculty Job Search at an R1 Institute
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Jim Wilhelm, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego
Kassandra Ori-McKenney, Assistant Professor, University of California, Davis
Naiara Akizu, Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Many trainees do not receive the proper training required for navigating the faculty job search. This panel will discuss the process
behind the faculty job search, specifically at an R1 institution. We will discuss what can be expected during this type of job search
and what sort of strategies have proved effective in obtaining the optimal faculty position for one’s research program.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about application components and strategies of successful trainees who have obtained interviews for faculty positions.
2. Learn what is expected for an interview for a faculty position, including a presentation, chalk talk, or skype interview.
3. Learn what faculty search committees primarily look for when evaluating job candidates.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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Minorities Affairs Committee Awards Reception (by invitation only)
12:15-1:00 pm
Roundtable Central Section 3, Learning Center
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
The ASCB Minorities Affairs Committee (MAC) provides travel awards to underrepresented graduate and undergraduate students,
postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty from minority serving institutions to attend the ASCB|EMBO Meeting. Each undergraduate,
graduate, and postdoctoral travel awardee presents at a judged poster session. The Awards Reception is an opportunity to showcase
the travel awardees judged to be of the highest caliber. Prize winners give short oral presentations summarizing their work, and
the reception offers an opportunity for networking among travel awardees, their faculty mentors, and MAC committee members.
Outcomes:
Participants in the MAC Awards Reception are expected to:
1. Communicate their laboratory findings with a diverse group of peers and more senior cell biologists from around the world.
2. Demonstrate the ability to ask and respond to questions about their research.
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Career Discussion and Mentoring Roundtables
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Roundtable Central Sections 1-2, Learning Center
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
(No preregistration required; first-come, first served)
Attending these roundtables can help attendees overcome the intimidating aspects of the large meeting, and may be helpful to
young cell biologists who are looking for mentors. Past attendees say that meeting others with common interests and concerns at
this event enriched their initial contacts and provided positive feedback and excellent advice regarding a career issue of concern
to them.
Table Topics
Career Options
Career Choices: Academia vs. Industry
Career Opportunities in Cell Biology at NASA
Careers in Biology Education
Careers in Computational Biology & Bioinformatics
Careers in Core Facilities
Careers in Government Lab Research
Careers in Government Research Support
Careers in Patent Law & Intellectual Property
Careers in Science Policy
Careers in Scientific Writing & Editing
Careers in the Biotech & Pharmaceutical Industries
Non Tenure-track Careers in Academia
Career Preparation
Applying for a Faculty Position at a Primarily Undergraduate
Institution
Career Transitions from Academia into Industry
Career Transitions from Faculty to Administrative
Funding Opportunities for Postdocs
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Funding Options for Academic Research
Funding Options for Research at Primarily Undergraduate
Institutions
Setting Up and Managing Your First Lab
What Does Teaching, Research, and Service Look Like at a
Primarily Undergraduate Institution?
Essential Career Skills, Resources, and Support
Improving Your Lab Management Skills
Interviewing & Negotiation Skills
Improving Your Teaching Practice through a Teaching
Mentoring Program
Integrating Research into Undergraduate Courses
Strategies for Conflict Resolution
Teaching Tools & Strategies
Thriving as a Faculty Member at a Minority Serving Institution
Unique Demands on Minority Graduate Students
Women in Science
Work/Life Balance
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SUNDAY
Meet informally for discussions on issues of importance to cell biologists in various career stag-es. Conversations are moderated by
individuals with experience in various professional areas or with particular issues. The session is an excellent way to disseminate
practical information on career choices, discuss strategies for effectively developing a career, and network with others who share
career interests and concerns.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Unbiased Functional Identification & Therapeutic Targeting of Tumor Neoantigens and Exploiting a Novel Cell Death
Mechanism for Selective Killing of Cancer Cells Upregulating Homologous Recombination
Presenters: Dr. Stephen Schoenberger, La Jolla Institute, and Dr. Maria Soloveychik, SyntheX
Level: Intermediate
Tumor-specific mutations that are recognized by an individual patient’s T cells are called neoantigens, and can form the basis
for personalized cancer immunotherapy. Neoantigens can now be readily identified through genomic sequencing and immune
responses to them can be generated through vaccination and measured at the level of single cells. Thus, all the tools needed
to evaluate and optimize personalized immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer treatment are in place. At SyntheX, we have
developed ToRPPIDO, a plug-and-play drug discovery platform for the identification of short peptide sequences and macrocycles
that are capable of disrupting or bridging intracellular protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of interest in a cell-based system.
Homology-directed DNA repair (HDR) plays a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability in cancer cells and is typically induced
by oncogenes such as Myc, CycE, and KRas. In accordance, overexpression of HDR pathway components correlates with poor
prognosis and chemo-resistance in most tumors, including currently untreatable pancreatic and biliary tract cancers. Application
of our screening platform, ToRPPIDO, toward a crucial PPI within the HDR pathway led to the discovery of STX100. Subsequent
derivatives of STX100 that are cell penetrant and proteolytically stable were tested using an xCELLigence instrument for selective
activity against various cancer cell lines that overexpress HDR.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Visualizing intracellular organelle and cytoskeletal interactions at nanoscale resolution on millisecond time scales
Presenter: Dr. Eric Betzig
Level: Intermediate
Please join ZEISS for three informative talks discussing relevant topics from leaders in microscopy and cell biology. From 12:00-12:30
Dr. René Buschow will discuss using the imaging and analysis pipeline he and his team have developed to image 3D cell cultures
using the ZEISS Celldiscoverer 7 automated imaging platform. From 12:30-1:00 Dr. Rainer Heintzmann will discuss theoretical
and experimental results obtained from imaging live cells with two-dimensional structured illumination patterns. Finally, in this
Tech Talk from 1:00-1:30 Dr. Eric Betzig will discuss results obtained with a newly developed gentle, high speed, high resolution
imaging technique called grazing incidence structured illumination (GI-SIM). The final 15 minutes will be Q&A. For more detailed
information, please visit www.zeiss.com/microscopy/ascb
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In-Booth Presentation
1:00-1:30pm
Booth 1019, Learning Center
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless and maskless photopatterning system
Presenters: Grégoire Peyret, PhD, and Hélène Delobel
To more efficiently study living cells and model diseases, researchers are challenged with mimicking the cell microenvironment in
vitro. We will show how PRIMO photopatterning technology allows researchers to fine-tune cell culture substrates’ topography
through microfabrication and biochemistry through protein micropatterning (compatible with all substrates: soft or stiff, flat or
microstructured).
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Meet the Committees
1:15-1:45 pm
ASCB Booth 623, Learning Center
Members from the International Affairs, Public Information, Public Policy, and Membership Committees, and the LGBTQ+ Task
Force will be on hand to answer any questions you have.
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Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
1:30-3:00 pm
Afternoon Refreshment Break
1:30-3:30 pm
Join us for a beverage and snack while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
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Learning Center
Meet the Editor of CBE—Life Sciences Education
1:45-2:30 pm
ASCB Booth 623, Learning Center
Erin Dolan, University of Georgia, Editor-in-Chief
Stop by for an informal discussion about the journal with Editor-in-Chief Erin Dolan.
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Faculty Research and Education Development (FRED) Mentoring Program Mock Grant Review Panel
Session (by invitation only)
2:00-6:00 pm
Room 24C
This invitation-only session will assist current FRED Program mentees in gaining a better understanding of the grant review process.
The FRED Program is targeted toward junior faculty and senior postdoctoral fellows who are either from underrepresented groups
or are employed at colleges/universities that demonstrate a commitment to serving underrepresented minorities. The 2018-2019
FRED Program mentors and mentees and FRED alumni will review draft proposals and provide feedback for the FRED Program
mentees with the aim of improving their future grant submissions.
Outcomes:
1. Improve grant proposal writing/editing skills.
2. Increase knowledge of grant review process at the NSF and the NIH.
Target audience: junior faculty members and senior postdoctoral fellows and their FRED mentors in the 2018-2019 FRED
Program cohort as well as former FRED Program mentees and mentors
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Learning Center
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How to Review a Paper
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
David Drubin, Professor, University of California, Berkeley, and Editor-in-Chief, Molecular Biology of the Cell
The peer review process is a vital component of communicating scientific data; it is designed to critically assess the quality, validity,
and originality of a manuscript for publication and helps maintain the integrity of science. Learning how to constructively review
a paper is an important step in one’s academic career, as peer review activity is commonly used as a criterion for demonstrating
standing, engagement, and contribution in the academic community. The goal of this session is to introduce attendees to the peer
review process and provide them with a knowledge base that will assist them in becoming valued reviewers.
Outcomes:
1. Understand the peer review process and the role of peer review within academia.
2. Learn how to critically assess a manuscript and formulate a clear, concise, and constructive review.
3. Know how to manage potential biases, conflicts of interest, and scientific misconduct.
4. Receive information about how to become a peer reviewer and the requirements of the role.
Target audience: undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs
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Research Careers in Biotechnology
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Ryan Taft, Senior Director of Scientific Research, Illumina
Milos Lazic, Scientist, Jecure Therapeutics
Mary Matyskiela, Senior Scientist, Celgene
This session will be a panel discussion focused on careers at the bench in biotech. Pursuing a career outside academia is quickly
becoming the norm for students and postdoctoral scientists alike. Bench-based industry positions are desirable positions for
transitioning academic scientists who enjoy laboratory work, with the majority of industrial postings offering better pay, career
progression, and working conditions compared with academic counterparts. The goal of this session is to expose trainees to different
industry career paths and provide them with knowledge on how to successfully pursue an industrial position.
Outcomes
1. Learn the daily responsibilities for a variety of scientific research careers in industry.
2. Understand the differences between academic and industrial research.
3. Gain critical insight into how to prepare and apply for a career in industry with an academic background.
4. Network with successful scientists in industry, a number of whom have made the transition from academia.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, and anyone looking to transition careers
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Andor Technology
Dragonfly: Subcellular SRRF-Stream Super-resolution to Big Specimen Imaging with Imaris Stitcher
Presenter: Geraint Wilde, PhD, Product Manager, Andor
Level: Intermediate
Keywords: Confocal, TIRF, live cell, Developmental models, organoids, cleared tissue, 3D cultures. The Andor Dragonfly high-speed
confocal has developed significantly in the last year. We have increased the number of imaging applications, and broadened the
66
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
sample range that can be addressed with our confocal solution. This presentation will: 1) Introduce a new model of Dragonfly that
can be used for applications that fit better with upright microscopes, e.g., deep imaging of cleared specimens, or use of dipping
objectives; 2) Demonstrate the power of the newly embedded SRRF-Stream super-resolution technique perfect for live cell imaging
(e.g., mitochondria, cytoskeleton) or fast SR imaging of fixed samples; 3) Demonstrate the ability to capture and stitch large 3D
data at high-speed for large sample imaging. Come and see the high-speed, high-productivity, workflow Dragonfly offers from
subcellular to whole specimen imaging. We can improve your time to publish by at least a factor of 10!
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
SUNDAY
Labviva
A New and Unique Approach for Relevant Scientific Information
Presenter: Siamak Baharloo, PhD
Level: Introductory
One of the time-consuming activities in any research laboratory is the literature search for identification of the most appropriate
reagents and instruments that will allow researchers to faithfully conduct their experimentation. Here we will introduce a
methodology based on Natural Language Understanding (NLU) to organize, summarize, and understand large pools of scientific
literature, protocols, and data sets with the aim of identifying research reagents that specifically meet the criteria defined by the
researchers. Through the utilization of controlled ontologies, sentiment analysis, mined banks of terms/synonyms, and neural
networks, chains of decision making can be structured that enable the technique, purpose, and outcome of a product to be
determined in large batches of published material and then summarized for the researcher. Advancements in highly-scalable
cloud infrastructure enable these techniques to be utilized more frequently for larger data sets, dramatically increasing the value
of these techniques for the modern lab as queries against the output of these activities can be made in real-time, enabling its use
in mobile devices embedded within the processes in the laboratory.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
ALVEOLE
Fine-tuning the mechanical and biochemical properties of in vitro microenvironments with a versatile and contactless
photopatterning technology: PRIMO
Presenters: Pierre-Olivier Strale, PhD, Alveole, Laurent Blanchoin, PhD, CytoMorpho Lab, CEA grenoble, CNRS
Level: Intermediate
In vivo, the cellular microenvironment has a crucial impact on the regulation of cell behavior and functions such as cellular
differentiation, proliferation, and migration. One of the challenges confronting cell biologists is to mimic this microenvironment in
vitro to more efficiently study living cells and model diseases. Here we present PRIMO®: a versatile, contactless, and maskless UV
projection system, which allows researchers to engineer custom in vitro microenvironments and fine-tune their topography and
biochemistry in a highly flexible and reproducible manner. We will first show that the projected UV light can be used to structure
cell culture substrates via photopolymerization of: a) photosensitive resists to create molds onto which elastomeric solutions
can be polymerized (microfabrication), b) and of the most commonly used hydrogels (microstructuration). Then we will show
that PRIMO® is a suitable tool to print biomolecules on all cell culture substrates (including glass, plastic, soft or stiff substrates,
textured surfaces, etc.) with an exquisite control over protein densities (micropatterning). Some of our users will then share their
research conducted with PRIMO, in cell biology and microfluidics, from sub-cellular to cell population levels: reconstitution of the
cytoskeleton with purified proteins, focal adhesions, cytoskeleton organization, force measurement, single cell confinement in 3D,
cell migration, tissue engineering, spheroid formation, etc.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
67
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Super Resolution Confocal Scanner Unit CSU-W1 Sora
Presenters: Takuya Azuma: Chief designer of CSU-W1 Sora, Yoshitaka Sekizawa: Product manager of CSU-W1 Sora
Level: Intermediate
Yokogawa will introduce our brand-new product “CSU-W1 SoRa.” This is a spinning disk based super resolution confocal scanner unit.
In this talk, we will introduce features and principles of this product and we will show beautiful image samples taken by “CSU-W1
SoRa”. Features of “CSU-W1 SoRa”: 1) XY resolution of approx. 120nm. XY resolution has been improved by approximately 1.4x
the optical limit based on spinning-disk confocal technology. Furthermore, a final resolution approximately twice the optical limit
is realized through deconvolution. 2) Ideal for super-resolution live cell imaging. Just like the CSU, high-speed real time imaging
can be performed with super-resolution. In addition, live cell imaging is possible, reducing bleaching and phototoxicity. 3) The CSU
is easy to use. Super-resolution images can be observed in real time without any specific preparation of sample. Deep position
observation is made possible through optical sectioning based on confocal technology. 4) Upgradable from CSU-W1. If you already
have CSU-W1, you can add SoRa disk.
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Keith R. Porter Lecture: Ruth Lehmann
3:15-4:00 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Ruth Lehmann, Chair, Department of Cell Biology; Director, Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine; Laura and Isaac
Perlmutter Professor of Cell Biology, Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; and
HHMI Investigator
A2
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Germ Cells are Forever.R. Lehmann1; 1Skirball Institute and Department of Cell Biology, HHMI and
NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY
Subgroup U: The Cell and Physics: 2018 and Beyond
4:15-6:50 pm
Ballroom 20A
Organizers: Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Thoru Pederson,
University of Massachusetts Medical School
The rapidly growing interface between cell biology and the quantitative approaches of physics is providing remarkable new insights
into cellular components and their dynamic relationships. This session has been designed to highlight path-breaking examples of
this fruitful partnership, presented by representatives from both the cell biology and physics communities.
Presentations:
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
4:45 pm
68
Cells as Physics and Physics as Cells: The Epistemological Wheel Turns. Thoru Pederson, University
of Massachusetts Medical School
Figure 1 Theory Meets Figure 2 Experiments in Cell Biology. Rob Phillips, California Institute of
Technology
Emergent Mechanics of Living Matter: How Do Cells Build Organisms? Manu Prakash, Stanford
University
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
The Physics of Self-Assembling Biological Materials. Dyche Mullins, University of California, San
Francisco
Cytosol Patterning by RNA Based Liquid-Like Droplets. Amy Gladfelter, University of North
Carolina
Physics of the Membrane Actin Interface. Patricia Bassereau, Marie Curie Institute
Focused Ion Beam-Scanning EM: A Physics Door to Ultrastructure. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz,
Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Wrapup
5:10 pm
5:35 pm
6:00 pm
6:25 pm
6:50 pm
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Minisymposium 1: Biology of Stem Cells
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
M1
4:35 pm
M2
4:50 pm
M3
5:05 pm
M4
5:20 pm
M5
5:35 pm
M6
5:50 pm
M7
6:05 pm
M8
6:20 pm
M9
6:35 pm
M10
Introduction
Creating a stem cell state map of hiPSCs from pluripotency through cardiomyocyte differentiation.
R. Gunawardane1; 1Allen Institute for Cell Science, Seattle, WA
A mechanism for Wnt-Fzd specificity in hematopoietic development. S. Grainger1, N. Nguyen1,
J. Richter1, J. Setayesh1, B. Lonquich1, C. Oon1, J.M. Wozniak2, R. Barahona1, C.N. Camei3, I.A.
Drummond3,4, D. Gonzalez2, K. Willert1, D. Traver1; 1Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University
of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Department of Pharmacology, University of California San
Diego, La Jolla, CA, 3Nephrology, Massachusetts General Hospital , Charlestown, MA, 4Genetics,
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Beyond Goosebumps: Interactions between the hair follicle, the arrector pili muscle, and the
sympathetic nerve during development and hair follicle regeneration. Y. Shwartz1, M. Gonzalez
Celeiro1, J. Chen2, S. Lin2, Y. Hsu1; 1Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University,
Cambridge, MA, 2Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
JNK-mediated spindle reorientation in stem cells promotes loss of tissue homeostasis in the
aging intestinal epithelium. D.J. Hu1, H. Jasper1,2; 1Immunology Discovery, Genentech, South San
Francisco, CA, 2Buck Institute of Research for Aging, Novato, CA
Pannexin 1 regulates skeletal muscle regeneration by promoting bleb-based myoblast migration
and fusion through a novel lipid based signaling mechanism. T. Zyrianova1, T. Zyrianova2, H.
Collins-Hooper3, A. Gromova1, R. Meech4, A. Sacco5, P.R. Dash3, R. Mitchell3, V. Shestopalov6,
T.E. Woolley7, K. Patel3, H.P. Makarenkova1; 1Molecular Medicine, The Scripps Research
Institution, La Jolla, CA, 2BioScience Center, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, 3School of
Biological Sciences, University of Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom, 4Department of Clinical
Pharmacology, Flinders University, South Australia, Australia, 5Sanford Children’s Health Research
Center, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, 6Bascom Palmer Eye Institute,
University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 7Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford,
Oxford, United Kingdom
Signaling dynamics control cell fate in the early Drosophila embryo. H.E. Johnson1, S.Y.
Shvartsman2,3, J.E. Toettcher1; 1Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 2Chemical
Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 3Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics,
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
The SCRIB paralog Lano/LRRC1 regulates breast cancer stem cell fate through WNT/b-catenin
signaling. M. Sebbagh1, L. Lopez-Almeida1, F. Bertucci1, P. Finetti1, J. Wicinski1, S. Marchetto1, R.
Castellano1, E. Josselin1, E. Charafe-JauffretT1, C. Ginestier1, J. Borg1, M. Santoni1; 1Institut PaoliCalmettes, CRCM INSERM_CNRS_Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France
Regulation of 4D nucleome during cell fate transition. K. Shevade1, R. Bajpai1, J.A. Bernstein2;
1
CCMB and Biochemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2Pediatrics, Stanford
University, Palo Alto, CA
C. elegans DYNLL1/2 Ortholog Associates with RNP Complexes to Promote Germline mRNA
Regulation. N. Day1, M. Ellenbecker1, E. Voronina1; 1Division of Biological Sciences, University of
Montana, Missoula, MT
Arp2/3 Complex Activity Times Stage Transition for Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation. F.M.
Aloisio1, D.L. Barber1; 1Department of Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco,
San Francisco, CA
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
69
SUNDAY
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 29C
Co-Chairs: David Traver, University of California, San Diego; and Ruwanthi Gunawardane, Allen Institute for Cell Science
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Minisymposium 2: Cell Adhesion Motility and Mechanics
4:15-6:50 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Co-Chairs: Elizabeth Chen, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center; and Xavier Trepat, IBEC Barcelona
4:15 pm
*4:20 pm
70
Session Introduction
Mechanical Tension Drives Cell Membrane Fusion. E.H. Chen1; 1Molecular Biology, UT
Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
**4:35 pm
M12
Energetic coordination of cooperative leader-follower dynamics during collective invasion of
cancer cells. J. Zhang1, F. Bordeleau1, C. Reinhart-King1,2; 1Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University,
Ithaca, NY
4:50 pm
M13
Mechanical control of cell division and polyploidy. M. Uroz1, A. Garcia-Puig2, I. Tekeli2,
A. Elosegui-Artola1, P. Roca-Cusachs1, L. Albertazzi1, A. Raya2, X. Trepat1,3; 1Institute for
Bioengineering of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain, 2Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona,
Barcelona, Spain, 3Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona, Spain
5:05 pm
M14
Paxillin and tensin1 contribute to focal adhesion disassembly at mitosis to relieve an integrininactivation G2-M checkpoint. H.R. Thiam1, A.M. Pasapera-Limon1, E.K. Degaga2, J.S. Urbach2,
C.M. Waterman1; 1Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute,
National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, 2Department of Physics and The Institute for Soft
Matter Synthesis and Metrology, Georgetown University Washington, Washington, DC
5:20 pm
M15
Local Contractions Test Rigidity of E-Cadherin Adhesions. Y. Yang1, E. Nguyen1, R. Mege2, B.
Ladoux1,2, M.P. Sheetz1,3; 1Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore,
Singapore, 2Université Paris Diderot, Institut Jacques Monod, Paris, France, 3Department of
Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY
5:35 pm
M16
Mechanical plasticity of the extracellular matrix regulates cancer cell migration through
confining microenvironments. K.M. Wisdom1, K. Adebowale2, J. Chang3, J.Y. Lee1, S. Nam1, R.
Desai4, N.S. Rossen5, M. Rafat5, R. West6, L. Hodgson7, O. Chaudhuri1; 1Mechanical Engineering,
Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,
3
Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 4School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA, 6Department of Clinical Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 7Department of
Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY
5:50 pm
M17
Nuclear rupture at sites of high curvature compromises retention of DNA repair factors. I.
Ivanovska1, Y. Xia1, K. Zhu1, R.A. Greenberg2, D.E. Discher1,2; 1Molecular & Cell Biophysics,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2Cancer Biology, University of Pennsylvania,
University of Pennsylvania, PA
6:05 pm
M18
Quantifying the 3D cellular forces generated in phagocytosis using deformable microparticles. D.
Vorselen1,2, Y. Wang3, M.J. Footer1,2, W. Cai3, J.A. Theriot1,2; 1Biochemistry, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA, 2Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Mechanical Engineering, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA
6:20 pm
M19
Membrane-Cytoskeleton Mechanical Feedback Mediated by Myosin 1 Controls Phagocytic
Efficiency. S.R. Barger1, N.S. Reilly2, M. Shutova3, Q. Li4, P. Maiuri4, M.S. Mooseker5, R.A.
Flavell6, T.M. Svitkina3, P.W. Oakes2,7, M. Krendel1, N.C. Gauthier4,8; 1Cell and Developmental
Biology Department, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY,
2
Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 3Department of Biology, University
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 4FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, IFOM, Milan, Italy,
5
Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 6Department
of Immunobiology, Yale University, School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 7Department of Biology,
University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 8Mechanobiology Institute, National University of
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
6:35 pm
M20
Mechanoregulated actin network organization and function in mammalian clathrin-mediated
endocytosis. C. Kaplan1, S.J. Kenny2, J. Schöneberg 1, S. Son3, A. Diz-Muñoz4, D.A. Fletcher3,
K. Xu2, D.G. Drubin1; 1Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California,
Berkeley, CA, 2Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 3Department of
Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 4Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European
Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany
* Elizabeth Chen is the 2018 WICB Mid-Career Awardee for Excellence in Science Research.
** Jian Zhang is the 2018 Molecular Biology of the Cell Paper of the Year Awardee.
M11
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
OO
Minisymposium 3: Cellular Stress Responses
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Minisymposium 4: Microbes and the Cytoskeleton
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 31B
Co-Chairs: Erin Goley, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Michael Way, The Francis Crick Institute
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
M31
4:35 pm
M32
Introduction
The MinDE system forms a propagating diffusion barrier that drives directed membrane protein
transport. B. Ramm1,2, P. Glock1, J. Muecksch1, P. Blumhardt1, D.A. García-Soriano1,2, M.
Heymann1, P. Schwille1; 1Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry,
Martinsried, AL, 2Ludwig-Maximillians-University, Graduate School of Quantitative Biosciences
(QBM), Munich, Germany
FtsZ signals to cell wall enzymes through a key constriction regulator to promote bacterial
division. P.J. Lariviere1, C.R. Mahone1, R.D. Zeinert2, A.K. Daitch1, P. Chien2, E.D. Goley1;
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
71
SUNDAY
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 28C
Co-Chairs: Rosa Puertollano, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH; and Andrew Dillin, University of California,
Berkeley
4:15 pm
Introduction
4:20 pm
M21
Glia regulate ER stress resistance and longevity. A.E. Frakes1,2,3, M. Metcalf1,2,3, S. Tronnes1,2,3, H.
Gildea1,2,3, A. Dillin1,2,3; 1Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA,
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Berkeley, CA, 3The Glenn Center for Aging Research , Berkeley, CA
4:35 pm
M22
The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Activator ATF6 Responds to Proteotoxic and Lipotoxic Stress
by Distinct Mechanisms. A.B. Tam1, L.S. Robert2, V. Chandra1, I.G. Rivera1, D.K. Nomura2, D.J.
Forbs1, M. Niwa1; 1Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Chemistry,
Molecular and Cell Biology and Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California,
Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
4:50 pm
M23
Cerebellar ataxia SCAR20 disease-associated protein Snx14 regulates lipid metabolism at ER-lipid
droplet contact sites. S. Datta1, L. Liu1, W.M. Henne1; 1Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical
Center, Dallas, TX
5:05 pm
M24
Protein phosphatase 2A stimulates activation of TFEB and TFE3 transcription factors in response
to oxidative stress. J.A. Martina1, R. Puertollano1; 1CBPC, NHLBI, National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD
5:20 pm
M25
Degradation of Blos1 mRNA by the unfolded protein response repositions lysosomes and protects
cells from stress. D. Bae1, K.A. Moore1, J. Mella1, S. Hayashi1, J. Hollien1; 1Biology, University of
Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
5:35 pm
M26
Nutrient-dependent mitochondrial hyperfusion requires the modified outer membrane carrier
MTCH2. K. Labbé1, E.A. Engelhart2, Z. Minic3, J. Cazet1, C. Juliano1, M. Babu3, S. Hoppins2, J.
Nunnari1; 1Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California Davis, Davis,
CA, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Department of
Biochemistry, University of Regina, Regina, SK
5:50 pm
M27
A Tyrosine Switch on NEDD4-2 E3 Ligase Transmits GPCR Inflammatory Signaling. N.J. Grimsey1,2,
R.V. Narala1, C.C. Rada1, S. Metha1, B.S. Stephens1,3, I. Kufareva1,3, J.J. Lapek1, D. Gonzalez1,
T.M. Handel1,3, J. Zhang1, J. Trejo1; 1Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla,
CA, 2Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, Athens, GA,
3
Pharmacology, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, La Jolla, CA
6:05 pm
M28
Ribosome assembly stress elicits an adaptive proteostatic response. B.W. Tye1,2, N. Commins3, M.
Springer3, D. Pincus4, S. Churchman1; 1Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Program in
Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 3Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School,
Boston, MA, 4Whitehead Institute, Cambridge, MA
6:20 pm
M29
USP21 and OTUD3 antagonize regulatory ribosomal ubiquitylation and ribosome-associated
quality control. D.M. Garshott1, M. Leonard1, E. Sundaramoorthy1, E.J. Bennett1; 1Cell and
Developmental Biology, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA
6:35 pm
M30
Reconstitution of CAT tail elongation, ubiquitination, and nascent chain release from failed
ribosomes by the RQC. C.J. Howard1; 1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of
California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Biological Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Biochemistry,
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Amherst, MA
Septins recognize dividing bacterial cells for delivery to the lysosome. S. Krokowski1, S. Mostowy1;
1
Department of Immunology and Infection, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine,
London, United Kingdom
Dynamin and formin mediated actin polymerization regulate septin dynamics. J. Pfanzelter1, S.
Mostowy2, M. Way1; 1Cellular Signalling and Cytoskeletal Function Laboratory, The Francis Crick
Institute, London, United Kingdom, 2Department of Immunology and Infection, London School of
Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom
Enteropathogenic E. coli relies on collaboration between the formin mDia1 and the Arp2/3
complex for actin pedestal biogenesis and maintenance. K.B. Velle1,2, K.G. Campellone1;
1
Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 2Biology, University of
Massachusetts- Amherst, Amherst, MA
Regulation of endocytic vesicle formation in a potentially novel actin-dependent pathway. P.
Brinkert1, L. Kühling1, C. Bannach1, L. Greune2, D. Bucher3,4, M.A. Schmidt2,5, S. Boulant3,4, T.E.
Stradal6, M. Schelhaas1,5; 1Institute of Cellular Virology, ZMBE, University of Münster, Münster,
Germany, 2Institute of Infectiology, ZMBE, University of Münster, Münster, Germany, 3Department
of Infectious Diseases, Virology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany, 4German
Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, 5Cluster of Excellence EXC1003, Cells in
Motion (CiM), Münster, Germany, 6Section Cell Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research,
Braunschweig, Germany
Nuclear rotation by a Golgi-derived MTOC formed during human cytomegalovirus infection. D.
Procter1, D. Walsh1; 1Microbiology-Immunology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of
Medicine, Chicago, IL
Mimicry of a +TIP binding motif by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid
coordinates early steps of infection. E. Santos da Silva1, M. Delaney1, M. Naghavi1; 1MicrobiologyImmunology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
An essential Trypanosoma brucei kinesin directs completion of cleavage furrow ingression
by bundling microtubules. T.E. Sladewski1, P.C. Campbell1, C.L. de Graffenried1; 1Molecular
Microbiology and Immunology, Brown University, Providence, RI
Toxoplasma parasite twisting motion mechanically induces host cell membrane fission to
complete invasion within a protective vacuole. G. Pavlou1, M. Biesaga1, B. Touquet1, V. Lagal2, M.
Balland3, A. Dufour4, M. Hakimi5, I. Tardieux1; 1Team Membrane Dynamics of Parasite-Host Cell
Interactions, Institute for Advanced Biosciences (IAB), Grenoble, France, 2Unit of Malaria Infection
and Immunity, Department of Parasites and Insect Vectors, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France,
3
Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, Grenoble, France, 4Bioimage Analysis Unit, Institut
Pasteur, Paris, France, 5Team Host-Pathogen Interactions & Immunity to Infection, Institute for
Advanced Biosciences (IAB), Grenoble, France
1
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4:50 pm
M33
5:05 pm
M34
5:20 pm
M35
5:35 pm
M36
5:50 pm
M37
6:05 pm
M38
6:20 pm
M39
6:35 pm
M40
Minisymposium 5: Nucleus
4:15-6:50 pm
Ballroom 20D
Co-Chairs: Xavier Darzacq, University of California, Berkeley; and Clodagh O’Shea, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
72
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
M41
4:35 pm
M42
4:50 pm
M43
5:05 pm
M44
5:20 pm
M45
Introduction
FIREnano and ChromEMT: Visualizing the structural basis of gene activation and silencing in
the nucleus. J. Yin1, G. Castillon2, S. Phan2, H. Ou1, T. Deerinck2, M.H. Ellisman2, C.C. O’Shea1;
1
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 2NCMIR,
University California San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Nuclear organization and Transcription regulation mechanisms studied by live cell imaging. X.
Darzacq1; 1MCB, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
A molecular sensor reveals differences in macromolecular crowding between the cytoplasm and
nucleoplasm. G.T. Shubeita1, C. Murade1; 1Physics, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
Spatiotemporal Patterning of Zygotic Genome Activation in Vertebrate Embryogenesis. H.
Chen1, L.C. Einstein1, M.C. Good1,2; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, 2Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Dynamics of free and chromatin-bound histone H3.2 and H3.3 yield insights into chromatin
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
M46
5:50 pm
M47
6:05 pm
M48
6:20 pm
M49
6:35 pm
M50
Minisymposium 6: An Organellar Perspective on Disease
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 30C
Co-Chairs: Michael Wangler, Baylor College of Medicine; and Blanche Schwappach, University Medical Center Göttingen
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
M51
4:35 pm
M52
4:50 pm
M53
5:05 pm
M54
5:20 pm
M55
5:35 pm
M56
Introduction
Pathogenic TFG mutations underlying hereditary spastic paraplegia impair secretory protein
trafficking and axon fasciculation. I. Pustova1, E. McMillan1, A. Schuh1, A. Audhya1; 1Biomolecular
Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
Phenotypic analysis of a Drosophila model for Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia. S. Xu1, M. Stern1, J.A.
McNew1; 1BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX
VPS13A and VPS13C, whose loss-of-function mutations result in neuroacanthocytosis and
Parkinson’s disease respectively, are lipid transport proteins differentially localized at ER contact
sites. M. Leonzino1,2,3,4,5, N. Kumar2, F.A. Horenkamp2, W.F. Hancock-Cerutti1,2,3,4,5, P. Li2, J.A. Lees2,
H. Wheeler1,2,3,4,5, K.M. Reinisch*2, P. De Camilli1,2,3,4,5; 1Neuroscience, Yale University - School
of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Cell Biology, Yale University - School of Medicine, New Haven, CT,
3
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University - School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 4Program
in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale University - School of Medicine,
New Haven, CT, 5Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale University - School of Medicine, New Haven,
CT
Accessory proteins harness the unique molecular architecture of the COPI vesicle coat. E.C.
Arakel1, V.R. Ramnarayan1, B. Schwappach1; 1University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen,
Germany
A genetic screen for essential genes that impact peroxisome morphology in Drosophila and
identification of candidate human disease genes. M. Wangler1, H. Graves1, E. Seto1, K. Tan1, S.
Yamamoto1; 1Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
Role of M1 Spastin in Tethering Lipid Droplets to Peroxisomes for Trafficking of Fatty Acids. C.
Chang1, A.V. Weigel1, M.S. Ioannou1, Y. Liao1, C. Blackstone2, J. Lippincott-Schwartz1; 1HHMI
Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, 2NINDS, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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SUNDAY
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5:35 pm
changes during early embryogenesis. Y. Shindo1, A. Amodeo1; 1Lewis-Sigler Institute for
Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Cryo-ET reveals nucleosome reorganisation in condensed mitotic chromosomes in vivo. S. Cai1, C.
Chen1, Z. Tan1, Y. Huang2, J. Shi1, L. Gan1; 1Department of Biological Sciences, National University
of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 2Department of Biological Sciences and Mechanobiology
Institute, Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, Singapore, Singapore
Direct Visualization of Genomic Loci Relocation to Heterochromatic Condensates in Living Cells. H.
MA1, Y. Feng1,2, Y. Zhao2, A. Naseri3, S. Zhang3, J. Zheng2, T. Pederson4; 1School of Life Science and
Technology, Shanghaitech University, Shanghai, China, 2School of Pharmacy, East China University
of Science and Technology, Shanghai, China, 3Department of Computer Science, University
of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, 4Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology,
University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
Analysis of chromatin dynamics reveals insights into the role of transcription in the formation of
topological domains. J.F. Johnston1, M. Bailey2, H. Yan2, S. Mochrie2,3, M.C. King1; 1Cell Biology,
Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 3Applied
Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT
Mechanotransduction regulates cell nuclear shape and function through heterochromatin
content and nuclear rigidity. A.D. Stephens1, P.Z. Liu1, V. Kandula1, H. Chen2, L.M. Almassalha3, V.
Backman3, T. O’Halloran2, S.A. Adam4, R.D. Goldman4, E.J. Banigan5, J.F. Marko1,6; 1Department
of Molecular Biosciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 2Department of Chemistry,
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern
University, Evanston, IL, 4Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University
Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 5Institute for Medical Engineering and Science,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, MA, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy,
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Visualizing spatiotemporal mRNA dynamics at subcellular resolution with a bright fluorogenic
RNA. T. Ariyoshi1, Y. Okada1; 1Lab for Cell Polarity Regulation, RIKEN BDR, Suita, Osaka, Japan
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5:50 pm
M57
6:05 pm
M58
6:20 pm
M59
6:35 pm
M60
Homeostatic remodeling of mammalian membranes in response to dietary lipid perturbations
directs stem cell differentiation. K.R. Levental1, E.J. Malmberg1, I. Levental1, R. Ernst2; 1Integrative
Biology and Pharmacology, McGovern Medical School at The University of TX Health Science
Center at Houston, Houston, TX, 2Medical Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of
Saarland, Homburg, Germany
Modulation of phosphatome to promote the lysosome function/biogenesis. S. Patel1, D.
Radhakrishnan1, S. Gangi Setty1; 1Microbiology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Science,
Bangalore, India
Macrophage catabolism of aggregated lipoproteins using a novel extracellular compartment
regulates lipid accumulation during atherosclerosis. R.K. Singh1, A.S. Haka1, V.C. Barbosa-Lorenzi1,
A. Asmal1, F.W. Lund1, Y. Xiong2, H.F. Chin1, I. Grosheva1, T. Hla2, F.R. Maxfield1; 1Biochemistry,
Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 2Boston Children’s Hospital and Department of
Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Dynamin-mediated disassembly and endosomal trafficking in regulated muscle remodeling of
T-tubule membranes. A.A. Kiger1, T. Lin1, N. Fujita1, W. Huang1; 1Cell & Developmental Biology, UC
San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Education Minisymposium: Evidence-Based Education: Promoting Excellence through an Inclusive
Environment
4:15-7:00 pm
Room 26B
Supported by CBE—Life Sciences Education
Co-Chairs: Tracie Gibson, University of Massachusetts-Amherst; and Jennifer Hood-DeGrenier, Worcester State University
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4:15 pm
4:20 pm
M61
4:40 pm
M62
5:00 pm
M63
5:20 pm
M64
5:40 pm
M65
6:00 pm
M66
6:20 pm
M67
6:40 pm
M68
Introduction
Transformation of Introductory Cell Biology into a flipped classroom with a model-based
reasoning approach led to significant reduction of the “achievement gap” in underserved
students. S.K. Olson1, M.L. Petreaca2; 1Biology, Pomona College, Claremont, CA, 2Biology, DePauw
University, Greenville, IN
Modified Supplemental Instruction in a high-enrollment upper-division biology course improves
student outcomes. M. Crowder1; 1Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California Davis,
Davis, CA
When active learning fails: How faculty beliefs inform their teaching and influence student
outcomes. S.M. Lo1,2; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla,
CA, 2Mathematics and Science Education, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Writing an experimental passage: A project to improve research-critical skills and mastery of
core cell biology principles in diverse student populations. S. Fromherz1, J.S. Weaver2; 1Biology,
Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI, 2Psychology, Saginaw Valley State
University, University Center, MI
Gaining STEAM! Engaging Students with STEM-based comics. J.C. Gardiner1, A.K. Purdy2; 1Cancer
Biology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, 2Academic Affairs, Fox Chase Cancer Center,
Philadelphia, PA
Welcoming the first-semester biology student: improving engagement and confidence through
the Students as Scholars (SAS) research curriculum. J.L. Brewster1, S.D. Davis1, R.L. Honeycutt1,
L.B. Kats1, H. Valenzuela2, S.A. Vetrone2, C. Swift2; 1Natural Science Division, Pepperdine
University, Malibu, CA, 2Biology Department, Whittier College, Whittier, CA
Identifying the unwritten rules of undergraduate research. K.M. Cooper1, J.M. Cala1, S.E.
Brownell1; 1School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
“Where’s my mentor?!” A typology of negative mentoring in undergraduate research. L. Limeri1,
M.Z. Asif1, D. Esparza2, B. Bridges1, D. Sanders1, T. Tuma1, E.L. Dolan1; 1Biochemistry & Molecular
Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2University of Texas El Paso, El Paso, TX
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Workshop: New Fluorescent Probes and HTP Imaging Approaches
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 33B
The growth of high-content screening (HCS), which combines automated fluorescence microscopy with quantitative image analysis,
has been driven by advances in biology and chemistry, as well as automation and computation. Major drivers of advances in
HCS include: 1) the development of genetic and molecular tools compatible with HTP microscopy, such as genome-scale mutant
collections and a variety of fluorescent protein tags and probes that report on numerous aspects of the state of the cell; 2) hardware
improvements that have catalyzed the development of fast, automated microscopes; and 3) major innovations in the software
for image analysis, which have enabled facile extraction of quantitative measurements. This workshop will focus on discussion of
projects at the leading edge of advances in HCS, with an emphasis on the latest developments in high-throughput imaging pipelines
and the development and application of new probes for exploring the structure and function of living cells.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
4:15-5:15 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bruker Corporation
Multiplexed quantitative single molecule localization microscopy with the Vutara 352
Presenter: Carl G. Ebeling, PhD, Worldwide Applications Scientist
Level: Intermediate
Single molecule localization microscopy has made a significant impact in the field of biology by increasing the resolving power of
optical microscopy tenfold. One of the challenges within single molecule imaging has been the development and usage of adequate
fluorophores for multicolor imaging. Advancing the scientific applications of single molecule imaging requires the ability to reliably
image numerous biological targets within the same sample, visualizing the data, and performing quantitative analysis on the data
set. Multiplexing methods, such as DNA-PAINT, Exchange-PAINT, and OligoSTORM remedy this by utilizing a fluorophore that is
sequentially imaged, labeling specific biological targets during each imaging sequence. However, the optimized use of the above
methods in a microscopy platform requires the use of an integrated fluidics system to allow delivery of the reagents to the sample
over successive imaging sequences. To alleviate this challenge, Bruker’s Vutara 352 single molecule localization microscope has been
designed to allow for multifaceted 3D single molecule imaging. Paired with Bruker’s custom fluidics module and control software
SRX, the Vutara 352 integrates these multiplexing techniques into a single platform to allow for a systematic imaging modality.
While SRX allows simultaneous imaging, localization and visualization, it also combines the numerous imaging sequences into a
comprehensive localization data set. This allows for the interactive multicolor visualization of multiplexed data, and the integrated
statistics module offers numerous computational tools to quantify the distribution, colocalization, and clustering of the various
biological species targeted in the multiplexed data.
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Organizers and Speakers:
Brenda Andrews, Co-Organizer and Speaker, University of Toronto
Luke Lavis, Co-Organizer and Speaker, Janelia/HHMI
Martin Schnermann, Speaker, National Cancer Institute, NIH
Ellen Sletten, Speaker, University of California, Los Angeles
Jason R. Swedlow, Speaker, University of Dundee, UK
Einat Zalckvar, Speaker, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
Jin Zhang, Speaker, University of California, San Diego
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Panel Discussion and Reception: Janelia is Looking for a Scientist with a Big New Idea. Could That Be You?
7:00-9:00 pm
Omni Hotel Salon C,D,E
Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Senior Group Leader
Luke Lavis, Senior Group Leader and Head of Molecular Tools and Imaging
Teng-Leong Chew, Director, Advanced Imaging Center
Rob Singer, Senior Fellow
Boyana Konforti, Director, Science Strategy & Development
HHMI is holding an open, international search for a scientist, or team of scientists, to lead a new research area at Janelia. The
research area can focus on a major problem in the life sciences, on technology development, or both. The idea and approach
should be bold and innovative and not one that could be easily pursued in a typical research institution. Instead, it should require
a cross-disciplinary environment in which technology developers and theorists collaborate with life scientists to overcome major
conceptual and technological barriers.
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Education Happy Hour
8:00-10:00 pm
Half Door Brewing Company
Anyone who is interested in biology education is invited to the Half Door Brewing Company, 903 Island Ave, San Diego, CA 92101!
Come chat informally with members of the Education Committee and your peers about their experiences and interests over drinks
and food. Food and drinks available for purchase.
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Ask a Scientist Bar Night
8:30 pm
Lobby D, Registration
Groups of 5-10 scientists will go to local bars near the convention center with signs and t-shirts reading “I’m a scientist. Ask me
about my research!” The purpose is for scientists to engage in conversations about science with the local public in a more organic
manner, advocate for science, and have fun!
Outcomes:
1. Learn what misconceptions exist about science, while educating the public about science.
2. Practice discussing science with a general audience.
3. Improve the public perception of scientists.
Target audience: all attendees and exhibitors
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SUNDAY
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Monday
December 10, 2018
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
79
7:30 am-6:00 pm
Registration Open
Registration Area
8:00-9:30 am
Symposium 4: Cytoskeletal Dynamics
8:15-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Ballroom 20BC
Theater 2, Learning Center
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing an all new microscopic toolbox for functional imaging
8:30-8:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Mizar Imaging
Bringing you the advantages of lightsheet for your live-cell fluorescence microscopy applications, now at
high-/super-resolution
8:30-10:00 am
Publishing Cell Biology Classroom Activities in CourseSource
8:45-9:00 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Room 32B
Theater 1, Learning Center
Daily Schedule—Monday, December 10
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Introduction to Fennik Life Sciences & TheraKan™ System for 3D Cell Culture Analysis
9:00-9:50 am
Careers in Science: Academic Core Facilities
Theater 3, Learning Center
9:00-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D super-resolution light sheet and single molecule imaging and tracking
9:00-9:50 am
For Faculty Members: National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Undergraduate and Predoctoral Grant Programs
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Coaching
9:30-10:30 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 4, Learning Center
Career Center, Learning Center
Theater 1, Learning Center
Cellecta, Inc.
Combining Cell Barcoding and CRISPR sgRNA Libraries with Targeted Gene Expression
for Single Cell Genetic Analysis
9:30-10:30 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Bio-Rad Laboratories
The Best Practices and the New Best Fluorophores for the Best Western Blots
9:30-11:00 am
Morning Refreshment Break
Learning Center
9:45-10:45 am
Symposium 5: Metabolism
9:45-10:45 am
Symposium 6: Regeneration and Morphogenesis
10:00-10:50 am
Careers in Scientific Editing, Writing, and Communications
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership: Communication and Feedback
10:00-10:50 am
Funding Opportunities from the European Research Council:
Supporting Top Researchers from Anywhere in the World
Theater 4, Learning Center
10:45-11:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Ballroom 20A
Ballroom 20BC
Theater 3, Learning Center
Room 25C
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
Fluorescent Probes for Cell Biology
10:45-11:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
GE Healthcare
EDGE confocal: A new line scanning confocal technique for improved resolution and contrast
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10:45 am-12:00 pm
LGBTQ+ Science, Diversity, and Networking Session
Room 25B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education: Erin Dolan
Room 26B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Open Forum: Giving and Receiving Feedback
Room 32B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
The Cost and Benefit of Reproducibility
Room: 31B
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Microsymposia
7
Advances in Mechanisms of Cellular Stress
Room 30B
8
Cell Biology of the Nucleus
Room 28D
9
Cell Division and Mitosis
Room 30C
10
Cell Mechanics
Room 28B
11
Cytoskeleton and Disease
Room 29C
12
Regulation of Membrane Trafficking
Room 29B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Organoids: The Future of Life Science Research
12:00-1:30 pm
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
12:00-12:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Room 33B
Learning Center
Theater 1, Learning Center
Andor Technology
NEW: Sona, a new back-illuminated sCMOS camera for the highest-sensitivity & largest field-of-view
imaging—Protecting your specimen from photobleaching & toxicity; maximizing sampling & throughput
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing a fully integrated Cryo Electron Tomography workflow for your lab
12:00-12:50 pm
Starting a Laboratory at an R1 Institution
Theater 3, Learning Center
12:00-12:50 pm
Writing Your Science Story: How to Get Everyone Else Excited About Your Work
Theater 4, Learning Center
1:00-1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Winning Westerns: Proven Strategies to Optimize Your Western Blots
1:00-1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Synthego
CRISPR-Engineered Cells For Your Research
Roundtable Central 3,
Learning Center
1:00-2:00 pm
Advocacy Toolbox II: Practice Being an Advocate for Science
1:00-1:50 pm
ASCB Member Forum/Business Meeting
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Career Discussion and Mentoring Roundtables
1:30-3:00 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
Learning Center
1:30-3:30 pm
Afternoon Refreshment Break
Learning Center
1:30-2:00 pm
In-Booth Presentation
Theater 3, Learning Center
Roundtable Central Sections
1-2, Learning Center
Booth 1019
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless
and maskless photopatterning system
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Daily Schedule—Monday, December 10
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Olympus America Inc.
The Olympus FV3000RS Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope: Speed and Sensitivity
for Live Cell Imaging and Beyond
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
A spectrum of light sheet instruments optimized for different imaging demands
2:00-2:50 pm
Careers in Scientific Consulting
Theater 3, Learning Center
2:00-2:50 pm
Statistical Thinking in Undergraduate Biology (STUB) Network:
Coordinating Teaching and Assessment
Theater 4, Learning Center
2:30-3:00 pm
Meet the Committees
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ASCB Booth 623,
Learning Center
81
3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Horizon Discovery Ltd
Cell line engineering with CRISPR-Cas9 - tips and tricks to maximize success
3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Allen Institute for Cell Science
From images to information: new machine-learning based image processing toolbox
for cellular organization
3:15-4:15 pm
EMBO Gold Medal Ceremony and Lectures: Marek Basler and Melina Schuh
4:15-5:15 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Ballroom 20BC
Theater 1, Learning Center
Nanolive SA
Label-free, long-term 3D analysis of organelles in living mammalian cells shows pre-mitotic organelle
spinning: mitochondria, nucleus and lipid droplets in the spotlight
Daily Schedule—Monday, December 10
4:15-5:15 pm
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cryo-tomography: a new imaging technique for cell biology to peer at the inner workings of cells
4:30-7:05 pm
Minisymposia
7
Motors in Transport and Cytoskeleton Remodeling
8
Neural Development and Neurodegeneration
9
Patterning Tissue Morphogenesis
10
Phase Transitions in the Cell
11
Spindle Mechanics and Chromosome Segregation
Ballroom 20BC
Room 31B
Ballroom 20D
Room 28C
Ballroom 20A
4:30-7:05 pm
NCI-ASCB Emerging Topic Symposium: A New Nuclear-Nexus in Cancer Cell
Biology
Room 29C
4:30-7:05 pm
Workshop: Screening Approaches in Human Cells and CRISPR Methods
Room 33B
4:30-7:05 pm
Special Interest Subgroup W: Organelle Interactome and Cell Plasticity Control
Room 30C
5:00-6:00 pm
Elevator Speech Videotaping/Coaching Session
5:30-6:30 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Room 24C
Theater 1, Learning Center
NanoSurface Biomedical, Inc.
Biomimetic Cell Culture Platforms for Enhancing Cell Biology Studies
5:30-6:30 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Advances in Image Processing Automation in Amira
7:15-8:45 pm
Navigating Negotiation in Science: A Panel and Networking Reception
Room 33B
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Monday, December 10
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Symposium 4: Cytoskeletal Dynamics
8:00-9:30 am
Ballroom 20BC
Supported by The Anatomical Record and The American Association of Anatomists
Chair: Samara Reck-Peterson, University of California, San Diego/HHMI
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8:00 am
S8
8:30 am
S9
9:00 am
S10
Control of cell architecture by microtubule minus-end binding proteins. A. Akhmanova1; 1Cell
Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands
The dynein/dynactin complex and long distance transport. A.P. Carter1; 1MRC Lab of Molecular
Biology, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Multi-component mechanisms controlling actin dynamics. B.L. Goode1; 1Brandeis University,
Waltham, MA
Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:15-9:15 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
MONDAY
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing an all new microscopic toolbox for functional imaging
Presenter: Dr. Susanne Holzmeister
Level: Intermediate
The introduction of CRISPR/CAS has fundamentally changed the possibilities in biological manipulation. The creation of (fluorescently)
tagged organisms or whole animal (knock-out) mutants is now feasible on a regular basis. To make use of these new possibilities,
non-invasive observation is needed. Until now, only fluorescent microscopy was capable of fulfilling this requirement. A fundamentally
new approach for functional imaging based on multiphoton microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging will be provided. Learn
how the utilization of spectrally tunable detection for multiphoton imaging available on the SP8 DIVE (Deep In Vivo Explorer)
confocal platform combined with ultrafast fluorescent lifetime contrast of the SP8 FALCON (FAst Lifetime CONtrast) gives researchers
easy access to the imaging of deep in vivo processes. The SP8 DIVE provides spectral capabilities that allows users to penetrate
samples deeper and separates up to four spectrally different signals simultaneously, and a much larger number sequentially. The
synergistic combination with FALCON provides additional information providing label-free imaging of key coenzymes like NADH,
dye-separation of spectrally alike markers by their fluorescent lifetime or interaction of molecules using FLIM-FRET – deep within
the tissue, in the most native context possible.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:30-8:45 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Mizar Imaging
Bringing you the advantages of lightsheet for your live-cell fluorescence microscopy applications, now at high-/superresolution
Presenter: Paul Maddox, PhD
Level: Intermediate
“Keep your cells happy and your objectives clean.” With that simple phrase Shinya Inoue captured an age-old dilemma of cell
biologists: the light needed for optical microscopy also damages cells and bleaches fluorophores, creating particular problems for
live-cell imaging. Structured planar illumination—lightsheet—reduces photo damage and bleaching. The Tilt lightsheet illumination
system by Mizar Imaging offers these benefits of lightsheet, while also opening up for you the ability to use the objective lens
of your choice, even high-NA, oil-immersion objectives. Designed to be an easy-to-use as well as high-performance system, the
Mizar Tilt is an add-on unit that fits onto virtually any inverted microscope stand. Learn more about how the Tilt is being used for
high- and super-resolution microscopy.
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Publishing Cell Biology Classroom Activities in CourseSource
8:30-10:00 am
Room 32B
Jessamina Blum, Education Program Specialist and Managing Editor, CourseSource, University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Susan Wick, Professor, Biology Teaching and Learning & Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Jennifer Hood-DeGrenier, Associate Professor of Biology, Worcester State University
CourseSource (http://www.coursesource.org) is an online open-access and peer-reviewed journal of evidence-based teaching
activities that are aligned with learning frameworks that were developed by professional societies, including ASCB. CourseSource
offers authors the opportunity to publish teaching materials in a journal that documents scholarly teaching efforts, accomplishments,
and innovations. For authors, publications offer new opportunities to collaborate and can provide evidence of a commitment to
high quality teaching. This workshop will help prospective authors write up their classroom activities by: highlighting commonly
used and cited CourseSource cell biology activities, reviewing the Instructions to Authors, learning how to align prospective lessons
with learning goals, discussing common author pitfalls and how to avoid them, and networking with other participants to form
writing and peer-review groups.
Outcomes:
1. Understand the types of articles published in CourseSource.
2. Draft sections of a CourseSource manuscript and receive feedback from peers.
3. Learn common author pitfalls and avoid using them during the preparation of your manuscript.
4. Develop an action plan for writing and submitting your manuscript to CourseSource.
Target audience: all attendees
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:45-9:00 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Introduction to Fennik Life Sciences & TheraKan™ System for 3D Cell Culture Analysis
Presenter: Lillian Cheng and Linda Cheng
Level: Introductory
Fennik Life Sciences is a life science research company based in Kansas City and affiliated with the University of Kansas Medical
Center. Its founders, Drs. Nikki Cheng and Wei Bin Fang, developed TheraKan, an innovative 3D culture device that creates a dynamic
environment and closely models the complexity of living tissue and cell environments. They recognized the need for a more
effective system after facing many challenges performing live cell imaging in mammary tissue in mice. The lab’s long-term goal is
to understand how the immune system responds to breast cancer. Drs. Cheng and Fang realized the inherent difficulty of ensuring
consistent tumor sizes as well as controlling for consistent numbers of immune cells recruited to the primary tumor. Their work
using conventional methods required large number of animals resulting in high costs and intensive labor. Further, high-resolution
multi-color images at thick areas of the tumor necessitated the use of specialized microscopy equipment, which was unavailable to
them. Instead, they sought an alternative approach and developed the TheraKan™, which proved simpler and more cost-effective.
The TheraKan™ utilizes a unique 2 chamber nested design with a simple swiveling mechanism allowing flow-through accessibility
to cells and molecules from the outside. The device is designed for drug validation, biomarker expression analysis, cell migration,
stem cell development therapies, immune cell recruitment, spheroid analysis, and more.
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Careers in Science: Academic Core Facilities
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Supported by Nikon Instruments, Inc.
Josh Rappoport, Core Facility Director, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine – Managing a research core
Maddy Parsons, PI and Facility Director, King’s College London – Core facility interactions with academics
Joe Dragavon, University of Colorado – Importance of core facilities in research
Caroline Hookway, Allen Institute – Careers and opportunities in a core facility
Core facilities are centralized technology platforms that maintain and support equipment (such as microscopes, FACS, mass spec
and genomics instruments) and provide specialized services and expertise. A core facility career provides an exciting and interesting
option for scientists wanting to remain in the lab without embarking on the academic tenure-track route. Careers in core facilities
are different from those in a research lab; they are essential service centers for the research community, providing broad access
to complex, expensive equipment. This session provides an overview of how core facilities work, roles available within them for
scientists at every level, and how to make yourself competitive for these positions. Four short talks covering different aspects of
core facilities will be followed by an interactive Q&A session.
MONDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn what core facilities do and how they can help researchers.
2. Understand what it means to be part of a core facility operating team.
3. Learn what skills you need/will gain as part of a core facility team.
4. Know how to start a career in core facilities and the pathway for career advancement.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, technicians, and research faculty
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
9:00-9:15 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Double Helix Optics
Engineered PSF technology for 3D super-resolution light sheet and single molecule imaging and tracking
Presenter: Anurag Agrawal, PhD
Level: Introductory
Conventional 3D-light microscopy has allowed for keen insights into biological questions, but it is often limited in spatial resolution,
imaging depth, or speed. Double Helix Light EngineeringTM utilizes a library of engineered point spread functions that enable extended
depth of field, for collection of more data with high precision axial information for 3D imaging and 4D tracking. Our SPINDLE®
optical module, designed to be attached between most scientific microscopes and cameras, includes a library of phase masks to
extend the imaging capabilities of microscopes for nanometer-scale single molecule imaging, light sheet, 3D particle tracking,
and is currently being developed for additional live cell modalities. With this method, we are able to achieve average localization
precision values below 20 nm laterally and below 25 nm axially with a 3-5x extension in depth range. We will demonstrate three
implementations to enable extended depth nanoscale imaging: 1) extend the imaging capabilities of a TIRF microscope to nanometer
scale 3D localization for super-resolution imaging and tracking; 2) use of Double Helix Light Engineering for extremely high-depth
molecule and particle tracking with 7-10 times the depth of conventional methods; and 3) use of Double Helix Light Engineering
in conjunction with Light Sheet microscopy to enable whole cell imaging and tracking at single molecule precision levels.
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For Faculty Members: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Undergraduate and Predoctoral
Grant Programs
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Luis Angel Cubano, Program Director, National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Anissa Brown, Program Director, National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Desirée L. Salazar, Program Director, National Institute of General Medical Sciences
Shiva Singh, Chief, Undergraduate and Predoctoral Training Branch
NIGMS has a longstanding commitment to develop a diverse pool of biomedical scientists through a variety of institutional training
and student development programs. NIGMS plans to make adjustments to programs designed to enhance diversity in the biomedical
research workforce to: 1) provide equity of trainee support across programs; 2) prevent programmatic overlap; 3) align funding
strategies with programmatic goals; 4) tailor expectation of Outcomes, support mechanisms, and review considerations according
to the institution’s level of research activity; and 5) strengthen NIGMS’s ability to evaluate the success of the programs. The changes
will impact the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD), the Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (RISE)
program, and the Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) programs.
Outcomes:
1. Gain a better understanding of Undergraduate and Predoctoral Grant Programs.
2. Learn what changes to the current programs will be in effect for 2019 applications deadlines.
3. Gain a better understanding of Diversity and Re-entry Supplements Programs.
Target audience: faculty
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Career Coaching
9:00 am-3:00 pm
Career Center, Learning Center
Jean Branan, Program Coordinator, Career & Postdoctoral Services, The Scripps Research Institute
Virginia Hazen, Program Manager, Postdoc Professional Development, Office of Postdoctoral and Visiting Scholar Affairs,
University of California, San Diego
Nisha Cavanaugh, Manager, Postdoctoral & Academic Programs Office of Education, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery
Institute
Joe Cribari, Founder and CEO, JC3 Consulting
Sharon Schendel, Project Manager and Science Writer, Viral Immunotherapeutic Consortium, The Scripps Research Institute
Andrew Bankston, Program Manager, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery
Institute
Christine Kelly, Director of Career Development, Claremont Graduate University
Phil Sheridan, COO, Business Facilitator and Co-Founder, Bio4Front Inc.
Tricia Wright, Postdoctoral Scholar Advisor, Salk Institute for Biological Sciences
Joel Tolson, Graduate Student Career Advisor, Career Center, University of California, San Diego
The career coaching program offers one-on-one 40-minute meetings with career development professionals. The goal is for students
and postdocs to have an opportunity to speak to a professional about the wide range of careers available to them and receive
individualized advice including, but not limited to, strategies for choosing a career and review of application materials. This service
will be especially useful for trainees from smaller universities with limited access to career offices and resources.
Outcomes:
1. Obtain professional one-on-one mentorship catered toward pursuing a career in science.
2. Gain insight into the career options available in the life sciences.
3. Learn individualized strategies to search and apply for job opportunities in your career of choice.
4. Gain critical advice on improving resumes, CVs, and application materials.
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Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
9:30-10:30 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Cellecta, Inc.
Combining Cell Barcoding and CRISPR sgRNA Libraries with Targeted Gene Expression for Single Cell Genetic Analysis
Presenter: Paul Diehl, PhD, COO, Cellecta
Level: Intermediate
Pooled lentiviral libraries of CRISPR sgRNA to mediate genome-wide gene knockout have become an invaluable tool for uncovering
the functional genetic drivers required for a biological response. Another type of pooled lentiviral library designed with unique
DNA sequence tags have been used to label large populations of cells with unique cell-specific barcodes, which allows monitoring
changes in sub-populations of cells with distinct phenotypes over time. Further, these barcode lentiviral libraries can be designed
so that the unique barcode sequence is detectable in next-generation sequencing (NGS) RNA expression profiling assays (e.g.,
RNA-seq). As a result, investigators can analyze and link distinct molecular changes in sub-populations of cells with distinct gene
expression profiles and phenotypes, such as drug resistance. The additional step, then, of incorporating these cell barcodes together
with genetic effectors, such as CRISPR sgRNA libraries, makes it possible to tease out gene expression changes that result from
specific genetic disruptions, and link these to the development of specific phenotypes. Cellecta will discuss work we are doing to
develop this integrated platform that combines CRISPR sgRNA screens with single-cell genetic analysis.
Exhibitor Tech Talk
9:30-10:30 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
Bio-Rad Laboratories
The Best Practices and the New Best Fluorophores for the Best Western Blots
Presenter: Paul Liu, PhD, and Thomas Berkelman, PhD
Level: Intermediate
Generating publication-quality Western blots requires not just good technique but a thorough understanding of how each step
in the workflow can affect data quality and reproducibility. New technologies are now available that make Western blotting more
sensitive, quantitative, and reliable. In this talk we will discuss method optimization, technical best practices, and new products
that improve Western blot detection and quantification. We will cover: How to prepare your cell/tissue lysate sample; How to
estimate protein accurately; Gel/buffer chemistries - Choosing the right gel and buffer chemistries; Best practices for running a
gel, transferring proteins to a membrane, and blocking; How to choose the best detection reagents; New products for fluorescent
Western blot detection and quantification (StarBright™ Blue secondary antibodies and hFAB™ Rhodamine HKP primary antibodies);
and Data analysis tools and tips. With this knowledge in your arsenal, you will run every Western blot more mindfully and the data
you get will be more dependable and quantifiable. Our goal is to empower you to do better Western blots.
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Morning Refreshment Break
9:30-11:00 am
Join us for complimentary coffee and tea while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
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Learning Center
Symposium 5: Metabolism
9:45-10:45 am
Ballroom 20A
Chair: Jeffrey Peterson, Fox Chase Cancer Center
9:45 am
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10:15 am
S12
Metabolic Transitions in Cancer: Lessons from Viral Infection. H.R. Christofk1; 1Biological
Chemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
Mechanisms and Physiology of Lipid Storage in Lipid Droplets. R.V. Farese, Jr.1,2,3; 1Genetics and
Complex Diseases, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 2Cell Biology, Harvard
Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA
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Symposium 6: Regeneration and Morphogenesis*
9:45-10:45 am
Ballroom 20BC
9:45 am
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10:15 am
S14
Chair: Maria Leptin, EMBO
Stem Cell-Based Organoids as Avatars in Human Disease. H. Clevers1,2,3; 1 , Hubrecht Institute of
the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts, Utrecht, Netherlands, 2University Medical Center Utrecht,
Utrecht, Netherlands, 3Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, Netherlands
Building the mouse and human embryo in vivo and in vitro. M. Zernicka-Goetz1; 1Department of
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cam, United Kingdom
* Heinz Herrmann Symposium. Heinz Herrmann was Professor Emeritus of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Connecticut.
A symposium in his honor was endowed at the ASCB in 1990. A founder of the ASCB, Professor Herrmann was well known for his
pioneering approach to research in developmental biology, which has led to over 100 publications. He also wrote two books—Cell
Biology and From Biology to Sociopolitics.
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Careers in Scientific Editing, Writing, and Communications
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Jenn MacArthur, Freelance life science marketing writer
Noelle Demas, Independent medical writing consultant
Amy Lindsay, Principal Writer, Envision Pharma Group
Science communications is a popular career path for PhDs; however, many students are not well informed of the options available
within science communications, such as science journalism, medical writing, and regulatory writing. The panelists will discuss the
variety of jobs in science communications and how to train for a career in science communications.
Outcomes:
1. Develop an understanding of the variety of career paths available for those interested in working in science communication.
2. Gain an appreciation for the concrete steps you can take toward transitioning into a career in science writing and developing
communications skills.
3. Network with other people interested in science communications.
4. Get feedback on your own communications project and ideas from science writing professionals.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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EMBO Lab Leadership: Communication and Feedback
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 25C
Samuel Krahl, Project Coordinator, EMBO Lab Management, Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Lebenswissenschaften Heidelberg GmbH
A fundamental skill of good leadership is communicating effectively. In this session we explore a model of communication that helps
you lead your lab and get more research done by working well with your staff and being effective in discussions or negotiations
with your peers and superiors. Giving and receiving feedback well is the best predictor of success for a leader. We introduce you
to a process of giving feedback about behavior that builds trust and increases performance in teams.
We encourage participants to attend all three sessions in this series (the other two are on Sunday and Tuesday) because they are
interrelated and build on each other.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about the Transactional Analysis model of communication and its application to communicating with staff, peers,
and superiors.
2. Explore how a feedback culture leads to improved performance of teams and leaders.
3. Learn how to give feedback to build trust, develop your staff, and get more research done.
Target audience: group leaders (PIs), senior postdocs with responsibility for lab supervision or who are about to set up their own lab
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Funding Opportunities from the European Research Council: Supporting Top Researchers from
Anywhere in the World
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Iva Tolic, Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI), Croatia
Daniel Gerlich, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Austria
The European Research Council, set up in 2007, is the first pan-European funding organization for excellent frontier research. The
ERC is already shaping Europe’s research scene and is highly regarded by the international research community, establishing itself
as a world-class research funding agency.
Through highly selective competitions for attractive grants, the ERC promotes junior and established researchers to pursue their
work in Europe in any field of research and regardless of nationality. To date, more than 8,000 researchers at various stages of
their careers have been funded.
The session will present the different ERC funding schemes, and ERC grantees will be present to share their experience with these
funding initiatives and answer questions from the audience.
MONDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn how the ERC can support research careers.
2. Learn how the ERC evaluation process works.
3. Gain an understanding of selection criteria.
4. Get tips on how to write a successful ERC proposal.
Target audience: all attendees
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
Fluorescent Probes for Cell Biology
Presenter: Kenichi Maruyama
Level: Intermediate
Fluorescent probes are an essential suite of reagents to probe and elucidate extracellular as well as intracellular processes in cell
biology. A number of unique, highly specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) probes, metallo detectors, acid sensors and enzymatic
fluors for glycobiology as well as proteases differentiated from existing probes through a single cleavage to liberate maximum
fluorescence will be presented. A series of silicon rhodamine based fluors for super resolution live cell imaging under physiological
conditions in microscopy, as well as the corresponding highly photostable fluorescent (Stella Fluor™) derivatives that have been
adapted as labels for cell permeable as well as impermeable applications for imaging as well as flow cytometry applications will
be described. Next generation calcium sensing and an innovative ratiometric probe to measure intracellular glutathione rapidly
will be highlighted.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
GE Healthcare
EDGE confocal: A new line scanning confocal technique for improved resolution and contrast
Presenter: Will Marshall
Level: Intermediate
Microscopy is becoming a more important source of primary data in biological research. The ability to test multiple hypotheses in a
single experiment through visualization and quantification of complex phenotypes (multiple markers, highly multivariate) facilitates
more comprehensive studies in biologically relevant models. Due to recent advances in 3D cell culture and growing amounts of
evidence that biological processes in these models are more representative of processes in vivo, there is a need for new imaging
methods that improve image quality in thick samples without sacrificing speed or flexibility. We at GE have developed a new line
scanning confocal modality that provides better background rejection, higher contrast, and improved z-resolution when compared
with conventional point scanning or spinning disk modalities. The methodology is practical for wide scale adoption and amenable
to both high resolution microscopy and high throughput automated imaging experiments in multi-well plates.
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LGBTQ+ Science, Diversity, and Networking Session
10:45 am-12:00 pm
Room 25B
All attendees are welcome to join us for a session of scientific knowledge and career development/networking for Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, Transsexual, Queer Cell Biologists and diversity allies. The session includes a scientific presentation by an accomplished
LGBTQ+ Scientist and a discussion about career issues involving LGBTQ+ students, postdocs, and professionals.
10:45-11:00 am
11:00-11:30 am
11:30-12:00 pm
Task Force updates and Introduction. Lee Ligon, Rensselaer Polytecnic Institute, and Bruno Da
Rocha-Azevedo, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Elucidating cellular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases by CRISPR-based functional
genomics. Martin Kampmann, University of California, San Francisco
Career Discussion and Networking
Outcomes:
1. Gain scientific knowledge provided by an accomplished cell biologist
2. Have an opportunity to network with LGBTQ+ attendees.
3. Learn career advice applicable to LGBTQ+ attendees.
Target audience: all attendees
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Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education: Erin Dolan
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 26B
Erin Dolan, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
A3
CBE – Life Sciences Education: The story of a “great journal scientists might be caught reading.”
E.L. Dolan1; 1Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
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Open Forum: Giving and Receiving Feedback
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 32B
Come meet the members of ASCB’s Committee for Postdocs and Students (COMPASS) and listen to Sandra Schmid’s presentation
on how to effectively give and receive both positive and negative feedback. Schmid, Professor and Chair of the Department of Cell
Biology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, earned an MS in Executive Leadership at the University of San Diego
and is known for her commitment to effective mentorship. This session will be helpful for all academics and will provide a training
opportunity applicable to many aspects of scientific training, including collaboration, communication, and leadership. At the end
of the session, we will put our new skills into practice by asking attendees for feedback on what they would like COMPASS to do
for them in the future.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about the activities conducted by COMPASS and how to become involved in the committee.
2. Voice opinions on what you would like COMPASS to do for you in the future.
3. Improve collaboration, communication, and leadership skills by learning strategies for giving and receiving feedback.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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MONDAY
How did a moderately sized scientific society create what many consider to be the leading journal in biology education? Erin Dolan,
Editor-in-Chief of ASCB’s education journal, CBE—Life Sciences Education (LSE), will tell the story of the establishment, growth,
and impact of ASCB’s “other journal.” Since its launch in 2002 with partial funding from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, LSE
has become the go-to resource for research and evaluation studies in biology education. Over the years, LSE has built capacity
among life scientists to read, evaluate, and conduct biology education studies, which is continuing through three new features
that Dolan will describe.
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The Cost and Benefit of Reproducibility
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room: 31B
This session will develop a clear understanding of the key issues around the much discussed question of reproducibility in biology
and medicine. While the panel will avoid clichés of a ‘reproducibility crisis’, the session will address squarely systemic issues that
lead to increased rates of corrections of the scientific literature and a decreasing level of reliance of both pharma and academic
research on the basic literature. We will identify realistic and achievable means to underpin optimal reliability and reproducibility
of research data, experimental methods, protocols and computational pipelines, whether they are shared through peer reviewed
scientific publications or other Open Science platforms.
The session will feature expertise from leaders and innovators representing all the key stakeholders: academic research, research
institution leadership, funders, pharma industry, platform providers and editors, as well as reproducibility advocates. We will aim
for representation from a broad set of disciplines, including molecular cell biology and the medical sciences.
Outcomes:
1. A clear understanding of what is meant by reproducibility and the key issues.
2. A clear set of realistic recommendations for solutions in terms of policies, platforms, and training that can be implemented
in the current research landscape.
3. A call for specific platform solutions.
Target audience: all attendees, funders, policymakers, journals, also in particular the pharma and biotech industries as well as
reagent manufacturers
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Microsymposium 7: Advances in Mechanisms of Cellular Stress
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 30B
Moderator: Arunika Das, University of Pennsylvania
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Temperature increases cause transposon-associated DNA damage specific to spermatocytes
and not oocytes. N.A. Kurhanewicz1, J.M. Helm1, D.E. Libuda1,2; Institute of Molecular Biology,
University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 2Department of Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
Actin-mediated structural changes preserve neuron integrity in the early hours after experimental
stroke. B. Calabrese1,2, S.L. Jones3, U. Manor4, T.M. Svitkina3, H.N. Higgs5, A.Y. Shih6, S. Halpain1,2;
1
Division of Biological Sciences, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Sanford Consortium for Regenerative
Medicine, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 3Departmen of Biology, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, 4Biophotonics Core Facility, Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA, 5Department of
Biochemistry, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, 6Department of Neurosciences, Medical
University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
The Role of Sigma-1-Receptor in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Alzheimer’s Disease. T.T.
Nguyen1,2, K.L. Ferguson2, P. Chudalayandi1,2, R. Bergeron1,2; 1Neuroscience, Ottawa Hospital
Research Institute , Ottawa, ON, 2Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON
Enforcing cellular stress promotes apoptotic and immunogenic responses in melanoma.
S.M. Daignault1,2, L. Spoerri1,2, R.J. Ju1,2, D.S. Hill3,4, S.J. Stehbens1,2, R. Dolcetti1,2, N.K.
Haass1,2,3,4;1Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, 2Translational
Research Institute, Woolloongabba, Australia, 3The Centenary Institute, Newtown, Australia,
4
Dermatological Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Yeast tRNA ligase structure reveals kinetic competition between non-conventional mRNA splicing
and mRNA decay. J. Peschek1,2, P. Walter1,2; 1Biochemistry and Biophysics, UC San Francisco, San
Francisco, CA, 2HHMI, Chevy Chase, MD
Cell Stress Biosensors for Rapid, Live-Cell Detection of Neurotoxic and Cardiotoxic Compounds in
iPSC-Derived Neurons and Cardiomyocytes. K.M. Harlen1, T. Hughes1,2, A.M. Quinn1; 1Montana
Molecular, Bozeman, MT, 2Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT
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Microsymposium 8: Cell Biology of the Nucleus
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 28D
Moderator: Sam Dundon, Yale University
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Artificial nuclear membranes: A synthetic biology platform for the reconstitution and mechanistic
dissection of LINC complex assembly. S. Majumder1, P. Willey2, M. DeNies1, A.P. Liu1, G. Luxton2;
1
Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Genetics, Cell Biology, and
Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Macronuclear shape and positioning in the giant ciliate, Stentor coeruleus. R.M. McGillivary1, P.
Sood1, W.F. Marshall1; 1Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, San
Francisco, CA
Nuclear pore complexes and age-induced protein aggregates are excluded from gametes during
budding yeast meiosis. G.A. King1, J.S. Goodman1, D. Jorgens2, E. Ünal1; 1Molecular and Cell
Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Electron Microscopy Lab, University of
California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
The nucleus is essential for force generation during morphogenesis. M. Rayer1, A. Ambrosini1, B.
Monier1, M. Suzanne1; 1LBCMCP, CBI, Toulouse, France
Investigating the regulation of nucleolar dominance during male Drosophila melanogaster
development. N. Warsinger-Pepe1,2, Y.M. Yamashita2,3,4; 1Molecular and Integrative Physiology,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor, MI, 3Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 4University of
Michigan, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ann Arbor, MI
A new player in the orchestra of nuclear movement. C.S. Janota1, J. Costa1, E.R. Gomes1; 1Instituto
de Medicina Molecular, Lisboa, Portugal
Microsymposium 9: Cell Division and Mitosis
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 30C
Moderator: Emily Summerbell, Emory University
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The Chromosome Passenger Complex phosphorylates SAF-A/hnRNP-U to mediate clearance
of nuclear, chromatin-associated RNAs during prometaphase. J.A. Sharp1,2, M.D. Blower1,2;
1
Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 2Department of
Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
SNAP-based inhibition of localized kinase activity reveals the roles of Aurora A and Polo-like kinase
1 at the centrosomes during mitosis. P.J. Bucko1, C.K. Lombard2, A. Bhat1, F.D. Smith1, D.J. Maly2,
J.D. Scott1; 1Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2Department of
Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Non-cell autonomous spindle morphology contributes to mitotic vulnerability of embryonic
neural stem cells in mammals. V.E. Marthiens1, D. Vargas-Hurtado1, J. Brault1, D. Krndija1, T.
Piolot2, L. Leconte1, C. Pennetier1, N. Da Silva1, A. Baffet1, R. Basto1; 1UMR144, Institut Curie,
Paris, France, 2UMR3215, Institut Curie, Paris, France
Mild Replication Stress increases Microtubule Stability and induces premature Centriole
Disengagement in Mitosis, favoring Chromosome Segregation Errors. T. Wilhelm1, A. Olziersky1,
D. Harry1, H. Vassal1,2, P. Meraldi1; 1Cell Physiology and Metabolism, University of Geneva,
Geneva, Switzerland, 22National Institute of Applied Sciences, Lyon, France
ATP deprivation during a prolonged mitosis compromises kinetochore structure, SAC signaling and
cell fate determination. J. Oliveira1, A. Santos1, C. Ferras1; 1CID Lab, IBMC, i3S, Porto, Portugal
The tumor suppressor SETD2 functions as a dual regulator of microtubule and kinetochore
assembly during mitosis. F.M. Mason1, S.R. Norris1, I. Park2, C.L. Walker2, R. Ohi3, W.K. Rathmell1;
1
Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 2Molecular and Cellular Biology,
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 3Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI
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Microsymposium 10: Cell Mechanics
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 28B
Moderator: Matthew Akamatsu, University of California, Berkeley
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Two distinct mechanisms for mitochondrially-associated actin filament assembly triggered by
Arp2/3 complex or a formin. T. Fung1, R. Chakrabarti1, H.N. Higgs1; 1Department of Biochemistry
and Cell Biology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH
An intact LINC complex is required for acinar development. Q. Zhang1, V. Narayanan2, K.L.
Mui3, C.S. O’Bryan4, A.C. Tamashunas1, R.H. Anderson5, B. KC5, K.J. Roux5,6, T.E. Angelini4, G.G.
Gundersen3, D.E. Conway2, T.P. Lele1; 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University,
Richmond, VA, 3Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY,
4
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL,
5
Enabling Technologies Group, Sanford Research, Sioux Falls, SD, 6Department of Pediatrics,
University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD
The Role of Vimentin Intermediate Filaments in Cell Cortex Mechanics and Contractility. A.
Vahabikashi1,2, H. Wu3, M. Weber4, A.E. Goldman1, O. Medalia4, D.A. Weitz3, M. Johnson2, R.D.
Goldman1; 1Cell and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine ,
Chicago, IL, 2Biomedical Engineering , Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 3Physics, Harvard
University, Boston, MA, 4Biochemistry , University of Zurich , Zurich, Switzerland
Cytoskeletal Mechanics of Blood Platelets. A. Mathur1, S. Correia1, S. Dmitrieff1, R. Gibeaux1, I.
Kalinina1, T. Quidwai1, J. Ries1, F.J. Nedelec1; 1Cell Biology, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Vinculin Couples Myofibrils to the Cardiomyocyte Adherens Junction. C.D. Merkel1, Y. Li1, Q.S.
Raza1, D.B. Stolz1, A.V. Kwiatkowski1; 1Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,
Pittsburgh, PA
VE-cadherin endocytosis regulates endothelial cell polarity, collective cell migration and
angiogenesis during vascular development. C. Myers1, C. Cadwell1, R. Isaacson1, J. Campos1,
W. Giang1, A. Kowalczyk1,2; 1Cell Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 2Dermatology, Emory
University, Atlanta, GA
Microsymposium 11: Cytoskeleton and Disease
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29C
Moderator: Scott Wilkinson, National Institutes of Health
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Dynamic recruitment of the retinal degeneration gene product CCDC66 to the centrosome/cilium
complex is regulated by satellites and microtubules. E.N. Firat-Karalar1, D. Conkar1; 1Molecular
Biology and Genetics, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey
Intracellular Cholesterol Transport Requires StARD9, a Novel Multifunctional Kinesin that Couples
LDL Uptake to Projection of Lysosomal Membrane Tubules. F.R. Newton1, S.N. Leahy1, E.M.
Gertbauer1, P.S. Vaughan1, K.T. Vaughan1; 1Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre
Dame, IN
Identification and characterization of Vasohibins/SVBP as long-sought α-tubulin detyrosinating
enzymes: importance for neuron and brain. M. Moutin1,2, C. Aillaud1,2, C. Bosc1,2, L. peris1,2,
P. Heemerick1,2, J. Deloulme1,2, J. Le Friec1,2, b. Boulan1,2, S. Syed3, Y. Couté4, M.S. Bogyo3, S.
Humbert1,2, A. Andrieux1,2,5; 1Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences (GIN), Univ. Grenoble Alpes,
Grenoble, France, 2Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences (GIN), Inserm, U1216, Grenoble, France,
3
Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford, CA, 4BIG-BGE, Univ.
Grenoble Alpes, CEA, INSERM, Grenoble, France, 5BIG-GPC , CEA, Grenoble, United States
The in situ structure of a pathogenic mutant of LRRK2 in Parkinson’s Disease. R. Watanabe1, R.
Buschauer 1,2, J. Böhning1, M. Audagnotto 1, D. Boassa3, S.S. Taylor4, E. Villa1; 1Molecular Biology,
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Biochemistry, Gene Center Munich, University of
Munich, Munich, Germany, 3The National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University
of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 4Chemistry & Biochemistry, Pharmacology, University of
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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11:40 am
E65
11:50 am
E66
California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
UNC-45A is novel, ATP-independent, MT destabilizing protein that regulates cancer cells’ response
to mitotic poisons. A. Mooneyham1,2, Y. Lizuka1,2, Q. Yang3, C.E. Coombes3, M. McClellan3, V.
Shridhar4, E. Emmings1,2, M. Shetty1,2, L. Chen5, T. Ai5, J. Meints6, M.K. Lee6, M.K. Gardner3, M.
Bazzaro1,2; 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Heath, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, MN, 2Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis , MN,
3
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis,
MN, 4Department of Experimental Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN,
5
Center for Drug Design, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN,
6
Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells is Indicated by Adhesion Strength. P. Beri, A.
Popravko1, A. Chiang1, J.K. Placone1, A. Banisadr2, A.J. Engler1,2; 1Bioengineering, UCSD, San
Diego, CA, 2Biomedical Sciences, UCSD, San Diego, CA
Microsymposium 12: Regulation of Membrane Trafficking
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29B
Moderators: Courtney Schroeder, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; and Sara Wong, University of Michigan
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11:10 am
E68
11:20 am
E69
11:30 am
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11:40 am
E71
11:50 am
E72
Clearance of emerin, a tail-anchored inner nuclear membrane protein, by the rapid ER stressinduced export (RESET) pathway. A.L. Buchwalter1, M.W. Hetzer2; 1Cardiovascular Research
Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2Molecular and Cell Biology
Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA
The tubular ER shaping protein Reticulon 4a enhances exocytosis independently of its effect on
ER morphology. R. Mukherjee1, Z. Zhang2, D.L. Levy1; 1Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming,
Laramie, WY, 2Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
Mutant p53 activates a Dynamin-1/APPL1 endosome nexus downstream of EGFR/Akt to regulate
beta-1 integrin recycling and migration. A.M. Lakoduk1, P. Roudot1, M. Mettlen1, H.M. Grossman1,
S.L. Schmid1, P. Chen1; 1Cell Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Ca2+- dependent activation of Arf5 at ER/Plasma Membrane contact sites by an IQSec1/ORP3
complex controls focal adhesion turnover and cell migration. R.S. D’Souza1, A. Turgut1, J. Lim1, J.F.
Durel1, K. Orth2, J. Zhang2, M. Sohn3, Y. Kim3, T. Balla3, J.E. Casanova1; 1Cell Biology, University of
Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 2Molecular Biology, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Centre,
Dallas, TX, 3NICHD/DIR, Bethesda, MD
Single Grb2 recruitment dynamics are modulated by ECM mechanics. D. Thakar1, S. Low-Nam2,
F. Kai1, J.N. Lakins1, G. Ou1, S.D. Hansen2, J.T. Groves2, V.M. Weaver1,3,4; 1Department of Surgery,
University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2Department of Chemistry, University of
California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 3Department of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco,
San Francisco, CA, 4Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of
California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
A nutrient-induced affinity switch controls mTORC1 activation by its Rag GTPase-Ragulator
lysosomal scaffold. R.E. Lawrence1, K.F. Cho1, R. Rappold1, A.F. Thrun1, M. Tofaute1, D. Kim1, O.
Moldavski1, R. Zoncu1, J.H. Hurley1; 1Molecular and Cell Biology, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Organoids: The Future of Life Science Research
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 33B
Ruth Lehmann, Director, Skirball Institute, New York University School of Medicine
Jurgen Knoblich Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Vienna, Austria
Hans Clevers, Hubrecht Institute, Netherlands
Alta Charo, University of Wisconsin Law School
Zev Gartner, University of California, San Francisco
Research using human organoids is a relatively new field with tremendous scientific and medical potential. Because the field is so
new, many very basic questions are still open for discussion. A Task Force of the ASCB’s Public Policy Committee has been examining
many of these basic questions.
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11:00 am
The ASCB Organoid Task Force will present the results of its work in a panel discussion, including recommendations on ways to
address questions of reproducibility, the need for increased training in the field, and how scientists can explain the research to
the public and policymakers. Following the presentation of an overview of the science and the highlights of the report, there will
be a period for questions and discussion.
Outcomes:
1. Gain an understanding of the important role organoids will play in the future of biomedical research.
2. Gain a better understanding of challenges facing this cutting-edge area of research.
3. Learn information on the technology and training necessary for cell biologists to conduct organoid research.
4. Learn tools for talking about this cutting-edge area of science with the public and policymakers.
Target audience: all attendees
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Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
12:00-1:30 pm
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Learning Center
Exhibitor Tech Talk
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Andor Technology
NEW: Sona, a new back-illuminated sCMOS camera for the highest-sensitivity & largest field-of-view imaging—Protecting
your specimen from photobleaching & toxicity; maximizing sampling & throughput
Presenter: Justin Cooper, PhD - Application Specialist, Andor
Level: Intermediate
Keywords: Live cell imaging, High content imaging, developmental biology, tissue imaging, organoids. Andor has just released the
most sensitive back-illuminated sCMOS camera on the market. The flagship model, Sona 4.2B, presents an exclusive solution for
capturing extremely large fields of cells or whole embryos with exceptional clarity. Great care has been taken to extend dynamic
range and ensure linearity to ensure no valuable signal from your sample is lost, and that quantitative analysis is accurate. If you
have an interest in capturing large volumes of data to improve your productivity, imaging large samples with as few fields as
possible, or looking for a balanced solution between sensitivity, speed, and resolution for living samples, then join this presentation
to find out more.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Introducing a fully integrated Cryo Electron Tomography workflow for your lab
Presenter: Dr. Jan De Bock
Level: Intermediate
To fully investigate complex biological mechanisms, scientists require structural information about molecules within their subcellular
context. To achieve this, the target molecules and their cellular environment need to be accurately resolved at subnanometer
resolution. Leica Microsystems and Thermo Fisher Scientific have collaborated to create the first fully integrated Cryo Electron
Tomography workflow that responds to these research needs and allows a fast screening of large areas and rapid determination
of regions of interest in the electron microscope under cryo conditions. Safe and contamination-free sample and data transfer
between instruments is ensured. Easy navigation to the cellular target regions via Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM)
is provided, being the basis for reliable results at subnanometer resolution.
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Starting a Laboratory at an R1 Institution
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Matt Daugherty, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego
Elizabeth Villa, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego
Michael Cianfrocco, Assistant Professor, University of Michigan
Sandra Schmid, Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Starting a lab at an R1 institution can be a daunting process, and postdoctoral researchers receive little training on many of the
managerial aspects of running a lab, such as interviewing and hiring, managing a budget, leadership, and mentoring. What are some
of the problems that one can be aware of or even avoid when setting up a lab at an R1 institution? What are useful strategies to
efficiently and effectively set up a successful lab, beyond the advice of “publish or perish”? In this panel discussion we will discuss
effective strategies for setting up a successful research program as an assistant professor.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, and new faculty members
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Writing Your Science Story: How to Get Everyone Else Excited About Your Work
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Heather Bushman, Science Writer and Media Relations Professional, University of California, San Diego
Madeline McCurry-Schmidt, Science Editor, The Scripps Research Institute
Nathan Young, Storytelling Communications Instructor
In today’s intense research environment, scientists must become effective communicators to gain a competitive edge and to make
a difference in their communities. Explaining science to the public is an essential skill for any scientist, whether it is to engage with
outreach opportunities, to educate students, or to communicate with patient advocates on grant panels and at fundraisers. This
session aims to equip everyone with the tools they need to become successful writers when addressing the public, whether it is
discussing their own work or the broader impact of their field. Participants will have the chance to hear from exceptional guest
speakers and to take part in hands-on activities to refine their science writing and public communication skills.
Outcomes:
1. Appreciate the impact of science writing for the public.
2. Understand what makes captivating writing to a nonspecialist audience.
3. Gain tools to engage the public with your work through powerful writing by breaking down complex scientific concepts.
4. Learn how to edit your own writing to adapt it to different situations.
Target audience: all attendees
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Outcomes:
1. Have a better understanding of the day-to-day job as a faculty member at an R1 institution.
2. Learn strategies for successfully mentoring and recruiting a variety of trainees from undergraduates to postdoctoral fellows.
3. Gain insight into skills required to succeed as a faculty member at an R1 institution that you can cultivate as a trainee.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Winning Westerns: Proven Strategies to Optimize Your Western Blots
Presenter: Natasha L. Pirman, PhD, Application Scientist, MilliporeSigma
Level: Introductory
Does Western blotting give you more trouble than expected? Do you feel like your precious samples are being wasted on bad
Westerns? Join us and find out how you can improve your Western blots! In this seminar, you will learn general guidelines
for performing and troubleshooting your Westerns, such as: • Choice of different blotting membranes • Parameters affecting
blotting efficiency • Conditions for optimizing your immunodetection • Information on SNAP I.D.® 2.0: A faster way to perform
immunodetection As the inventors of PVDF Immobilon® membranes, MilliporeSigma knows how informative a good Western can
be. Bring your research questions to get the most out of this session.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Synthego
CRISPR-Engineered Cells For Your Research
Presenter: Kevin Holden, PhD - Head of Synthetic Biology at Synthego
Level: Introductory
The CRISPR-Cas9 technology is a powerful molecular biology tool that has revolutionized mammalian cell engineering. It is now
relatively straightforward to generate gene knockouts, tag genes, or program specific genome changes such as single nucleotide
variants in a wide range of cell lines and primary cells. Such engineered cells can be utilized for a variety of research purposes
including drug discovery, disease modeling, gene therapies, and basic research. However, adapting this technology into the lab
can require extensive optimization. Synthego has developed a software driven, automated platform for rapidly optimizing and
generating CRISPR-Cas9 engineered cells for research purposes through a cloud biology solution. This allows scientists to focus
more on their own research questions, and spend less time adapting and optimizing methods.
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Advocacy Toolbox II: Practice Being an Advocate for Science
1:00-2:00 pm
Roundtable Central 3, Learning Center
You don’t have to travel to Washington, DC, to advocate for science. There are plenty of opportunities to be a science policy advocate
in your hometown. This session will provide you with the opportunity to tune your advocacy skills to improve your effectiveness
as advocates. You can participate in short advocacy exercises to put your new skills into practice. The exercises include practice
meetings with local government officials and learning the best ways to send advocacy messages using social media.
Outcomes:
1. Learn how to improve your skills as a science advocate.
2. Practice being an advocate for science in your local community.
3. Learn the newest ways to get your advocacy message out to community leaders.
Target audience: all attendees
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ASCB Member Forum/Business Meeting
1:00-1:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Join leaders of the ASCB to learn about the state of the Society and the passing of the gavel from Jodi Nunnari to Andrew Murray.
Refreshments will be served.
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Career Discussion and Mentoring Roundtables
1:00 pm-2:00 pm
Roundtable Central Sections 1-2, Learning Center
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
(No preregistration required; first-come, first served)
Meet informally for discussions on issues of importance to cell biologists in various career stag-es. Conversations are moderated by
individuals with experience in various professional areas or with particular issues. The session is an excellent way to disseminate
practical information on career choices, discuss strategies for effectively developing a career, and network with others who share
career interests and concerns.
Attending these roundtables can help attendees overcome the intimidating aspects of the large meeting, and may be helpful to
young cell biologists who are looking for mentors. Past attendees say that meeting others with common interests and concerns at
this event enriched their initial contacts and provided positive feedback and excellent advice regarding a career issue of con-cern
to them.
Career Preparation
Applying for a Faculty Position at a Primarily Undergraduate
Institution
Applying for a Faculty Position at a Research University or
Institute
Navigating the Tenure Process
Setting Up and Managing Your First Lab
Strategies for Obtaining a Postdoc Position
Strategies for Succeeding in Postdoctoral Research
Teaching and Research in Primarily Undergraduate
Institutions
Tips for Applying to Graduate School
Tips for Succeeding in Graduate School
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Essential Career Skills, Resources, and Support
Biology Education Research
Career Planning & the Individual Development Plan (IDP)
CourseSource: Publishing Evidence-based Undergraduate
Teaching Resources
Elevator Speech – Create a Great First Impression
Leadership Skill Development
LGBTQ+ in Science
Mentor-Mentee Relationships: Mentee Perspective
Mentor-Mentee Relationships: Mentor Perspective
Science Sketches: Videos to Communicate Research
Teaching Professional Development for Graduate Students
Thriving as a Faculty Member at a Minority Serving Institution
Troubleshooting Active Learning and Equity Strategies
Unique Demands on Minority Graduate Students
Women in Science
Work/Life Balance
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
1:30-3:00 pm
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Learning Center
Afternoon Refreshment Break
1:30-3:30 pm
Join us for a beverage and snack while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
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Table Topics
Career Options
Career Choices: Academia vs. Industry
Career Opportunities in Cell Biology at NASA
Careers in Government Lab Research
Careers in Scientific Writing & Editing
Careers in the Biotech & Pharmaceutical Industries
Non Tenure-track Careers in Academia
Research and Career Opportunities for Undergrads
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In-Booth Presentation
1:30-2:00 pm
Booth 1019
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless and maskless photopatterning system
Presenters: Grégoire Peyret, PhD, and Hélène Delobel
To more efficiently study living cells and model diseases, researchers are challenged with mimicking the cell microenvironment in
vitro. We will show how PRIMO photopatterning technology allows researchers to fine-tune cell culture substrates’ topography
through microfabrication and biochemistry through protein micropatterning (compatible with all substrates: soft or stiff, flat or
microstructured).
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Olympus America Inc.
The Olympus FV3000RS Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope: Speed and Sensitivity for Live Cell Imaging and Beyond
Presenter: Rebecca Murray, PhD, Product Manager, Confocal Microscopy Olympus America Inc.
Level: Intermediate
Olympus now offers the next generation FV3000RS laser scanning confocal microscope. Combining a large field of view resonant
scanner and patented revolutionary spectral detection, the FV3000RS improves detection of dim signals at high speeds. Come learn
about recent advances in confocal imaging technology as we discuss its applications for live cell imaging, thick tissue 3D imaging,
and macro-to-micro imaging. We will also discuss the benefits of using red-shifted fluorophores for live cell imaging applications,
such as reduced phototoxicity and improved tissue penetration. Olympus now offers the next generation FV3000RS laser scanning
confocal microscope. Combining a large field of view resonant scanner and patented revolutionary spectral detection, the FV3000RS
improves detection of dim signals at high speeds. Come learn about recent advances in confocal imaging technology as we discuss
its applications for live cell imaging, thick tissue 3D imaging, and macro-to-micro imaging. We will also discuss the benefits of
using red-shifted fluorophores for live cell imaging applications, such as reduced phototoxicity and improved tissue penetration.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
A spectrum of light sheet instruments optimized for different imaging demands
Presenter: Colin Monks, PhD
Level: Intermediate
Light sheet technology has been at the core of many exciting recent developments in microscopy. These new instruments can
image living cells at unprecedented speed with a minimal light dose. However, each instrument is optimized for only a subset of
biological specimens. This talk will review the various light sheet architectures available and discuss the biological context where
they are most useful.
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Careers in Scientific Consulting
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Glenn Croston, Principal Consultant, Glenn Croston Consulting
Amy Duncan, CEO and Chief Marketing Consultant, Goldfish Consulting, Inc.
Jieling Zhu, Senior Consultant, Deloitte
This panel discussion with a variety of speakers from different sized consulting firms will focus on scientific consulting jobs available
to PhDs. Consulting jobs are well suited for PhDs because they require critical thinking skills and many consulting companies prefer
to hire candidates with advanced degrees. Attendees will learn about the requirements to obtain a consulting job as well as the
skills and tactics to become more competitive when applying.
Outcomes:
1. Discover what a job in scientific consulting is like and the daily activities of a consultant.
2. Learn what the requirements are to apply for a job in consulting and what makes an applicant stand out.
3. Interact with consultants from various sized companies to further develop your career.
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Statistical Thinking in Undergraduate Biology (STUB) Network: Coordinating Teaching and Assessment
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Noa Pinter-Wollman, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles
Beth Chance, Professor, Statistics, Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo
There are now many social media platforms that scientists can use to directly communicate their research with both other
scientists and the public at large. This session will be a panel discussion focused on the use of social media as a tool for science
communication, and the pros and cons of the different social media platforms. The panelists will discuss their experiences using
social media as a scientist and how to get started.
Outcomes:
1. Hear about and discuss recent guidelines and best practices for effective instruction of statistical principles and learnercentered free technology.
2. Hear about and discuss topics in biology that could integrate a focus on quantitative reasoning.
3. Hear about and discuss recent guidelines and best practices for effective instruction of statistical principles for helping
students develop statistical reasoning.
4. Explore existing, and consider developing new, curricular materials and assessments as part of the STUB-networks repository.
Target audience: instructors of introductory biology courses, biologists whose research includes a quantitative focus
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Meet the Committees
2:30-3:00 pm
ASCB Booth 623, Learning Center
Members from the Education and Minorities Affairs Committees will be on hand to answer any questions you have.
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Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Horizon Discovery Ltd
Cell line engineering with CRISPR-Cas9 - tips and tricks to maximize success
Presenter: Vipat Raksakulthai , Field Application Specialist, Horizon Discovery
Level: Introductory
CRISPR-Cas9 is a versatile tool to discover more about your biological pathway or gene of interest. The simplicity of the CRISPRCas9 system has led to an explosion in applications, from single cell genomics to personalized medicine. In this Tech Talk, we will
discuss key considerations when embarking on your gene engineering project to help minimize the bench time needed to reach
your gene-engineering goals. Topics will range from designing guide RNA reagents to target your gene of interest to validating
the resulting clones. We will also discuss the benefits of using an independent cell line model for confirmation of the phenotype.
Key topics will include: Introduction to CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering and Important considerations when initiating your gene
engineering projects, including: Cell line optimization, Guide RNA selection, Donor design for knock-in studies, and Clone screening
strategies and validation.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Allen Institute for Cell Science
From images to information: new machine-learning based image processing toolbox for cellular organization
Presenter: Allen Institute for Cell Science
Level: Introductory
We will present the publicly available toolsets we have developed to tackle challenges in modern image-processing and analysis
workflows. These include our new Python-based open source toolkit for streamlined 3D segmentation, which combines a set of
traditional segmentation algorithms with an iterative deep learning workflow. This toolkit evolved from the challenge of developing
successful 3D segmentation algorithms for a wide range (over 30) of intracellular structures in the Allen Cell Collection (www.allencell.
org). We will demonstrate our straightforward workflow for applying this toolkit to your own 3D images of intracellular structures.
We will also present a new method to get more information from brightfield imaging: our label-free method. It is designed to
mitigate the challenges inherent in fluorescence microscopy. The method predicts 3D fluorescence directly from transmitted light
images. It can be used to generate multi-structure, integrated images. Notably, training data for the method requires no manual
annotation, little to no pre-processing, and relatively small numbers of paired examples, drastically reducing the barrier to entry.
The methodology has wide potential use in many biological imaging fields and may reduce or even eliminate routine capture of
some images in existing imaging and analysis pipelines, permitting similar throughput in an efficient, cost-effective manner.
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EMBO Gold Medal Ceremony and Lectures: Marek Basler and Melina Schuh
3:15-4:15 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Marek Basler, Biozentrum at the University of Basel,
Switzerland
A4
A5
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Melina Schuh, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical
Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany
Type VI secretion system: from the discovery to the mode of action of a dynamic bacterial
nanomachine. M. Basler1; 1Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
New Insights into Causes of Aneuploidy in Mammalian Eggs. M. Schuh1; 1Max Planck Institute for
Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, Germany
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
4:15-5:15 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Nanolive SA
Label-free, long-term 3D analysis of organelles in living mammalian cells shows pre-mitotic organelle spinning: mitochondria,
nucleus and lipid droplets in the spotlight
Presenter: Dr. Alexander Jones, Nanolive SA
Level: Introductory
Holo-tomographic microscopy (HTM) is a label-free non-phototoxic microscopy method reporting the fine changes of a cell’s refractive
indexes (RI) in 3D. Cellular organelles such as lipid droplets and mitochondria which were dependent on chemical staining to be
visualized, show a specific RI signature that distinguishes them with high resolution and contrast in HTM. Furthermore, thanks to
the absence of phototoxicity proper of HTM, it is possible to follow the dynamics of mitochondria, lipid droplets as well as that of
endocytic structures in live cells over long periods of time, even in the most sensitive type of cells (e.g., stem cells) which led us to
observe, to our knowledge for the first time, a global organelle spinning occurring before mitosis1. Big announcements will follow
the scientific talk. 1 Sandoz et al (2018), Label free 3D analysis of organelles in living cells by refractive index shows pre-mitotic
organelle spinning in mammalian stem cells, Biorxiv, https://doi.org/10.1101/407239
Exhibitor Tech Talk
4:15-5:15 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cryo-tomography: a new imaging technique for cell biology to peer at the inner workings of cells
Presenter: Elizabeth Villa
Level: Introductory
Studying the molecular machinery of cells from atomic detail to the cellular context and beyond is a great challenge for cell biology.
This session will highlight how cryo-electron tomography allows researchers to peer inside cells and see proteins in situ—in their
unperturbed functional environments—at high resolution and in 3D. The best possible structure preservation is guaranteed
by sample vitrification, a freezing process so fast that it preserves structural integrity and functional interactions. Introducing
innovative and user-friendly instrumentation makes this cutting-edge technology now more applicable for cell biology. This lecture
will feature introductions into the Thermo Scientific Aquilos cryo-dual beam microscope and the tomography workflow utilizing
Thermo Scientific’s cryo-transmission electron microscopes. The presentation will show how cryo-tomography is used to study
the molecular architecture of the nuclear periphery, to understand Parkinson’s disease at the molecular level, and to peek into
the inner life of bacteria.
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Minisymposium 7: Motors in Transport and Cytoskeleton Remodeling
4:30-7:05 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Supported by Biology Open
Co-Chairs: Julie Welburn, University of Edinburgh; and E. Michael Ostap, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
4:30 pm
4:35 pm
M69
Introduction
Molecular motors destroy microtubules and catalyze tubulin exchange within the lattice.
S. Triclin1, D. Inoue1, J. Gaillard1, Z.M. Htet2, M.E. DeSantis2, D. Portran3, E. Derivery4, C.
Aumeier5, L. Schaedel1, K. John6, C. Leterrier7, S.L. Reck-Peterson2, L. Blanchoin1,8, M. Théry1,8;
1
Cytomorpholab, Laboratoire de Phyiologie Cellulaire & Végétale, Biosciences & Biotechnology
Institute of Grenoble, Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CEA, CNRS, INRA, Grenoble, France, 2Dept. of Cellular
and Molecular Medicine, and Cell and Developmental Biology Section, Division of Biological
Sciences, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, 3CRBM, CNRS UMR 5237, Montpellier,
France, 4Laboratory of Molecular Biology, MRC , Cambridge, United Kingdom, 5Department of
Biochemistry, University of Geneva , Geneva, Switzerland, 6Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de
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4:50 pm
M70
5:05 pm
M71
5:20 pm
M72
5:35 pm
M73
5:50 pm
M74
6:05 pm
M75
6:20 pm
M76
6:35 pm
M77
6:50 pm
M78
Physique, Univ. Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble, France, 7NeuroCyto Lab, Aix Marseille Université,
CNRS, INP UMR7051, Marseille, France, 8CytoMorpho Lab, Institut Universitaire d’Hematologie,
Univ. Paris Diderot, INSERM, CEA, Hôpital Saint Louis, UMRS1160 , Paris, United States
Mechanisms regulating microtubule length in mitosis. T. McHugh1, A. Gluszek1, J.P. Welburn1;
1
Wellcome Trust for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Using silent mutations to design a chemical probe for the microtubule-severing AAA+ protein
spastin. T. Cupido1, R. Pisa1, M.E. Kelley1, T.M. Kapoor1; 1Laboratory of chemistry and cell biology,
the Rockefeller University, New York, NY
The RanGTP Gradient Acts as a Rheostat to Promote XCTK2 Microtubule Cross-Linking and
Sliding. S.C. Ems-McClung1, S. Zhang2, S. Mahnoor3,4, L.N. Weaver2,5, C.E. Walczak1; 1Medical
Sciences Program, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 2Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington,
IN, 3International Summer Undergraduate Research Program, Indiana University, Bloomington,
IN, 4Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 5Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
Microtubule Attachment Geometries Affect Kinesin Attachment Durations. S. Pyrpassopoulos1,
E.M. Ostap1; 1Pennsylvania Muscle Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Cargo Adaptors Regulate the Mechanical Properties of the Mammalian Dynein-Dynactin Complex.
J. Canty1, M. Elshenawy1, L. Oster1, L.S. Ferro2, A. Yildiz1,2,3; 1Biophysics, University of California
Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA,
3
Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
HOOK3 is a Scaffold for Opposite Polarity Motors. A.A. Kendrick1, W.B. Redwine1, L. Pontano
Vaites2, P.T. Tran1, J.W. Harper2, S.L. Reck-Peterson1,3; 1Department of Cellular and Molecular
Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Department of Cell Biology, Harvard
Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Division of Biological Sciences, Cell and Developmental Biology
Section, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Transport of Mbp mRNA by Dynein and Myosin Motors in Oligodendrocytes is Critical for Local
Translation and Myelination. M. Fu1, C. Lee1, B.A. Barres1; 1Neurobiology, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA
Myosin 18A targets the Rac/Cdc42 GEF β-PIX to dendritic spines to promote spine maturation.
C.J. Alexander1, M. Barzik2, J.A. Hammer III1; 1Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, 2Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute on
Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD
Agent-based modeling of myosin motor ensembles in dynamic contractile rings. D.B. Cortes1, F.J.
Nedelec2, A.S. Maddox1; 1Biology, UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 2EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Minisymposium 8: Neural Development and Neurodegeneration
4:30-7:05 pm
Room 31B
Co-Chairs: Aaron DiAntonio, Washington University in St. Louis; and Andrea Brand, University of Cambridge, UK
4:30 pm
*4:35 pm
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Introduction
Uncovering the Hidden Cell Biology of the Human Brain. S.P. Pasca1; 1Psychiatry and Behavioral
Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Time to wake up: regulation of neural stem cell quiescence and reactivation. A.H. Brand1; 1The
Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Kinetochore Proteins Have a Post-Mitotic Function in Drosophila Neurodevelopment. G. Zhao1,
A. Oztan1, R.S. O’Neill2, N.M. Rusan2, T. Schwarz1; 1Neurobiology, Children’s Hospital, Boston,
Boston, MA, 2Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute,
Bethesda, MD
Shortening heparan sulfate chains decreases parenchymal plaques and prolongs survival in
prion-infected mice. P. Aguilar-Calvo1, A. Sevillano1, J. Bapat1, K. Soldau1, D.R. Sandoval2,
H.C. Altmeppen3, L. Linsenmeier3, D. Pizzo1, S.D. Edland4, M. Glatzel3, P.R. Nilsson5, J.D.
Esko2, C. Sigurdson1,6,7; 1Pathology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, 2Cellular
and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, 3Institute of
Neuropathology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf , Hamburg, Germany,
4
Departments of Family Medicine & Public Health and Neurosciences, University of California
San Diego, San Diego, CA, 5Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, Linköping University, San Diego, CA,
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Pathology, Immunology, and Microbiology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, 7Medicine,
University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA
Dual leucine zipper kinase is required for mechanical pain and microgliosis resulting from nerve
injury. J.J. Wlaschin1, J.M. Gluski1, E.K. Nguyen2, H. Silberberg1, J.H. Thompson2, A.T. Chesler2, C.
Le Pichon1; 1NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 2NCCIH, National Institutes of
Health, Bethesda, MD
Axon Degeneration: Molecular Mechanism and Therapeutic Potential. A. DiAntonio1;
1
Developmental Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
Annexin A11 dysfunction disrupts docking of RNP granules to endolysosomes in FTD/ALS. M.S.
Fernandopulle1,2, Y. Liao3, S. Qamar2, P. St. George-Hyslop2, M. Ward1, J. Lippincott-Schwartz3;
1
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda,
MD, 2Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United
Kingdom, 3HHMI Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA
A Mitochondrial Membrane-Spanning Ternary Machinery Regulates Mitochondrial Motility and
Lifespan. L. Li1, X. Wang1; 1Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
Cellular mechanisms that prevent the liquid-to-solid phase transition of aggregation-prone
proteins. S. Spannl1,2, A.A. Hyman2, H.O. Lee1,2; 1University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 2Max
Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
Perturbed posttranslational polyglutamylation of the neuronal microtubule cytoskeleton
causes neurodegeneration in mice and humans. M.M. Magiera1, V. Shashi2, S. Bodakuntla1, J.
Ziak3, D. Klein4, S. Rudnik-Schönebor5, M. Dusl6, S. Lacomme7, P. Catarino Marques Sousa1,8,
S. Leboucher1, T.J. Hausrat9, C. Bosc10, A. Andrieux10, M. Kneussel9, M. Landry7, A. Calas7, R.
Martini4, M. Balastik3, J. Senderek6, C. Janke1; 1Institut Curie, Orsay, France, 2Division of Medical
Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 3Dept. of
Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of Physiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech
Republic, 4Department of Neurology, Developmental Neurobiology, University Hospital Würzburg,
Würzburg, Germany, 5Division of Human Genetics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck,
Austria, 6Friedrich Baur Institute at the Department of Neurology, Ludwig Maximilian University
of Munich, Munich, Germany, 7Bordeaux Imaging Center, BIC, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux,
France, 8Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 9Center for Molecular
Neurobiology (ZMNH), University Medical Center Hamburg- Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany,
10
Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, GIN, Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble, France
6
5:35 pm
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Minisymposium 9: Patterning Tissue Morphogenesis
4:30-7:05 pm
Ballroom 20D
Co-Chairs: Lucy O’Brien, Stanford University; and Matthew Gibson, Stowers Institute
4:30 pm
4:35 pm
M89
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* 5:05 pm
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Introduction
A morphogenetic Hox code controls tissue segmentation and appendage patterning in the sea
anemone Nematostella vectensis. S. He1, F. Del Viso1, C. Chen1, A. Ikmi1, A. Kroesen1, M.C.
Gibson1; 1Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO
Distinct modes of cell competition shape tissue morphogenesis and function in mammalian skin.
S. Ellis1, J. Levorse1, E. Fuchs1; 1Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, The
Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Imaging how the pluripotent inner mass forms in the living mouse embryo. M.D. White1, J.
Zenker1, Y.D. Alvarez1, M. Gasnier1, H. Lim1, S. Bissiere1, N. Plachta1; 1IMCB, Agency for Science,
Technology and Research, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore
Orienting Feather Buds by Coupling of Biochemical and Bioelectric Signals. A. Li1, J. Cho2,3, B.
Reid4, C. Tseng5, L. He6, P. Tan6, C. Yeh1, P. Wu1, Y. Li7, R.B. Widelitz1, Y. Zhou6, M. Zhao4, R. Chow2,
C. Chuong1,8; 1Pathology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles,
CA, 2Physiology and Biophysics, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los
Angeles, CA, 3Synaptic Transmission Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and
Stroke, Bethesda, MD, 4Dermatology, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA, 5Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, 6Institute of
Biosciences and Technology, Texas AM University Health Science Center, Houston, TX, 7Biology
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MONDAY
* Sergiu Pasca is the 2018 ASCB Early Career Awardee.
5:35 pm
M93
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and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 8Integrative Stem Cell
Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
Role of Celsr1 extracellular adhesive interactions in coordinating planar cell polarity. S.N. Stahley1,
D. Devenport1; 1Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
Active cell migration is critical for epithelial renewal in gut homeostasis. D. Krndija1, F. El Marjou1,
S. Richon1, O. Leroy2, E. Hannezo3, D. Matic Vignjevic1; 1CNRS UMR 144, Institut Curie, Paris,
France, 2U934/UMR3215, Institut Curie, Paris, France, 3Institute of Science and Technology Austria
(IST Austria), Vienna, Austria
Study of planarian fission identifies polarity signaling as a link between size-scaling and sizedependent behavior. C.P. Arnold1,2, B.W. Benham-Pyle2, J.J. Lange1, A. Sánchez Alvarado1,2;
1
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute,
Kansas City, MO
Direct visualization of a native Wnt in vivo reveals that a long-range Wnt gradient forms by free,
extracellular dispersal. A.M. Pani1, B. Goldstein1; 1Biology, UNC Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
Cell-cell contact induced EGFR signaling promotes the survival and growth of highly metastatic
tumor cell clusters. E.D. Wrenn1,2,3, B.M. Moore1,2, M.A. McBirney1,2, A. Yamamoto1,2,3, A.J.
Thomas1,2, E. Greenwood1,2, K.J. Cheung1,2,4; 1Public Health Sciences Division, Translational
Research Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 2Human Biology
Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle , WA, 3Molecular and Cellular Biology
Graduate Program, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 4Division of Medical Oncology,
University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Orchestration of a subset of O-glycosylation by a conserved atypical MFS family member
facilitates macrophage dissemination and tissue invasion. K. Valoskova1, J. Biebl1, M. Roblek1,
S. Emtenani1, A. Gyoergy1, M. Misova1, J. Stopp1, S. Wachner1, A. Ratheesh1, K. Shkarina2,
I.S. Larsen3, S. Vakhrushev3, H. Clausen3, D.E. Siekhaus1; 1Institute of Science and Technology
Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Lausanne, Epalinges,
Switzerland, 3Copenhagen Center for Glycomics, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen,
Denmark
* Melanie White is an ASCB Porter Prize for Research Excellence Awardee.
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Minisymposium 10: Phase Transitions in the Cell
4:30-7:05 pm
Room 28C
Co-Chairs: Amy Gladfelter, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and D. Allan Drummond, The University of Chicago
4:30 pm
4:35 pm
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M100
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Introduction
Poly-Q dependent phase separations drive spatial heterogeneity in cytoplasmic crowding.
E.M. Langdon1, J. Newby2, G. McLaughlin1, T.M. Gerbich1, M. Roper3, L. Holt4, A.S. Gladfelter1;
1
Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Mathematics, University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill, NC, 3Mathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 4Biochemistry, New York
University School Of Medicine, New York City, NY
Stress-sensitive phase separation regulates translation of stress-induced mRNAs. C.D. Katanski1,
H. Yoo1, C. Iserman2, E. Pilipenko1, S. Alberti2, D.A. Drummond1; 1Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and
Genetics, Dresden, Germany
Phase separation potentiates the condensation of mitochondrial nucleoids in a premature aging
disease. M. Feric1, T. Misteli2; 1National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes
of Health, Bethesda, MD, 2National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
Phase transition drives telomere clustering. H. Zhang1, M. Liu1, C. Aonbangkhen2, R. Dilley3,4,
R.A. Greenberg3,4, D.M. Chenoweth2, M.A. Lampson1; 1Biology, University of Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia, PA, 2Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Cancer Biology,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 4 Pathology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Stoichiometry controls activity of phase separated clusters of actin signaling proteins. L.B. Case1,
X. Zhang1, J.A. Ditlev1, M.K. Rosen1; 1Department of Biophysics, UT Southwestern Medical Center,
Dallas, TX
Synthetic condensed-phase signaling. D. Sang1, A. Rice2, M.K. Rosen2, L.J. Holt1; 1Institute for
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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6:05 pm
M105
6:20 pm
M106
6:35 pm
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Systems Genetics, New York University, New York, NY, 2Department of Biophysics, University of
Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX
The liquid core of P granules is stabilized by a gel-like shell. A. Putnam1,2, M. Cassani1,2, G.
Seydoux1,2; 1Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD,
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baltimore, MD
The Balbiani Body and how it disassembles. C. Martinez-Guillamon1, E. Boke1,2; 1Cell and
Developmental Biology, Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Spain, 2Universitat
Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain
Age-induced large and stable P-bodies predict the future lifespan of yeast. J. Choi1, S. Wang1, B.M. Zid1;
1
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Multiple cellular mechanisms maintain the liquidity of an RNA-protein condensate, stress
granules. H.O. Lee1, A. Schwager2, S. Spannl1, A.A. Hyman2; 1Biochemistry, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON, 2Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany
Minisymposium 11: Spindle Mechanics and Chromosome Segregation
4:30-7:05 pm
Ballroom 20A
Co-Chairs: Iva Tolic, Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI), Croatia; and Daniel Gerlich, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the
Austrian Academy Sciences (IMBA)
4:50 pm
M110
*5:05 pm
M111
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Introduction
Forces, torques, and architecture of the mitotic spindle. B. Polak1, J. Simunić1, B. Kuzmić1, M.
Jagrić1, J. Martinčić1, P. Risteski1, K. Vukušić1, R. Buđa1, M. Novak2, N. Pavin2, I.M. Tolić1; 1RBI,
Zagreb, Croatia, 2University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Electron tomographic reconstructions of mammalian spindles provide information about
interactions between kinetochore microtubules and interpolar microtubule bundles. E.T. O’Toole1,
M.K. Morphew1, J.R. McIntosh1; 1MCD Biology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
Cell Division: Mechanical Integrity with Dynamic Parts. C.L. Hueschen1, P. Suresh1, A.F. Long1, S.
Dumont1; 1Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Kinetochore-mediated multivalency of Ndc80 complex is essential to harness the power stroke of
bending protofilaments at the microtubule end. V.A. Volkov1, P.J. Huis in ’t Veld2, A. Musacchio2,
M. Dogterom1; 1Bionanoscience Department, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands,
2
Department of Mechanistic Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology,
Dortmund, Germany
Molecular and evolutionary strategies of meiotic cheating by selfish centromeres. T. Akera1, E.
Trimm1, M.A. Lampson1; 1Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Chromosome mechanics during nuclear assembly. S. Cuylen1,2, M. Petrovic1, M. Samwer1, M.W.
Schneider1, D.W. Gerlich1; 1IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Vienna, Austria, 2EMBL European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany
A contractile actomyosin network on the nuclear envelope remnant positions human
chromosomes for mitosis. A.J. Booth1, Z. Yue1, J.K. Eykelenboom1, G. Luxton2, H. Hochegger3, T.U.
Tanaka1; 1Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom,
2
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis,
MN, 3Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom
Chromosome segregation fidelity in epithelia requires tissue architecture. K.A. Knouse1, K.E.
Lopez2,3,4, M. Bachofner5, A. Amon2,3,4; 1Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge,
MA, 2Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 3Koch Institute for
Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 4Howard
Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 5Biology, Swiss
Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), Zurich, Switzerland
Cell cycle asynchrony and DNA damage at mitotic entry contribute to the evolution of polyploid
karyotypes. R. Basto1, S. Gemble1, A. Simon1, V. Fraisier1, V.E. Marthiens1, M. Nano1; 1Cell Biology,
Institut Curie, Paris, France
DNA-dependent innate immune signaling by cGAS controls mitotic cell death and the response
to taxol. C. Zierhut1, N. Yamaguchi2, H. Funabiki1; 1Laboratory of Chromosome and Cell Biology,
The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, 2Laboratory of Systems Cancer Biology, The Rockefeller
University, New York, NY
* Sophie Dumont is the 2018 WICB Junior Awardee for Excellence in Science Research.
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MONDAY
4:30 pm
4:35 pm
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NCI-ASCB Emerging Topic Symposium: A New Nuclear-Nexus in Cancer Cell Biology
4:30-7:05 pm
Room 29C
Organizers: Michael Graham Espey, National Cancer Institute, NIH; and Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis, and ASCB
President
While cancer has been viewed primarily a disease of mutations, an emerging new understanding of the unique changes that occur
in the cell biology of the nucleus as malignancies progress has moved the field forward. The Symposium will highlight new biology
revealed by oncogenic adaptations in nuclear organization, nuclear pore complex structure and function, and coordination between
mitochondria and the nucleus to regulate transcription and DNA damage responses.
Presentations:
4:30 pm
4:40 pm
5:15 pm
5:50 pm
6:25 pm
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Introduction. Jodi Nunnari. UC Davis, and Michal Graham Espey, NCI
Cancer and the Aging Nucleus. Martin Hetzer, Salk Institute
Oncogenic Coupling of Metabolism and Nuclear Pore Complex Transcriptional Control.
Rosalie Sears, Oregon Health & Science University
Metastatic Nuclear Mechanobiology. Jan Lammerding, Cornell University
Role of mtDNA in Coordinating Nuclear Damage Responses. Gerald Shadel, Salk Institute
Workshop: Screening Approaches in Human Cells and CRISPR Methods
4:30-7:05 pm
Room 33B
Organizers and Speakers:
Martin Kampmann, Co-Organizer and Speaker, University of California, San Francisco
Manuel Leonetti, Co-Organizer and Speaker, Chan Zuckerberg Biohub
Britt Adamson, Speaker, Princeton University
Mike Bassik, Speaker, Stanford University
The rapid development of CRISPR-based technologies is transforming the cell biologist’s toolbox and our ability to interrogate
genes, proteins, or organisms. Here we will provide an update on methods to manipulate gene expression or protein sequence in
mammalian cells, with an emphasis on systematic approaches to study pathways on a genome- or proteome-scale. This workshop
will cover endogenous protein tagging, base editing for directed evolution, and CRISPR inactivation/activation platforms with both
population-level and single cell readouts. We will focus particularly on the technical aspects of implementing these methods, and
talks will be followed by a town-hall discussion providing ample time for questions. All are welcome to participate.
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Special Interest Subgroup W: Organelle Interactome and Cell Plasticity Control
4:30-7:05 pm
Room 30C
Organizers: Yeguang Chen, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; and Xuebiao Yao, University of Science & Technology of China,
Hefei, China
The organization of the eukaryotic cell into discrete membrane-bound organelles allows for the separation of incompatible
biochemical processes, and dynamic interactions of these organelles orchestrate context-dependent cell physiology. The basic cell
biology of how organelles communicate is central to understanding metazoan development, tissue homeostasis, and cell plasticity
control. However, despite our knowledge of the composition of organelles, the spatio- temporal organization of organelles within
the cell and their context-dependent interactions remain poorly characterized. Recent advancements in multiplex organelle imaging,
emerging dynamics of membraneless organelles combined with model organoids from normal and diseased tissues enable us to
delineate organelle dynamics underlying cell plasticity control. This session provides a unique forum to feature speakers from
ASCB and EMBO to feature works addressing how organelle communications regulate cell plasticity during homeostasis and cell
fate decision as well as how host-microbe interactions regulate cell physiology in organoids.
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Introduction. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, HHMI, USA
Yeguang Chen, Tsinghua University, China
Pietro De Camilli, Yale University, USA
Markus Mund, EMBL, Germany
Wei Liu, Zhejiang University, China
Sarah Cohen, University of North Carolina, USA
Xiaochen Wang, Institute of Biophysics, China
Gokul Upadhyayula, Harvard University, USA
Liangyi Chen, Peking University, China
Zhengjun Chen, Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, China
Yunyu Shi, University of Science & Technology of China, China
Questions and Wrap-up; Xuebiao Yao, USTC, China
MONDAY
4:30 pm
4:40 pm
4:55 pm
5:10 pm
5:25 pm
5:40 pm
5:55 pm
6:10 pm
6:25 pm
6:40 pm
6:55 pm
7:05 pm
Elevator Speech Videotaping/Coaching Session
5:00-6:00 pm
Room 24C
The purpose of this session is to provide both technical support to meeting attendees who want to enter the Elevator Speech
contest, as well as interactive coaching from members of the Public Information and Public Policy Committees. Coaches will provide
technical help to video the speaker and help with timers, as well as give them feedback on what works and doesn’t work in their
pitch. This is not an in-depth interactive educational session in and of itself, but builds on the skills the speakers learned in the
earlier Advocacy Toolbox I session.
Outcomes:
1. Practice science communication skills, honing your short explanation of your science for a general audience.
2. Get one-on-one feedback on your presentations.
3. Get technical assistance on making your video submission.
Target audience: all attendees
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
5:30-6:30 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
NanoSurface Biomedical, Inc.
Biomimetic Cell Culture Platforms for Enhancing Cell Biology Studies
Presenter: Nicholas A. Geisse, PhD
Level: Intermediate
Cells use structural and mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) to regulate a broad spectrum of processes such as cell
signaling, differentiation, division, and even life and death. Over the past few decades, the literature has demonstrated that many
cell types cultured in conventional flat, rigid, and static culture conditions lack both structural and functional phenotypes seen in
the body, and that the lack of extracellular cues contributes significantly to the disconnect between in vitro experimental results
and in vivo observation. We will demonstrate that ECM-inspired substrate nanotopography drastically improves the structural
and functional development of a variety of cell types. Specifically, we show how NanoSurface Cultureware and the NanoSurface
Cytostretcher can be utilized to study the effects of cell-nanotopography interactions on adhesion, signaling, polarity, migration,
and differentiation across many cell types and model systems including cancer biology, human epithelia, and cardiovascular
function. Further, we will describe how the differentiation of stem cells can be enhanced by providing a more biomimetic culture
environment, with particular focus on iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. We will also illustrate how the combination of nanotopography
and mechanical stretch can enhance the in vitro phenotypes of cells in culture.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
5:30-6:30 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Advances in Image Processing Automation in Amira
Presenter: Trevor Lancon
Level: Introductory
Powerful image processing tools are essential to the modern microscopist’s workflow. Image sizes are growing as microscopes
advance in quality and power, and with that the need for workflow automation is growing to be more important than ever. Amira
rises to this challenge with the inclusion of recipes for image stack processing. Recipes are a mechanism by which tedious workflows
of unlimited complexity are recorded, documented, and customized for application to further datasets. These recipes can be applied
as a batch to 2D images comprising a stack, or as a sequence of 3D image processing operations. Saving a recipe as a simple text
file allows the quick and easy transfer of expertise between colleagues or research sites via email. Results of recipes can include
processed images, segmentation results, statistical measures, meshed surfaces and volumes, and more. During the talk, the recipe
creation process will be explained and demonstrated for segmentation of a life sciences dataset. Follow creation, the recipe will be
applied on further datasets. We’ll describe in detail how automation of this segmentation process eliminates the main bottleneck
of the image processing workflow, and enables researchers to more quickly reach the results that push their research forward.
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Navigating Negotiation in Science: A Panel and Networking Reception
7:15-8:45 pm
Room 33B
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
Joan Heller Brown, Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmacology, University of California, San Diego
Victor L. Schuster, Senior Vice-Dean, Baumritter Professor of Medicine, Professor of Physiology & Biophysics, Albert Einstein
College of Medicine
Terra Saltzman-Baker, Director of Career Connections, Randy School of Management, University of California, San Diego
This panel discussion will be led by experts on negotiation as it pertains to succeeding in a career in cell biology. An introduction
by each panelist will be followed by questions and comments from the audience. Content will have a particular focus on practical
advice and methodologies for communicating effectively, deciding what to negotiate for, understanding who you are negotiating
with, and ultimately getting what you need to ensure your success. Attendees can continue the discussion during the networking
reception following the panel, with appetizers and a cash bar.
Target audience: all attendees wanting to learn more about how to negotiate anything from terms of employment to where to
publish a paper to taking family leave
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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MONDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn skills for effective communication during negotiation.
2. Understand how to decide what you want to negotiate for.
3. Understand who you are negotiating with and how to adapt your strategy accordingly.
4. Share stories of negotiation and effective communication in science and network with other cell biologists to make personal
and professional connections.
NOTES
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The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Tuesday
December 11, 2018
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
113
7:30 am-6:00 pm
Registration Open
Registration Area
8:00-9:30 am
Symposium 7: Organelle Communication
8:15-9:15 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Ballroom 20BC
Theater 2, Learning Center
Leica Microsystems Inc.
NEW Leica THUNDER Imagers – Decode 3D biology in real time
8:30-9:30 am
ASCB MAC Linkage Fellows Program (by invitation only)
8:30-8:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Room 24C
Theater 1, Learning Center
Daily Schedule—Tuesday, December 11
GATTAquant GmbH (Start-up Company)
The next generation of imaging standards for fluorescence microscopy
9:00-9:50 am
How to Deliver an Effective Chalk Talk
Theater 4, Learning Center
9:00-9:50 am
How to Thrive as a New Faculty Member: Strategies for Research
and Mentoring Success
Theater 3, Learning Center
9:30-10:30 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Sapphire North America
ReZolve Scientific Photostable Fluorophores for live cell imaging by fluorescence microscopy and more
9:30-11:00 am
Morning Refreshment Break
Learning Center
9:45-10:45 am
Louis-Jeantet Prize Lectures: Christer Betsholtz and Antonio Lanzavecchia
10:00-11:00 am
ASCB MAC Visiting Professors Program (by invitation only)
Room 24C
10:00 am-12:00 pm
EMBO Lab Leadership: Teamwork and Conflict in the Lab
Room 25C
10:00-10:50 am
Faculty Search and Starting a Lab at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution
Theater 3, Learning Center
10:00-10:50 am
How to Boost Your Research Project with Support of International Research
Infrastructures
Theater 4, Learning Center
10:45-11:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Ballroom 20BC
Bruker Corporation
Advances in dye development and microscopy for live cell super resolution microscopy with the Vutara 352
10:45-11:45 am
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
ChromoTek GmbH
One for All: Small Affinity-Tag & Nanobody for Multiple Capture & Detection Applications
10:45 am-12:00 pm
WICB Awards and Mentoring Theater: Let’s Make a Deal:
The Art of Negotiating for Success
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Microsymposia
Room 26B
13
Molecular Mechanisms of Metabolic Reprogramming
Room 29C
14
Motility
Room 30C
15
Neuronal Cell Biology
Room 29B
16
Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 2
Room 28B
17
The Story of Life: Survival and Death
Room 30B
18
Tissue Architecture and Mechanics
Room 28D
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Creating Inclusive Biology Education Environments
Room 25B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
How to Improve Research Assessment for Hiring and Funding Decisions
Room 32B
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Moving (Rapidly) toward Open Data for All and by All
12:00-1:30 pm
Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
Room 31B
12:00-1:00 pm
Barriers Removed: Manuscript Transfer Reception
12:00-12:50 pm
Dissecting Job Ads and Tailoring Your Résumé
Theater 3, Learning Center
12:00-12:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Learning Center
ASCB Booth 623,
Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Dynamic Live Cell Imaging of Mammalian Cells Using CellASIC® ONIX2 Microfluidic Platform
12:00-12:50 pm
114
Social Media for Science Communication
Theater 4, Learning Center
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
1:00-2:00 pm
Science Discussion Tables
Roundtable Central Section 3,
Learning Center
1:00-1:50 pm
Careers in Biotech Beyond the Bench
Theater 4, Learning Center
1:00-1:50 pm
Celldance Video Premiere and Elevator Speech Awards
Theater 3, Learning Center
1:00-1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bruker Corporation
Cellular Imaging with Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: Ultra Gentle,
High-resolution Imaging of Living Samples
1:15-1:45 pm
Meet the Committees
ASCB Booth 623,
Learning Center
1:30-3:00 pm
Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
Learning Center
1:30-3:30 pm
Afternoon Refreshment Break
Learning Center
2:00-2:50 pm
Careers in Science Policy
Theater 3, Learning Center
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
2:00-2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 2, Learning Center
GenScript USA Inc.
Using CRISPR Technologies in Cell Line Engineering
2:00-2:50 pm
Helping the Next Generation of Researchers: Navigating the Challenges
and Answering the Call for Change
2:00-2:30 pm
In-Booth Presentation
Theater 4, Learning Center
Booth 1019
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless
and maskless photopatterning system
3:00-4:00 pm
Exhibitor Tech Talk
Theater 1, Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Duolink® PLA: A Powerful Tool to Study Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling Pathways
3:15-4:00 pm
E.B. Wilson Medal Presentation and Address: Barbara J. Meyer
4:15-6:50 pm
Workshop: Electron Cryo-Tomography and Correlated Light and Electron
Microscopy (CLEM)
4:15-6:50 pm
Subgroup X: New Tools and Resources for Studies of Stem Cell Biology
4:30-7:05 pm
Minisymposia
7:00-8:30 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Room 33B
Room: 20D
12
Biomechanics
Room 29C
13
Cell Biology of the Neuron
Room 28C
14
Cell Size, Cell Division, and Contractility
15
Cytoskeleton, Motility, and Cell Mechanics: Tracks
16
Organelle Homeostasis
Room 30C
17
Regulation of Autophagy
Room 31B
Reception: Enabling Persistence in Science: Creating Inclusive Environments
through Microaffirmations
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Daily Schedule—Tuesday, December 11
Bruker Corporation
Cell Mechanics with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM): From Modulus Mapping
to Measuring Cell-Surface Interactions
Ballroom 20A
Ballroom 20BC
Room 32B
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Tuesday, December 11
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Symposium 7: Organelle Communication
8:00-9:30 am
Ballroom 20BC
Chair: Thomas Langer, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne
OO
8:00 am
S15
8:30 am
S16
9:00 am
S17
The role of ER membrane contact sites in lipid metabolism and organelle biogenesis. W. Prinz1;
1
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD
mTOR and Lysosomes in Growth Control. D.M. Sabatini1,2,3; 1Whitehead Institute for Biomedical
Research, Cambridge, MA, 2Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA,
3
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MA
New insights into mitochondrial vesicle transport. H.M. McBride1; 1Neurology and Neurosurgery,
McGill University, Montreal, QC
Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:15-9:15 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
Leica Microsystems Inc.
NEW Leica THUNDER Imagers – Decode 3D biology in real time
Presenter: Oliver Schlicker, Product Application Manager Advanced Widefield Microscopy, Leica Microsystems
Level: Intermediate
Working in 3D biology with thick specimens such as organoids, spheroids, small animals, 3D cell cultures and tissue sections on
a typical widefield microscope often leads to a loss of details caused by hazy images. In contrast widefield imaging is the perfect
solution for combining highest speed with highest sensitivity in combination with lowest phototoxicity for physiological imaging.
Leica Microsystems is proud to introduce its new THUNDER Imager—a family of widefield imaging solutions designed to deliver
benchmark application performance in core life science applications. Leica Microsystems’ new THUNDER Imagers enable users to
see through the haze using the latest opto-digital techniques using computational clearing to remove the typical haze inherent to
all widefield images. THUNDER-powered solutions use minimally invasive widefield illumination without any additional mechanical
complexities. Learn how these new imagers simplify your workflow, while allowing you to produce computationally cleared images
at unprecedented speeds and quality.
OO
ASCB MAC Linkage Fellows Program (by invitation only)
8:30-9:30 am
Room 24C
ASCB MAC Linkage Fellows serve as a link between other faculty members and students at their home institution and nearby
institutions and the ASCB MAC and the Society as a whole. The Fellows engage students at under-resourced universities and colleges
in cell biology-related programming year-round. This session provides an opportunity for Linkage Fellows alumni to interact with
each other and with the ASCB MAC IPERT Program leadership (PI, co-PIs, Scientific Manager and Evaluator) as we discuss their
projects/activities, the outcomes, next career steps and future plans.
Outcomes:
1. Through this discussion, LF alumni will be able to gain new insight into developing outreach programs in cell biology.
2. To allow LF to share and disseminate their assessment plans and outcomes data, and provide input to program leadership
on developing and improving new outreach programs in cell biology.
Target audience: Linkage Fellows program participants from prior cohorts
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
8:30-8:45 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
GAATAquant GmbH (Start-up Company)
The next generation of imaging standards for fluorescence microscopy
Presenter: Dr. Jürgen Schmied
Level: Intermediate
Fluorescence microscopy is one of the key technologies in life sciences and biological research and the development of novel
super-resolution techniques pushed the imaging even beyond the physical diffraction limit of light, resolving structural details
which have never be seen before. Nevertheless researchers entered a level of imaging where reliable test and calibration standards
were missing. Based on the groundbreaking technique of DNA nanotechnology, GATTAquant GmbH has the ability to build precise
nanostructures, which allow researchers to test, to optimize and to monitor the resolution and performance of these high-end
microscopes. The so-called nanorulers and nanobeads enable an easy and precise evaluation of the resolution and sensitivity of
the optical system and therefore support researchers as well as developers in their daily routines.
OO
How to Deliver an Effective Chalk Talk
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Erik Snapp, Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Programs, Janelia, and Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins University
Are you interested in a career in academia but unfamiliar with the standards of chalk talks often given during interviews? While
trainees have plenty of opportunities to practice and present their data, tips and strategies on delivering a chalk talk are often
sparse. This session will provide trainees with fundamental strategies and tips for delivering an effective chalk talk.
TUESDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn the appropriate decorum for giving a chalk talk.
2. Learn how to convey you are an independent thinker.
3. Learn how to be an effective communicator.
4. Learn what qualities interviewers are looking for and how to portray that during a chalk talk.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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How to Thrive as a New Faculty Member: Strategies for Research and Mentoring Success
9:00-9:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Jonathan A. Kebler, Associate Professor, California State University Northridge
Michael Boyce, Assistant Professor, Duke University
Erin Cram, Associate Professor, Northeastern University
Crystal Rogers, Assistant Professor, California State University, Northridge
Ricardo M. Zayas, Associate Professor, San Diego State University
This session is intended for senior postdoctoral fellows and new faculty within three years of their first academic appointment.
Attendees will improve the knowledge and skills needed to establish and maintain a productive research program and successful
academic track record. Guided discussion topics by co-chairs and panelists will include balancing publishing and grant-writing,
trainee recruiting/expectations, laboratory and collaboration management, tenure preparation, identifying influential mentors, and
work-life balance. The Q&A session will be open to other topics including, but not limited to, conference attendance, navigating
professional relationships within and outside of academia, networking, etc. Panelists include faculty who have successfully navigated
the transition from postdoctoral trainee to establishing an externally funded research program at a range of academic institutions
(e.g., R1 versus non-R1, public versus private, large versus small, different geographic locations, etc.).
Outcomes:
1. Discuss skills/strategies for advancing from postdoctoral training to an independent, tenure-track faculty position with
external funding.
2. Receive tips and advice on topics such as publishing, grant-writing, laboratory management, tenure, identifying mentors,
and work-life balance.
3. Learn strategies to build scientific professional skills and confidence.
Engage in an interactive Q&A session driven by attendee interests.
Target audience: senior postdocs and new faculty within three years of their first academic appointment
OO
Exhibitor Tech Talk
9:30-10:30 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Sapphire North America
ReZolve Scientific Photostable Fluorophores for live cell imaging by fluorescence microscopy and more
Presenter: Christie Bader, PhD
Level: Introductory
ReZolve Scientific’s range of fluorophores provide targeted insights on cell biology. The range of products are suited to confocal
microscopy and include fluorescent probes that localize with polar lipids, mitochondria, and the endoplasmic reticulum. The
probes use a unique metal core making them highly resistance to photobleaching, allowing for longer imaging with less signal loss.
Applications include: • Cancer biology – ability to label polar lipids and lipid rich compartments that allows for easy comparisons
and tracking of metabolic changes, which is important in cancer progression. • Neuroscience – detect lipid accumulation common
to many neurological pathologies • Metabolic diseases – monitor mitochondria and changes in lipid content related to metabolic
disease. Key advantages include: • Fast uptake of the dyes • Compatibility with other fluorophores, including GFP, allowing imaging
of multiple attributes of the cell simultaneously • Use on live and fixed cells and tissue • Compatible with a range of fluorescent
platforms and more. Unique properties: • Ability to label polar lipids • ER dye can wash-in wash-out for long term assays • Ability
to detect mitochondria in fixed and frozen samples.
OO
Morning Refreshment Break
9:30-11:00 am
Join us for complimentary coffee and tea while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
118
Learning Center
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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Louis-Jeantet Prize Lectures: Christer Betsholtz and Antonio Lanzavecchia
9:45-10:45 am
Ballroom 20BC
Chair: Hans Clevers, Hubrecht Institute
Christer Betsholtz, Director, Integrated Cardio Metabolic
Centre, Karolinska Institute, and Professor, Uppsala
University, Sweden
OO
9:55 am
A7
10:20 am
A8
Antonio Lanzavecchia, Director, Institute for Research
in Biomedicine, and Professor, Università della Svizzera
italiana, Switzerland
Cellular interactions and heterogeneity in the blood microvasculature. C. Betsholtz1; 1Department
of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Lessons from the analysis of the immune response to P. falciparum. A. Lanzavecchia1,2; 1Institute
for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland, 2Università della Svizzera italiana, Lugano,
Switzerland
ASCB MAC Visiting Professors Program (by invitation only)
Outcomes:
1. Through this discussion, Visiting Professors will be able to refine their upcoming professional development activities and
promote their future career development.
2. Visiting Professors will share and disseminate their proposed assessment plans and outcomes data, and together with
IPERT program leadership discuss future career development programs and new approaches to development of research
programs by junior faculty.
3. Share insights into how to involve undergraduates in faculty research programs to promote their interest in careers in cell
biology.
Target audience: junior and mid-career faculty Visiting Professor Program alumni
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TUESDAY
10:00-11:00 am
Room 24C
The ASCB MAC Visiting Professors Program targets junior or mid-career faculty members who are seeking to begin and/or sustain
collaborative professional development experiences with a more established and accomplished senior cell biologist who is also
an ASCB member. This session provides an opportunity for Visiting Professors Program alumni to interact with each other and
with the ASCB MAC IPERT Program leadership to discuss their projects/activities, outcomes, career development and future plans.
OO
EMBO Lab Leadership: Teamwork and Conflict in the Lab
10:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 25C
Samuel Krahl, Project Coordinator for EMBO Lab Management, Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Lebenswissenschaften
Heidelberg GmbH
How much time does your team spend on research and how much time do the members spend on disagreements, discussions
about who does or owns what, and even in conflict? We explore the different aspects of how teams work well together and what
you as the leader can do to help your team achieve high levels of performance. Conflicts arise even in high performance teams,
so we look at how you can identify conflict, what you can do to resolve it, and how you can redirect the energy it generates to
drive your research forward.
We encourage participants to attend all three sessions in this series (the other two are Sunday and Monday) because they are
interrelated and build on each other.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about the Team Clock and its application to team development and performance.
2. Learn about conflict and conflict management.
Target audience: group leaders (PIs), senior postdocs with responsibility for lab supervision or who are about to set up their
own lab
OO
Faculty Search and Starting a Lab at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 3, Learning Center
Lance Barton, Professor, Austin College
Derek Applewhite, Assistant Professor, Reed College
Sara Olson, Assistant Professor, Pomona College
Many trainees opt to teach and start their labs at a primarily undergraduate institution (PUI). Trainees obtain their graduate degrees
and postdoctoral experience at R1 institutions, so they often do not know the ins and outs of starting a lab at a PUI or how to
navigate the faculty job search at this type of institution. What should applicants expect in the interview process and what sort of
strategies should they employ to be successful? Also, how does this very particular lab setting differ from labs at R1 institutions?
What are the strategies of building a successful research program with a lab fully composed of undergraduates? The panelists will
discuss the effective strategies for navigating the job search and establishing a research lab at a PUI.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about the application components and the strategies of successful candidates who apply for positions at a PUI.
2. Learn about the interview process at a PUI.
3. Learn strategies for engaging undergraduates in academic research.
4. Gain insight into how to cultivate a successful research program at a PUI.
Target audience: graduate students and postdocs
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How to Boost Your Research Project with Support of International Research Infrastructures
10:00-10:50 am
Theater 4, Learning Center
Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
Bahne Stechmann, FMP Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology
Radislav Sedláček, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the ASCR, v.v.i.
Frauke Leitner, European Molecular Biology Laboratory
Modern life science research often sees a dissociation between the researcher, who leads a scientific project, and the technology
expert, who has the expertise to perform the required experiments. Often, an interdisciplinary approach as well as access to
innovative technologies and services is needed. Our pan-European research infrastructures, Euro-BioImaging (www.eurobioimaging.
eu), EU-OPENSCREEN (www.eu-openscreen.eu), and INFRAFRONTIER (www.infrafrontier.eu), aim to fill this gap and provide a
solution to allow all scientists open access to the desired technologies and services, such as imaging, compound screening, or
mouse disease models.
To demonstrate how access to cutting-edge technologies can enable excellent research, Scott Fraser, one of the key figures in
microscopy technology development and Director of Science Initiatives at USC, will give a presentation on “Multi-Dimensional
Imaging of Cells in Their Native Habitat.”
Outcomes:
1. Learn about the research opportunities provided by the three international research infrastructures: Euro-BioImaging,
EU-OPENSCREEN and INFRAFRONTIER.
2. Discover the technologies, resources, and expertise offered in biological and medical imaging, compound screening, and
mouse disease model phenotyping.
3. Understand how researchers have successfully integrated these technologies and expertise in their research projects.
4. Understand application procedures and discuss your project with research infrastructure experts onsite.
TUESDAY
Target audience: all attendees
OO
Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bruker Corporation
Advances in dye development and microscopy for live cell super resolution microscopy with the Vutara 352
Presenter: Robert Hobson, PhD – Applications Scientist
Level: Intermediate
Expanding the frontier of super-resolution imaging requires advances in both microscopy hardware and fluorescent labels. Here we
describe a cooperative effort to improve both technological fronts with the ultimate goal of live-cell super-resolution microscopy.
Bruker’s Vutara 352 super-resolution microscope has been designed for live-cell super-resolution microscopy with both high spatial
and temporal resolution capabilities. The patented biplane module allows simultaneous two-color imaging in 3D while the sCMOS
detector enables fast imaging of biological phenomena. Although this microscope system is capable of live-cell super-resolution
imaging, it has been stymied by limitations in the current generation of live-cell-compatible fluorophores. Extant live-cell probes
are either fluorescent proteins with low photon counts—and therefore low localization precision—or organic dyes, which require
high laser power resulting in phototoxicity in living samples. To remedy this problem, we developed spontaneously blinking
(SB) versions of the Janelia Fluor and Alexa Fluor dyes, which blink under physiological conditions at low laser power while still
providing high photon counts. In particular, the spontaneously blinking Janelia Fluor 549 (SB-JF549) and red-shifted SB-JF646 are
cell-permeable and are easily conjugated to HaloTag or SNAP-tag ligands, making them ready to use in live cell multi-color superresolution experiments. The SB dyes, in combination with the Vutara 352, provide a powerful methodology for simultaneous
imaging, localization and visualization of live-cell single-molecule localization data, while offering numerous statistical tools to
quantify the data into publishable results.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
10:45-11:45 am
Theater 2, Learning Center
ChromoTek GmbH
One for All: Small Affinity-Tag & Nanobody for Multiple Capture & Detection Applications
Presenter: Dr. Klaus Herick
Level: Intermediate
We have developed a new epitope tag system based on a VHH, Nanobody®, or alpaca single-domain antibody. This VHH binds
with high affinity to the Spot-Tag®, an engineered 12-aa sequence PDRVRAVSHWSS. Owing to the unique properties of the antiSpot-VHH, the Spot-Tag capture and detection system is universally applicable. When covalently coupled to beads the anti-Spot
Nanobody enables the immunoprecipitation and purification of Spot-Tag fusion proteins: • High affinity allows the purification
of low-abundance proteins • Native elution possible with free Spot peptide • High chemical stability allows for extraordinary
harsh buffer compositions and repeated use for purification Anti-Spot Nanobody conjugated to fluorophores allows the imaging
of cellular proteins and structures using fluorescence microscopy: • Small size of Spot-Label leads to better tissue penetration •
Spot-Label is the first detection tool directed against a small peptide tag that is ideal for super resolution microscopy owing to
minimal label displacement. Examples for immunoprecipitation, Co-IP for MS analysis, affinity purification, immunofluorescence
including super resolution microscopy, Western blot, ELISA, and CRISPR/Cas are given. The Spot-Tag system combines the high
affinity and specificity of an antibody-epitope tag system with the stability and small size of an alpaca nanobody. This results in a
universal tag-system that simplifies the purification and concurrent analysis of target proteins.
OO
WICB Awards and Mentoring Theater: Let’s Make a Deal: The Art of Negotiating for Success
10:45 am-12:00 pm
Room 26B
Supported by Burroughs Wellcome Fund
WICB Junior for Excellence in
Research Awardee:
Sophie Dumont, University of
California, San Francisco
WICB Mid-Career Awardee for
Excellence in Research Awardee:
Elizabeth Chen, UT Southwestern
Medical Center, Dallas
WICB Sandra K. Masur Senior
Leadership Awardee:
Eva Nogales, University of California,
Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory/HHMI
Presentation of the annual Women in Cell Biology (WICB) Awards For Excellence In Research honoring women for their exceptional
contributions to cell biology and high levels of scientific endeavor and leadership during their early and mid-careers. The Sandra K. Masur
Senior Leadership award will also be presented honoring a cell biologist at a later career stage whose outstanding achievements
are coupled with a record of excellence and leadership in mentoring young scientists. “Let’s Make a Deal!” the WICB Mentoring
Theater, will illustrate negotiation skills and approaches, effective communication and assertiveness, and the different perceptions
and unrecognized biases we bring to these conversations. Following each skit, the actors will facilitate an open discussion with the
audience on topics that challenge the advancement of women and underrepresented groups in science.
Outcomes:
1. Honoring and heightening awareness in the cell biology community of the exceptional contributions of women scientists.
2. Increased sensitivity and appreciation of the value of differing language and style approaches in lab, workplace, and academe.
3. Increased awareness that style stereotypes actually cut across gender and other group boundaries; concerns and solutions
from students to retirees.
4. Learn successful approaches to workplace challenges from seasoned cell biologists attempting to mitigate bias: gender,
race, age, etc.
5. Recognize that communication skills and bias are issues that must be, and can be addressed, at every stage of a scientist’s
career, from both sides of each conversation.
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Target audience: all attendees
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Microsymposium 13: Molecular Mechanisms of Metabolic Reprogramming
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29C
Moderator: Peter Yu, Ohio State University
E73
11:10 am
E74
11:20 am
E75
11:30 am
E76
11:40 am
E77
11:50 am
E78
Cxcl12a and c-Myc promote the metabolic switch to glycolysis to support kidney repair after
injury. T.A. Yakulov1, A. Todkar1, K. Slanchev1, J. Wiegel1, A. Bona1,2,3, A. Scholz1, G. Walz1,4; 1Renal
Division, University Freiburg Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg,
Germany, 2Faculty of Biology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 3Spemann Graduate
School of Biology and Medicine (SGBM), University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 4BIOSS Center
for Biological Signalling Studies, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany
IGF-1’s regulates TGFβ’s profibrotic response contributing to lung fibrosis. D.M. Hernandez1,2, M.
Andrianifahanana1, X. Yin1, J. Kang1, A.H. Limper1, E.B. Leof1; 1Thoracic Disease Research Unit,
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 2Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Rochester, MN
Palmitate inhibits muscle cell insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and Rac1-dependent actin
remodelling independently of Akt. V. Tokarz1,2, H. Akhuanzada1,3, A. Klip1,2,3; 1Cell Biology, Hospital
for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, 2Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 3Biochemistry,
University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
Sequential lipolysis and lipophagy pathways orchestrate lipid droplet breakdown in hepatocytes.
M.B. Schott1, S.G. Weller1, R.J. Schulze1, E.W. Krueger1, H. Cao1, C.A. Casey2,3, M.A. McNiven1;
1
1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 2Department
of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 3Research Service,
Nebraska Western Iowa Health Care System, Omaha, NE
Soluble klotho acts as a circulating FGF23 co-receptor that modifies FGF23’s receptor affinity and
subsequent downstream signaling. C. Yanucil1,2, D. Kentrup1, B. Richter1, B. Czaya1,2, I. Campos1,2,
C. Faul1; 1Nephrology, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 2Cell Biology,
University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
Ate1 Controls Cellular Warburg Effects by modifying HIF1a with arginylation. C. Jiang1, F.
Fontanesi2, A. Barrientos2,3, T. Lampidis4, F. Zhang1; 1Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology,
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 2Biochemistry & Molecular Biology,
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3Nurology, University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 4Cell Biology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine,
Miami, FL
Microsymposium 14: Motility
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 30C
Moderator: Krishnakumar Vasudevan, Stanford University
11:00 am
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Arp2/3-nucleated dendritic actin networks are required structures for adhesion formation and
cell spreading in 3D. T. Isogai1,2, K.M. Dean1,2, S.J. Han1,2, P. Roudot1,2, M.K. Driscoll1,2, E.S. Welf1,2,
J.D. Cillay1,2, K.A. Sochacki3, J.W. Taraska3, R. Fiolka2, G. Danuser1,2; 1Lyda Hill Department of
Bioinformatics, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 2Department of Cell Biology, UT
Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 3Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, National Heart,
Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
Macropinocytosis overcomes directional bias due to hydraulic resistance to enhance space
exploration by dendritic cells. H.D. Moreau1, C. Blanch-Mercader2, R. Attia3,4, M. Maurin1,
Z. Alraies1, D. Sanséau1, O. Malbec1, M. Delgado1, P. Bousso5,6, J. Joanny2,7, R. Voituriez8, M.
Piel3,4, A. Lennon-Dumenil1; 1INSERM U932, Institut Curie, ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL* and ANR11-LABX-0043, Paris, France, 2PSL Research University, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC – CNRS,
Laboratoire PhysicoChimie Curie, Institut Curie , PARIS, France, 3Institut Curie, PSL Research
University, CNRS, UMR 144, PARIS, France, 4Institut Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, PSL Research
University, PARIS, France, 5Institut Pasteur, Dynamics of Immune Responses Unit, PARIS, France,
6
INSERM U1223, PARIS, France, 7ESPCI Paris-Tech, PARIS, France, 8Laboratoire Jean Perrin, UM
8237 CNRS/UPMC, Paris, France
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Resolving the 3D nano-architecture of actin networks at the leading edge of cells. J.A. Galbraith1,
J. Aaron2, G. Shtengel2, H. Hess2, C.G. Galbraith1; 1Spatial Systems Biomedicine, Oregon Health
Science University, Portland, OR, 2Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute,
Ashburn, VA
A viral fusogen hijacks the actin cytoskeleton to drive cell-cell fusion. K. Chan1, S. Son2, E.M.
Schmid2, D.A. Fletcher1,2,3,4; 1UC Berkeley/UC San Francisco Graduate Group in Bioengineering,
Berkeley, CA, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA,
3
Biophysics Program, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 4Physical Biosciences
Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
Firing of the harpoon-like invasion machinery of microsporidian parasites by high-speed
microscopy. P. Jaroenlak1, M. Cammer2, F. Liang2, J.J. Becnel3, D.C. Ekiert1, G. Bhabha1; 1Skirball
Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY,
2
Microscopy Laboratory, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 3Center for
Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Agricultural Research Service, US Department
of Agriculture, Gainesville, FL
Cell-extrinsic mechanical forces induce neutrophil polarization in the absence of leading-edge
actin assembly pathways. B.R. Graziano1, A. Diz-Muñoz2, O.D. Weiner1; 1Cardiovascular Research
Institute, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 2Cell Biology and Biophysics, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Microsymposium 15: Neuronal Cell Biology
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 29B
Moderator: Gaia Cantelli, Duke University
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11:10 am
E86
11:20 am
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11:30 am
E88
11:40 am
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11:50 am
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TUBA1A mutations identified in lissencephaly patients dominantly disrupt neuronal migration
and impair dynein activity. J.E. Aiken1, E.A. Bates2, J.K. Moore1; 1Cell and Developmental Biology,
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 2Department of Pediatrics,
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO
Ribosomal protein SA (Rpsa) signaling regulates neuronal morphogenesis. S.M. Blazejewski1, S.A.
Bennison1, T.H. Smith1, K. Toyooka1; 1Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University College of
Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Tenectin recruits integrin to stabilize bouton architecture and regulate vesicle release at the
Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Q. Wang1, T. Han1, P. Nguyen1, M. Jarnik1, M. Serpe1; 1NICHD,
NIH, Bethesda, MD
A coagulation factor IX peptide regulates endothelial barrier function and improves prognosis in
traumatic brain injury model. Y. Fujiwara1; 1Division of oral surgery, Nihon University School of
Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
Protein kinase Trc regulates neurite outgrowth via Pavarotti (kinesin-6). R. Norkett1, M. Winding1,
U. del Castillo1, W. Lu1, V.G. Gelfand1; 1Cell and Molecular Biology, Feinberg School of Medicine,
Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
RACK1 regulates local mRNA translation at adhesion sites in developing neurons. L. Kershner1,
T. Bumbledare1, P. Cassidy1, K. Welshhans1,2; 1Department of Biological Sciences, Kent State
University, Kent, OH, 2School of Biomedical Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, OH
Microsymposium 16: Regulation of the Cytoskeleton 2
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 28B
Moderator: Brooke Gardner, University of California, Berkeley
11:00 am
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Reconstitution of aster movement and cell division plane positioning mechanisms in Xenopus
egg extract. J.F. Pelletier1,2,3, C.M. Field1,2, N. Fakhri3, J.S. Oakey2,4, J.C. Gatlin2,5, T.J. Mitchison1,2;
1
Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Marine Biological
Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 3Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
Cambridge, MA, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY,
5
Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY
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11:10 am
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11:20 am
E93
11:30 am
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11:40 am
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11:50 am
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Live imaging of acentrosomal microtubule dynamics controlling early mammalian development. J.
Zenker1,2, M. White2, R.M. Templin3, R.G. Parton3, O. Thorn-Seshold4, Y.D. Alvarez2, M. Gasnier2,
H. Lim2, M. Biro5, S. Bissiere2, N. Plachta2; 1ARMI, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia,
2
IMCB, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore, 3University of Queensland, IMB, Brisbane, Australia,
4
Ludwig-Maximilians-University , 3Department of Pharmacy, Center for Drug Research, Munich,
Germany, 5University New South Wales, EMBL Australia, Single Molecule Science node, School of
Medical Sciences, Sydney, Australia
Dynamics and regulation of microtubule minus ends. C. Strothman1, M. Podolski1, N. Rodgers2,
V. Farmer1, G. Arpag1, S. Wang1, A. Rahman3, M. Zanic1,3,4; 1Cell and Developmental Biology,
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2Chemical and Physical Biology , Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN, 3Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
4
Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
Lis1 promotes the formation of maximally activated dynein complexes. J.P. Gillies1,2, Z.M. Htet1,3,
M.E. DeSantis1, S.L. Reck-Peterson1,2; 1Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University
of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Division of Biological Sciences, University of California San
Diego, La Jolla, CA, 3Biophysics Graduate Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
A quantitative model for BicD2/cargo interactions. K.M. Loftus1, H. Cui1, C.R. Noell1, C.
Grewer1, E.W. Debler2, S.R. Solmaz1; 1Department of Chemistry, State University of New York
at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 2Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Thomas
Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA
Optical control of fast and processive engineered myosins in vitro and in living cells. P.V. Ruijgrok1,
R.P. Ghosh1,2,3,4, M. Nakamura1, R. Chen1, V. Vachharajani1, J.T. Liphardt1,2,3,4, Z. Bryant1,5;
1
BioEngineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2Bio-X Institute, Stanford University, Stanford,
CA, 3Chem-H, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 4Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA, 5Structural Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Microsymposium 17: The Story of Life: Survival and Death
11:00 am
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11:10 am
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11:20 am
E99
11:30 am
E100
11:40 am
E101
11:50 am
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Room 30B
Genetic interactions between specific chromosome copy number alterations dictate complex
aneuploidy patterns. M. Coimbatore Ravichandran1, S. Fink1, M. Clarke1, F. Hofer1, C.S.
Campbell1; 1Department of Chromosome biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of
Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Cadherin-11 is required for the specification and cell survival of neural crest cells. S. Manohar1, A.
Camacho1, C.D. Rogers1; 1Biology, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA
Shedding light on cell death: optogenetic control of programmed cell death pathways. K.
Shkarina1, E. Hasel2, M. Leptin2, P. Broz1; 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Lausanne,
Lausanne, Switzerland, 2Directors’ Research Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory,
Heidelberg, Germany
Molecular and topological reorganizations in mitochondrial architecture interplay during Baxmediated steps of apoptosis. N.R. Ader1,2, P. Hoffmann2, I. Ganeva2, A. Borgeaud2, C. Wang1, R.J.
Youle1, W. Kukulski2; 1National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes
of Health, Bethesda, MD, 2Cell Biology, Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge, United Kingdom
Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in the genomic stability of glioblastoma cells to DNA
damage. Y.T. Magalhaes1, F.L. Forti1; 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Sao Paulo Institute of Chemistry, São Paulo, Brazil
Proteomic and Genetic Interaction Mapping Reveals New Ras Pathway Effectors and Regulators.
M.R. Kelly1, K. Han2, K. Kostyrko3, N. Mooney1, E.E. Jeng2, M.C. Bassik2, A. Sweet-Cordero3;
1
Baxter Laboratories, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2Department of Genetics, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, 3Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
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11:00 am-12:00 pm
Moderators: Scott Wilkinson, National Institutes of Health; and Emily Summerbell, Emory University
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Microsymposium 18: Tissue Architecture and Mechanics
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 28D
Moderator: Amanda Haage, University of British Columbia
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Image-based quantitative single-cell analysis of cellular architecture in developing tissues. J.M.
Hartmann1, M. Wong1, D. Gilmour1,2; 1Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular
Biology Laboratory EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany, 2Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of
Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Cell Migration Coordination by Site-Dependent Cell-Cell Contact. D. Li1, Y. Wang1; 1Biomedical
Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
Mechanical coordinates: designing geometrical microenvironments for the control mechanical
waves in model tissues. V. Petrolli1, O. Mandula2, L. Herve2, C. Allier2, P. Moreau1, M. Balland1,
G. Cappello; 1Physics, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Physics (CNRS), Grenoble, France, 2Leti, CEA,
Grenoble, France
Smooth muscle differentiation physically sculpts emerging branches during mouse lung
development. K. Goodwin1, A. Kosmrlj2, C.M. Nelson3,4; 1Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative
Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 3Department of Chemical and Biological
Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 4Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton
University, Princeton, NJ
A geometry-based model is sufficient to describe lumen stability in epithelial cells. C.G. Vasquez1,
V. Vachharajani2, A.R. Dunn1,2; 1Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA,
2
Biophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
How do the semicircular canals of the inner ear form? A. Munjal1, S. Megason1; 1Systems Biology,
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
Creating Inclusive Biology Education Environments
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 25B
Kimberly Tanner, Professor, San Francisco State University
Christopher Pickett, Director, Rescuing Biomedical Research
Jana Marcette, Assistant Professor, Harris-Stowe State University
Latanya Hammonds-Odie, Associate Professor, Georgia Gwinnett College
Alison Crowe, Principal Lecturer, University of Washington
The Inclusive Environments and Metrics in Biology Education and Research (iEMBER) network examines new ways of thinking about
biology education reform, by taking the viewpoint that education spaces are social interaction spaces. This session led by iEMBER
members will share current research on how social interactions in classrooms can impact students in different ways: self-efficacy,
performance, sense of belonging, and science identity. Audience members will self-select into groups focused on specific pedagogical
approaches (e.g., clickers, small group work), discuss barriers to student engagement, and brainstorm possible evidence-based
strategies to increase equitable participation. This session is expected to be of interest both to stakeholders working in STEM
diversity, equity, and inclusion and to students, faculty, and educators interested in building inclusive classroom environments.
Outcomes:
1. Appreciate the range of barriers that exist to student engagement in social learning environments.
2. Evaluate the effectiveness of your own teaching practices in promoting equity and inclusivity.
3. Practice designing classroom activities that promote inclusion using evidence-based approaches.
Target audience: all attendees
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How to Improve Research Assessment for Hiring and Funding Decisions
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 32B
Journal-based metrics do not capture the quality of individual research articles or scientists. Despite this, many research institutes
and funding agencies around the world rely on the Journal Impact Factor to quantify research success, especially when triaging
large volumes of applications. The Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) is working to change the culture and improve
evaluation. This session will be an opportunity to provide feedback on forms associated with research evaluation in hiring and
funding decisions. Attendees will work together in small groups to review one form—either a grant or faculty application. Following
the small group discussions, there will be a debriefing for each type of application.
Outcomes:
1. Awareness of how research is assessed.
2. Recognition of existing biases in hiring, promotion, and funding decisions.
3. Identification of strategies to improve research assessment.
Target audience: all attendees and those with institutional responsibilities
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Moving (Rapidly) toward Open Data for All and by All
11:00 am-12:00 pm
Room 31B
Anna E. Mazzucco, Special Assistant to the Principal Deputy Director, Immediate Office of the Director, NIH
Outcomes:
1. Gain a better knowledge of what open data is, and is not.
2. Recognize similarities and differences in approaches to open data by research sector and geographic region.
3. Begin to understand the need for data management plans and for strategic selection of data depositories.
Target audience: all attendees, with emphasis on those responsible for handling primary and large datasets, as well as those
responsible for maintaining data from individual researchers
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Odd-Numbered Poster Presentations
12:00-1:30 pm
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Open data will only become a reality when its principles are included in research plans from the beginning of research. But funders,
research institutions, and governments are moving rapidly away from discussing principles to demanding certain actions. Particularly
of note are requirements for filing data management plans, and of ensuring that any data storage infrastructure chosen by a
researcher meets a certain set of standards. Thus it is critical that researchers are involved in these discussions now. This session
will discuss universal good practices as well as differences between stakeholders and between regions. We will focus particularly
on roles of researchers, and will have the audience participate in a discussion of policy gaps, particularly where stakeholders may
have discordant understandings of their responsibilities.
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Barriers Removed: Manuscript Transfer Reception
12:00-1:00 pm
ASCB Booth 623, Learning Center
Come for a slice of cake to celebrate a new collaboration that allows authors to effortlessly transfer their manuscripts and peerreview reports between our community journals, Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Cell Science (JCS), and Molecular Biology
of the Cell (MBoC). Join ASCB President Jodi Nunnari and Tim Spencer from JCB; Michael Way and Sharon Ahmad from JCS; and
David Drubin and Erika Shugart from MBoC/ASCB.
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Dissecting Job Ads and Tailoring Your Résumé
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Joe Cribari, Founder and CEO, JC3 Consulting
Recruiters spend an average of just 5-7 seconds assessing a résumé or CV. To stand out among the competition and maximize your
chances of success, it is vital to know how to dissect a job ad and tailor your résumé to the position and organization to which you
are applying. This session will teach attendees how to analyze a job description and provide them with insight into what recruiters/
hiring managers look for when screening applications. Using this information, attendees will be able to tailor their CV, résumé, and
personal statement to a specific academic or industrial position.
Outcomes:
1. Learn how to analyze a job description.
2. Know how to tailor your CV or résumé to a job description.
3. Understand how to target your personal statement to a specific position.
4. Distinguish between a CV and résumé, and know the do’s and do not’s of each.
Target audience: undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
12:00-12:45 pm
Theater 1,Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Dynamic Live Cell Imaging of Mammalian Cells Using CellASIC® ONIX2 Microfluidic Platform
Presenters: Cindy Chen, PhD, and Jun Park, PhD, Senior Scientists, MilliporeSigma
Level: Intermediate
This workshop will cover the advantages of “dynamic live cell” imaging, where microenvironmental parameters such as flowrates,
the perfusion of nutrients and reagents, and temperature and gas compositions can be precisely controlled on demand by software
during the entire duration of a given imaging experiment. Overview of applications covering hypoxia, apoptosis, migration, and
suspension immune cell imaging will be presented. Specific emphasis will be given to microfluidic designs targeted for use with
different cell types as well as fluorescent probes for live cell imaging. Any scientists planning to start live cell imaging experiments,
as well as experienced imaging scientists wanting to broaden their applications, will benefit from this workshop.
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Social Media for Science Communication
12:00-12:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Prachee Avasthi, Assistant Professor, University of Kansas Medical Center
Beth Kenkel, Research Scientist, University of Washington
Needhi Bhalla, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz
Scientists can use many social media platforms to directly communicate their research with both other scientists and the public
at large. This panel discussion will focus on the use of social media as a tool for science communication, and the pros and cons of
different social media platforms. The panelists will discuss their experiences using social media as a scientist and how to get started.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about multiple tools to communicate science through different social media platforms.
2. Learn the techniques and skills that help communicate science using social media in a way that is professional but still
intriguing.
3. Hear from multiple panelists about their experiences using these different platforms.
4. Interact and network with scientists who have been successful in using social media for communicating science.
Target audience: undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs
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Science Discussion Tables
1:00-2:00 pm
Roundtable Central Section 3, Learning Center
Take advantage of this special networking opportunity! Select your interest area and bring your questions to the ASCB Learning
Center.
TUESDAY
Table
Presenter
Topic
1����������������������Daniel Gerlich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chromosome Biology and Cell Division
2����������������������Harm Kampinga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Protein Homeostasis, Age-Related Diseases and Aging
3����������������������Michel Labouesse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Morphogenesis; Mechanical Forces; C. Elegans
4����������������������Adam Hughes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mitochondria, Lysosomes, and Organelle Crosstalk
5����������������������Brenda Bloodgood . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neurobiology
6����������������������Clodagh O’Shea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visualizing and Redesigning Genomes
7����������������������Andrew Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .How Do Motor Proteins Select Their Cargos?
8����������������������Bruce Goode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cytoskeletal Dynamics
9����������������������Peter Walter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .UPR
10��������������������Heidi McBride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mitochondrial Dynamics
11��������������������Erika Holzbaur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Organelle and Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Neurons; Autoph-agy
12��������������������Andrew Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TBD
13��������������������Marek Basler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bacterial Secretion Systems
14��������������������Antonio Lanzavecchia . . . . . . . . . . . Immunology
15��������������������Amy Gladfelter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Phase Separation in Cell Biology
16��������������������Katja Röper
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Developmental and Cell Biology, Tissue Morphogenesis, Cytoskele-ton
17��������������������Diane Barber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Actin Architectures and Epithelial Plasticity
18��������������������Blanche Schwappach . . . . . . . . . . . . Membrane Protein Targeting, Vesicular Traffic
19��������������������Julie Welburn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Cell Division, Microtubule Cytoskeleton
20��������������������Lawrence Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viruses and Cancer
21��������������������Anna Akhmanova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Where Should I Publish My Paper?
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Careers in Biotech Beyond the Bench
1:00-1:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Katerina Capkova, Regulatory Affairs Specialist, Hologic, Inc. - Diagnostic Solutions
Laura Lloyd, Registered Patent Attorney, Matrix Law Group LLC
Dan Schroen, Director of Marketing, WuXi Advanced Therapies
Robyn Leary, Medical Science Liaison, Teva
This panel discussion will focus on non-research careers in biotech and drug discovery such as patent law, regulatory affairs,
marketing, and medical affairs. The goal of this session is to expose trainees to different industry career paths that move beyond
research and provide knowledge on how to successfully pursue those career paths. The panel format will allow the audience to
guide the conversation and ensure topics are focused on the interests of attendees.
Outcomes:
1. Learn about a range of non-research careers in industry.
2. Have an opportunity to begin networking with professionals in a variety of fields.
3. Identify skills needed to pursue a non-research career in industry.
Target audience: graduate students, postdocs, and anyone looking to transition careers
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Celldance Video Premiere and Elevator Speech Awards
1:00-1:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Join us for the premiere of the 2018 Celldance videos and recognition of the authoring labs. In addition, the winners of the 2018
Elevator Speech contest will be announced and awards will be given.
Outcomes:
1. Get introduced to the value of science outreach to non-scientists.
2. See examples of good scientific outreach communication.
3. Be exposed to research of peer labs, providing opportunities for networking and collaboration.
Target audience: all attendees
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
1:00-1:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bruker Corporation
Cellular Imaging with Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: Ultra Gentle, High-resolution Imaging of Living Samples
Presenter: Dane Maxfield M.S., PhD – Sales Product Specialist
Level: Intermediate
Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is a state-of-the-art imaging technique that allows for long-term 3D imaging at unprecedented
speed across scales from single molecules to whole organisms. This presentation will focus on the Luxendo InVi SPIM, an inverted
light-sheet geometry, which is optimized for long-term 3D imaging of live specimens with resolution better than on a confocal
microscope and under meticulously adjustable conditions. We will describe our innovative sample mounting technique and
demonstrate the ease of use for a variety of specimens, ranging from cell culture to organoids and embryos. Coupled with precise
environmental control, the InVi SPIM allows for imaging of these samples for multiple days and for resolving subcellular structures
without the photobleaching or phototoxicity that plagues standard imaging techniques like laser scanning or spinning disk confocal
microscopy. You can expect to learn the advantages of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy for high resolution cellular imaging and
how this technique can be adapted to a multitude of different samples.
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Meet the Committees
1:15-1:45 pm
ASCB Booth 623, Learning Center
Members from the Committee for Postdocs and Grad Students (COMPASS) and Women in Cell Biology and Committees will be on
hand to answer any questions you have.
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Even-Numbered Poster Presentations
1:30-3:00 pm
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Learning Center
Afternoon Refreshment Break
1:30-3:30 pm
Join us for a beverage and snack while visiting exhibitors and viewing posters.
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Learning Center
Careers in Science Policy
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 3, Learning Center
Adriana Bankston, Associate Director of Fundraising and Strategic Initiatives, Future of Research
Shannon Muir, Director of Research Proposal Development Service, University of California, San Diego
This panel discussion will focus on exploring career options within science policy. Science policy careers are an exciting option for
PhDs because they require a strong scientific background coupled with the ability to explain science to a variety of audiences,
problem solve, and an interest in politics. The panelists will discuss how to get involved in science policy and the diversity of options
within this career path.
TUESDAY
Outcomes:
1. Learn about a range of careers in science policy.
2. Have an opportunity to begin networking with leaders in science policy.
3. Identify skills needed to pursue a career in science policy.
Target audience: undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
Bruker Corporation
Cell Mechanics with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM): From Modulus Mapping to Measuring Cell-Surface Interactions
Presenter: Andrea Slade, PhD – BioAFM Product Manager
Level: Intermediate
Mechanobiology-related studies aimed at understanding how cells exert and respond to forces in their environment have become an
important area of cell biology research. Examining the effects of forces on cells has a wide range of applications from understanding
disease pathology to the development of tissue engineering devices. While operable in fluid environments under near-physiological
conditions, atomic force microscopy (AFM) not only allows direct examination of the nanoscale structure of cell membrane surfaces
but it also provides unique opportunities to quantitatively measure the nanomechanical properties of living cells and tissues. In
addition, the integration of AFM with advanced light microscopy techniques (e.g., confocal, super-resolution, etc.) enables direct
correlation of these mechanical properties with fluorescence imaging datasets. Please join us for this informative seminar where
we will introduce our complete family of BioAFMs, including the latest JPK systems to join Bruker. We will describe the most recent
advances in Bruker’s BioAFM technology, focusing on various examples of how our industry-leading capabilities are enabling new
possibilities for novel cell mechanics studies, both in real time and in situ.
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
2:00-2:45 pm
Theater 2, Learning Center
GenScript USA Inc.
Using CRISPR Technologies in Cell Line Engineering
Presenter: TBD
Level: Intermediate
CRISPR/Cas9 is an easy and efficient tool to study gene function in cells. However, generation of CRISPR-mediated gene knock-in
(KI) or knock-out (KO) cell line involves substantial workload, especially for hard-to-transfect cell lines or primary cell lines. For
generating functional gene KO/KI using CRISPR, it is essential to choose the appropriate gRNA/Cas9 delivery system and design gRNA
and/or donor template wisely. Join our discussion to learn more about how to effectively use CRISPR for generating KO/KI cell lines.
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Helping the Next Generation of Researchers: Navigating the Challenges and Answering the Call for
Change
2:00-2:50 pm
Theater 4, Learning Center
Gary McDowell, Executive Director, Future of Research (organizer)
Christopher Pickett, Director, Rescuing Biomedical Research
Maria-Elena Zavala, Professor, California State University Northridge
Giovanna Guerrero-Medina, Executive Director, Ciencia Puerto Rico
Sue Biggins, Professor, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Three reports issued recently—”Breaking Through,” mandated by Congress under the 21st Century Cures Act; “Graduate STEM
Education for the 21st Century;” and “Sexual Harassment of Women”—contain overarching themes of a lack of transparency,
a lack of responsibility by stakeholders, and a system of training that increasingly does not work for the very people it trains.
These reports make recommendations about ways to reform the research enterprise. But how can we effect change? This session
will focus on discussing important issues that must be considered as part of these reforms. Presentations will be followed by a
larger panel discussion and the opportunity for discussion with the ASCB community, with the aim of including this community’s
considerations in pushing for reform.
Outcomes:
1. Appreciate the range of barriers that exist to effecting change.
2. Gain an understanding of the various issues driving hyper-competition and restricting the ability to do innovative science
in the current research enterprise.
Target audience: all attendees
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In-Booth Presentation
2:00-2:30 pm
Booth 1019
ALVEOLE
Demo of bioengineering custom cell microenvironments with PRIMO contactless and maskless photopatterning system
Presenters: Grégoire Peyret, PhD, and Hélène Delobel
To more efficiently study living cells and model diseases, researchers are challenged with mimicking the cell microenvironment in
vitro. We will show how PRIMO photopatterning technology allows researchers to fine-tune cell culture substrates’ topography
through microfabrication and biochemistry through protein micropatterning (compatible with all substrates: soft or stiff, flat or
microstructured).substrates: soft or stiff, flat or microstructured).
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Exhibitor Tech Talk
3:00-4:00 pm
Theater 1, Learning Center
MilliporeSigma
Duolink® PLA: A Powerful Tool to Study Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling Pathways
Presenter: Tracy Adair-Kirk, PhD, Principal Scientist, MilliporeSigma
Level: Introductory
The ability to study concerted movements, modifications, and interactions of proteins within a cell in a multiplexed fashion is key
to unraveling the fundamental mechanisms of biology and disease states. However, the low-level expression of many proteins,
combined with the transient nature of their interactions, makes analyzing these processes quite difficult. Duolink® in situ proximity
ligation assay (PLA) offers a solution to overcome these problems. Duolink® PLA is both highly selective and sensitive, resulting
from dual antibody recognition and rolling-circle amplification, which occurs only when the two PLA probes are in close proximity.
Protein targets can be readily detected, quantified, and localized with single molecule resolution in unmodified cells. Duolink®
PLA can be adapted for use on suspension or adherent cells, tissue sections, and multiwell plates, making it an ideal method for
performing high-throughput screening of drugs, inhibitors, or monoclonal antibodies, target validation, and disease pathway
analysis. In addition, Duolink® flowPLA now allows the detection of very low abundant proteins and protein interactions by flow
cytometry. Furthermore, Multicolor Duolink® PLA allows multiplex detection of up to 4 protein events (e.g., protein interactions
or modifications) within a single assay. These recent advances in the Duolink® PLA technology will allow researchers to generate
more robust data in fewer tissue or cell samples.
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E.B. Wilson Medal Presentation and Address: Barbara J. Meyer
3:15-4:00 pm
Ballroom 20BC
TUESDAY
Barbara J. Meyer, University of California, Berkeley/HHMI
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Protein Folding in the Cell: The Role of Molecular Chaperones. U. Hartl1; 1Department of Cellular
Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
Chaperonin-mediated protein folding. A.L. Horwich1,2;1Genetics, Yale University School of
Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New Haven, CT
Workshop: Electron Cryo-Tomography and Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM)
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 33B
Organizers and Speakers:
Wanda Kukulski, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, organizer and speaker
Martin Pilhofer, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, organizer and speaker
Juha Huiskonen, University of Oxford, UK, speaker
Elizabeth Wright, Morgridge Institute for Research and University of Wisconsin-Madison, speaker
Integrating the complexity of cellular organization from the atomic to the organelle scale is a grand challenge at the intersection
of cell biology, biophysics, and structural biology. There is thus a growing need to study cellular assemblies of proteins, lipids, and
nucleic acids in their native environment. In addition, it is important to understand how the distribution of cellular components
changes over time and how dynamic changes in protein complexes mediate functions.
A requirement for such comprehensive cellular models is integration of data from different scales of resolution. Electron cryotomography (cryo-ET) has emerged as a key technology toward this goal, since it resolves cellular complexes in situ, in a near-native
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state, in three dimensions, and at the nanometer regime. Correlated light and electron microscopy is a powerful approach to
overcome major challenges in cryo-ET: the localization of transient and elusive structures and the identification of defined stages
during a cellular process. At the other end of the scale, combining density maps from cryo-ET with high-resolution structures attains
an atomic view of cellular mechanisms.
In this workshop we present the forefront of cryo-ET, including sample preparation by cryo-focused ion beam milling and correlation
with fluorescence microscopy. Specific examples will illustrate advances that were made while discovering novel aspects of cellular
function and organization.
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Subgroup X: New Tools and Resources for Studies of Stem Cell Biology
4:15-6:50 pm
Room: 20D
Organizers: Yukiko Yamashita, University of Michigan; and David Drubin, University of California, Berkeley
Combined advances in genome editing, stem cell production, and organoid derivation from stem cells represent a revolution in cell
and developmental biology. These advances have important implications for the study of basic biology as well as for translation of
mechanistic discoveries into understanding of disease. Most cell and developmental biologists, however, are unfamiliar with the
techniques and procedures necessary to work with stem cells. This session aims to provide the latest information about the new
tools and resources being developed, and about the innovative model systems and experimental approaches being deployed for
studies of stem cell biology. Wide adoption of stem cells for studies of cell and developmental biology promises to enable progress
in basic research and translation of the results to address disease.
Presentations:
4:15 pm
Introduction. Yukiko Yamashita, University of Michigan, and David Drubin, University of
California, Berkeley Subcellular organization and dynamics:
Human iPSCs: from image to information. Molly Maleckar, Allen Institute for Cell Science
4D cell biology: Big data image analytics and lattice light-sheet imaging of live stem cell-derived
organoids. Johannes Schoeneberg, University of California, Berkeley
Non-random sister chromatid segregation and germline immortality. Yukiko Yamashita, University
of Michigan Stem cells in development and disease:
Understanding progenitor to muscle stem cell transitions in human development and human
pluripotent stem cells. April Pyle, University of California, Los Angeles
Using human iPSCs to understand the cell biology underlying neurodegeneration. Hyun Kate Lee,
University of Toronto
CRISPR and Stem Cells: Disease mechanism and genome surgery. Bruce Conklin, University of
California, San Francisco Cell polarity and tissue organization:
Manipulating cellular and sub-cellular asymmetry with high spatiotemporal resolution in fly
neural stem cells. Clemens Cabernard, University of Washington
Cellular aspect ratio and division mechanics pattern cell lineages in the intestinal epithelium. Kara
McKinley, University of California, San Francisco
Dynamic regulation of stem cell division and fate by tissue architecture. Danelle Davenport,
Princeton University
Closing comments
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Minisymposium 12: Biomechanics
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 29C
Supported by The Kavli Foundation
Co-Chairs: Katja Röper, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology; and Michel Labouesse, Institute of Biology Paris – Seine
4:15 pm
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Introduction
Epithelial tissue fracture dynamics govern fast and extreme plastic shape changes in Trichoplax
adhaerens. V.N. Prakash1, M.S. Bull2, M. Prakash1; 1Department of Bioengineering, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, 2Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Extrinsic stress triggers actin-based viscoplasticity in a ratchet-based morphogenetic process. A.
Lardennois1, G. Pasti1, X. Yang1,2, T. Ferraro1, J. Pontabry2, F. Llense1, D. Rodriguez2, C. Gally1, M.
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5:05 pm
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5:35 pm
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Minisymposium 13: Cell Biology of the Neuron
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 28C
Supported by The Kavli Foundation
Co-Chairs: Brenda Bloodgood, University of California, San Diego; and Gentry Patrick, University of California, San Diego
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
Introduction
Mitochondria tune neuronal computation in the Drosophila visual system. E.L. Barnhart1,2, C.
Desplan2, T.R. Clandinin1; 1Neurobiology, Stanford, Stanford, CA, 2Biology, NYU, New York, NY
4:35 pm
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Activity-dependent trafficking and function of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines. M.
Goo1, L. Sancho1, N. Slepak1, S.K. Gilmore1, D. Boassa2, T.J. Deerinck2, M.H. Ellisman2,3,4, B.L.
Bloodgood1, G.N. Patrick1; 1Section of Neurobiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University
of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2National Center for Microscopy, and Imaging Research and
Center for Research on Biological Systems, La Jolla, CA, 3Department of Neurosciences, University
of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 4Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego, CA
4:50 pm
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Phosphofructokinase (PFK-1) self-interaction is necessary for its clustering near synapses. Z.
Xuan1, S.K. Jang1, S. Prashad1, L. Jawerth2, B. Kim1, A. Patel2, D. Albrecht3, A.A. Hyman2, D.A.
Colón-Ramos1,4; 1Department of Neuroscience, Cell Biology and Program in Cellular Neuroscience,
Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2Max Planck Institute of Molecular
Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, Germany, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester
Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA, 4Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad de Puerto Rico,
San Juan, Puerto Rico
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Labouesse1,2; 1Laboratoire de Biologie du Développement, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Paris,
France, 2Institut de Génétique Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Strasbourg, France
Asymmetric biogenesis of occluding junctions drives integration of stem cell progeny during
epithelial turnover. P. Moreno-Roman1, I. Kolotueva2, B. Humbel2, L.E. O’Brien3; 1Department of
Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2Electron Microscopy Facility, Université de Lausanne,
Lausanne, Switzerland, 3Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University,
Stanford, CA
Radially-patterned cell behaviours during tube budding from an epithelium. K. Röper1, Y.E.
Sanchez Corrales1, G.B. Blanchard2; 1Cell Biology, MRC-Laboratory of Molecular Biology,
Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
3D Tissue elongation via ECM stiffness-cued junctional remodeling. D. Chen1, J. Crest1, S.J.
Streichan2, D. Bilder1; 1Dept. of Molecular & Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA, 2Dept. of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA
Differential expression of Cadherin-2 patterns RhoA and Myosin activity to drive zippering
and neural tube closure in a simple chordate. H. Hashimoto1, E.M. Munro1,2; 1Department
of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2Committee on
Development, Regeneration and Stem Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Structural redundancy in supracellular actomyosin network connections enables robust tissue
folding. H.G. Yevick1, A.C. Martin1; 1Biology, MIT, Cambridge, MA
The Diaphanous-Related Formin, Dia1, Acts Upon Cell Junctions to Coordinate Differentiation
and Cell Sorting in a Stratified Epithelium. R.M. Harmon1, M.L. Gardel1; 1Institute of Biophysical
Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Mechanical signaling underlies self-organized regions of mesoderm differentiation in hESC
colonies. N.M. Ayad1,2, J.M. Muncie1,2, L. Przybyla2, J.N. Lakins2, R. Sunyer3, X. Trepat3, V.M.
Weaver1,2,4; 1Graduate Program in Bioengineering, UC Berkeley - UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 2Center
for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, Department of Surgery, University of California
San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Institute for Bioengineering of Catelonia (IBEC), Universitat
de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, 4Department of Anatomy, Department of Bioengineering
and Therapeutic Sciences, Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem
Cell Research, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San
Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Lateral inhibition in cell fate specification is mediated by mechanical signals modulating TAZ
activity. P. Xia1, D. Gütl1, V. Zheden1, C. Heisenberg1; 1IST AUSTRIA, Klosterneuburg, Austria
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ATP-dependent phase transition of peri-active zone and active zone bio-condensates regulate
synapse organization and function. L. Guillaud1, T. Takahashi1; 1Cellular and Molecular Synaptic
Function, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Onna-Son, Okinawa, Japan
Axon injury triggers a liquid-solid transition of an intrinsic inhibitor of regeneration. M.G.
Andrusiak1, P. Sharifnia1, Z. Wang1, Z. Wu1, A.M. Dickey1, A.D. Chisholm1, Y. Jin1;1Biological
Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Microcephaly mutations disrupt chromosome integrity in neurons. A.T. Kodani1,2, P. Li1, C. Kenny1,
C.A. Walsh1,2, R. Rodin1; 1Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA,
2
Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
TorsinA and Neuronal Nuclear Pore Complex Biogenesis. S. Kim1, S.S. Pappas2, W.T. Dauer1,2,3;
1
Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI,
2
Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 3Department of Cell &
Developmental Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Communication of pathway-specific circuit activity to the genome by the immediate early gene
transcription factor NPAS4. G. Brigidi1, M. Hayes2, P. Lin3, A. Hartzell3, S. Heinz2, B.L. Bloodgood1;
1
Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Medicine,
University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 3Neurosciences Graduate Program, University of
California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
Viral-like mechanisms of intercellular RNA trafficking in the nervous system. E. Pastuzyn1, R.
Kearns1, J. Einstein1, J. Shepherd1; 1Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
Rab11 and Retromer act antagonistically to one another to regulate neuronal extracellular vesicle
cargo. R.B. Walsh1, M.A. Zunitch1, A.N. Becalska1, A. Yeh1, H. Ye2,3, J. Shulman2,3, A.A. Rodal1;
1
Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA, 2Neurology, Neuroscience, and Molecular and Human
Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 3Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research
Institute, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX
Minisymposium 14: Cell Size, Cell Division, and Contractility
4:15-6:50 pm
Ballroom 20A
Co-Chairs: Jan Skotheim, Stanford University; and Amy Maddox, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
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Introduction
Constructing DNA-binding modules to sense changes in cell volume. C.W. Sandlin1, H. Chen1, M.C.
Good1; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
The biosynthetic basis of cell size control. D. Chandler-Brown1, K. Schmoller1, M. Swaffer1, J.
Turner1, M. Langhinrichs1, J.M. Skotheim1; 1Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Aurora-A breaks symmetry in C. elegans zygotes independently of its role in centrosome
maturation. P. Zhao1,2, X. Teng3, M. Nishikawa4, Y. Toyama2,3, F. Motegi1,2,3; 1Temasek Lifesciences
Laboratory, Singapore, Singapore, 2Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore,
Singapore, Singapore, 3Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore, Singapore, 4Frontier Bioscience,
Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan
A reaction-diffusion mechanism for crossover regulation during meiosis. L. Zhang1,2, W.T.
Stauffer2,3, S. Köhler1,2, R. Rillo-Bohn1,2, A.F. Dernburg1,2,4,5; 1Molecular and Cell Biology, University
of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD,
3
Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 4California Institute for
Quantitative Biology (QB3), Berkeley, CA, 5Biological Systems and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley
National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
The regulation of nuclear remodelling at mitotic exit. G. Dey1, S. Bruderer1,2, M.
Balasubramanian3, W. Kukulski4, B. Baum1; 1MRC Lab for Molecular Cell Biology, University
College London, London, United Kingdom, 2Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom,
3
Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Warwick, United Kingdom, 4MRC Lab for
Molecular Biology, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Metaphase actin waves drive mitochondrial motility to promote spatial mixing of mtDNA before
cell division. A.S. Moore1, S.M. Coscia1, C.L. Simpson1, J.J. Nirschl1, E.L. Holzbaur1; 1Physiology,
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Integration of biochemical signals and mechanical forces in the synchronization of the cell cycle.
V.E. Deneke1, A. Puliafito2, D. Krueger3, A. Narla4, M. Vergassola4, S. De Renzis3, S. Di Talia1; 1Cell
Biology, Duke University, Durham, NC, 2IRCC, Turin, Italy, 3EMBL Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany,
4
University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA
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Three mechanisms generate tension in the fission yeast contractile ring: sliding filament, fixed
filament and unanchored myosin-II. S. Thiyagarajan1, S. Wang2, H.F. Chin1, T.D. Pollard3,4,5, B.
O’Shaughnessy1; 1Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2Physics, Columbia
University, New York, NY, 3Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, 4Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 5Cell Biology,
Yale University, New Haven, CT
Actin filaments locally template filament elongation to provide a structural memory of filament
alignment during cytokinesis. Y. Li1, E.M. Munro1,2; 1Committee on Development, Regeneration,
and Stem Cell Biology, the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology,
the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Novel cytokinetic ring components limit myosin levels and closure speed. K.R. Bell1, M.E.
Werner1, A. Doshi1, D.B. Cortes1, A.S. Maddox1; 1Biology, UNC - Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
* Andrew Moore is an ASCB Porter Prize for Research Excellence Awardee.
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Minisymposium 15: Cytoskeleton, Motility, and Cell Mechanics: Tracks
4:15-6:50 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Co-Chairs: Brad Nolen, University of Oregon; and Radhika Subramanian, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General
Hospital
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Introduction
Activation of Arp2/3 complex by WISH/DIP/SPIN90 (WDS) proteins, a family of nucleation
promoting factors that seed branched actin network assembly. Q. Luan1, C.J. Balzer1, A.R.
Wagner1, S. Liu1, L.A. Helgeson2, B.J. Nolen1; 1Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oregon,
Eugene , OR, 2Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
A complex containing lysine-acetylated actin and cyclase-associated protein inhibits the formin
INF2. M. A1, H.N. Higgs1; 1Biochemistry, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
Bil2, a dual (positive and negative) regulator of formin activity, controls cell compartment-specific
actin cable assembly. T.J. Rands1, B.L. Goode1; 1Biology, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
Ena/VASP is fine-tuned for processive elongation on actin filaments bundled by filopodia
crosslinker fascin. A.J. Harker1, H.H. Katkar2,3,4, T.C. Bidone2,3,4, F. Aydin2,3,4, G.A. Voth2,3,4, D.A.
Applewhite5, D.R. Kovar1,6; 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of
Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 3The James
Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 4Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University
of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 5Department of Biology, Reed College, Portland, OR, 6Department of
Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Muscle specific stress fibers give rise to sarcomeres and are mechanistically distinct from stress
fibers in non-muscle cells. A.M. Fenix1, M.R. Visetsouk2, N. Taneja1, A.C. Neininger1, R. Garde2,
B. Liu3, B.R. Nixon4, A. Manalo4, J.R. Becker4, S.W. Crawley5, D. Bader4, M.J. Tyska1, Q. Liu3, J.H.
Gutzman2, D.T. Burnette1; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN,
2
Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, 3Biomedical Informatics,
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 4Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical
Center, Nashville, TN, 5Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
Severing enzymes amplify microtubule arrays through lattice GTP-tubulin incorporation. A.
Vemu1, E. Szczesna1, E. Zehr1, J.O. Spector1, N. Grigorieff2,3, A.M. Deaconescu 4, A. Roll-Mecak1,5;
1
Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, National Institute of
Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute,, Brandeis
University, Waltham, MA, 3Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn,
VA, 4Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence,
RI, 5Biochemistry & Biophysics Center, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD
Human β-tubulin isotypes regulate microtubule protofilament number and stability. S. Ti1, G.M.
Alushin2, T.M. Kapoor1; 1Laboratory of Chemistry and Cell Biology, The Rockefeller University, New York,
NY, 2Laboratory of Structural Biophysics and Mechanobiology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Cryo-EM structure of the tubulin cofactors-Arl2-alpha/beta-tubulin complex reveal the
molecular basis for alpha/beta-tubulin biogenesis and topology. Z. Wang1, F. Guo1, J.K. Moore2,
J. Al-Bassam1; 1Molecular Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 2Cell and
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4:20 pm
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Developmental Biology, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver , CO
Direct induction of microtubule branching by microtubule nucleation factor SSNA1. N. Basnet1,
H. Nedozralova1, A.H. Crevenna2, S. Bodakuntla3, T. Schlichthaerle1, M. Taschner4, G. Cardone1,
C. Janke3, R. Jungmann1, M.M. Magiera3, C. Biertuempfel1, N. Mizuno1; 1Department of
Structural Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Munich, Germany, 2Biomolecular
Self-Organization, Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier, Lisbon, Portugal,
3
Genotoxic Stress and Cancer, Institut Curie, Paris, France, 4Department of Fundamental
Microbiology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
The means to an end: How the ciliary kinesin Kif7 finds microtubule ends. S. Jiang1, N. Mani1,
E.M. Wilson-Kubalek2, P. Ku1, R.A. Milligan2, R. Subramanian1; 1Molecular Biology, Harvard
Medical School and MGH, Boston, MA, 2The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA
Minisymposium 16: Organelle Homeostasis
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 30C
Co-Chairs: Adam Hughes, University of Utah School of Medicine; and Marisa Otegui, University of Wisconsin-Madison
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
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Introduction
Systematic superresolution analysis of endocytosis reveals an actin nucleation nano-template that
drives efficient vesicle formation. M. Mund1,2, J. Beek1, J. Deschamps1, S. Dmitrieff1, P. Hoess1, J.
Monster1, A. Picco2, F.J. Nedelec1, M. Kaksonen2, J. Ries1; 1Cell Biology and Biophysics, European
Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of
Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Actin-independent endocytosis in yeast revealed through visualization of intracellular sterols with
a bacterial toxin bio-sensor. M. Marek1, S.G. Martin1; 1Department of Fundamental Microbiology,
University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
FERARI: an unusual tether involved in endocytic recycling. J.A. Solinger1, H. Rashid1, A. Spang1;
1
Biozentrum, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Architecture of mammalian retromer by single particle cryo-EM. A.K. Kendall1, B. Xie1,2, C. Jung1,
E. Binshtein1, S.E. Collier1, P. Xu1, R. Burcham1, T. Graham1, T. Nakagawa1, L.P. Jackson1;1Biological
Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University,
Nashville, TN
Catalytic activation of β-arrestins by GPCRs promotes independent β-arrestin trafficking and
signaling. K. Eichel1, D. Jullié1, B. Barsi-Rhyne1, N. Latorraca2, M. Masureel2, J. Sibarita3, R.
Dror2, M. von Zastrow1; 1Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA,
2
Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 3Interdisciplinary Institute
for Neuroscience, Bordeaux, France
Mechanism of miRNA sorting into extracellular vesicles. M.M. Temoche-Diaz1, M.J. Shurtleff1,2, R.
Nottingham3, J. Yao3, A. Lambowitz3, R.W. Schekman2; 1Plant and Microbial Biology, University of
California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA, 3Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
Mitochondrial-Derived Compartments Promote Nutrient-Dependent Remodeling of the
Mitochondrial Proteome. M. Schuler1, A.M. Litwiller1, T.J. Campbell1, T. Tedeschi1, J.M. Shaw1,
A.L. Hughes1; 1Biochemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
The triggering of a spatially segregated ESCRT-nuclear envelope repair system leads to local
nuclear membrane remodeling. D.J. Thaller1, M. Allegretti2, S. Borah1, M. Beck2, P. Lusk1; 1Cell
Biology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
Lipid homeostasis is maintained by dual targeting of the mitochondrial PE biosynthesis enzyme
Psd1 to the ER. J.R. Friedman1,2, M. Kannan3, A. Toulmay3, C.H. Jan4,5, W. Prinz3, J.S. Weissman4,
J. Nunnari2; 1Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 2Molecular and Cellular
Biology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, 3NIDDK, NIH, Bethesda, MD, 4Department of
Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA, 5Calico Life Sciences, South San
Francisco, CA
Reticulon proteins in plants: Membrane remodeling and autophagy. X. Zhang1, X. Ding1, R.
Marshall2, R.D. Vierstra2, M.S. Otegui1; 1Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, University of
Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 2Biology, Washington University at St Louis, St Louis, MO
* Kelsie Eichel is the 2018 ASCB Merton Bernfield Awardee.
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Minisymposium 17: Regulation of Autophagy
4:15-6:50 pm
Room 31B
Supported by Biogen
Co-Chairs: Meng Wang, Baylor College of Medicine; and Hong Zhang, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences
M169
4:35 pm
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4:50 pm
M171
5:05 pm
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5:20 pm
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M178
Introduction
Tethering the ER with the isolation membrane for autophagosome formation. Y. Zhao1, H.
Zhang1,2; 1Department of Molecular, Cell and Cancer Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical
School, Worcester, MA, 2National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
The autophagy-related gene ATG2A encodes a lipid transfer protein. S. Yu^1, D. Valverde^1, V.
Boggavarapu2, T. Walz2, K.M. Reinisch*1, T.J. Melia*1; 1Department of Cell Biology, Yale University,
New Haven, CT, 2Laboratory of Molecular Electron Microscopy, The Rockefeller University, New
York, NY
Conserved protein machinery regulates the autophagosome lipid composition. M. Graef1; 1MPRG
Graef, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany
Differential proteomic analysis identifies TEX264 as a novel receptor for ER autophagy. H.
CHINO1,2, T. Hatta3, T. Natsume3, N. Mizushima1; 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, 3Biomedical Information Research Center, National Institute of
Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tokyo, Japan
A novel Atg39-mediated nucleolar autophagy pathway in response to DNA replication stress.
A. Van Elgort1, L. Perucho Jamies1, K.B. Kaplan1; 1Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of
California, Davis, Davis, CA
Lysosomal Signaling in Orchestrating Cellular and Organism Homeostasis. M.C. Wang1,2;
1
Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, 2Howard Hughes
Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD
Distinct Spatiotemporal Control of Macro-autophagy by Acute Glucose Restriction Remodels
Vacuole Liquid-ordered Membrane Domain to Regulate Cellular Lipid Metabolism and Survival
during Starvation. A.Y. Seo1, F. Sarkleti1, J. Lippincott-Schwartz1; 1Janelia Research Campus,
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA
A novel autophagic mechanism mediating cellular lipid droplet catabolism. R.J. Schulze1, M.B.
Schott1, S.G. Weller1, E.W. Krueger1, C.A. Casey2, M.A. McNiven1; 1Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, 2Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center,
Omaha, NE
Structural and biochemical analyses of the autophagic ATG2A-WIPI4 complex. S. Chowdhury1,
C. Otomo1, A. Leitner2, K. Ohashi1, A. Rudolf2,3, G.C. Lander1, T. Otomo1; 1Integrative Structural
and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA, 2Institute of Molecular
Systems Biology, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zurich, Switzerland, 3Faculty of
Science, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Coordination of Class II PI3-kinase and Mtm PI3-phosphatase functions in autophagy. A.A.
Kiger1, J. Groulx1, S. Jean1, M. Velichkova1, P. Kadandale1, N. Fujita1, S. Cox1, S. Kumar1; 1Cell &
Developmental Biology, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA
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139
TUESDAY
4:15 pm
4:20 pm
OO
Reception: Enabling Persistence in Science: Creating Inclusive Environments through Microaffirmations
7:00-8:30 pm
Room 32B
Leticia Márquez-Magaña, Professor of Biology, San Francisco State University
Patricia Castruita, Post-baccalaureate researcher, University of California, San Francisco
Kenjus Watson, Postdoctoral Fellow, San Francisco State University
Research training and teaching environments in particular domains of science often reflect the culture of population group(s)
predominant in its sub-fields (e.g., cell biology). While this affirms the culture and values of the historically predominant group, it
often does not affirm the culture, lived experiences, or values of historically underrepresented students in those sub-fields. This
session will discuss evidence of the negative outcomes, including exit from science, associated with this phenomenon in both
research labs and classrooms. We will also share strategies to support faculty in creating more affirming and inclusive environments
through verbal and non-verbal use of microaffirmations to improve persistence of historically underrepresented students in all
domains of science.
Outcomes:
1. Gain an understanding of stereotype threat and other psychosocial barriers to persistence in science for historically
underrepresented groups.
2. Learn strategies for creating affirming and inclusive environments in science.
3. Develop ideas for verbal and non-verbal microaffirmations.
Target audience: all attendees
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TUESDAY
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The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Wednesday
December 12, 2018
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Daily Schedule—Wednesday, December 12
144
7:30-11:30 am
Registration Open
8:30 am-11:05 pm
Minisymposia
Registration Area
18
Autophagy and Protein Quality Control
Ballroom 20BC
19
Biological Insights from Organoid Models of Health and Disease
20
Cellular Metabolism
Ballroom 20A
21
Centrosomes, Cilia and Flagella
Ballroom 20D
22
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Room 30C
23
Organelle Zones
Room 28C
Room 33B
8:30 am
Subgroup Y: The Cellular and Molecular Basis of Invasive Metastatic Cancer
Room 29C
8:30-11:05 am
Subgroup Z: Cell Biology of Marine Protists: Toward Functional Genomic
Tools for Diverse New Model Organisms
Room 31B
11:20 am-12:20 pm
Symposium 8: Quality Control
2:00-5:00 pm
Genetic Tool Development in Marine Protists: Emerging New Model
Organisms for Cell Biology
Ballroom 20BC
Santa Rosa Room,
Marriott Marquis
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Wednesday, December 12
OO
Minisymposium 18: Autophagy and Protein Quality Control
8:30-11:05 am
Ballroom 20BC
Co-Chairs: Martin Graef, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne; and Harm Kampinga, University Medical Center
Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
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M188
Introduction
Molecular chaperones, macroautophagy and protein aggregation diseases. H. Kampinga1; 1Cell
Biology, UMCG/RuG, Groningen, Netherlands
The organization and consequence of accumulating unfolded proteins in mitochondria. L.
Ruan1,2,3, X. Zhang1,2,4, J. McNamara1,2,3, A. Chang1,2, J. Zhu1,2, C. Na5, A. Peterson3, R. Li1,2,4;
1
Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD,
2
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore,
MD, 3Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (BCMB) Graduate Program, Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimroe, MD, 4Diana Helis Henry Medical Research Foundation,
New Orleans, LA, 5Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,
Baltimore, MD
Gp78 regulation of mitophagy by PINK1 and USP13 deubiquitinase is mediated by its CUE
domain. Y. Mohammadzadeh1, B. Joshi1, G. Gao1, I.R. Nabi1; 1Cell and Physiological Sciences ,
University of British Columbia , Vancouver , BC
The nucleus is a common quality control destination for failed mitochondrial import
substrates. V.P. Shakya1, W. Barbeau1, C. Knutson1, A.L. Hughes1; 1Department of Biochemistry,
University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
Mechanism of protein quality control at the inner nuclear membrane: lessons from the SUNprotein, Mps3, in budding yeast. B.A. Koch1, H. Yu1; 1Biology, Florida State University, Tallahassee,
FL
Parallel genome-wide CRISPR analysis identified substrate-specific modules and a role for
heterotypic ubiquitin chains in ER-Associated Degradation. D.E. Leto1, D.W. Morgens2, L.
Zhang3, C.P. Walczak1, J. Elias3, M.C. Bassik2,4, R.R. Kopito1; 1Department of Biology, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA, 2Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 3Department
of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 4Program in Chemistry,
Engineering and Medicine for Human Health, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Illuminating degradation: The coordination and timing of substrate processing by the 26S
proteasome. J.A. Bard1, E. Jonsson1,2, A. Martin1,2,3; 1Molecular and Cell Biology, University of
California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California at
Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 3 University of California at Berkeley, California Institute for Quantitative
Biosciences, Berkeley, CA
Activation of ER stress response in a premature aging disease. S. Vidak1, T. Misteli1; 1Center for
Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Characterization of LAMP1-labeled degradative and non-degradative autophagic-lysosomal
organelles in the nervous system. X. Cheng1, Y. Xie1, B. Zhou1, N. Huang1, T. Farfel-Becker1, Z.
Sheng1; 1Synaptic Function Section, NINDS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
Proteome remodeling in human ATG conjugation system-deficient cells. L. Pontano Vaites1, J.A.
Paulo1, O. Owoyemi1, J.W. Harper1; 1Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston,
MA
Minisymposium 19: Biological Insights from Organoid Models of Health and Disease
8:30-11:05 am
Room 33B
Co-Chairs: Dirk Hockemeyer, University of California, Berkeley; and Aron Jaffe, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research
8:30 am
8:35 am
M189
Introduction
Pioneer transcription factor promiscuity requires co-factors to ensure cell fate specificity. M.
Mall1, Q. Lee2, M. Wernig2; 1Hector Institute for Translational Brain Research, German Cancer
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WEDNESDAY
OO
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:50 am
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Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany, 2Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative, Stanford
University, Stanford, CA
Genetically-engineered human cortical spheroid models of Tuberous Sclerosis. J. Blair1, D.
Hockemeyer1, H. Bateup1,2; 1Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley,
Berkeley, CA, 2Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
3D culture in brain-mimetic matrices demonstrates that glioblastoma tumors acquire
chemotherapy resistance through matrix-mediated SRC activation. W. Xiao1, S. Wang2, R.
Zhang1, A. Sohrabi1, Q. Yu1, S. Liu3, A. Ehsanipour1, J. Liang1, D.A. Nathanson4,5, S.K. Seidlits1,5,6;
1
Bioengineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 2Microbiology, Immunology
and Molecular Genetics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 3Undergraduate
Interdepartmental Program for Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles,
CA, 4Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
5
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA,
6
Brain Research Institute, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Modeling rare cancers using patient-derived tumor organoids. M. Mapua1, J. Yanagawa2, S. Dry3,
S. Nelson3, A. Singh1, N. Bernthal4, F.C. Eilber5, S. Memarzadeh6, R. Damoiseaux7, N. Federman8,
A. Soragni1; 1Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School
of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 2Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, David
Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 3Department of Pathology, Department of
Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 4Division of Orthopaedic
Oncology, Department of Orthopaedics, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA,
5
Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA,
Los Angeles, CA, 6Department of OB-GYN, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles,
CA, 7Department of Molecular and Medicinal Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine,
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 8Department of Pediatrics and Department of Orthopaedics, David Geffen
School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
Investigating the specification of the CFTR-rich pulmonary ionocyte. L.W. Plasschaert1, R.
Zilionis2, R. Choo-Wing1, V. Savova2, J. Knehr3, G. Roma3, H. Yang4, Y. Wang4, M. Hild4, A.M.
Klein2, A.B. Jaffe1; 1Respiratory Diseases, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Cambridge,
MA, 2Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Chemical Biology and Therapeutics,
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel, Switzerland, 4Chemical Biology and
Therapeutics, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, MA
Cellular aspect ratio and cell division mechanics intermix cell lineages in the intestinal
epithelium. K.L. McKinley1, N. Stuurman1, L.A. Royer2, C. Schartner3, D. Castillo-Azofeifa4,
M. Delling3, O.D. Klein4, R.D. Vale1; 1Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, UCSF/HHMI, San
Francisco, CA, 2Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, 3Physiology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA,
4
Orofacial Sciences, UCSF, San Francisco, CA
Modeling cellular dynamics underlying H. pylori VacA-host cell interaction using gastric
organoids. X. Liu1, X. Liu1,2, P.Y. Yao1, S. Muthusamy1,2, X. Song1,2, W. Wang2,3, C. Henry1, X. Ding3,
D. Wang2,3, X. Yao2; 1Physiology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, United States, 2Organelle
Dynamics, Keck Center for Cellular Dynamics, Hefei, China, 3Medicine, Beijing University of
Chinese Medicine, Beijig, China
Organoids reveal roles for multicellular interactions that establish aging-related epigenetic
and transcriptional states in human mammary epithelia. M. Miyano1,2, R. Sayaman1,2, M.
Todhunter1,2, M. Stampfer3, M.A. LaBarge1,2,3; 1Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute
at City of Hope, Duarte, CA, 2Center for Cancer and Aging, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, 3Biological
Systems and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Duarte, CA
Tissue Mechanics Guide Reprograming Of Deep Ectoderm Through Mesenchymal-To-Epithelial
Transition On The Surface Of Embryonic Aggregates. H.Y. Kim1,2, T. Jackson1, C. Sruckenholz1, L.
Davidson 1; 1Bioengineering , University of Pittsburgh , Pittsburgh , PA, 2Institute for Basic Science ,
Daejeon , South Korea
Cell cycle control of blood progenitors regulates their fate and differentiation state. L.M. Goins1,
B.C. Mondal1, J.R. Girard1, U. Banerjee1,2,3; 1Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University
of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 2Molecular Biology Institute, University of California,
Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 3Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem
Cell Research, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
OO
Minisymposium 20: Cellular Metabolism
8:30-11:05 am
Ballroom 20A
Co-Chairs: Kivanc Birsoy, The Rockefeller University; and Yasemin Sancak, University of Washington
OO
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8:35 am
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M208
Introduction
Mitochondria, Calcium and Metabolism. M. MacEwen1, Y. Sancak1; 1Pharmacology, University of
Washington, Seattle, WA
Systematic approaches to study limiting metabolites for tumor growth. K. Birsoy1;
1
Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Regulation of macropinocytosis by nutrient signaling. C. Commisso1; 1Tumor Initiation and
Maintenance, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA
Mitochondrial protein acylation is a post-translational signature of energy dysfunction. N.
Ghazal1, J.Q. Kwong1; 1Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta,
GA
Metabolic requirements of breast cancer cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. A.
Muir1, M.R. Sullivan1, M.G. Vander Heiden1; 1Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, Cambridge, MA
Genetically encoded tools for manipulation of bioenergetics in living cells. D.V. Titov1;
1
Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA
Drosophila Snazarus regulates a lipid droplet sub-population at plasma membrane-droplet
contacts in fat body adipocytes. R. Ugrankar1, H. Hariri1, J. Bowerman1, W.M. Henne1; 1Cell
Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
Ferroptosis induction by conjugated polyunsaturated fatty acids. A.C. Beatty1, T. Singh1, E.
Nicolas1, K.Q. Cai1, S. Doll2, M. Conrad2, U. Rennefahrt3, J.R. Peterson1; 1Cancer Biology, Fox Chase
Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, 2Institute of Developmental Genetics, Helmholtz Center Munich,
Neuherberg, Germany, 3Metanomics Health, GmbH, Berlin, Germany
Molecular mechanisms for lipid sensing by mTORC1. O. Davis1, C. Lim1, R. Zoncu1;
1
Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
LPS decreases the expression of metabolic transporters in mouse monocytes. J.D. Ochrietor1, R.
Al-Khatab1; 1Biology, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL
Minisymposium 21: Centrosomes, Cilia and Flagella
8:30-11:05 am
Ballroom 20D
Co-Chairs: Guangshuo Ou, Tsinghua University, China; and Jadranka Loncarek, National Cancer Institute/NIH, Frederick
M209
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M213
Introduction
High Speed AFM of SAS-6 protein self-assembly reveals biophysical principles at the root of
centriole formation. N. Banterle1, A. Nievergelt2, T. Hübscher1, G. Fantner2, P. Gönczy1; 1Swiss
Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal
Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland, 2Laboratory for Bio- and NanoInstrumentation, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
Mechanisms Regulating Cilia Abundance in Multiciliated Cells. R. Nanjundappa1, D. Kong2, K.
Shim1, T. Stearns3, S.L. Brody4, J. Loncarek2, M.R. Mahjoub1,5; 1Medicine (Nephrology Division),
Washington University, St Louis, MO, 2Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute,
Frederick, MD, 3Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 4Medicine (Pulmonary Division),
Washington University, St Louis, MO, 5Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University, St Louis,
MO
A two-step mechanism for the inactivation of microtubule organizing center function at the
centrosome. J. Magescas1, J.C. Zonka1, J.L. Feldman1; 1Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Radial organization and pre-mitotic remodeling of mammalian centriole distal appendages. D.
Kong1, M. Bowler1, S. Sun2, R. Nanjundappa3, H. Sui2, M.R. Mahjoub3, J. Loncarek1;
1
LPDS, NIH/NCI, Frederick, MD, 2Wadsworth Center, New York Department of Health, Albany, NY,
3
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University, St Louis, MO
The Role and Fate of the Centrosome During Muscle Differentiation. J.M. Geisinger1, T. Stearns1,2;
1
Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
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WEDNESDAY
8:30 am
8:35 am
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Primary cilia control gut length by regulating its mechanical properties. Y. Yang1, P. Paivinen2, K.E.
Mostov1,3, T.P. Makela2, J.F. Reiter1; 1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Cardiovascular
Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 2Research Programs
Unit, Faculty of Medicine and HiLIFE-Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki,
Helsinki, Finland, 3Department of Anatomy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Structure of Dynein-2 Reveals a Contorted Tail Coordinating Intraflagellar Transport. K. Toropova1,
R. Zalyte2, M. Mladenov1, A.P. Carter2, A.J. Roberts1; 1Institute of Structural and Molecular
Biology, Birkbeck, University of London, London, United Kingdom, 2Division of Structural Studies,
Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Intraflagellar Transport Motor Proteins in C. elegans Sensory Neurons. G. Ou1; 1School of Life
Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Rapid and acute inhibition of heterotrimeric kinesin-2 function reveals mechanisms of
intraflagellar transport in mammalian cilia. M.F. Engelke1, B. Waas1, S.E. Kearns1, A. Suber1, A.
Boss1, B.L. Allen1, K.J. Verhey1; 1Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Michigan Medical
School, Ann Arbor, MI
Microtubule inner proteins (MIPs) are essential for the structural integrity and function of motile
cilia axonemes. M. Winey1,2, Y. Zhao2, D. Stoddard3, B. Bayless1, P. Louka4, A. Fabritius1, C.
Ebmeier2, W. Heydeck2, W. Old2, J. Gaertig4, D. Nicastro3; 1Molecular Cellular Biology, University
of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 2Molecular, Cellular Developmental Biology , University of
Colorado, Boulder, Boulder, CO, 3Cell Biology and Biophysics, University of Texas Southwestern
Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 4Cellular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA
Minisymposium 22: Host-Pathogen Interactions
8:30-11:05 am
Room 30C
Co-Chairs: Shaeri Mukherjee, University of California, San Francisco; and Nihal Altan-Bonnet, National Heart, Lung, and Blood
Institute/NIH
8:30 am
Introduction
8:35 am
M219
A novel coronavirus exit pathway. N. Altan-Bonnet1, T. Dellibovi-Ragheb1, E. Pak1, J. Stamos1,
Q. Qiu1, A. Fehr2, S. Perlman2; 1Cell Biology and Physiology Center, National Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD, 2Microbiology and Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
8:50 am
M220
A bacterial kinase phosphorylates the Hsp70 chaperone family to inhibit eukaryotic protein
synthesis. S. Mukherjee1; 1Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco,
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
9:05 am
M221
Live-Cell imaging reveals how interactions between bacteriophages, bacteria and mammalian
cells shape health and disease. K. Bodner1, A.I. Barth 1, A. Melkonian1, Y. Tanouchi1, M.W.
Covert1; 1Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
9:20 am M222
Genome-wide CRISPR screens for Shiga toxin and Ricin reveal Golgi proteins critical for
glycosylation. S. Tian1,2, M. Dong1,2; 1Urology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA,
2
Microbiology and Immunobiology , Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
9:35 am
M223
Cellular exit of Salmonella Typhimurium by exocytosis: implications for cell-to-cell spread of
infection. G.F. Walpole1,2, Z. Liu1, J.H. Brumell1, S. Grinstein1,2; 1Program in Cell Biology, The
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto,
Toronto, ON
9:50 am
M224
Global mapping of protein subcellular location in apicomplexans: the parasite as we’ve never seen
it before. K. Barylyuk1, L. Koreny1, H. Ke1, S. Butterworth1, I. Lassadi1, T. Mourier2, L.M. Breckels1,
L. Gatto1, A. Pain2, K.S. Lilley1, R.F. Waller1; 1Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge,
United Kingdom, 2Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah
University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
10:05 am
M225
Efficacy of HIV Antibodies: Why Two Arms are Better than One. T. Einav1, R. Galimidi2, P.P.
Gnanapragasam2, D.S. Joshi2,3, A.M. Lynch2, S. Yazdi4, A.P. West2, R. Phillips1,2,5, P.J. Bjorkman2;
1
Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 2Biology and Biological Engineering,
California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 3Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI,
4
Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA,
5
Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Physics, CA
148
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
OO
10:20 am
M226
10:35 am M227
10:50 am
M228
Adenovirus targets gap junction expression and function to facilitate replication. P.J. Calhoun1,2,
A.V. Phan1, J.D. Taylor1, C.C. James1,3, M.J. Zeitz1, J.W. Smyth1,2,3; 1Virginia Tech Carilion Research
Institute and School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA, 2Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 3Graduate Program in Translational
Biology, Medicine, and Health, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
A signaling pathway comprised of mTOR, Protein Kinase C-α, Filamin A, and the exocyst complex
controls exocytosis during InlB-mediated entry of Listeria monocytogenes. K. Ireton1, M. Bhalla1;
1
Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Infection with microsporidia induces an immune response in the offspring of Caenorhabditis
elegans. W. Zhao1, A. Willis1, A. Reinke1; 1Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON
Minisymposium 23: Organelle Zones
8:30-11:05 am
Room 28C
Co-Chairs: Akihiko Nakano, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics; and Julia Von Blume, Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry
M229
8:35 am
M230
9:05 am
M231
9:20 am
M232
9:35 am
M233
9:50 am
M234
10:05 am
M235
10:20 am
M236
10:35 am
M237
10:50 am
M238
Introduction
Organelle zones: a new concept emerging from cutting-edge live imaging microscopy. A.
Nakano1; 1RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, Wako, Japan
Activity of the SPCA1 calcium pump couples sphingomyelin synthesis to sorting of secretory
proteins in the trans-Golgi network. C.G. Burd1, Y. Deng1, E.L. Sundberg1, M. Pakdel2, B. Blank2,
J. Von Blume2; 1Cell Biology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Molecular Medicine, Max
Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsired, Germany
ACBD3 Controls KDEL Receptor Trafficking To the ER and the Cell Surface. X. Yue1, Y. Qian1,
M. Bao1, L. Zhu1, S. Jing1, B. Gim2, S. Li1, P. Ziltener3, F. Bottanelli3, Q. Yue1, J. Jia1, Y. Wang1,
D. Meshram1, S. Choi1, P. Hao1, J.E. Rothman3, I. LEE1; 1School of Life Science and Technology,
ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, China, 2School of Physical Science and Technology,
ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai, China, 3Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of
Medicine, New Haven, United States
Organelle zones executing GPI modification in the nuclear envelope and the perinuclear ER. M.
Yamamoto-Hino1, E. Katsumata1, E. Suzuki2, Y. Maeda3, T. Kinoshita1, S. Goto1;
1
Department of Life Science, Rikkyo University, Tokyo, Japan, 2Gene Network Laboratory, National
Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka, Japan, 3Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University,
Osaka, Japan
Autophagy-like protein degradation zone generated by trans-Golgi membrane. S. Shimizu1;
1
Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
Correlative light – electron microscopy methods reveal multiple roles for endolysosomal tethering
proteins in membrane trafficking. J. Klumperman1; 1Cell Biology, University Medical Center
Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate LPL sorting into a sphingomyelin-rich branch of the
secretory pathway. E.L. Sundberg1, Y. Deng1, C.G. Burd1; 1Department of Cell Biology, Yale
University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
High speed, single molecule imaging in the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum. C.J. Obara1, J.
Nixon-Abell1,2, C. Blackstone2, J. Lippincott-Schwartz1; 1Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes
Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA, 2Cell Biology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders
and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD
Dynamic nano-scale size holes in ER sheets revealed by STED nanoscopy. L.K. Schroeder1,
A.E. Barentine1,2, H. Merta3, S. Schweighofer1, Y. Zhang1, D. Baddeley1,4, J. Bewersdorf1,2,
S. Bahmanyar3; 1Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2Biomedical Engineering, Yale
University, New Haven, CT, 3Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New
Haven, CT, 4Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Probing the organization and interaction of cellular membranes via multiparametric,
multidimensional super-resolution microscopy. R. Yan1, K. Chen1, S. Moon1, K. Xu1; 1Department
of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
149
WEDNESDAY
8:30 am
8:50 am
OO
Subgroup Y: The Cellular and Molecular Basis of Invasive Metastatic Cancer
8:30 am
Room 29C
Organizers: Mark A. McNiven, Mayo Clinic; and Alissa M. Weaver, Vanderbilt University
This subgroup will focus on understanding the important and widespread process of how tumor cells actively remodel the surrounding
microenvironment through a combination of migration and matrix degradation during the metastatic process. The program will
feature experts in protease biology, cytoskeletal dynamics, in situ live cell imaging, mouse and other genetic model systems, and
human pathology to provide a state-of-the-art update on new findings and technologies to both understand and curtail metastatic
disease. We have organized this session at three previous ASCB meetings with outstanding participation and attendance.
Introduction. Mark A. McNiven, Mayo Clinic, Alissa M. Weaver, Vanderbilt University
Action of the invadosome during metastasis. Mark A. McNiven, Mayo Clinic
Extracellular vesicles in single cell and collective migration. Bong Hwan Sung, Weaver Lab,
Vanderbilt University
Cooperation is in our nature - using image guided genomics to deconstruct collective invasion.
Adam Marcus, Emory University
The role of Akt in melanoma invasion. Wei Guo, University of Pennsylvania
Nuclear deformability and expression of lamin A/C as predictors of metastatic potential in breast
cancer cells. Jan Lammerding, Cornell University
In vivo imaging of cancer invasion. Jacky Goetz, INSERM, Strasbourg, France
Tumor-stromal interactions in cancer invasion. Danijela Vignjevic, Institut Curie, Paris, France
Eliminating metastatic cancer using genetically enhanced, enucleated cell-based therapies.
Richard Klemke, University of California San Diego School of Medicine
8:30 am
8:35 am
8:50 am
9:05 am
9:25 am
9:45 am
10:05 am
10:25 am
10:45 am
OO
Subgroup Z: Cell Biology of Marine Protists: Toward Functional Genomic Tools for Diverse New Model
Organisms
8:30-11:05 am
Room 31B
Supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Organizers: Adam Jones, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; and Jackie L. Collier, Stony Brook University
The broad taxonomic and physiological diversity of marine unicellular eukaryotes offers opportunities to investigate a range of
features of the eukaryotic lineage that are inaccessible in canonical model organisms. Undertaking such investigations depends
on the development of methods to manipulate gene content and expression in a wide variety of new model systems. Speakers
in this session will describe their efforts to understand unique cell biological features of emerging model marine protists and the
status of functional genomics tools in each. The session will end with a panel discussion of the challenges speakers have faced in
developing methods for their organisms, as well as how the collaborative focus of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation-funded
Experimental Model Systems program has affected their efforts.
8:30 am
8:40 am
8:55 am
9:10 am
9:25 am
9:40 am
9:55 am
10:10 am
150
Introduction and Overview. Adam Jones, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
Disentangling novel cellular processes using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Chris
Bowler, Ecole Normale Superieure
Cell biology and genetic tool development in Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum
tricornutum. Mark Moosburner, Scripps Institution of Oceanography and J. Craig Venter Institute
Cell biology and genetic tool development in Pseudo-nitzchia. Deborah Robertson, Clark
University
Development of genetic transformation technologies for Micromonas species (Prasinophyceae).
Lisa Sudek, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Adaptation of Mamiellophyceae to specific environmental niches: cues from genetic approaches.
Francois-Yves Bouget, CNRS
Development of genetic tools for Perkinsus species: parasites at the evolutionary interface
between apicomplexan pathogens and dinoflagellate algae. Elin Einarsson, Cambridge University
Development of genetic tools for unicellular relatives of animals: Capsaspora owczarzaki,
Corallochytrium limacisporum and Creolimax fragrantissim. Sebastián R. Najle, Institut de
Biología Evolutiva (CSIC - Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Tools for stable integrative transfection of Bodo saltans: A marine micro-eukaryote with
polycistronic peptide coding genes. Fatma Gommaa, Harvard University
Genetic tools for investigating the cell biology of Aurantiochytrium and other Labrinthulomycetes.
Jackie L. Collier, Stony Brook University
Panel discussion
10:25 am
10:40 am
10:55 am
OO
Symposium 8: Quality Control
11:20 am-12:20 pm
Ballroom 20BC
Chair: Jodi Nunnari, University of California, Davis
OO
11:20 am
S18
11:50 am
S19
Defining translational stress using ribosome profiling. R. Green1,2, C. Wu1,2; 1Molecular Biology
and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Howard Hughes
Medical Institute, Washington, DC
Targeting the Cell’s Stress Pathways for Therapeutic Benefit. P. Walter1,2; 1Howard Hughes
Medical Institute, San Francisco, CA, 2Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of
California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Genetic Tool Development in Marine Protists: Emerging New Model Organisms for Cell Biology
2:00-5:00 pm
Registration is free. Event includes light refreshments.
Santa Rosa Room, Marriott Marquis
This afternoon satellite event will feature presentations, posters, and active discussion about new efforts to develop genetic tools
in marine protists, where an international research community is making exciting progress in advancing these nascent experimental
model systems. This event is designed to facilitate networking among protist researchers and cell biologists attending the ASCB
conference who can offer valuable insights and advice from working in more established model systems. A deeper study of marine
protists—some of the most diverse yet least understood forms of life on earth—will shed light into the process of organelle origin
and evolution, cytoskeleton structure, and protist-microbe interactions, while also helping scientists better understand the roles
protists play in global nutrient cycles, food webs, and climate. The event is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.
For questions regarding the meeting, please email [email protected]
WEDNESDAY
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
151
NOTES
152
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Save the date!
An ASCB Regional Meeting
University of Georgia, Athens
Friday, May 31, 2019, 9:00 am-6:30 pm
Designed for a teaching-intensive audience, the day-long meeting will include
education research and scientific plenaries, a poster session, networking lunch,
afternoon workshops, and mixer.
EX H I BIT O RS
Teaching Tomorrow’s
Scientists
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ASCB and EMBO gratefully acknowledge all exhibiting companies and supporters.
EXHIBIT HOURS
Sunday, Dec. 9 9:30 am–4:00 pm
Monday, Dec. 10 9:30 am–4:00 pm
Tuesday, Dec. 11 9:30 am–4:00 pm
Remember, all activities take place in the Learning Center from
12:00 pm to 3:00 pm.
EXHIBITOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE
The ASCB Exhibitor Advisory Committee (EAC) will meet during the 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting. EAC members can be identified by
the blue/gold colored ribbon on their meeting badge. Questions or concerns about your 2018 experience? Suggestions on how we can
serve you better? Locate an EAC member below or visit the exhibit management office and let us know how we can help.
EAC MEMBERS
Elaine Fitzpatrick
Trade Show Project Manager
MilliporeSigma Booth 529
Louis LaRiviere
Manager, Trade Shows & Events
Olympus America, Inc.
Booth 716
Cyndy Nawrocki
Director Marketing
Communications
Booth 916
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Sande Giaccone
Group Publisher
Genetic Engineering
& Biotechnology News
Booth 1025
Kelly Varesio, CMP
Senior Meetings & Events Planner
Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.
Booth 504
155
Learning Center (Exhibit Hall)
156
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
157
EXHIBITORS (Descriptions were provided by exhibiting companies.)
3I INTELLIGENT IMAGING INNOVATIONS
616
Denver, CO
www.intelligent-imaging.com
Image analysis, Image analysis software,
Imaging - Ex vivo, Imaging - In vivo, Microscopes,
Microscopes- confocal, Microscopes- optical &
accessories
ACEA BIOSCIENCES, INC.
628
San Diego, CA
www.aceabio.com
Cell biology products, Data acquisition, Data
acquisition equipment, Data analysis software,
Flow cytometer, Lasers, Live Cell Assays, Reagents
3i (Intelligent Imaging Innovations) designs and
manufactures technologies for living cell, live
cell, and intravital fluorescence microscopy
including digital holography, spinning disk confocal,
multi-photon and lightsheet. SlideBook software
manages everything from instrument control to
image capture, processing and data analysis.
ACEA Biosciences features a product line of the
xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analysis instruments as
well as the NovoCyte Flow Cytometer. xCELLigence
instruments allow live cell analysis that is both
sensitive and reproducible. The NovoCyte aims
to simplify your workflow with an affordable high
performance benchtop with industry leading
software.
ABBELIGHT
229
Paris, France
www.abbelight.com
Buffers, Data acquisition equipment, Image analysis
software, Microscopes
Abbelight has developed the first 3D superresolution microscope (SMLM) with isotropic
15 nm precision over the largest field of view
(200x200 micron). The result of 10 years of
research in single molecule imaging, Abbelight
provides cutting-edge instruments, software and
expertise to accelerate the imaging workflow of
your research project.
AD BIOSCIENCES
641
Newport Beach, CA
www.ad-biosciences.com
Biologicals, Cell biology products, Culture media,
Growth factors
AD BioScience is a leading producer of high-grade
human platelet lysate (HPL) supplement. As one
of the earliest innovators to use platelet lysate in
cell cultures, we have maintained a reputation for
developing scalable, reliably consistent, and high
quality HPL lots for clinical trials.
AGILENT
Lexington, MA
www.agilent.com
Cell biology products
319
ABCLONAL SCIENCE INC.
336
Woburn, MA
www.abclonal.com
Antibodies, Custom antibody, Custom synthesis,
Elisa testing, Enzymes, Monoclonal antibodies,
Peptide synthesizer, Protein expression, Sequencing
reagents, Western blotting equipment
Agilent Technologies Inc. is a global leader in
life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical
markets. With more than 50 years of insight and
innovation, Agilent instruments, software, services,
solutions, and people provide trusted answers to
its customers’ most challenging questions. Agilent
employs about 13,500 people worldwide.
ABclonal is a dynamic and growing provider of
biology research reagents and services. With
scientists from world-class universities, we thrive
to improve the quality of life science research by
providing high-quality antibodies, proteins, ELISA,
NGS, and molecular enzymes. Under stringent QC,
our custom services ensure best quality with low
price.
AIM BIOTECH PTE LTD.
1122
Singapore
www.aimbiotech.com
Cell culture apparatus, Custom screening, Tissue
culture labware
ABSOLUTE ANTIBODY/KERAFAST
304
Boston, MA
www.kerafast.com
Antibodies, Cell Lines, Dyes and labeling reagents,
Reagents, Recombinant Antibodies
Absolute Antibody and Kerafast are committed to
improving the selection of research tools available
to the global scientific community. The companies
merged in 2018 to increase access to unique
reagents and technology, including recombinant
antibodies in engineered formats, custom antibody
services and novel biomaterials from academic labs.
158
AIM Biotech offers a modular platform to coculture multiple cell types in discrete 3D and 2D
channels. Organotypic assays with animal modellike complexities using human cells have been
developed (e.g., immune checkpoint, T-cell killing,
angiogenesis, metastasis, cell migration, bloodbrain barrier, etc.) for research, drug discovery &
diagnostics.
ALERE TECHNOLOGIES
Oslo, Norway
237
Cell separation medium, Centrifugation media and
blood separation media, Density Gradient Media
ALLEN INSTITUTE FOR CELL SCIENCE
723
Seattle, WA
www.allencell.org
Cell Lines, Data analysis software, Image analysis
software
Launched by Paul G. Allen in 2014, the Allen
Institute for Cell Science studies the cell as an
integrated system. The Institute is producing
novel visual, dynamic, predictive models of the
cell to accelerate biological research. The Institute
provides public tools, including gene edited cell
lines, methods, images, and models, on allencell.org.
ALVEOLE
1019
Paris, France
www.alveolelab.com
Cell culture apparatus, Fluorescence systems, Light
sources, Microscopes, Tissue culture apparatus
Specialized in tools for bioengineering custom
microenvironments, Alvéole presents PRIMO:
contactless and maskless custom photopatterning
to tune in vitro cell microenvironments. PRIMO
allows researchers to control the topography and
biochemistry of all cell culture substrates (stiff, soft,
flat, microstructured) and study their impacts on
cell development.
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR CELL BIOLOGY
Bethesda, MD
www.ascb.org
Apparel, Conferences, Educational material,
Meetings, Membership
623
The ASCB Booth is your one-stop shop for all things
ASCB. Browse our selection of popular T-shirts and
merchandise, talk to ASCB staff and committee
members about all the benefits and programs the
organization offers, and let us know what ASCB can
do for you!
205
AMS BIOTECHNOLOGY
Cambridge, MA
www.amsbio.com
AMSBIO is contributing to the acceleration of
discovery through the provision of cutting-edge
life science products and services for R&D. We are
able to provide solutions for studying cell motility,
migration, invasion and proliferation. We also
offer solutions for organoid and spheroid culture,
regenerative medicine and stem cell research.
ANABIOS
522
San Diego, CA
www.anabios.com
Cell cultures, Reagents, Tissue cultures, Translation
AnaBios provides human tissue samples processed
utilizing proprietary methods to maximize the
preservation of physiological function and success
in experimentation involving functional end
points or gene expression analysis, proteomics &
metabolomics. Our quality control helps guarantee
exceptional quality tissue for supporting drug
discovery.
Alere Technologies AS will display a range of
Density Gradient Media for the isolation of
biological particles using centrifugation techniques.
Among these products you will find OptiPrep and
Lymphoprep.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ANASPEC, EGT GROUP
1229
Fremont, CA
www.anaspec.com
Antibodies, Custom synthesis, Dyes and labeling
reagents, Oligonucleotides, PCR kits
AnaSpec, EGT group is a leading provider of
integrated proteomic and genomic solutionsTM
for life science research. We offer products and
expertise in peptides (including cGMP grade),
antibodies, assay kits, fluorescent dyes, qPCR
mastermixes and oligonucleotides.
ANDOR TECHNOLOGY & BITPLANE, INC. 1027
Concord, MA
www.andor.com
Cameras- CCD, Cameras- specialty CCD, Image
analysis, Image analysis software, Microscopesconfocal
Andor is a global leader in the development and
manufacturing of high performance scientific
imaging cameras including EMCCD, CCD, sCMOS &
Back-illuminated sMCOS, spectroscopy solutions
& microscopy systems to match application needs
in research. Bitplane is the creator of Imaris, the
world’s leading 3D/4D Visualization & Analysis
Software.
APPLIED BIO PHYSICS INC.
745
Troy, NY
biophysics.com
Cell biology products, Electrophoresis equipment,
Tissue culture labware
ECIS (Electric Cell-Based Impedance Sensing) is a
real-time, impedance-based method to study the
behavior of cells grown in tissue culture. Assays
include TEER, migration, proliferation, signal
transduction, cell differentiation, cell toxicity
as well as cell behavior under dynamic flow
conditions. The measurement is continuous and
label free.
ASI/APPLIED SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTATION
417
Eugene, OR
www.asiimaging.com
Microinjector, Micromanipulators,
Micropositioners, Microscopes- motorized stages,
Microscopes- optical & accessories
We create solutions whether you need help with
precise and stable positioning for super resolution
microscopy, a custom modifiable microscope
tailored for your application, or a complete light
sheet microscope system. ASI has the proven
products, people and partners to provide wellengineered solutions for all your applications.
ATLAS ANTIBODIES AB
622
EXHIBITORS
Bromma, ST Sweden
atlasantibodies.com
Antibodies, Monoclonal antibodies
Atlas Antibodies is a Swedish manufacturer and
supplier with a mission to provide customers
around the world with advanced research reagents
targeting all human proteins. Characterization and
validation data for our antibodies can be found on
our website as well as on the open access Human
Protein Atlas portal.
AUROX LTD.
642
Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
www.aurox.co.uk
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesmotorized stages, Microscopes- optical &
accessories
Aurox designs and manufactures laser free confocal
imaging instruments for the life-sciences and
materials markets, including the new ‘unity’ all-inone bench-top laser free confocal microscope and
the microscope add-ons Clarity / ClarityHS, which
can be fitted to virtually any research microscope
to upgrade them to be confocal.
AVIVA SYSTEMS BIOLOGY CORPORATION
San Diego, CA
www.avivasysbio.com
Antibodies, Custom antibody, Monoclonal
antibodies, Protein expression
1036
Aviva Systems Biology specializes in providing
polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies and ELISA
Kits for research needs. The company has an
extensive list of antibodies for the following
research areas: neuroscience, transcription factors,
cancer, cell biology, DNA damage and repair, signal
transduction, cell differentiation and stem cell
biology.
AXION BIOSYSTEMS
418
Atlanta, GA
www.axionbiosystems.com
Electrophysiological instruments, Live Cell Assays
Axion BioSystems’ Maestro Pro and Edge
microelectrode arrays combine an industryleading electrode count with the simplicity of
an automated benchtop system to grant you
unprecedented access to your cells in vitro. Our
mission is to make powerful electrophysiology
accessible to everyone, for a comprehensive
understanding of life’s circuitry.
AZURE BIOSYSTEMS
Dublin, CA
www.azurebiosystems.com
Western blotting equipment
331
Azure Biosystems is focused on the development
and commercialization of state-of-the-art
technologies to support research in the life science
community. Founded in Dublin, California, Azure
Biosystems develops a series of instruments for
image capture and analysis.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
BAKER RUSKINN
543
Sanford, ME
www.bakerco.com
Glove boxes, Tissue culture CO2 incubator, Tissue
culture hood
Since 1951 Baker has been engineering, testing,
and producing reliable laboratory contamination
control equipment. Our Baker Ruskinn line of
precision cell culture solutions, including controlled
O2, anaerobic, and microaerophilic workstations,
provide a controlled environment for low O2
studies and systemized incubation.
BIOCYTOGEN LLC
Wakefield, MA
www.biocytogen.com
Animals, Antibodies, Cell Lines, Reagents,
Recombinant Antibodies
429
BIOCYTOGEN was founded in 2009 and
headquartered in Beijing, with three affiliates both
in the U.S. and China. We are a professional service
provider specializing in gene targeted animal model
generation to support basic research, preclinical in
vivo efficacy studies, pharmacological services for
antibody drug discovery, and development.
BIOLEGEND, INC.
217
San Diego, CA
www.biolegend.com
Antibodies, Immunoassay system- automated,
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits, Monoclonal
antibodies- large scale production, Reagents
BioLegend develops and manufactures world-class
antibodies & reagents at an outstanding value.
Our product portfolio includes tools for research
in immunology, neuroscience, cell biology, cancer,
& stem cells, plus more than 18,000 products.
We are cited in over 25,000 peer-reviewed
journal publications. BioLegend is certified for ISO
13485:2003.
BIOLOGICAL INDUSTRIES USA
428
Cromwell, CT
www.bioindusa.com
Anti-microbial products, Cell biology products,
Cell culture media, Cell Lines, Culture media,
Mycoplasma detection systems, Reagents, Serumfree media, Serums, Tissue culture media
Biological Industries USA (BI-USA) offers a portfolio
of optimized cell culture media for cell therapy
applications involving stem cells and other
specialty cells. Products include: Serum-free, xenofree media, NutriStem® hPSC and MSC Media,
CryoStem™ Freezing Media, Human Platelet Lysate,
FBS, Mycoplasma Detection, and Custom Media
Manufacturing.
159
EXHIBITORS
BIOMEDTECH LABORATORIES, INC.
Tampa, FL
www.biomedtech.com
Cell adhesion molecules, Elisa plates/strips,
Extracellular matrix products, Microplate
fluorometer, Plastic laboratory ware
1237
BioMedTech offers imaging plates and TC-ware
functionalized for cell attachment & proliferation,
non-cell attachment for spheroid formation, and
attachment of non-adherent cells. Options include
1536- to 6-well plates, glass-bottom, ultra-lo-base,
flask, chambered slide and multi-layer formats. Our
EvaluPlate™ surface optimization tool is featured.
BIO-RAD LABORATORIES
617
Hercules, CA
www.bio-rad.com
Antibodies, Cell biology products, DNA
quantification, Enzyme immunoassay reagents/kits,
Western blotting equipment
Bio-Rad provides all the instrumentation, antibodies
and reagents to meet your needs for protein and
cell preparation and analysis in applications such as
flow cytometry and western blotting. The range
includes imagers, sorters, analyzers and over 10,000
antibodies focused on areas such as immunology,
cancer and veterinary research.
BIOSMITH DIVISION/F&L MEDICAL PRODUCTS LLC
820
Vandergrift, PA
www.biosmith.com
Cuvettes- plastic, Laboratory apparatus- miscellaneous,
Plastic laboratory ware, Sample preparation- equipment
Specializing in Medical, Laboratory, and Research
Supplies Since 1989
BIOTECHNIQUES
London, United Kingdom
www.biotechniques.com
Cell cultures
707
BioTechniques is a MEDLINE-indexed, peer-reviewed,
open access journal that provides the life science
research community with an invaluable resource to
access latest methods, techniques and protocols.
BIOTEK INSTRUMENTS
1129
Winooski, VT
www.biotek.com
Microplate readers, Microplate washers, Microscopes
BioTek® is celebrating its 50th year as a global leader
in the design and manufacture of innovative life
science instrumentation, including cell imaging
systems, microplate readers, washers, dispensers,
automated incubators, stackers and pipetting systems.
BIOTIUM, INC.
527
Fremont, CA
www.biotium.com
Flow cytometry reagents, Fluorescence reagents,
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits, Live Cell
Assays, Molecular biology reagents
Biotium is a leading life science reagent company
based in the Bay Area. The company is specialized in
developing and manufacturing innovative fluorescent
detection reagents that are widely used in many
research and diagnostic applications including
molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology,
proteomics and drug discovery.
160
BITPLANE, INC.
1027
South Windsor, CT
www.andor.com
Image analysis, Image analysis software, Image
analyzer, Image processors, Software
CAYMAN CHEMICAL COMPANY
817
Ann Arbor, MI
www.caymanchem.com
Analytical services, Biochemical reagents, Enzyme
immunoassay reagents/kits, Inhibitors, Lipids
Bitplane is the creator of Imaris, the world’s leading
Microscopy Image Analysis software for 3D and
4D image visualization and analysis. Imaris works
with images from light-sheet, confocal, spinningdisk, multi-photon and wide-field fluorescent
microscopes. Imaris is the Software of choice for
Scientific Microscopy Imaging.
Cayman Chemical specializes in the areas of
eicosanoids and lipids, mitochondrial health, stem
cell research, apoptosis, and fluorescence imaging
tools. Bioanalysis and custom assay development
services are also available. Cayman has manufactured
and distributed assay kits, high-purity biochemicals,
antibodies, and proteins for more than 35 years.
BOSTER BIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGY
526
Pleasanton, CA
www.bosterbio.com
Antibodies, Custom antibody, Elisa plates/strips,
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits, Monoclonal
antibodies
CBE—LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION
Bethesda, MD
www.lifescied.org
Journals
Boster Bio has specialized in manufacturing highsensitivity, high-specificity, ELISA kits and WB/IHC
compatible antibodies for 25+ years. Visit us to win
a Dr. Booster plush doll! While you’re here, grab
some pathway map posters and our popular eBook
series for IHC, WB, ELISA, flow cytometry, and
molecular biology. Get better results with Boster!
BRUKER CORPORATION
Middleton, WI
www.bruker.com/FM
Microscopes, Microscopes- atomic force,
Microscopes- confocal
1123
Bruker offers a range of advanced microscopy
solutions: super-resolution microscopy for nanoscale
quantitative imaging; light-sheet microscopy for
long-term studies in developmental biology and
dynamic processes in cell culture; BioAFM for highresolution imaging and nanoscale biomechanics
studies; confocal systems for advanced live-cell
imaging.
BTX
1143
Holliston, MA
www.btxonline.com
Cell fusion equipment, Electroporation system, Gel
electrophoresis equipment, Microplate readers,
Spectrophotometers
BTX is a leading supplier of electroporation and
electrofusion systems for the advancement
of transfection and cell fusion. We offer
electroporation systems for virtually every cell and
tissue type including in vitro, in vivo, and highthroughput applications. In addition, BTX provides
the widest selection of electrodes and accessories.
CARL ZEISS MICROSCOPY
511
Thornwood, NY
www.zeiss.com/microscopy/us
Electron microscopes, Microscopes, Microscopesautomated scanning, Microscopes- confocal,
Microscopes- scanning electron
As the world’s only manufacturer of light, X-ray &
electron/ion microscopes, ZEISS offers tailor-made
microscope systems for 3D imaging in biomedical
research, life sciences and healthcare. A well-trained
salesforce, an extensive support infrastructure and
a responsive service team enable customers to use
their ZEISS microscopes to full potential.
224
CBE—Life Sciences Education (LSE) is ASCB’s openaccess journal for excellence in biology education
research and evidence-based teaching. It is for
educators at all levels and across all life science
disciplines.
CELL APPLICATIONS, INC.
San Diego, CA
www.cellapplications.com
Cell biology products, Cell culture media, Cell
cultures, Serum-free media, Transfection kits
409
Cell Applications, Inc. is a globally recognized
leader and provider of primary cells, optimized
media & reagents. Primary Cells & Media - 150+
human/animal cell types, cell-specific media Stem cells, iPSC-derived cells, 3D models Custom
Services: - cGMP facility for cell culture/media
production - Cell isolation/media optimization,
cell-based assays
1219
CELL BIOLOGICS INC.
Chicago, IL
www.cellbiologics.com
Cell biology products, Cell culture media, Cell
cultures, Culture media, Cultured cells
Cell Biologics is a premier manufacturer of primary
cultured cells and cell culture products. We provide
a broad range of high-quality human and animal
primary cells including endothelial, epithelial,
tumor and stem cells, along with optimized cell
culture media and other related products.
CELL BIOLOGY IN FRANCE
922
Paris, France
www.sbcf.fr, itbcde.aviesan.fr/
Conferences, Job fairs, Membership, Research
awards-postdoctoral, Scientific information services
The French Society of Cell Biology, SBCF, and the
French Institute of Cell Biology, Development and
Evolution, ITMO BCDE, are the two representatives
of cell biologists and their laboratories in France,
dedicated to advancing scientific discovery,
advocating sound research policies, improving
education, and promoting professional
development.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
CELL GUIDANCE SYSTEMS
643
Cambridge, United Kingdom
www.cellgs.com
Culture media, Cytokines, Extracellular matrix
products, Growth factors, Purified proteins
Transforming the qualities of protein PODS
technology from Cell Guidance Systems transforms
the value of proteins by dramatically increasing
stability. Essentially any protein can be addressed
with many off-the-shelf proteins available. Visit us
to see the potential for your research.
CELL MICROSYSTEMS, INC.
939
Research Triangle Park, NC
cellmicrosystems.com
Cell separator, Cell sorters, Image analysis,
Microscopes, Sample preparation- equipment
Cell Microsystems provides instrumentation and
cell culture consumables for the imaging, sorting
and isolation of single cells and clonal colonies.
Sorting cells by imaging provides sophisticated
analysis of subpopulations and the CytoSort Array
consumable allows single cell isolation and clonal
colony growth under standard in vitro conditions.
216
CELL PRESS
Cambridge, MA
www.cell.com
Data processing systems, Educational material,
Scientific information services, Scientific software,
Software
Cell Press (booth #216) is the home for cell
biologists, offering high-quality, cutting-edge cell
biology research and resources to propel your work
forward. We publish 17 primary research journals
including Cell, the Trends reviews journals including
Trends in Cell Biology, and 8 research journals on
behalf of learned societies.
CELLECTA, INC.
Mountain View, CA
www.cellecta.com
Cell Lines, Cloning vectors, Custom screening,
Expression vectors, Viral reagents
505
Cellecta is a leading provider of genomics products
and services. Our functional genomics portfolio
includes gene knockout, knock-in and knock-down
screening products, custom and genome-wide
CRISPR and RNAi libraries, construct services,
cell engineering services, cell barcoding kits, and
targeted expression profiling products and services.
CELLINK LLC
841
Blacksburg, VA
www.cellink.com
Cell culture apparatus, Culture apparatus,
Extracellular matrix products, Laboratory apparatusmiscellaneous, Liquid handling- automated
CHEMOMETEC
1244
Allerod, Copenhagen, Denmark
www.chemometec.com
Cell biology products, Image analysis, Microcarriers
ChemoMetec specializes in automated cell
counting, advanced cell analysis and image
cytometry. Our technology ensures high quality
and reliability and our instruments are known for
their robustness, high precision and ease of use,
yet advanced analysis capabilities.
®
CHROMA TECHNOLOGY CORP.
1137
Bellows Falls, VT
www.chroma.com
Interference filters, Light sources, Microscopesoptical & accessories, Microscopy accessoriesfluorescence filters, Optical filters, Optical
interference filters
Chroma designs and manufactures precision
interference filters for imaging applications from
widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy,
TIRF and super-resolution techniques to flow
cytometry, high content screening, multi-photon
and Raman spectroscopy. 89 North offers contract
engineering and optical system design.
CHROMATRAP
422
Wrexham, United Kingdom
www.chromatrap.com
DNA assay kits, Filters, Molecular biology reagents,
Nucleic acid isolations, Spin columns
Chromatrap is a life science company offering
researchers the only alternative method to
performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP).
Completely bead-free, our solid state platform
enables you to perform ChIP more efficiently and
effortlessly with high quality results. Push the
boundaries of epigenetic research by streamlining
your workflow.
EXHIBITORS
CLICK CHEMISTRY TOOLS
842
Scottsdale, AZ
clickchemistrytools.com
Biochemical reagents, DNA assay kits, Dyes
and labeling reagents, Fluorescence reagents,
Molecular biology reagents
Click Chemistry Tools specializes in providing high
quality yet cost effective, cutting edge tools for
proteomics, and molecular and cellular biology.
The company offer a wide range of click chemistrybased detection, innovative fluorescent detection
reagents and enrichment kits and metabolic
labeling reagent.
COLD SPRING HARBOR LABORATORY PRESS
Cold Spring Harbor, NY
cshlpress.org
Books and Journals
228
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press is an
internationally renowned publisher of books,
journals, and electronic media. Since 1933, it has
furthered the advance and spread of scientific
knowledge in all areas of genetics and molecular
biology, including cancer biology, plant science,
bioinformatics, and neurobiology.
COOLLED
810
Andover, United Kingdom
www.coolled.com
Fluorescence microscopy lamp unit, Fluorescence
systems, Light sources, Microscopes
CoolLED designs and manufactures cutting edge
LED illumination systems for researchers and
clinicians using the latest LED technology. CoolLED
offers a comprehensive range of LED illumination
systems for bioscience and clinical microscopy
including: pE-4000, pE-340fura. pE-300 Series and
pE-100 Series.
CHROMOTEK GMBH
523
Martinsried, Germany
www.chromotek.com
Antibodies, Cell biology products, Fluorescent
antibody, Monoclonal antibodies, Recombinant
Antibodies
COSMO BIO USA
626
Carlsbad, CA
www.cosmobiousa.com
Cosmo Bio offers a diverse selection of unique and
routine research biotools consolidated from more
than 80 Japanese developers and manufacturers.
ChromoTek is the pioneer of protein-protein
interactions, who has brought fluorescent
proteins from cell biology as protein tags into
biochemistry laboratories. Innovative, high
quality protein research tools are their field of
expertise, particularly the GFP-Trap® which shows
outstanding properties in immunoprecipitation.
CUSABIO TECHNOLOGY
525
Houston, TX
www.cusabio.com
Antibodies, Biotin-conjugated antibodies, Elisa
testing, Peptides- synthetic, Protein expression
CELLINK is the first bioink company in the world.
As the leading 3Dbioprinter provider, we focus on
development/commercialization of bioprinting
technologies to allow researchers to print
human organs & tissues for the development of
pharmaceuticals & cosmetics. Founded 2016,
active in 50 countries, CELLINK is changing the
future of medicine!
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Cusabio Technology (previous name “Flarebio
Biotech”) develops, manufactures and sells high
quality products including recombinant proteins,
antibodies and ELISA kits. We also offer customized
service to meet individual’s specific needs. Our
mission is to accelerate research and discovery in
biomedical research.
161
EXHIBITORS
CYTOSKELETON, INC.
816
Denver, CO
www.cytoskeleton.com
Antibodies, Dyes and labeling reagents, Live Cell
Assays, Purified proteins
DIGITAL PROTEOMICS LLC
San Diego, CA
www.digitalproteomics.com
Antibodies, Custom antibody, Monoclonal
antibodies, Recombinant Antibodies
Cytoskeleton, Inc. provides live cell imaging probes
for F-actin, microtubules, DNA, and lysosomes,
purified and active actins, tubulins, motor proteins,
and small G-proteins, functional assay kits for
these proteins, and custom protein production and
screening services. Products are stringently qualitycontrolled and available for bulk purchase.
Digital Proteomics offers unique antibody services.
Valens is our antibody sequencing service for
resurrecting monoclonal antibodies when the
source cell has been lost. Alicanto is our novel
antibody discovery platform that identifies targetspecific antibodies from serum without requiring
cell selection, fusions, or cloning.
Eclipse BioInnovations Inc. is a San Diego
biotechnology start-up company focused on
specialized genomics technologies. Our major focus
is the development of next-generation sequencing
products and services to profile binding sites for
RNA binding proteins, using enhanced crosslinking
and immunoprecipitation (eCLIP-seq).
DOUBLE HELIX OPTICS
316
Boulder, CO
doublehelixoptics.com
Computer-3-D reconstruction, Imaging - Ex vivo,
Imaging - In vivo, Microscopes- optical &
accessories, Software
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY SCIENCES
717
Hatfield, PA
www.emsdiasum.com
Colloidal gold complexes, Dissecting instruments,
Microscopes- stereo, Microscopy accessoriesfluorescence filters, Tissue embedding media
DHO’s SPINDLE imaging system enables
unprecedented precision-depth 3D imaging and 4D
tracking, capturing details as small as 10 nm in x/y
and 15 nm in z with depth of up to 20 microns in a
single shot. Designed as an easy-to-use affordable
modular upgrade to your existing microscope, the
SPINDLE can be matched to the specifics of your
experiment.
Electron microscopy sciences will have on display
their complete line of accessories, chemicals,
supplies and equipment for all fields of microscopy,
biological research and general laboratory
requirements, as well as our full line of tools,
tweezers and dissecting equipment.
CYTOSURGE AG
Glattbrugg, Zurich Switzerland
www.cytosurge.com/r/Bam
Cell transfer systems, Laboratory apparatusmiscellaneous, Liquid handling- automated,
Microinjector, Pharmaceutical development
equipment
541
With our revolutionary FluidFM BOT and the
FluidFM nanosyringe (800 nm aperture), you
can perform nanoinjection of a vast variety of
compounds into either cytoplasms or nuclei of
adherent cells. This is achieved in a cell-context
preserving, non-destructive (cell viability > 95%),
measurable (fL volumes) and fast (inject 100+ cells/
hour) manner.
DDNEWS (DRUG DISCOVERY NEWS)
926
Rocky River, OH
www.ddn-news.com
DDNews is an international news organization
reporting trends and developments impacting the
business of pharma, biopharma and life science
researchers from the bench to the boardroom.
From a single business news publication, DDNews
has grown to twelve print and online news vehicles.
We serve the informational needs of pharma &
biotech industry.
DE NOVO SOFTWARE
Glendale, CA
www.denovosoftware.com
Software
708
De Novo Software specializes in producing high
quality cytometry data analysis software. FCS
Express 6 RUO/IVD is a full feature solution used by
hundreds of customers, both research and clinical,
worldwide. FCS Express combines a user friendly
modern Microsoft office-style interface custom
report generation and seamless LIS integration.
DENOVIX INC.
Wilmington, DE
www.denovix.com
DNA quantification, Fluorometers, Protein
concentration, Spectrophotometer- micro,
Spectrophotometers
DeNovix Inc. develops, manufactures and sells
award-winning laboratory equipment for life
science applications. Our stand-alone systems
include 1uL UV-Vis Spectrophotometers,
Fluorometers and cost-saving products for cell
biology labs.
162
516
424
DRUMMOND SCIENTIFIC CO.
537
Broomall, PA
www.drummondsci.com
Cell biology products, Dispensers- microliter
and injection, Liquid handling- automated,
Microinjector, Pipettes, Pipettes- automatic- hand
driven, Pipettes- micro
Drummond Scientific is the originator of the PipetAid and has been around for over 70 years serving
as your leader in liquid handling. Feel free to stop
by the booth to experience all of the Pipet-Aid
models: XP, XP2, XL and even the Original Portable.
In addition to Pipet-Aids, Drummond will be
showcasing the Nanoject III Microinjector.
DRVISION TECHNOLOGIES
823
Bellevue, WA
www.drvtechnologies.com
Computer-3-D reconstruction, Data analysis
software, Image analysis software, Scientific software
DRVision is a pioneer and world leader in imagebased decision technology. Using state-of-the-art
algorithm and software architecture, Aivia delivers
top performance on critical tasks such as display
of large images and analysis of complex biological
phenomena. With Aivia, you are the analysis expert.
ECLIPSE BIOINNOVATIONS, INC.
245
San Diego, CA
www.eclipsebio.com
Molecular biology reagents, Molecular biology
software, Sequencing reagents
ELIFE
737
Cambridge, United Kingdom
www.elifesciences.org
eLife aims to help scientists accelerate discovery by
operating a platform for research communication
that encourages and recognises the most
responsible behaviours in science. We publish
important research in all areas of the life and
biomedical sciences, selected by scientists and
made freely available online. Learn more at
elifesciences.org
EMBO
Heidelberg, Germany
www.embo.org
Scientific information services
729
EMBO is an organization of more than 1,800
leading researchers that promotes excellence in the
life sciences. The major goals of the organization
are to support talented researchers at all stages of
their careers, stimulate the exchange of scientific
information, and help build a research environment
where scientists can achieve their best work.
ETALUMA, INC.
Carlsbad, CA
www.etaluma.com
Fluorescence systems, Live Cell Assays,
Microscopes, Microscopes- motorized stages,
Microscopes- optical & accessories
645
Etaluma’s digital fluorescence LS Microscopes
provide near diffraction-limited resolution and
outstanding sensitivity due to compact, solid-state
optics with no pixel shift. All LS Microscopes can
be used inside incubators for live cell imaging in a
wide variety of labware. 3 colors, fully automated
or manual, components also available for OEM.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXPEDEON LTD.
827
Cambridge, United Kingdom
www.expedeon.com
Affinity purification kits, Conjugation of antibodies,
Electrophoresis equipment, Reagents, Western
blotting equipment
Expedeon develops and commercializes valueadded, easy-to-use, reliable products for genomics
and proteomics research for use across sample
preparation, purification, characterisation,
conjugation and validation. The company is
multinational with laboratories and manufacturing
facilities in the UK, USA, Spain, Germany and
Singapore.
EXPRESSION SYSTEMS LLC
524
Davis, CA
www.expressionsystems.com
Cell culture bags, Cell culture media, Insect cell
media, Protein expression, Serum-free media
Expression Systems specializes in cell culture
of insect and mammalian cell lines for protein
expression. Key Products: High performance
serum-free insect and mammalian media, new
WAVE-style rocker cell culture bags, Sf9 cells, new
Grace’s media, titration service, custom protein
expression service. Immediate media shipments,
no back-orders.
FASEB - SOCIETY MANAGEMENT SERVICES
Bethesda, MD
www.faseb.org
Books and Journals, Educational material,
Employment, Meetings, Membership
607
The Federation of American Societies for
Experimental Biology (FASEB) is the largest U.S.
biomedical coalition, representing 30 societies &
130,000 researchers. FASEB is known for policy
and advocacy, publishing The FASEB Journal and
FASEB BioAdvances, hosting the Science Research
Conference (SRC) Series, and providing diversity &
career resources.
FENNIK LIFE SCIENCES LLC
318
Kansas City, KS
www.fenniklifesciences.com
Cell biology products, Cell cultures, Contract and
R&D, Live Cell Assays, Tissue culture labware
Built on 25+ years of combined cancer biology
research experience, Fennik Life Sciences, LLC
is dedicated to advancing research through
innovative, reliable tools. Its patent-pending
TheraKan™ is the first commercial device of its
kind: a low-cost, easy-to-use 3D tissue/cell culture
tool that mirrors an exact in vivo tissue/cell
environment.
FIBERCELL SYSTEMS, INC.
638
New Market, MD
www.fibercellsystems.com
Bioreactors, Cell culture apparatus, Serum-free media
FINGER LAKES INSTRUMENTATION LLC
410
Lima, NY
www.flicamera.com
Cameras- cooled CCD, Cameras- specialty CCD,
Microscopes- optical & accessories
EXHIBITORS
FRONTIERS
Lausanne, Switzerland
frontiersin.org
Books and Journals, Online services
220
FLI manufactures cooled CCD/sCMOS cameras
and high speed filter wheels and rotators. The
MicroLine is a favorite for both OEM and research
labs for low-light applications. FLI supports over
40 different CCDs. High speed filter wheels change
to the adjacent filter in as little as 23 milliseconds.
Custom designs available.
Frontiers is an award-winning Open Science
platform and leading open-access scholarly
publisher. Our mission is to make high-quality,
peer-reviewed research articles rapidly and freely
available to everybody in the world, thereby
accelerating scientific and technological innovation,
societal progress and economic growth. Visit www.
frontiersin.org.
FLEXCELL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
839
Burlington, NC
www.flexcellint.com
Cell culture apparatus, Culture apparatus, Tissue
culture apparatus
FUNAKOSHI CO., LTD.
819
Tokyo, Japan
www.funakoshi.co.jp/exports
Antibodies, Cell biology products, Cell culture
media, DNA isolation kits and supplies, Reagents
Flexcell specializes in products to apply mechanical
load (tension, compression, and fluid shear) to
cells in monolayer and 3D culture; specifically,
equipment and consumables for creating
environments to stretch cells in monolayer as well
creating and stretching 3D cell-seeded constructs.
Funakoshi Co., Ltd. has contributed as a leader
to distribute research reagents and instruments
for researchers in life science fields since its
foundation. Our corporate mission is to provide
products to a broad range of customers throughout
our worldwide network.
FLUIGENT
1038
Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France
www.fluigent.com
Cell sorters, Liquid handling- automated,
Micromanipulators, Perfusion system, Pumps
Fluigent offers automated systems for cell and
organ perfusion studies. Our pressure based
systems allow for the sequential delivery of up to
10 different solutions to a perfusion chamber at
user defined times. This is accomplished controlling
flow rates as well as dispensed volumes under
software control.
FOLDSCOPE INSTRUMENTS, INC.
Palo Alto, CA
www.foldscope.com
Microscopes
644
Foldscope is the ultra-affordable, paper
microscope that you assemble yourself. Designed
to be extremely portable, durable, and to give
optical quality similar to conventional research
microscopes (magnification of 140X and 2 micron
resolution), Foldscope brings hands-on microscopy
to new places!
FROGGABIO USA INC.
Toronto, ON, Canada
froggabio.com
DNA purification kits, Microscopes
829
GE HEALTHCARE
925
Marlborough, MA
www.gelifesciences.com
Cameras- CCD, Image analyzer- high resolution,
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Scanners- gel
GE Healthcare provides expertise and tools for a
wide range of applications, including basic research
of cells and proteins, drug discovery research,
and tools to support large-scale manufacturing of
biopharmaceuticals. By combining our knowledge,
talent, and resources, we deliver solutions that
help our customers achieve their goals.
GENE TOOLS, LLC
425
Philomath, OR
www.gene-tools.com
Custom synthesis, Gene cloning and expression
products, Molecular biology reagents,
Oligonucleotides, Sequencing reagents
Gene Tools manufactures Morpholino oligos for
blocking translation, modifying splicing or inhibiting
miRNA activity. Morpholinos are used in cell
cultures, embryos or, as Vivo-Morpholinos, in adult
animals. Morpholinos are effective, specific, stable
and non-toxic. Gene Tools designs and synthesizes
Morpholinos & offers cytosolic delivery options.
FroggaBio is a distributor of laboratory products,
supply instruments, reagents and disposables.
We serve customers within academic and
industrial research institutes, biotechnology and
pharmaceutical companies and hospitals.
Suppliers of hollow fiber bioreactor systems
for easy cell culture scale-up and more in vivo
like culture conditions. Applications include
high density antibody and recombinant protein
production, collection of concentrated exosomes,
cell co-cultivation, antibiotic Pk/Pd, and 3-D
modeling of endothelial cells and other cell types.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
163
EXHIBITORS
GENECOPOEIA INC.
317
Rockville, MD
www.genecopoeia.com
Cell biology products, Cell Lines, Detection systems,
Expression vectors, Gene cloning and expression
products, Molecular biology reagents, PCR kits, PCR
reagents, Reagents, Transfection kits
GeneCopoeia, Inc., a U.S.-based functional
genomics company founded in 1999, develops
cutting edge products and services for genomics,
proteomics, and molecular and cellular biology.
GENETEX
936
Irvine, CA
www.genetex.com
Antibodies, Reagents, Recombinant Antibodies,
Tumor markers, Zebra Fish
GeneTex is proud to offer the highest quality
antibody reagents supported by extensive research,
development, and validation. We are committed to
the highest standards of product performance.
GENETIC ENGINEERING & BIOTECHNOLOGY
NEWS
1025
New Rochelle, NY
www.genengnews.com
Books and Journals
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN)
has retained its position as the premier biotech
publication since launch in 1981. GEN’s unique
news and technology focus covers the entire
bioproduct life cycle, including drug discovery,
early-stage R&D, applied research (e.g., omics,
biomarkers, and diagnostics), bioprocessing, and
commercialization
1128
GENSCRIPT USA INC.
Piscataway, NJ
www.genscript.com
Custom antibody, Gene cloning and expression
products, Peptides- synthetic, Protein expression,
Recombinant Antibodies
GenScript is a publicly-traded contract research
organization providing gene, peptide, protein,
CRISPR, and antibody reagents to global scientists.
Since its foundation in 2002, GenScript has grown
exponentially through partnerships conducting
fundamental and translational biomedical research,
as well as early stage pharmaceutical development.
GOLD BIOTECHNOLOGY INC.
840
Olivette, MO
www.goldbio.com
Cell biology products, Growth factors,
Luminescence imaging, Molecular biology reagents,
Protein expression
Gold Biotechnology is a small company offering
high quality yet cost effective chemicals and
reagents for cellular and molecular research.
164
GORYO CHEMICAL, INC.
1242
Sapporo, HK, Japan
goryochemical.com/en/
Biological stains and indicators, Custom synthesis,
Fluorescence reagents, Fluorescent particles
GORYO Chemical designs unique fluorescent
probes for cellular analysis, biochemical assays,
and imaging for the life sciences. We have released
over 200 probes for in vitro assays and for in vivo
imaging – ROSFluor™ Series to detect reactive
oxygen species, MetalloFluor™ Series to detect
metal ions, and NOFluor™ Series to detect nitric
oxide.
HAMAMATSU CORPORATION
1117
Bridgewater, NJ
www.hamamatsu.com
Cameras- CCD, Cameras- cooled CCD, Camerasdigital systems, Cameras- specialty CCD,
Fluorescence systems- quantitative, Image
intensifiers, Luminescence imaging, Microscopesoptical & accessories, Scientific software, Video
microscopy systems
HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS
624
Solna, Sweden
www.proteinatlas.org/
The Human Protein Atlas is a free-to-use database
containing millions of high-resolution images
showing the spatial distribution of the human
proteins in normal tissues and different cancer
types, as well as the sub-cellular localisation in
single cells, complemented by transcriptomic data.
HYBRIGENICS CORP
Cambridge, MA
www.hybrigenics-services.com
Antibodies, Protein binding studies, Protein
databases
741
We are a complete service provider of cutting-edge
technologies dedicated to the study of proteins
& small molecule interactions. We have over 130
cDNA libraries available in 35+ species and we can
build a library from your material. We also provide
VHH antibody selection & validation services
through the screening of a unique VHH synthetic
library.
Hamamatsu Corporation is the North American
subsidiary of Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (Japan),
a leading manufacturer of cameras and optical
devices for light and electron microscopy. These
devices include sCMOS cameras, dual camera
optics and extended focus devices. The company
also offers detectors and image sensors.
IBIDI USA, INC.
405
Fitchburg, WI
www.ibidi.com
Cell biology products, Data analysis software, Live
Cell Assays, Microscope slides, Microscope slidesspecialty, Microscopes- optical & accessories,
Plastic laboratory ware, Pumps, Reagents
HIMEDIA LABORATORIES
427
Kennett Square, PA
www.himedialabs.com
Biochemicals, Culture media, Insect cell media,
Molecular biology reagents, Tissue culture media
ibidi is a global leading supplier for functional
cell-based assays and advanced products for
cellular microscopy. Headquartered in Martinsried,
Germany and Madison, Wisconsin, the ibidi spirit
of innovation, passion for quality, and steadfast
commitment to our customers drives us to be at
the vanguard of microscopy-based research and
technology.
HiMedia is a global manufacturer of powdered
cell culture media. Products include cell culture
tested chemicals, classical, low serum and serum
free media. Our facilities can produce single lots up
to 5,000 kg of powdered and 2,000 liters of liquid
media to service the smallest research labs to large
industrial cell culture of pharma/biopharma.
HORIZON DISCOVERY LTD.
710
Cambridge, United Kingdom
www.horizondiscovery.com
Cell biology products, Cell cultures, Cell Lines,
Cultured cells, DNA modification reagents, Gene
cloning and expression products, Molecular biology
reagents, Oligonucleotides, Protein expression,
Reagents
Horizon is a world leader in gene editing and gene
modulation. With a catalogue of over 1,000,000
cell and reagent products, and related research
services, Horizon supports a greater understanding
of the function of genes across all species and the
genetic drivers of disease, and the development of
personalised molecular, cell and gene therapies.
IEEE ACCESS
208
Piscataway, NJ
ieeeaccess.ieee.org/
IEEE Access is an award-winning, multidisciplinary,
all-electronic archival journal, continuously
presenting the results of original research or
development across all of IEEE’s fields of interest.
Supported by author publication fees, its hallmarks
are a rapid peer review and publication process
with open access to all readers.
IMRA AMERICA INC.
306
Ann Harbor, MI
nano.imra.com
Biochemical reagents, Cell membrane labeling,
Fluorescent particles, Magnetic particles, Reagents
IMRA America, Inc. provides functional gold
nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in
optical dark-field and fluorescence microscopy.
The dark-field signal is free of photo-bleaching.
The fluorescence signal is enhanced by high load
of fluorophores on particle surface. We also
provide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for cell
separation.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
INNOPSYS, INC.
221
Chicago, IL
www.innopsys.com
Image analysis, Image analysis software, Image
analyzer- high resolution, Lasers, Microscope slides
The microarray scanner specialist. Innopsys
develops, manufactures and sells equipment and
associated software for biotechnological & medical
research laboratories combining cost-effectiveness
with performance.
INSTITUT CURIE
924
Paris, France
science.institut-curie.org/
Institut Curie comprises a cutting edge
multidisciplinary (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and
Translational) Research Centre and a Hospital group
offering care for most types of cancer, including the
rarest, and hosting two new centres dedicated to
Immunotherapy Centre and Pediatric Oncology.
IOTASCIENCES LTD.
426
Oxford, United Kingdom
www.iotasciences.com
Cell culture apparatus, Cell cultures, Laboratory
workstation- automated
iotaSciences pioneers the development of the
world’s first fluid-shaping technologies that
transform conventional cell-culture dishes into
sophisticated microscale analysis platforms.
iotaSciences’ first product - the isoCell - is a
lightweight ‘3-in-1’ instrument that greatly
accelerates single-cell cloning with assured
monoclonality.
ISS
1217
Champaign, IL
www.iss.com
Fluorescence systems, Fluorometers, Imaging - In
vivo, Microscopes- confocal, Spectrofluorometers
ISS manufactures research-grade
spectroflurometers (PC1, K2,Chronos) for timeresolved & steady-state measurements & confocal
microscopes with single-molecule sensitivity &
STED Imaging (Alba, Q2, PL1), modular components
(laser launchers, LEDs, HP cell, data acquisition
cards). Applications include FRET, FLIM, FCS, FCCS,
PCH, scanning FCS, N&B.
JACKSON IMMUNORESEARCH LABORATORIES
604
West Grove, PA
www.jacksonimmuno.com
Affinity purified antibodies, Alkaline phosphatase
conjugated antibody, Fluorescent antibody,
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits, Serums
Specializing in affinity-purified secondary
antibodies (many adsorbed against other
species) conjugated with Alexa Fluor®, DyLight™,
and Cyanine fluorescent dyes; R-PE; and other
detection ligands. Anti-IgG, Light Chain specific for
Western blotting after IP, Alexa Fluor® 680 and 790
for highly sensitive Western blots. ISO 9001:2015
registered.
JETPUMP TECHNOLOGY INC.
744
Taipei City, Taiwan
www.jpumptec.com/smx.htm
Cell disruption equipment, Homogenizers- tissue,
Magnetic stirrers, Mixers, Pharmaceutical
development equipment
Non-contact ultrasonic stirrer- SoniMixer. The
fully new designed SoniMixer presents an
unprecedented combination of non-contact
ultrasonic and stirring function. Beyond traditional
heating stirrer and sonication system, no additional
chemical solvent needed, the sample can quickly
be homogenized, dissolved, and emulsified without
thermal damage.
JOURNAL OF CELL BIOLOGY (JCB)
738
New York, NY
www.jcb.org
Journal of Cell Biology (JCB) publishes advances
in any area of basic cell biology as well as applied
cellular advances in fields such as immunology,
neurobiology, metabolism, microbiology,
developmental biology, and plant biology. All
editorial decisions are made by research-active
scientists in conjunction with professional editors.
JPK INSTRUMENTS AG
231
Berlin, Germany
www.jpk.com
Microscopes- atomic force, Microscopes- scanning
probe
JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer
of nanoanalytic instruments, in particular atomic
force microscopes (AFM) and optical tweezers, has
joined forces with Bruker Corp. JPK products can be
used for a wide range of applications ranging from
the Life Sciences to soft matter physics and nanooptics. Visit us at booths 231 and 1123!
KEYENCE CORPORATION
704
Itasca, IL
www.keyence.com/ss/products/microscope/bzx800/
Image analysis, Microscopes, Microscopesautomated scanning, Microscopes- confocal,
Microscopes- motorized stages
The BZ series All-in-one Fluorescence Microscope is
an automated system that combines the functions
of a confocal, slide scanner and live-cell imaging
platform into a fully integrated solution. With
high-speed precise motion control, everyone from
beginners to experts can capture high-definition
fluorescence, brightfield, and phase contrast
images.
KINEXUS BIOINFORMATICS CORPORATION
844
Vancouver, BC, Canada
www.kinexus.ca
Affinity purified antibodies, Kinases/phosphatases,
Protein databases, Protein kinase assay kit, Signal
transduction reagents
A proteomics company offering products and services
for monitoring changes in expression levels &
phosphorylation states in protein kinases, phosphatases,
transcription factors, cell cycle, apoptosis, heat
shock, stress, and other cell signaling proteins.
Products include antibody & peptide microarrays,
antibodies, peptides, and substrate profiling
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXHIBITORS
KUHNER SHAKER INC
San Carlos, CA
kuhner.com
Bioreactors, Incubator shakers, Incubators
937
Kuhner manufactures world-renowned shaker
incubators for life-science applications. From
microplates to flasks and large scales, Kuhner shakers
are the absolute benchmark for quality, performance,
flexibility and reliability (5 year standard warranty).
All machines feature changeable orbit diameters.
Cooling, humidity, and CO2 are available.
LABVIVA
808
Cambridge, MA
www.labviva.com
Cell biology products, Centrifugation media and blood
separation media, Educational material, Laboratory
apparatus- miscellaneous, Molecular biology
reagents, Pipettes, Plastic laboratory ware, Reagents
Labviva….Accelerating the science of life. Introducing
Labviva, a new marketplace that leverages the
scientific context as an organizing principle,
connecting researchers with suppliers in an
intuitive, user-friendly platform. In addition, Labviva
provides integration of eProcurement platforms to
support specific purchasing workflows and processes.
LABX MEDIA GROUP
Midland, ON, Canada
www.labxmediagroup.com
Books and Journals
837
LabX Media Group is an information and marketing
company that provides scientific intelligence and
integrated marketing solutions to researchers
seeking to discover new ideas and approaches for
their labs and connect with their peers to advance
scientific research forward. Our brands include
LabX; Lab Manager; The Scientist and Technology
Networks.
LARODAN AB
Retzius Vag 8, Sweden
www.larodan.com
Lipids, Phospholipids
743
Larodan makes a comprehensive range of research
grade lipids for use as analytical standards and
reagents with customers all over the world. Our
products include all sorts of lipids, from simple
fatty acids and methyl esters to complex oxylipins,
glycerides and phospholipids. We are located at the
Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.
LEICA MICROSYSTEMS INC.
944
Buffalo Grove, IL
www.leica-microsystems.com
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesmotorized stages, Microscopes- optical &
accessories, Microscopes- stereo
Leica Microsystems offers infinite possibilities in
Cell Biology Research. The Leica DMi8 inverted
microscope grows to meet your ever-changing
needs for live cell imaging. We will show widefield,
confocal, and super-resolution platforms including
the Leica TCS SP8, and more.
165
EXHIBITORS
LEICA MICROSYSTEMS INC.
1116
Buffalo Grove, IL
www.leica-microsystems.com
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesmotorized stages, Microscopes- optical &
accessories, Microscopes- stereo
LOGOS BIOSYSTEMS, INC.
430
Annandale, VA
www.logosbio.com
Cell biology products, Colony counters,
Fluorescence systems, Microscopes- automated
scanning, Sample preparation- equipment
MAD CITY LABS, INC.
1231
Madison, WI
www.madcitylabs.com
Micropositioners, Microscopes- atomic force,
Microscopes- motorized stages, Microscopesoptical & accessories, Microscopes- scanning probe
Leica Microsystems offers infinite possibilities in
Cell Biology Research. The Leica DMi8 inverted
microscope grows to meet your ever-changing
needs for live cell imaging. We will show widefield,
confocal, and super-resolution platforms including
the Leica TCS SP8, and more.
Logos Biosystems is dedicated to developing
simple and smart research solutions for scientific
professionals. Our image-based automated cell
counters are known for their incredible speed,
accuracy, and reliability. The CELENA S Digital
Imaging System makes capturing high resolution,
publication-quality multi-fluorescence images a
breeze.
Mad City Labs designs and manufactures
nanopositioning systems and precision microscopy
instruments for the biophysics community. We
have provided piezo nanopositioners, single
molecule microscopes, atomic force microscopes,
and precision micropositioners for 20 years.
Specializing in custom nanopositioning and
microscopy solutions.
LONZA
530
Walkersville, MD
www.lonza.com/primary
Cell biology products, Cell cultures, Mycoplasma
detection systems, Serum-free media, Transfection
kits
MATRIGEN
822
San Diego, CA
matrigen.com
Cell biology products, Cell cultures, Extracellular
matrix products, Tissue cultures
LIFELINE CELL TECHNOLOGY
420
Frederick, MD
www.lifelinecelltech.com
Biochemical reagents, Cell biology products, Cell
culture media, Cell Lines, Contract and R&D
Lifeline Cell Technology provides Normal Human
Cells and Optimized Serum-Free or Low-Serum
Media. The Lifeline Cell Culture Systems provide
excellent in vitro models for many applications
including drug screening, cytotoxicity studies,
cancer research, wound healing studies, gene
therapy, infectious disease studies and regenerative
medicine studies
LIFESENSORS, INC.
431
Malvern, PA
www.lifesensors.com
Antibodies, Custom screening, Enzymes, Molecular
biology reagents, Protein expression
LifeSensors provides products and services specific
to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our products
include ubiquitin affinity reagents, activity-based
probes, enzymes, inhibitors, antibodies, and other
protein-based reagents. We also perform novel
R&D, assay development, proteomics, and fee-forservice compound screening and profiling.
LIPOTYPE GMBH
Dresden, Saxony, Germany
www.lipotype.com
Analytical services, Lipids, Phospholipids
1126
Lipotype delivers comprehensive, absolutely
quantitative lipid analysis services for clinical and
biological samples on a high-throughput scale.
Customers and applications include biomarker
identification for clinical research, pharma and
biotech companies, functional food development,
claim support for the cosmetics industry and
academia.
166
Lonza’s Bioscience Solutions products and services
range from basic research to drug discovery tools.
We offer primary cells and media, Nucleofector™
Technology for difficult-to-transfect cells, novel 3D
culture methods and live-cell imaging system.
LUMENCOR, INC.
Beaverton, OR
www.lumencor.com
Light boxes, Light sources
521
Lumencor builds innovative, high-quality light
engines that facilitate rapid, sensitive, accurate
analysis. Our areas of expertise reside in analytical
chemistry, materials science, solid-state physics,
optics and engineering. We offer lighting solutions
to support the demands of researchers and
manufacturers alike.
LUMICKS B.V.
611
Amsterdam, NH, Netherlands
www.lumicks.com
Cell adhesion molecules, Laminar flow equipment,
Micromanipulators, Microscopes- confocal, Protein
binding studies
LUMICKS is the leading supplier of Dynamic SingleMolecule and Single-Cell analysis instruments
for the study of molecular motor activity, protein
folding, DNA-protein interactions, and cell-target
avidity. Our instruments enable the analysis of
complex dynamic details related to the behavior
and interaction of single molecules and cells.
Matrigen’s expansive line of hydrogel-coated wells
mimic the stiffness of biological tissues. Our aim is
to make cell culture more physiologically relevant,
yet practical and economical.
MEIJI TECHNO AMERICA MICROSCOPES
804
San Jose, CA
meijitechno.com
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesoptical & accessories, Microscopes- stereo,
Microscopy accessories- fluorescence filters
Meiji Techno America Microscopes develops and
manufactures optical and digital imaging products
and software for Biological applications. It offers
microscope systems, such as upright, inverted,
confocal, stereo, including fully automated digital
vision systems. The company also provides digital
pathology products, which include imaging stations.
MICRO-MANAGER BY OPEN IMAGING
920
Mountain View, CA
open-imaging.com
Data acquisition, Image analysis software, Scientific
software, Software
Open Imaging develops and distributes µManager
(Micro-Manager), the free and open source optical
microscopy image acquisition and device automation
software platform. µManager supports a wide range
of microscopes and peripheral devices, provides an
intuitive user interface to run complex experiments,
and is highly extensible and customizable.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
MIGHTEX
310
Pleasanton, CA
www.mightexbio.com
Cell biology products, Imaging - Ex vivo, Imaging
- In vivo, Light sources, Microscopes- optical &
accessories
Mightex is a leading developer of advanced
illumination sources for cell biology. The Polygon400
patterned illuminator offers users precise spatial,
temporal, and spectral control of light to target
multiple cells or sub-cellular features for applications
such as optogenetics, photoactivation, and
photoconversion.
MILLIPORESIGMA
Burlington, MA
www.milliporesigma.com
Antibodies, Biochemicals, Cell Lines, Filter
membranes,
Flow cytometer
529
MilliporeSigma, the life science business of Merck
KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, develops innovative,
quality high-tech products in healthcare, life science
and performance materials. With deep expertise in
separations, reagents, culture, biomarker and cell
analysis, MilliporeSigma provides advancements
for basic and applied research and manufacturing.
MILTENYI BIOTEC
416
San Diego, CA
www.miltenyibiotec.com
Cell sorters, Flow cytometer, Imaging - In vivo,
Recombinant Antibodies, Sample preparationequipment
Miltenyi Biotec provides products that advance
biomedical research and cellular therapy. Our
innovative tools support research from basic
research to translational research to clinical
application. More than 25 years of expertise includes
immunology, stem cell biology, neuroscience, and
cancer. Miltenyi Biotec has 1,700 employees in
25 countries.
MIMETAS B.V.
344
Leiden, Netherlands
www.mimetas.com
Cell biology products, Cell cultures, Tissue cultures
MIMETAS develops predictive human tissue &
disease models using organ-on-a-chip technology.
The core-product, the OrganoPlate®, allows
perfused 3D cell culture, membrane free co-culture
& culture of tubules and vessels. MIMETAS works
for nearly all major pharmaceutical companies
worldwide on models for compound screening and
toxicity testing.
MINERVA BIOLABS INC.
421
Hillsborough, NJ
www.minervabiolabs.us
Cell biology products, Detection systems,
Nucleic acid isolations, PCR kits, Pharmaceutical
development equipment
Minerva Biolabs GmbH is a leading biotechnology
company for innovative products in PCR, cell
culture, food and biopharmaceutical safety.
EXHIBITORS
MINIPCR
305
Cambridge, MA
www.minipcr.com
Educational material, Gel electrophoresis
equipment, PCR reagents, Pipettes- micro, UV
transilluminators
NACALAI USA, INC.
605
San Diego, CA
www.nacalaiusa.com
Biochemical reagents, Cell culture media,
Chemiluminescence reagents, Electrophoresis
media- gels, Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits
miniPCR develops innovative tools for DNA
experimentation. The DNA Discovery system is a
portable lab used by educators and researchers
in labs and in extreme places such as the
International Space Station and off-the-grid
locations. It includes a miniPCR thermal cycler, a
blueGel electrophoresis/transilluminator system,
and pipette for under $900.
Nacalai USA provides the highest quality research
products necessary for the Life Science research
such as Molecular Biology and Proteomics. Most
of the products are manufactured and packaged in
high level manufacturing facilities in Japan.
MIZAR IMAGING
330
Woods Hole, MA
www.mizarimaging.com
Fluorescence systems, Imaging - In vivo,
Microscopes, Microscopes- optical & accessories,
Zebra Fish
Mizar Imaging brings you the Mizar Tilt: a
lightsheet add-on that works even with oil
immersion objectives. Sample prep is easy, imaging
is easy, and it fits on most scopes. Image live cells
in multiple colors with minimal photodamage, now
at the resolution you need.
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE CELL
Bethesda, MD
www.molbiolcell.org
Journal
224
Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) is ASCB’s
journal for the best in cell biology and biomedical
research. MBoC publishes important research
in all areas of cell biology and life sciences, from
biophysics to genetics to developmental biology.
MOLECULAR DEVICES
943
San Jose, CA
www.moleculardevices.com
Image analysis, Image analysis software, Microplate
readers, Microplate washers, Microscopesconfocal, Reagents, Western blotting equipment
At Molecular Devices, we enable our customers to
unravel the complexity of biological systems. We
provide platforms for high-throughput screening,
genomic and cellular analysis, colony selection and
microplate detection.
MONTANA MOLECULAR
1145
Bozeman, MT
montanamolecular.com
Biosenors, Cell biology products, Fluorescence
reagents, Imaging - Ex vivo, Live Cell Assays
Montana Molecular develops genetically-encoded
fluorescent biosensors for live cell assay. Biosensors
include cell stress, cAMP, DAG, Ca2+, cGMP,
PIP2, voltage & beta arrestin can be combined to
simultaneously detect multiple cellular processes
in any cell type. Compatible with detection on
fluorescence imaging systems and automated plate
readers.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
NANJING CHUANBO BIOTECH CO., LTD.
539
Nanjing, Jiangsu, China
www.sabbiotech.com
Antibodies, Elisa plates/strips,
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits, Inhibitors,
Purified proteins
We are committed to providing high-quality
research reagents such as antibodies, proteins,
cytokines, ELISA kits, Inhibitors and compound
libraries, etc., for life science companies,
universities and research institutes around the
world.
NANOCELLECT BIOMEDICAL, INC
1124
San Diego, CA
www.nanocellect.com
Cell Lines, Cell sorters, Flow cytometry standards,
Genomic DNAs, Sample preparation- equipment
NanoCellect is a novel microfluidic cell sorter. Using
proven detection technologies, we have focused
on innovative cartridge technology and intuitive
software for simple, safe operation. The compact
machine is portable to bench or hood. A sterile
cartridge and tubing set protects cells from users
and users from cells.
NANOLIVE SA
528
Ecublens, Vaud, Switzerland
nanolive.ch/
Computer-3-D reconstruction, Educational
material, Microscopes, Microscopes- automated
scanning, Microscopes- motorized stages
Nanolive’s 3D Cell Explorer is a Swiss high
precision Tomographic Microscope to look
instantly inside living cells in 3D & marker-free! Big
announcements coming at ASCB2018. Do not miss
our tech talk on Monday December 10 at 4:15 in
Theater 2.
NANOSURFACE BIOMEDICAL
918
Seattle, WA
www.nanosurfacebio.com
Bioreactors, Cell culture apparatus, Plastic
laboratory ware, Tissue culture apparatus, Tissue
culture labware
NanoSurface Biomedical provides products for
cell & tissue engineering, disease modeling, drug
discovery, and fundamental cell biology research.
NanoSurface Cultureware features biomimetic
nanotopographic surfaces. The NanoSurface
Cytostretcher enables mechanical stimulation
of cell & tissue cultures. Learn more online at
nanosurfacebio.com.
167
EXHIBITORS
NASA AMES RESEARCH CENTER
242
Moffett Field, CA
www.nasa.gov/spacebio
Animal tissues, Employment, Research awardspostdoctoral, Research funding materials
NICOYA LIFESCIENCES INC.
Kitchener, ON, Canada
www.nicoyalife.com
Antibodies, Biosenors, Reagents, Software
1225
NASA life sciences executes high quality, high value
research which enables space exploration. We are
pioneering scientific discovery to drive advances in
science, technology and space exploration to
enhance knowledge, education, innovation, and
economic vitality. Come learn about grant opportunities
for space research and postdoctoral fellowships.
Nicoya Lifesciences uses nanotechnology to make
OpenSPR™ the world’s only benchtop surface
plasmon resonance instrument. OpenSPR is a
user-friendly and low maintenance SPR solution,
currently being used in over 25 countries. With SPR
technology in your lab, you can get the high quality
data you need to accelerate your research and
publish faster.
NATIONAL CENTER FOR
BIOTECHNOLOGY INFORMATION
Rockville, MD
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
Biochemicals, Molecular biology reagents
NIDDK INFORMATION NETWORK (DKNET)
240
La Jolla, CA
dknet.org
Animals, Antibodies, Cell Lines, Online services,
Software
327
As a center within the U.S. National Library of
Medicine as part of the NIH, NCBI’s mission is to
create and maintain resources for national and
international research, clinical, and education
communities and aid in the understanding of
molecular biological, biochemical, and genetic
processes that contribute to health and disease.
NEUROINDX, INC.
639
Torrance, CA
www.neuroindx.com
Cell culture apparatus, Laboratory apparatusmiscellaneous, Live Cell Assays, Microdissecting
instruments, Temperature controllers
NeuroInDx, Inc. (NDX) was founded in 2006 with a
goal to develop new instrumentation and technologies
for cell specific biomedical research. Our primary
focus is in the development of instrumentation for
single cell isolation and complex tissue microdissection
for a range of downstream applications including
genomics and single cell analysis.
NEW ENGLAND BIOLABS, INC.
1023
Ipswich, MA
www.neb.com
Antibodies, Cloning vectors, Protein expression,
Purified proteins, Vectors
NEB, a leader in the discovery and production of
tools for molecular biology, offers a wide selection
of reagents for PCR, cloning, expression and
purification. In addition to enzymes for DNA work,
NEB offers expression systems, enzymes for protein
modification, nucleic acid purification kits, and
tools for cellular analysis.
NEWPORT CORPORATION
211
Irvine, CA
www.newport.com
Lasers, Light sources, Micropositioners, Microscopy
accessories- fluorescence filters
Newport is a brand within the MKS Instruments
Light & Motion division. The Newport product
portfolio consists of a full range of solutions
including motion control, optical tables and
vibration isolation systems, photonics instruments,
optics and opto-mechanical components. For more
information, visit www.newport.com.
168
The NIDDK Information Network (dkNET;
http://dknet.org) is resource for basic and clinical
researchers that provides access to a collection
of diverse research resources and associated
resource reports. Building on the foundation of
Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs), dkNET also
provides services to promote scientific rigor and
reproducibility.
NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC.
917
Melville, NY
www.nikoninstruments.com
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesoptical & accessories
Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the
development and manufacture of optical and
digital imaging technology for biomedical and
clinical applications. Nikon provides imaging
systems that offer optimal versatility, performance
and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include
super resolution, confocal and high content
imaging systems.
NOVA BIOLOGICS, INC.
Oceanside, CA
www.novabiologics.com
Serums
806
NOVA Biologics, Inc. offers a range of serums and
plasma, including disease state and patient sample
materials, as well as human and animal derived
products for use in cell culture, IVD and for further
manufacture of therapeutic injectable products.
OLYMPUS AMERICA INC.
716
Waltham, MA
www.olympusamerica.com
Cameras- CCD, Cell culture apparatus, Microscopes,
Microscopes- confocal, Microscopes- optical &
accessories, Microscopes- stereo, Software
Visit the Olympus booth today
or visit https://www.olympus-lifescience.com
OPENTRONS LABWORKS
640
Brooklyn, NY
www.opentrons.com
Pipettes, Pipettes- automatic, Robotics, Sample
preparation- equipment
We make robots for biologists. Our mission is to
provide the scientific community with a common
platform to easily share protocols and reproduce
each other’s results. Our robots automate
experiments that would otherwise be done by
hand, allowing our community to spend more time
pursuing answers to some of the 21st century’s
most important questions.
OXFORD NANOIMAGING LTD.
938
Oxford, United Kingdom
www.oxfordni.com
Buffers, Data analysis software, Fluorescence
systems- quantitative, Image analysis software,
Microscopes
ONI has created the next generation of singlemolecule microscopes. Designed to operate on
a regular table with a footprint smaller than A4
letter paper, the Nanoimager is also very accessible
to researchers. It offers quantitative analysis for
super-resolution microscopy (dSTORM, PALM, SIM),
single-particle tracking and single-molecule FRET.
PARTEK INC.
818
St. Louis, MO
www.partek.com
Data analysis software, DNA sequence analysis
software, Molecular biology software, Scientific
software, Statistics software
Partek offers user-friendly analysis software
and services for NGS, single-cell sequencing,
microarray, and qPCR applications. With superior
statistics, interactive visualizations, and robust
administration and collaboration tools backed by
world-class technical support, Partek provides
researchers the fastest route to discovery.
OKOLAB SRL
931
Ottaviano, Italy
oko-lab.com
Cell culture apparatus, Environmental chambers,
Incubators, Live Cell Assays, Temperature
controllers
Okolab manufactures superior performance
microscope incubators and temperature/humidity/
gas controllers and meters. Microscope incubators’
basket includes Cage Incubators and Top Stage
Incubators, both for inverted and also upright
scopes. Latest products for digital and lattice light
sheet, oSPIM and diSPIM systems will be displayed.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
PHI OPTICS, INC.
Champaign, IL
www.phioptics.com
PCO-TECH INC.
1040
Romulus, MI
www.pco-tech.com
Cameras- CCD, Cameras- cooled CCD, Camerasdigital systems, Cameras- specialty CCD, Data
acquisition equipment, Image analyzer, Image
analyzer- high resolution, Image analyzer- high
speed, Image intensifiers, Image processors
PCO is a leading Pioneer in Cameras with more
than 30 years of expert knowledge and experience
developing and manufacturing high-end imaging
systems. The company’s cutting edge sCMOS and
high-speed cameras are used in scientific and
industrial research, automotive testing, quality
control and a large variety of other applications all
over the world.
PDXEN BIOSYSTEMS CO.
308
Seoul, South Korea South
www.pdxen.com
Cell culture media, Cell cultures, Cell Lines,
Cultured cells, DNA isolation kits and supplies
Founded in 2013, PDXen Biosystems Co. is
focusing on establishment of patient derived
xenograft model and their related technologies
such as the responsiveness of anti-cancer drugs,
realtime tracking system to determine the biologic
behaviors of cells, etc.
PEPROTECH, INC.
928
Rocky Hill, NJ
www.peprotech.com
Antibodies, Cell culture media, Cytokines, Growth
factors, Serum-free media
PeproTech manufactures an extensive line of
Recombinant Human, Murine and Rat Cytokines,
Animal-Free Recombinant Cytokines, Monoclonal
Antibodies, Affinity Purified Polyclonal Antibodies,
Affinity Purified Biotinylated Polyclonal Antibodies,
ELISA Development Kits, Cell Culture Media
Products and GMP Cytokines.
PHASEFOCUS
838
Sheffield, United Kingdom
phasefocus.com
Fluorescence systems, Image analysis software,
Image analyzer, Live Cell Assays, Microscopes
Phasefocus™ is pioneering live cell imaging and
analysis, powered by ptychographic imaging
technology. Livecyte™ is the only instrument for
live cell research that can enable measurement and
comparison of the dynamic behaviour of thousands
of individual cells at a depth previously impossible,
over extended time, label-free, in a 96 well plate.
1227
Image analysis, Imaging - Ex vivo, Live Cell Assays,
Microscopes, Microscopes- optical & accessories
EXHIBITORS
POLYPLUS-TRANSFECTION
941
Illkirch, France
www.polyplus-transfection.com
Cell biology products, Protein expression, Reagents,
Reagents- mouse, Transfection kits
Phi Optics upgrades existing optical microscopes
to provide 4D label-free quantitative imaging
of live specimens. Researchers can see live cells
and tissues with higher contrast than traditional
microscopy modalities. Output data is repeatable
and sample invariant, and is suitable for machine
learning and automatic screening.
Polyplus-transfection has been manufacturing
and selling transfection reagents for over 15
years. Polyplus-transfection applies its expertise
to the development of novel delivery solution for
all types of nucleic acids (DNA, siRNA, miRNA)
for bioproduction (FectoPRO, PEIpro), research
(jetCRISPR, jetPRIME, jetMESSENGER, jetPRIME)
and therapeutics.
PHOTOMETRICS
916
Tucson, AZ
www.photometrics.com
Cameras- CCD, Cameras- specialty CCD, Image
analysis software, Microscopy accessoriesfluorescence filters
PROGEN BIOTECHNIK GMBH
821
Heidelberg, Germany
www.progen.com
Antibodies, Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits,
Monoclonal antibodies, Protein expression, Tumor
markers
Photometrics designs and manufactures Scientific
CMOS, CCD and EMCCD cameras for quantitative
bio-research. The architect of the first scientific-grade
EMCCD, Photometrics maintains its leadership role
with the release of its award-winning Prime 95B,
the Scientific CMOS with 95% quantum efficiency,
and Iris 15 CMOS for light sheet microscopy.
Since 1983, PROGEN is an established manufacturer
& supplier of premium antibodies, in vitro diagnostics,
& reagents for the life science research community.
Its antibodies are among the most published ones
in biomedical & cell biology literature. PROGEN
recently launched a quality initiative to provide
even more reliable data for researchers.
PHOTONICS MEDIA
Pittsfield, MA
www.photonics.com
Books and Journals
218
BioPhotonics magazine is the global information
resource covering photonics products and techniques
to solve problems for researchers, product
developers, clinical users, physicians and others in
the fields of medicine, biology and biotechnology.
Stay current with a FREE subscription and search our
extensive, industry-specific archives online.
PIEZOCONCEPT
Lyon, France
311
Incubators, Micropositioners, Microscopesautomated scanning, Microscopes- motorized
stages, Microscopes- scanning probe
PIEZOCONCEPT is the leading provider of
nanopositioners dedicated to applications such
as Super Resolution Microscopy, Optical Trapping
and Atomic Force Microscopy. We developed a
range of ultra-stable nanopositioner able to meet
a wide range of microscopy applications with
significant advantages over the currently available
nanopositioners.
PROSCI INC.
Poway, CA
www.prosci-inc.com
Antibodies, Custom antibody, Monoclonal
antibodies
329
ProSci is a leading provider of high performance
antibodies and custom antibody services.
They have produced more than 10,000 custom
monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies for
researchers worldwide in academia, biotechnology,
diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries.
PROTEIN FLUIDICS, INC.
825
Burlingame, CA
www.proteinfluidics.com
Biochemical reagents, Elisa testing, Eliza platesspecialty, Immunoassay system- automated,
Laboratory apparatus- miscellaneous
Protein Fluidics provides protein analysis systems
that accelerate data driven decisions in the
laboratory. Our PuMA System performs immunoassays
with antibody pairs, shrinking a 2-day “hands-on”
workflow to less than 3 hours “hands-off”. Come
see our benchtop PuMA System and learn about
how it can streamline your laboratory workflow.
PROTEINTECH GROUP INC.
227
Rosemont, IL
www.ptglab.com
Affinity purified antibodies, Antibodies, Monoclonal
antibodies, Reagents
Proteintech Group is an original manufacturer
of primary antibodies, proteins, ELISA kits &
Humankines, human cell-expressed proteins.
We’ve produced 14,000 antibodies against 14,000
different human whole proteins. They’re animalfree, xeno-free humankines allow for native human
glycosylation, folding & maturation. US, CN, Eur,
JP-in stock.
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169
EXHIBITORS
PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE (PLOS)
404
San Francisco, CA
www.plos.org
PLOS (Public Library of Science) is a nonprofit
Open Access publisher dedicated to accelerating
progress in science and medicine by leading a
transformation in research communication. The
PLOS suite of influential journals contain rigorously
peer-reviewed Open Access research articles from
all areas of science and medicine.
R RayBiotech
Empowering your proteomics
RAYBIOTECH INC.
411
Norcross, GA
www.raybiotech.com
Antibodies, Custom screening, Cytokines, Elisa
testing, Flow cytometry reagents, Monoclonal
antibodies, PCR kits, Protein blotting, Protein
expression, Quantitation kits
RayBiotech, a leading life sciences company
providing proteomic discovery tools, is the
industry leader of antibody array technology and
manufacturer of the world’s largest selection of
validated ELISA kits.
ROYAL SOCIETY PUBLISHING
London, United Kingdom
royalsociety.org/journals
Books and Journals
1245
RPMC Lasers Inc is the leading laser distributor
in North America. We offer diode lasers, laser
modules, solid state and fiber lasers from
technology leading manufacturers. Our goal is
to provide high quality technical advice with an
in-depth knowledge of our lasers at an attractive
value proposition, the best laser at a fair price.
SAPPHIRE NORTH AMERICA
739
Ann Arbor, MI
www.sapphire-usa.com
Antibodies, Biochemical reagents, Dyes and
labeling reagents, Enzyme immunoassay reagents/
kits, Lipids
Sapphire offers innovative research tools for
cellular processes, energy storage, immune
signaling, and membrane dynamics. We focus on
sourcing and distributing unique products from
specialty manufacturers operating around the
world. ReZolve Scientific’s novel fluorescent probes
are featured. Learn more at Booth 739 or visit
www.sapphire-usa.com.
170
Sarstedt provides consumables for life science
research and diagnostics. Research products
include cell culture devices, cryo tubes and
supplies, PCR tubes and plates, basic labware
and benchtop instruments. Our diagnostics range
includes blood collection devices suited for the
unique requirements of lab animal science from
rodents to primates.
SARTORIUS
Ann Arbor, MI
www.essenbioscience.com
Image analysis, Live Cell Assays, Reagents
204
Essen BioScience, now part of Sartorius, specializes
in developing and manufacturing instruments,
software, reagents, and consumables for real-time
live-cell imaging and data analysis. The IncuCyte®
S3 Live-Cell Analysis System is a real-time
quantitative live-cell imaging and analysis platform.
742
The Royal Society publishes three journals aimed at
cell biologists. Open Biology publishes outstanding
open access research and review articles;
Philosophical Transactions B publishes topical
theme issues; Royal Society Open Science publishes
high quality, open access research on the basis of
objective peer review. Find out more at booth 742
RPMC LASERS INC.
O’Fallon, MO
www.rpmclasers.com
Lasers
SARSTEDT
831
Newton, NC
www.sarstedt.com
Blood collecting systems, Cell biology products,
Elisa plates/strips, Filters, Plastic laboratory ware
SCIENCE/AAAS
Washington, DC
www.aaas.org
Books and Journals, Job fairs, Meetings,
Membership, Professional society
736
Since 1848, AAAS and its members have worked
together to advance science and serve society. As
part of these efforts, AAAS publishes Science, a
multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal, and offers
programs focused on science policy, international
cooperation, science education, diversity, and
career development for scientists.
SCIENCELL RESEARCH LABORATORIES
637
Carlsbad, CA
sciencellonline.com
Cell biology products, Cell culture media, Gene
cloning and expression products, Growth factors,
Reagents
Sciencell Research Laboratories is the world’s
largest cell provider with a variety of high-quality
normal human and animal cells, cell culture media
and reagents, gene analysis tools, cell-derived
molecular biology products, cell-based assay kits,
and stem cell products for the research community.
SCREEN NORTH AMERICA HOLDINGS, INC.
Rolling Meadows, IL
419
SEMROCK (A DIVISION OF IDEX HEALTH
& SCIENCE)
705
Rochester, NY
www.semrock.com
Data analysis software, Filters, Fluorescence filter
sets, Microscopy accessories- fluorescence filters,
Optical filters
Semrock, a unit of IDEX Health & Science,
manufactures optical filters that set the standard in
performance, quality, and reliability for the life
science, point-of-care, clinical diagnostic, and
analytical instrumentation markets. OEMs and endusers benefit from high volume customized optics
as well as wide selection of standard catalog products.
SINO BIOLOGICAL, INC.
Beijing, China
www.sinobiological.com
Antibodies, Cytokines, Protein expression
709
Sino Biological Inc. is a world leading biological
reagents manufacturer, offering premium quality
reagents, Proteins (6000+), Antibodies (9000+),
Genes (20000+) and ELISA Kits, all of which are
made in-house. It also provides one-stop services
for protein and antibody discovery, research,
development, production and commercialization.
SOCIETY FOR NEUROSCIENCE
238
Washington, DC
www.sfn.org
Founded in 1969, the Society for Neuroscience
(SfN) is the world’s largest organization of scientists
and physicians devoted to understanding the brain
and the nervous system. The Society now has
nearly 36,000 members in more than 95 countries.
SPRINGER NATURE
New York, NY
www.springernature.com
Books and Journals
323
Springer Nature is one of the world’s leading global
research, educational and professional publishers,
home to an array of respected and trusted brands
providing quality content through a range of
innovative products and services. www.
springernature.com
ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL
Memphis, TN
www.stjude.org/postdoc
Employment, Research awards-postdoctoral
609
We rapidly translate cutting-edge basic research
into groundbreaking treatments for life-threatening
diseases. Cell & molecular biology research is
integral to our multidisciplinary programs. We
provide exceptional training for 260+ postdocs, and
consistently rank on FORTUNE magazine’s “100
Best Companies to Work For” list.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
SUTTER INSTRUMENT COMPANY
1017
Novato, CA
www.sutter.com
Amplifiers, Light sources, Micromanipulators,
Microscopes, Pipette pullers
Stop by to see our exciting new products: dPatch®
our fully integrated digital patch clamp amplifier and
data analysis software system for single channel
or whole cell recording; the versatile BOB open
platform upright microscope, the highly-stable TRIO
3-axis manipulator system; and our optical beam
combiners, the Lambda 421 and Lambda OBC.
SYNTHEGO
207
Redwood City, CA
www.synthego.com
Cell Lines, Custom screening, DNA sequence analysis
software, Oligonucleotides, Protein expression
Synthego is a leading provider of genome engineering
solutions, including software and synthetic RNA
kits designed for CRISPR genome editing. With
next-generation informatics and machine learning,
Synthego’s vision is to enable precise, automated,
rapid and cost-effective research for every scientist.
THE COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD.
Cambridge, United Kingdom
www.biologists.com
Books and Journals
1030
The Company of Biologists is a not for profit
publishing organisation dedicated to supporting
and inspiring the biological community through
scientific journals, meetings and grants. Our
journals are Development, Journal of Cell Science,
Journal of Experimental Biology, Disease Models &
Mechanisms and Biology Open.
THE JACKSON LABORATORY
236
Bar Harbor, ME
www.jax.org/careers
Conferences, Educational material, Employment,
Meetings, Recruiting
Join our nonprofit biomedical research institution
for your academic postdoctoral, PhD, or postbac
training and work at the cutting-edge of genetics
and genomics to improve human health. Develop
your research and professional skills through our
in person and online courses, conferences and
workshops. Learn how to accelerate your career!
Join US!
THERMO FISHER SCIENTIFIC
504
Carlsbad, CA
www.thermofisher.com
Cell biology products, Cell culture media, Culture
media, Electron microscopes, Transfection kits
Thermo Fisher Scientific is the world leader in
serving science. Our mission is to enable our
customers to make the world healthier, cleaner
and safer. Through our Thermo Scientific, Applied
Biosystems and Invitrogen brands, we help
customers accelerate innovation and enhance
productivity.
THEWELL BIOSCIENCE INC.
Newark, NJ
www.thewellbio.com
Cell biology products, Cell culture media
520
EXHIBITORS
UPM-KYMMENE CORPORATION
Helsinki, Finland
www.growdex.com
Biochemicals, Cell cultures, Reagents
408
Perform 3D cell culture in 20 minutes. VitroGel
is the next generation, ready-to-use, xeno-free
tunable hydrogel for 3D cell culture research.
Just add your cells. The hydrogel system is room
temperature stable, has a neutral pH, transparent,
permeable and compatible to different imaging
systems with easy cell harvesting.
UPM Biomedicals develops and supplies innovative
and sustainable wood-based biomedical products
for a variety of uses. GrowDex® product family is a
nanofibrilar cellulose hydrogel for 3D cell culturing
and other biomedical applications. It is highly
biocompatible with human cells and tissues—but
free from any animal- or human-derived material.
THORLABS
1221
Newton, NJ
www.thorlabs.com
Cameras- CCD, Image analysis, Lasers, Microscopes,
Microscopes- confocal
V&P SCIENTIFIC, INC.
942
San Diego, CA
www.vp-sci.com
DNA isolation kits and supplies, DNA purification
kits, Liquid dispensers, Magnetic stirrers, Mixers
Thorlabs has grown from the laser and electrooptics markets to serve the life sciences. Our
portfolio includes multiphoton and confocal
microscopes, scientific cameras, microscope
accessories, OCT systems, and modular
microscopes. Our vertically integrated structure
allows us to quickly design and produce custom
solutions that fit specific needs.
V&P Scientific works with scientists to design and
develop new, innovative tools for biological, chemical,
and materials research in basic studies and in
pharmaceutical and industrial applications. With
many decades of experience, we know and
understand research, assay development, and
scientific tool development.
TOKAI HIT CO., LTD.
517
Bala Cynwyd, PA
www.tokaihit.com
Environmental chambers, Hot plates, Incubators,
Perfusion system, Tissue culture CO2 incubator
Happiness for Cells Success for Researchers: Let’s
leave cell culture to Tokai Hit incubators and one
less thing to worry during time-lapse imaging.
Stage Top and ThermoBox incubators maintain
the best temp, gas and humidity condition. We’re
launching NEW multi-fluidic system to meet various
kinds of application. Please come and see it at our
booth!
TOMOCUBE, INC.
423
Daejeon, South Korea
www.tomocube.com
Cell biology products, Computer-3-D reconstruction,
Fluorescence systems, Live Cell Assays,
Microscopes
Tomocube is a holotomography(HT) microscope
manufacturer for the life science industry. Our
product measures refractive index and produces
detailed 3D tomograms of live cells (like an optical
version of X-ray CT). Unlike conventional optical
microscopy, HT is label-free, providing great potential
for scientists to image live untreated cells in 3D.
UNION BIOMETRICA, INC.
619
Holliston, MA
www.unionbio.com
Cell sorters, Flow cytometer, Imaging - In vivo,
Zebra Fish
VECTOR LABORATORIES, INC.
836
Burlingame, CA
www.vectorlabs.com
Affinity purified antibodies, Alkaline phosphatase
conjugated antibody, Antibodies, Biotin-conjugated
antibodies, Chromogenic substrates, Fluorescence
reagents, Fluorescent antibody, Immunohistochemistry
reagents/kits, Peroxidase conjugated antibody,
Protein blotting
U.S. based manufacturer since 1976, renowned for
reagents of the highest quality for immunohistochemistry,
immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, blot
applications, ELISAs, tract tracing, and glycobiology.
Makers of VECTASTAIN ABC Kits, ImmPRESS Polymer
Kits, ImmPACT substrates, VECTASHIELD Mounting
Media and TrueVIEW Autofluorescence Quencher.
VIROMER® TRANSFECTION
Halle, Germany
www.viromer-transfection.com
Transfection kits
706
VIROMER Transfection reagents are powerful,
polymer-based transfection reagents featuring
an active escape from the endosome leading to
great efficiencies in hard-to-transfect cell lines,
primary and suspension cells. Come and welcome
our brand new VIROMER PLASMID, mRNA and
CRISPR reagents, take a sample and make your
transfections more successful!
Union Biometrica Large Particle Flow Cytometers
automate the analysis & dispensing of objects too
big/too fragile for traditional flow cytometers.
Samples include large delicate cells (adipocytes),
cell clusters (EBs, islets), spheroids (neurospheres,
tumorspheres) COPAS and BioSorter instruments
cover the full 10-1500μm size range.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
171
EXHIBITORS
VISITECH INTERNATIONAL LTD.
843
Sunderland, United Kingdom
www.visitech.co.uk
Fluorescence systems, Imaging - Ex vivo,
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal, Microscopesoptical & accessories
VisiTech International is a leading developer of
novel imaging instruments for the life and material
science communities. VisiTech’ products target
fluorescence based Live Cell imaging through
Confocal and Super Resolution imaging techniques,
including the recently developed instantSIM, for
high speed live cell imaging beyond the diffraction
limit.
W.W. NORTON
309
New York, NY
books.wwnorton.com
The oldest and largest publishing house
owned wholly by its employees, W. W. Norton,
Inc. publishes about 400 trade, college, and
professional titles each year.
WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE
Worcester, MA
www.wpi.edu/admissions/graduate
Education
244
WPI, a global leader in project-based learning,
is a distinctive, top-tier technological university
founded in 1865 on the principle that students
learn most effectively by applying the theory
learned in the classroom to the practice of solving
real-world problems.
XPRESSBIO
824
Frederick, MD
www.xpressbio.com
Antibodies, Custom screening, Cytokines, DNA
isolation kits and supplies, Enzyme immunoassay
reagents/kits, Molecular biology reagents,
Mycoplasma detection systems, PCR reagents,
Reagent- rat, Reagents- mouse
XpressBio manufactures and markets molecular
and immunological products and services to
the bio-science research community around the
world. Our customers are some of the leading
pharmaceutical, biotechnology, government, and
academic organizations. We continuously expand
our product portfolio through providing clients
customized solutions.
YOKOGAWA ELECTRIC CORPORATION
845
Kanazawa-si, Ishikasa Japan
www.yokogawa.com/solutions/products-platforms/
life-science
Cell biology products, Image analysis software,
Microscopes, Microscopes- confocal
CSU is Yokogawa’s original technology, and 3,000
units are sold all over the world. Now Yokogawa
released new product “CSU-W1 SoRa”. Just like
the CSU, high-speed real time imaging can be
performed with super-resolution. So “CSU-W1
SoRa” is Ideal for super-resolution live cell imaging.
WORTHINGTON BIOCHEMICAL CORPORATION
636
Lakewood, NJ
www.worthington-biochem.com
Biochemicals, Cell biology products, DNA
modification reagents, Enzymes, Purified proteins
Worthington enzymes, proteins, and kits for
biotech and life science research, cell & mobio,
primary/stem cell isolation. Collagenases,
nucleases, proteases, purified proteins and
cell isolation kits. Animal-free collagenases,
STEMxyme® collagenase/neutral protease blends,
nucleases, inhibitors, and proteases are also
available. Win an [email protected] 636!
172
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
A
Affinity purification kits
Expedeon Ltd.
Affinity purified antibodies
Jackson ImmunoResearch
Laboratories
Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation
Proteintech Group Inc.
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Alkaline phosphatase conjugated
antibody
Jackson ImmunoResearch
Laboratories
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Amplifiers
Sutter Instrument Company
Analytical services
Cayman Chemical Company
Lipotype GmbH
Animal tissues
NASA Ames Research Center
Animals
Biocytogen LLC
NIDDK Information Network (dkNET)
Antibodies
ABclonal Science Inc.
Absolute Antibody/Kerafast
AnaSpec, EGT Group
Atlas Antibodies AB
Aviva Systems Biology Corporation
Biocytogen LLC
BioLegend, Inc.
Bio-Rad Laboratories
Boster Biological Technology
ChromoTek GmbH
Cusabio Technology
Cytoskeleton, Inc.
Digital Proteomics LLC
Funakoshi Co., Ltd.
GeneTex
Hybrigenics Corp
LifeSensors, Inc.
MilliporeSigma
Nanjing Chuanbo Biotech Co., Ltd.
New England Biolabs, Inc.
Nicoya Lifesciences Inc.
NIDDK Information Network (dkNET)
Peprotech, Inc.
Progen Biotechnik GmbH
ProSci Inc.
Proteintech Group Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Sapphire North America
Sino Biological, Inc.
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
XpressBio
Anti-microbial products
Biological Industries USA
Apparel
American Society for Cell Biology
ASCB Journals booth
B
Biochemical reagents
Cayman Chemical Company
Click Chemistry Tools
IMRA America Inc.
Lifeline Cell Technology
Nacalai USA, Inc.
Protein Fluidics, Inc.
Sapphire North America
Biochemicals
HiMedia Laboratories
MilliporeSigma
National Center for Biotechnology
Information
UPM-Kymmene Corporation
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Biological stains and indicators
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
Biologicals
AD Biosciences
Bioreactors
Fibercell Systems, Inc.
Kuhner Shaker Inc.
NanoSurface Biomedical
Biosenors
Montana Molecular
Nicoya Lifesciences Inc.
Biotin-conjugated antibodies
Cusabio Technology
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Blood collecting systems
SARSTEDT
Books and Journals
Cells MDPI
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
FASEB - Society Management Services
Frontiers
Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology
News
LabX Media Group
Photonics Media
Royal Society Publishing
Science/AAAS
Springer Nature
The Company of Biologists Ltd.
Buffers
Abbelight
Oxford Nanoimaging Ltd.
C
Cameras- CCD
Andor Technology & Bitplane, Inc.
GE Healthcare
Hamamatsu Corporation
Olympus America Inc.
PCO-TECH Inc.
Photometrics
Thorlabs
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
Cameras- cooled CCD
Finger Lakes Instrumentation LLC
Hamamatsu Corporation
PCO-TECH Inc.
Cameras- digital systems
Hamamatsu Corporation
PCO-TECH Inc.
Cameras- specialty CCD
Andor Technology & Bitplane, Inc.
Finger Lakes Instrumentation LLC
Hamamatsu Corporation
PCO-TECH Inc.
Photometrics
Cell adhesion molecules
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
Lumicks B.V.
Cell biology products
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
AD Biosciences
Agilent
Applied Bio Physics Inc.
Biological Industries USA
Bio-Rad Laboratories
Cell Applications, Inc.
Cell Biologics Inc.
ChemoMetec
ChromoTek GmbH
Drummond Scientific Co.
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Funakoshi Co., Ltd.
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Gold Biotechnology Inc.
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Labviva
Lifeline Cell Technology
Logos Biosystems, Inc.
Lonza
MATRIGEN
Mightex
MIMETAS B.V.
Minerva Biolabs Inc.
Montana Molecular
Polyplus-transfection
SARSTEDT
ScienCell Research Laboratories
Thermo Fisher Scientific
TheWell Bioscience Inc.
Tomocube, Inc.
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Cell culture apparatus
AIM Biotech Pte Ltd.
ALVEOLE
CELLINK LLC
Fibercell Systems, Inc.
Flexcell International Corporation
iotaSciences Ltd.
NanoSurface Biomedical
NeuroInDx, Inc.
Okolab SRL
Olympus America Inc.
Cell culture media
Biological Industries USA
Cell Applications, Inc.
Cell Biologics Inc.
Expression Systems LLC
Funakoshi Co., Ltd.
Lifeline Cell Technology
Nacalai USA, Inc.
PDXen Biosystems Co.
Peprotech, Inc.
ScienCell Research Laboratories
Thermo Fisher Scientific
TheWell Bioscience Inc.
Cell cultures
AnaBios
BioTechniques
Cell Applications, Inc.
Cell Biologics Inc.
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
iotaSciences Ltd.
Lonza
MATRIGEN
MIMETAS B.V.
PDXen Biosystems Co.
UPM-Kymmene Corporation
Cell disruption equipment
JetPump Technology Inc.
Cell fusion equipment
BTX
Cell lines
Absolute Antibody/Kerafast
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Biocytogen LLC
Biological Industries USA
Cellecta, Inc.
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Lifeline Cell Technology
MilliporeSigma
NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.
NIDDK Information Network (dkNET)
PDXen Biosystems Co.
Synthego
Cell membrane labeling
IMRA America Inc.
Cell separation medium
Alere Technologies
Cell separator
Cell Microsystems, Inc.
Cell sorters
Cell Microsystems, Inc.
Fluigent
Miltenyi Biotec
NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.
Union Biometrica, Inc.
Cell transfer systems
Cytosurge AG
Cell culture bags
Expression Systems LLC
173
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
Centrifugation media and blood
separation media
Alere Technologies
Labviva
Chemiluminescence reagents
Nacalai USA, Inc.
Chromogenic substrates
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Cloning vectors
Cellecta, Inc.
New England Biolabs, Inc.
Colloidal gold complexes
Electron Microscopy Sciences
Colony counters
Logos Biosystems, Inc.
Computer-3-D reconstruction
Double Helix Optics
DRVision Technologies
Nanolive SA
Tomocube, Inc.
Conferences
American Society for Cell Biology
ASCB Journals booth
Cell Biology in France
The Jackson Laboratory
Conjugation of antibodies
Expedeon Ltd.
Contract and R&D
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Lifeline Cell Technology
Culture apparatus
CELLINK LLC
Flexcell International Corporation
Culture media
AD Biosciences
Biological Industries USA
Cell Biologics Inc.
Cell Guidance Systems
HiMedia Laboratories
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Cultured cells
Cell Biologics Inc.
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
PDXen Biosystems Co.
Custom antibody
ABclonal Science Inc.
Aviva Systems Biology Corporation
Boster Biological Technology
Digital Proteomics LLC
GenScript USA Inc.
ProSci Inc.
Custom screening
AIM Biotech Pte Ltd.
Cellecta, Inc.
LifeSensors, Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Synthego
XpressBio
174
Custom synthesis
ABclonal Science Inc.
AnaSpec, EGT Group
Gene Tools, LLC
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
DNA quantification
Bio-Rad Laboratories
DeNovix Inc.
Cuvettes- plastic
BioSmith Division/F&L Medical
Products LLC
Cytokines
Cell Guidance Systems
Peprotech, Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Sino Biological, Inc.
XpressBio
DNA sequence analysis software
Partek Inc.
Synthego
Dyes and labeling reagents
Absolute Antibody/Kerafast
AnaSpec, EGT Group
Click Chemistry Tools
Cytoskeleton, Inc.
Sapphire North America
Education
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
D
Data acquisition
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Micro-Manager by Open Imaging
Data acquisition equipment
Abbelight
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
PCO-TECH Inc.
Data analysis software
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Allen Institute for Cell Science
DRVision Technologies
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Oxford Nanoimaging Ltd.
Partek Inc.
Semrock (a Division of Idex Health &
Science)
E
Educational material
American Society for Cell Biology
ASCB Journals booth
Cell Press
FASEB - Society Management Services
Labviva
MiniPCR
Nanolive SA
The Jackson Laboratory
Electron microscopes
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Thermo Fisher Scientific
Electrophoresis equipment
Applied Bio Physics Inc.
Expedeon Ltd.
Data processing systems
Cell Press
Electrophoresis media- gels
Nacalai USA, Inc.
Density Gradient Media
Alere Technologies
Electrophysiological instruments
Axion BioSystems
Detection systems
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Minerva Biolabs Inc.
Electroporation system
BTX
Dispensers- microliter and injection
Drummond Scientific Co.
Dissecting instruments
Electron Microscopy Sciences
DNA assay kits
Chromatrap
Click Chemistry Tools
DNA isolation kits and supplies
Funakoshi Co., Ltd.
PDXen Biosystems Co.
V&P Scientific, Inc.
XpressBio
Elisa plates/strips
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
Boster Biological Technology
Nanjing Chuanbo Biotech Co., Ltd.
SARSTEDT
Elisa testing
ABclonal Science Inc.
Cusabio Technology
Protein Fluidics, Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Eliza plates- specialty
Protein Fluidics, Inc.
DNA modification reagents
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Employment
FASEB - Society Management Services
NASA Ames Research Center
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
The Jackson Laboratory
DNA purification kits
FroggaBio USA Inc.
V&P Scientific, Inc.
Environmental chambers
Okolab SRL
TOKAI HIT Co., Ltd.
Enzyme immunoassay reagents/kits
Bio-Rad Laboratories
Cayman Chemical Company
Sapphire North America
XpressBio
Enzymes
ABclonal Science Inc.
LifeSensors, Inc.
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Expression vectors
Cellecta, Inc.
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Extracellular matrix products
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
Cell Guidance Systems
CELLINK LLC
MATRIGEN
F
Filter membranes
MilliporeSigma
Filters
Chromatrap
SARSTEDT
Semrock (a Division of Idex Health &
Science)
Flow cytometer
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
MilliporeSigma
Miltenyi Biotec
Union Biometrica, Inc.
Flow cytometry reagents
Biotium, Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Flow cytometry standards
NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.
Fluorescence filter sets
Semrock (a Division of Idex Health &
Science)
Fluorescence microscopy lamp unit
CoolLED
Fluorescence reagents
Biotium, Inc.
Click Chemistry Tools
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
Montana Molecular
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Fluorescence systems
ALVEOLE
CoolLED
Etaluma, Inc.
ISS
Logos Biosystems, Inc.
Mizar Imaging
Phasefocus
Tomocube, Inc.
VisiTech International Ltd.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Fluorescence systems- quantitative
Hamamatsu Corporation
Oxford Nanoimaging Ltd.
Fluorescent antibody
ChromoTek GmbH
Jackson ImmunoResearch
Laboratories
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Fluorescent particles
GORYO Chemical, Inc.
IMRA America Inc.
Fluorometers
DeNovix Inc.
ISS
G
Gel electrophoresis equipment
BTX
MiniPCR
Gene cloning and expression
products
Gene Tools, LLC
GeneCopoeia Inc.
GenScript USA Inc.
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
ScienCell Research Laboratories
Genomic DNAs
NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.
Glove boxes
Baker Ruskinn
Growth factors
AD Biosciences
Cell Guidance Systems
Gold Biotechnology Inc.
Peprotech, Inc.
ScienCell Research Laboratories
H
Homogenizers- tissue
JetPump Technology Inc.
Hot plates
TOKAI HIT Co., Ltd.
I
Image analysis
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Andor Technology & Bitplane, Inc.
Bitplane, Inc.
Cell Microsystems, Inc.
ChemoMetec
Innopsys, Inc.
KEYENCE Corporation
Molecular Devices
Phi Optics, Inc.
Sartorius
Thorlabs
Image analysis software
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Abbelight
Allen Institute for Cell Science
Andor Technology & Bitplane, Inc.
Bitplane, Inc.
DRVision Technologies
Innopsys, Inc.
Micro-Manager by Open Imaging
Molecular Devices
Oxford Nanoimaging Ltd.
Phasefocus
Photometrics
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Image analyzer
Bitplane, Inc.
PCO-TECH Inc.
Phasefocus
Image analyzer- high resolution
GE Healthcare
Innopsys, Inc.
PCO-TECH Inc.
Incubators
Kuhner Shaker Inc.
Okolab SRL
PIEZOCONCEPT
TOKAI HIT Co., Ltd.
Inhibitors
Cayman Chemical Company
Nanjing Chuanbo Biotech Co., Ltd.
Insect cell media
Expression Systems LLC
HiMedia Laboratories
Interference filters
Chroma Technology Corp.
J
Job fairs
Cell Biology in France
Science/AAAS
Image analyzer- high speed
PCO-TECH Inc.
Image intensifiers
Hamamatsu Corporation
PCO-TECH Inc.
Image processors
Bitplane, Inc.
PCO-TECH Inc.
Imaging - Ex vivo
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Double Helix Optics
Mightex
Montana Molecular
Phi Optics, Inc.
VisiTech International Ltd.
Imaging - In vivo
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Double Helix Optics
ISS
Mightex
Miltenyi Biotec
Mizar Imaging
Union Biometrica, Inc.
Immunoassay system- automated
BioLegend, Inc.
Protein Fluidics, Inc.
Immunohistochemistry reagents/kits
BioLegend, Inc.
Biotium, Inc.
Boster Biological Technology
Jackson ImmunoResearch
Laboratories
Nacalai USA, Inc.
Nanjing Chuanbo Biotech Co., Ltd.
Progen Biotechnik GmbH
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Incubator shakers
Kuhner Shaker Inc.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
Liquid dispensers
V&P Scientific, Inc.
Liquid handling- automated
CELLINK LLC
Cytosurge AG
Drummond Scientific Co.
Fluigent
Live Cell Assays
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Axion BioSystems
Biotium, Inc.
Cytoskeleton, Inc.
Etaluma, Inc.
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Montana Molecular
NeuroInDx, Inc.
Okolab SRL
Phasefocus
Phi Optics, Inc.
Sartorius
Tomocube, Inc.
K
Luminescence imaging
Gold Biotechnology Inc.
Hamamatsu Corporation
L
Magnetic particles
IMRA America Inc.
Kinases/phosphatases
Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation
Laboratory apparatus- miscellaneous
BioSmith Division/F&L Medical
Products LLC
CELLINK LLC
Cytosurge AG
Labviva
NeuroInDx, Inc.
Protein Fluidics, Inc.
Laboratory workstation- automated
iotaSciences Ltd.
Laminar flow equipment
Lumicks B.V.
Lasers
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Innopsys, Inc.
Newport Corporation
RPMC Lasers Inc.
Thorlabs
M
Magnetic stirrers
JetPump Technology Inc.
V&P Scientific, Inc.
Meetings
American Society for Cell Biology
ASCB Journals booth
FASEB - Society Management Services
Science/AAAS
The Jackson Laboratory
Membership
American Society for Cell Biology
ASCB Journals booth
Cell Biology in France
FASEB - Society Management Services
Science/AAAS
Microcarriers
ChemoMetec
Light boxes
Lumencor, Inc.
Microdissecting instruments
NeuroInDx, Inc.
Light sources
ALVEOLE
Chroma Technology Corp.
CoolLED
Lumencor, Inc.
Mightex
Newport Corporation
Sutter Instrument Company
Microinjector
ASI/Applied Scientific Instrumentation
Cytosurge AG
Drummond Scientific Co.
Lipids
Cayman Chemical Company
Larodan AB
Lipotype GmbH
Sapphire North America
Micromanipulators
ASI/Applied Scientific Instrumentation
Fluigent
Lumicks B.V.
Sutter Instrument Company
Microplate fluorometer
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
175
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
Microplate readers
BioTek Instruments
BTX
Molecular Devices
Microplate washers
BioTek Instruments
Molecular Devices
Micropositioners
ASI/Applied Scientific Instrumentation
Mad City Labs, Inc.
Newport Corporation
PIEZOCONCEPT
Microscope slides
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Innopsys, Inc.
Microscope slides- specialty
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Microscopes
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Abbelight
ALVEOLE
Aurox Ltd.
BioTek Instruments
Bruker Corporation
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Cell Microsystems, Inc.
CoolLED
Etaluma, Inc.
Foldscope Instruments, Inc.
FroggaBio USA Inc.
GE Healthcare
KEYENCE Corporation
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Meiji Techno America Microscopes
Mizar Imaging
Nanolive SA
Nikon Instruments Inc.
Olympus America Inc.
Oxford Nanoimaging Ltd.
Phasefocus
Phi Optics, Inc.
Sutter Instrument Company
Thorlabs
Tomocube, Inc.
VisiTech International Ltd.
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Microscopes- atomic force
Bruker Corporation
JPK Instruments AG
Mad City Labs, Inc.
Microscopes- automated scanning
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
KEYENCE Corporation
Logos Biosystems, Inc.
Nanolive SA
PIEZOCONCEPT
Microscopes- confocal
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
Andor Technology & Bitplane, Inc.
Aurox Ltd.
Bruker Corporation
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
GE Healthcare
ISS
KEYENCE Corporation
Leica Microsystems Inc.
176
Lumicks B.V.
Meiji Techno America Microscopes
Molecular Devices
Nikon Instruments Inc.
Olympus America Inc.
Thorlabs
VisiTech International Ltd.
Yokogawa Electric Corporation
Gold Biotechnology Inc.
HiMedia Laboratories
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Labviva
LifeSensors, Inc.
National Center for Biotechnology
Information
XpressBio
Microscopes- motorized stages
ASI/Applied Scientific Instrumentation
Aurox Ltd.
Etaluma, Inc.
KEYENCE Corporation
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Mad City Labs, Inc.
Nanolive SA
PIEZOCONCEPT
Molecular biology software
Eclipse BioInnovations, Inc.
Partek Inc.
Microscopes- optical & accessories
3i Intelligent Imaging Innovations
ASI/Applied Scientific Instrumentation
Aurox Ltd.
Chroma Technology Corp.
Double Helix Optics
Etaluma, Inc.
Finger Lakes Instrumentation LLC
Hamamatsu Corporation
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Mad City Labs, Inc.
Meiji Techno America Microscopes
Mightex
Mizar Imaging
Nikon Instruments Inc.
Olympus America Inc.
Phi Optics, Inc.
VisiTech International Ltd.
Microscopes- scanning electron
Carl Zeiss Microscopy
Microscopes- scanning probe
JPK Instruments AG
Mad City Labs, Inc.
PIEZOCONCEPT
Microscopes- stereo
Electron Microscopy Sciences
Leica Microsystems Inc.
Meiji Techno America Microscopes
Olympus America Inc.
Microscopy accessories- fluorescence
filters
Chroma Technology Corp.
Electron Microscopy Sciences
Meiji Techno America Microscopes
Newport Corporation
Photometrics
Semrock (a Division of Idex Health &
Science)
Mixers
JetPump Technology Inc.
V&P Scientific, Inc.
Molecular biology reagents
Biotium, Inc.
Chromatrap
Click Chemistry Tools
Eclipse BioInnovations, Inc.
Gene Tools, LLC
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Monoclonal antibodies
ABclonal Science Inc.
Atlas Antibodies AB
Aviva Systems Biology Corporation
Boster Biological Technology
ChromoTek GmbH
Digital Proteomics LLC
Progen Biotechnik GmbH
ProSci Inc.
Proteintech Group Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
PCR reagents
GeneCopoeia Inc.
MiniPCR
XpressBio
Peptide synthesizer
ABclonal Science Inc.
Peptides- synthetic
Cusabio Technology
GenScript USA Inc.
Perfusion system
Fluigent
TOKAI HIT Co., Ltd.
Peroxidase conjugated antibody
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Pharmaceutical development
equipment
Cytosurge AG
JetPump Technology Inc.
Minerva Biolabs Inc.
Monoclonal antibodies- large scale
production
BioLegend, Inc.
Phospholipids
Larodan AB
Lipotype GmbH
Mycoplasma detection systems
Biological Industries USA
Lonza
XpressBio
Pipette pullers
Sutter Instrument Company
N
Nucleic acid isolations
Chromatrap
Minerva Biolabs Inc.
O
Oligonucleotides
AnaSpec, EGT Group
Gene Tools, LLC
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Synthego
Online services
Frontiers
NIDDK Information Network (dkNET)
Optical filters
Chroma Technology Corp.
Semrock (a Division of Idex Health &
Science)
Optical interference filters
Chroma Technology Corp.
P
PCR kits
AnaSpec, EGT Group
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Minerva Biolabs Inc.
RayBiotech Inc.
Pipettes
Drummond Scientific Co.
Labviva
Opentrons Labworks
Pipettes- automatic
Opentrons Labworks
Pipettes- automatic- hand driven
Drummond Scientific Co.
Pipettes- micro
Drummond Scientific Co.
MiniPCR
Plastic laboratory ware
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
BioSmith Division/F&L Medical
Products LLC
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Labviva
NanoSurface Biomedical
SARSTEDT
Professional society
Science/AAAS
Protein binding studies
Hybrigenics Corp
Lumicks B.V.
Protein blotting
RayBiotech Inc.
Vector Laboratories, Inc.
Protein concentration
DeNovix Inc.
Protein databases
Hybrigenics Corp
Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Protein expression
ABclonal Science Inc.
Aviva Systems Biology Corporation
Cusabio Technology
Expression Systems LLC
GenScript USA Inc.
Gold Biotechnology Inc.
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
LifeSensors, Inc.
New England Biolabs, Inc.
Polyplus-transfection
Progen Biotechnik GmbH
RayBiotech Inc.
Sino Biological, Inc.
Synthego
Protein kinase assay kit
Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation
Pumps
Fluigent
Ibidi USA, Inc.
Purified proteins
Cell Guidance Systems
Cytoskeleton, Inc.
Nanjing Chuanbo Biotech Co., Ltd.
New England Biolabs, Inc.
Worthington Biochemical Corporation
Quantitation kits
RayBiotech Inc.
Reagent- rat
XpressBio
R
Reagents
Absolute Antibody/Kerafast
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
AnaBios
Biocytogen LLC
BioLegend, Inc.
Biological Industries USA
Expedeon Ltd.
Funakoshi Co., Ltd.
GeneCopoeia Inc.
GeneTex
Horizon Discovery Ltd.
Ibidi USA, Inc.
IMRA America Inc.
Labviva
Molecular Devices
Nicoya Lifesciences Inc.
Polyplus-transfection
Proteintech Group Inc.
Sartorius
ScienCell Research Laboratories
UPM-Kymmene Corporation
Reagents- mouse
Polyplus-transfection
XpressBio
Recombinant Antibodies
Absolute Antibody/Kerafast
Biocytogen LLC
ChromoTek GmbH
Digital Proteomics LLC
GeneTex
GenScript USA Inc.
Miltenyi Biotec
Recruiting
The Jackson Laboratory
Spectrofluorometers
ISS
Research awards-postdoctoral
Cell Biology in France
NASA Ames Research Center
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Spectrophotometer- micro
DeNovix Inc.
Research funding materials
NASA Ames Research Center
Robotics
Opentrons Labworks
S
Sample preparation- equipment
BioSmith Division/F&L Medical
Products LLC
Cell Microsystems, Inc.
Logos Biosystems, Inc.
Miltenyi Biotec
NanoCellect Biomedical, Inc.
Opentrons Labworks
Scanners- gel
GE Healthcare
Scientific information services
Cell Biology in France
Cell Press
EMBO
Scientific software
Cell Press
DRVision Technologies
Hamamatsu Corporation
Micro-Manager by Open Imaging
Partek Inc.
Sequencing reagents
ABclonal Science Inc.
Eclipse BioInnovations, Inc.
Gene Tools, LLC
Serum-free media
Biological Industries USA
Cell Applications, Inc.
Expression Systems LLC
Fibercell Systems, Inc.
Lonza
Peprotech, Inc.
Serums
Biological Industries USA
Jackson ImmunoResearch
Laboratories
Nova Biologics, Inc.
Signal transduction reagents
Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation
Software
Bitplane, Inc.
Cell Press
De Novo Software
Double Helix Optics
Micro-Manager by Open Imaging
Nicoya Lifesciences Inc.
NIDDK Information Network (dkNET)
Olympus America Inc.
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
EXHIBITOR PRODUCT INDEX
U
UV transilluminators
MiniPCR
Spectrophotometers
BTX
DeNovix Inc.
Spin columns
Chromatrap
Vectors
New England Biolabs, Inc.
Statistics software
Partek Inc.
Video microscopy systems
Hamamatsu Corporation
T
Temperature controllers
NeuroInDx, Inc.
Okolab SRL
Tissue culture apparatus
ALVEOLE
Flexcell International Corporation
NanoSurface Biomedical
Tissue culture CO2 Inc.ubator
Baker Ruskinn
TOKAI HIT Co., Ltd.
Tissue culture hood
Baker Ruskinn
Tissue culture labware
AIM Biotech Pte Ltd.
Applied Bio Physics Inc.
Fennik Life Sciences LLC
NanoSurface Biomedical
V
Viral reagents
Cellecta, Inc.
W
Western blotting equipment
ABclonal Science Inc.
Azure Biosystems
Bio-Rad Laboratories
Expedeon Ltd.
Molecular Devices
Z
Zebra Fish
GeneTex
Mizar Imaging
Union Biometrica, Inc.
Tissue culture media
Biological Industries USA
HiMedia Laboratories
Tissue cultures
AnaBios
MATRIGEN
MIMETAS B.V.
Tissue embedding media
Electron Microscopy Sciences
Transfection kits
Cell Applications, Inc.
GeneCopoeia Inc.
Lonza
Polyplus-transfection
Thermo Fisher Scientific
VIROMER® Transfection
Translation
AnaBios
Tumor markers
GeneTex
Progen Biotechnik GmbH
177
NOTES
178
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Oral Presentations
A
A, Mu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M150
Aaron, Jesse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E81
Abraham, Libin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Adam, Stephen A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Adebowale, Kolade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Ader, Nicholas R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100
Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia����������������������������������������� M82
Ahn, Jong I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Ai, Teng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Aiken, Jayne E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E85
Aillaud, Chrystelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Akera, Takashi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M113
Akhmanova, Anna��������������������������������������������������� S8
Akhuanzada, Humayon�����������������������������������������E75
Al-Bassam, Jawdat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M156
Albertazzi, Lorenzo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
Alberti, Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M100
Albrecht, Dirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Alexander, Christopher J.������������������������������������� M77
Al-Khatab, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M208
Allegretti, Matteo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M166
Allen, Benjamin L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Allier, Cédric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Almassalha, Luay M. ������������������������������������������� M49
Aloisio, Francesca M.������������������������������������������� M10
Alonso, Alejandra D. ���������������������������������������������E15
Alraies, Zahraa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Altan-Bonnet, Nihal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Altmeppen, Hermann C.������������������������������������� M82
Alushin, Gregory M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M155
Alvarez, Yanina D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92,M91
Ambrosini, Arnaud�������������������������������������������������E46
Amodeo, Amanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M45
Amon, Angelika . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M116
Anantharam, Vellareddy .�������������������������������������E13
Anderson, Ruthellen H.�����������������������������������������E56
Andrianifahanana, Mahefatiana���������������������������E74
Andrieux, Annie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63,M88
Andrusiak, Matthew G.������������������������������������� M133
Angelini, Thomas E.�����������������������������������������������E56
Aonbangkhen, Chanat��������������������������������������� M102
Applewhite, Derek A.����������������������������������������� M152
Arakel, Eric C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M54
Ariyoshi, Tetsuro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M50
Arnold, Christopher P.����������������������������������������� M95
Arpag, Goker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Asif, Muhammad Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
Asmal, Arky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Attia, Rafaele . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Audagnotto, Martina���������������������������������������������E64
Audhya, Anjon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M51
Aumeier, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Ayad, Nadia M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M127
Aydin, Fikret . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M152
Aydogan, Mustafa G.���������������������������������������������E12
Ayers, Jacob I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
B
Babu, Mohan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Bachmann-Gagescu, Ruxandra�����������������������������E10
Bachofner, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M116
Backman, Vadim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Baddeley, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Bader, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Bae, Donghwi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M25
Baffet, Alexandre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51
Bahmanyar, Shirin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Bailey, Mary Lou . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M48
Bajpai, Ruchi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M8
Balastik, Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Balasubramanian, Mohan��������������������������������� M143
Balla, Tamas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Balland, Martial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105,M40
Balzer, Connor J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Banerjee, Utpal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M198
Banigan, Edward J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Banisadr, Afsheen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Bannach, Carina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Banterle, Niccolò . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M209
Bao, Menjing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Bapat, Jaidev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Barahona, Rocio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Barbeau, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M182
Barber, Diane L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M10
Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valeria C.��������������������������������� M59
Bard, Jared A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M185
Barentine, Andrew E.����������������������������������������� M237
Barger, Sarah R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Barnhart, Erin L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M129
Barres, Ben A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M76
Barrientos, Antonio�����������������������������������������������E78
Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin ������������������������������������� M163
Barth, Angela I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M221
Bartman, Caroline��������������������������������������������������� S3
Barylyuk, Konstantin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Barzik, Melanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M77
Basler, Marek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A4
Basnet, Nirakar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Bassik, Michael C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102,M184
Basto, Renata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51,M117
Basu, Atrayee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E17
Bates, Emily A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E85
Bateup, Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M190
Baum, Buzz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M143
Bayless, Brian A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Bazzaro, Martina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Beagrie, Robert A.��������������������������������������������������� S2
Beatty, Alexander C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Becalska, Agata N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Beck, Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M166
Becker, Jason R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Becnel, James J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Beek, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Bell, Kathryn R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M148
Bénard, Claire Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E25
Benham-Pyle, Blair W.����������������������������������������� M95
Bennett, Eric J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M29
Bennison, Sarah A.�������������������������������������������������E86
Berchowitz, Luke E.�����������������������������������������������E19
Bergeron, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E39
Beri, Pranjali . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Bernstein, Jonathan A. ����������������������������������������� M8
Bernthal, Nicholas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Bertucci, François . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Besprozvannaya, Marina���������������������������������������E24
Betsholtz, Christer���������������������������������������������������A7
Bewersdorf, Joerg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Bhabha, Gira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Bhalla, Manmeet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M227
Bharambe, Nikhil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Bhat, Akansha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Bidone, Tamara C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M152
Biebl, Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Biertuempfel, Christian������������������������������������� M157
Biesaga, Mateusz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Bilder, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M123
Binshtein, Elad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Biro, Mate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92
Birsoy, Kivanc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M200
Bissiere, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92,M91
Bjorkman, Pamela J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Blackstone, Craig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M236,M56
Blair, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M190
Blanchard, Guy B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M122
Blanch-Mercader, Carles���������������������������������������E80
Blanchoin, Laurent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Blank, Birgit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230
Blazejewski, Sara M. ���������������������������������������������E86
Blobel, Gerd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S3
Bloodgood, Brenda L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130,M136
Blower, Michael D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E49
Blumhardt, Philipp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Boassa, Daniela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130,E64
Bodakuntla, Satish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157,M88
Bodner, Katie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M221
Boemo, Michael A.�������������������������������������������������E12
Boggavarapu, Venkata��������������������������������������� M170
Bogyo, Matthew S.�������������������������������������������������E63
Böhning, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E64
Boke, Elvan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M106
Bolger-Munro, Madison ���������������������������������������E34
Bona, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Booth, Alexander J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M115
Borah, Sapan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M166
Borchelt, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Bordeleau, Francois��������������������������������������������� M12
Borg, Jean-Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Borgeaud, Alicia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100
Bosc, Christophe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63,M88
Boss, Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Bottanelli, Francesca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Boulan, Benoit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Boulant, Steeve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Bousso, Philippe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Bowerman, Jade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M205
Bowler, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M212
Bradley, Alexander O. �������������������������������������������E33
Brand, Andrea H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M80
Brault, Jean-Baptiste���������������������������������������������E51
Breckels, Lisa M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Brewster, Jay L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Bridges, Benjamin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
Brigidi, G. Stefano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M136
Brinkert, Pia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Brody, Steven L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210
Brown, Hilda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Brownell, Sara E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M67
Broz, Petr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E99
Bruderer, Sandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M143
Brugués, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E29
Brumell, John H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M223
Bryant, Zev . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E96
Bucher, Delia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Buchwalter, Abigail L.���������������������������������������������E67
Buck, Matthias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Bucko, Paula J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Buđa, Renata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Bull, Matthew S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M119
Bumbledare, Taylor�����������������������������������������������E90
Burcham, Rodger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Burd, Christopher G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230,M235
Burnette, Dylan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Buschauer, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E64
Butterworth, Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
179
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
C
Cadwell, Chantel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E60
Cai, Kathy Q. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Cai, Shujun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Cai, Wei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M18
Cala, Jacqueline M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M67
Calabrese, Barbara�������������������������������������������������E38
Calas, André . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Calhoun, Patrick J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Camacho, Alberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E98
Camei, Caramai N.������������������������������������������������� M2
Cammer, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Campbell, Christopher S.���������������������������������������E97
Campbell, Paul C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M39
Campbell, Thane J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M165
Campellone, Kenneth ����������������������������������������� M35
Campos, Isaac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E77
Campos, Jazmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E60
Canty, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M74
Cao, Hong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76
Cappello, Giovanni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Cardone, Giovanni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Carter, Andrew P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M215,S9
Casanova, James E. �����������������������������������������������E70
Case, Lindsay B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M103
Casey, Carol A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Cassani, Madeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M105
Cassidy, Paige . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E90
Castellano, Remy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Castillo-Azofeifa, David������������������������������������� M194
Castillon, Guillaume��������������������������������������������� M41
Catarino Marques Sousa, Patricia����������������������� M88
Cazet, Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Cebul, Elizabeth R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E25
Chakrabarti, Rajarshi���������������������������������������������E55
Chan, Ka Man Carmen�������������������������������������������E82
Chandler-Brown, Devon ����������������������������������� M140
Chandra, Vivek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Chang, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Chang, Chi-Lun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M56
Chang, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Chappell, Rhys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle ����������������������������� M7
Charli, Adhithiya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13
Chaudhuri, Ovijit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Chen, Chen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Chen, Cheng-Yi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M89
Chen, Dong-Yuan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M123
Chen, Elizabeth H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M11
Chen, Haimei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Chen, Hui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M44,M139
Chen, Jyhlong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M3
Chen, Kun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M238
Chen, Liqiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Chen, Ping-hung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E69
Chen, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E96
Chen, Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Cheng, Xiu-Tang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Chenoweth, David M.��������������������������������������� M102
Chesler, Alexander T.������������������������������������������� M83
Cheung, Kevin J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M97
Chiang, Alyssa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Chien, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M32
Chin, Harvey F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M146,M59
Chino, Haruka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M172
Chisholm, Andrew D.����������������������������������������� M133
Cho, Jung-Hwa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Cho, Kelvin F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Choi, Joonhyuk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M107
Choi, Kate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Choi, Sunkyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Choo-Wing, Rayman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
180
Chow, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Chowdhury, Saikat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Christofk, Hearther R.�������������������������������������������S11
Chudalayandi, Prakash �����������������������������������������E39
Chuong, Cheng-Ming������������������������������������������� M92
Churchman, Stirling��������������������������������������������� M28
Cillay, Justin D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Cissé, Ibrahim I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S1
Clandinin, Thomas R.����������������������������������������� M129
Clarke, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E97
Clausen, Henrik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Clevers, Hans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S13
Cohen, Leah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E15
Coimbatore Ravichandran,
Madhwesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E97
Collier, Scott E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Collins-Hooper, Henry������������������������������������������� M5
Cologna, Stephanie�����������������������������������������������E14
Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.������������������������������������� M131
Commins, Nicoletta��������������������������������������������� M28
Commisso, Cosimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M201
Conkar, Deniz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E61
Conrad, Marcus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Conway, Daniel E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Coombes, Courtney E.�������������������������������������������E65
Coombs, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Cooper, K. M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M67
Correia, Sandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58
Cortes, Daniel B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M148,M78
Coscia, Stephen M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M144
Costa, Judite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E48
Couté, Yohann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Covert, Markus W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M221
Cox, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178
Crawley, Scott W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Crest, Justin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M123
Crevenna, Alvaro H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Crowder, Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M62
Cui, Heying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E95
Cupido, Tommaso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M71
Cuylen, Sara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M114
Czaya, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E77
D
Daignault, Sheena M. �������������������������������������������E40
Daitch, Allison K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M32
Damoiseaux, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Dang-Lawson, May �����������������������������������������������E34
Danuser, Gaudenz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Darzacq, Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M42
Dash, Philip R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Da Silva, Nathalie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51
Datta, Sanchari . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M23
Dauer, William T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M135
Davidson, Lance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M197
Davis, Oliver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M207
Davis, Stephen D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Day, Nicholas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M9
Deaconescu, Alexandra M.������������������������������� M154
Dean, Kevin M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Debler, Erik W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E95
De Camilli, Pietro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M53
Deerinck, Thomas J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M41, M130
Degaga, Eleni K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M14
de Graffenried, Christopher L. ��������������������������� M39
Delaney, Micahel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M38
del Castillo, Urko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E89
Delgado, Maria-Graciela���������������������������������������E80
Dellibovi-Ragheb, Teegan��������������������������������� M219
Delling, Markus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Deloulme, Jean-Christophe�����������������������������������E63
Del Viso, Florencia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M89
Deneke, Victoria E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Deng, Yongqiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230,M235
DeNies, Maxwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E43
De Renzis, Stefano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Derivery, Emmanuel ������������������������������������������� M69
Dernburg, Abby F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M142
Desai, Rajiv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
DeSantis, Morgan E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E94,M69
Deschamps, Joran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Desplan, Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M129
Devenport, Danelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M93
Dey, Gautam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M143
DiAntonio, Aaron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M84
Dickey, Andrea M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M133
Dickson, Eamonn J. �����������������������������������������������E14
Dilley, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M102
Dillin, Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M21
Ding, Xia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Ding, Xinxin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M168
Discher, Dennis E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M17
Di Talia, Stefano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Ditlev, Jonathon A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M103
Dixon, Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14
Diz-Muñoz, Alba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E84,M20
Dmitrieff, Serge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159,E58
Dogterom, Marileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M112
Doherty, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E10
Dolan, Erin L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A3,M68
Dolcetti, Riccardo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E40
Doll, Sebastian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Dong, Min . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M222
Doshi, Anusha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M148
Driscoll, Meghan K.�����������������������������������������������E79
Dror, Ron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Drubin, David G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M20
Drummond, D. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M100
Drummond, Iain A. ����������������������������������������������� M2
Dry, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
D’Souza, Ryan S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Dufour, Alexandre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
Dumont, Sophie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E5,M111
Dunn, Alexander R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E107
Durel, John F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Dusl, Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
E
Ebmeier, Christopher����������������������������������������� M218
Edland, Steven D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Ehsanipour, Arshia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Eichel, Kelsie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Eilber, Fritz C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Einav, Tal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Einstein, Jenifer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M137
Einstein, Lily C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M44
Ekiert, Damian C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Elias, Joshua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Ellenbecker, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M9
Ellis, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M90
Ellisman, Mark H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130,M41
El Marjou, Fatima . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M94
Elosegui-Artola, Alberto ������������������������������������� M13
Elshenawy, Mohamed����������������������������������������� M74
Emmings, Edith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Ems-McClung, Stephanie C. ������������������������������� M72
Emtenani, Shamsi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Engelhart, Emily A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Engelke, Martin F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Engler, Adam J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Ernst, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M57
Esko, Jeffrey D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Esparza, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
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Eukovich, Amanda R.���������������������������������������������E18
Eykelenboom, John K.��������������������������������������� M115
F
Fabritius, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Fakhri, Nikta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E91
Falkenberg, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E24
Fantner, Georg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M209
Farese, Jr., Robert V.�����������������������������������������������S12
Farfel-Becker, Tamar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Farmer, Veronica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Faul, Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E77
Federman, Noah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Fehr, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Feldman, Jessica L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E28,M211
Feng, Ying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Fenix, Aidan M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Ferguson, Kayla L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E39
Feric, Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M101
Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo�������������������������������E27
Fernandopulle, Michael S.���������������������������������� M85
Ferraro, Teresa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Ferras, Cristina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E53
Ferro, Luke S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M74
Field, Christine M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E91
Finetti, Pascal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Fink, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E97
Fiolka, Reto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Firat-Karalar, Elif N. �����������������������������������������������E61
Flavell, Richard A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Fletcher, Daniel A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E82,M20
Fomicheva, Maria ���������������������������������������������������E1
Fontanesi, Flavia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E78
Footer, Matthew J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M18
Forbs, Douglass J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Forti, Fabio L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E101
Fraisier, Vincent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M117
Frakes, Ashley E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M21
Friedman, Jonathan R.��������������������������������������� M167
Fromherz, Sylvia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M64
Frye, Keyada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Fu, Meng-meng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M76
Fuchs, Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M90
Fujita, Naonobu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178,M60
Fujiwara, Yuusuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E88
Fumasoni, Marco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E6
Funabiki, Hironori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M118
Fung, Tak Shun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E55
G
Gaertig, Jacek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Gaillard, Jeremie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Galbraith, Catherine G.�����������������������������������������E81
Galbraith, James A.�����������������������������������������������E81
Galimidi, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Gally, Christelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Gan, Lu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Ganeva, Iva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100,E21
Gangi Setty, Subba Rao��������������������������������������� M58
Gao, Guang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M181
Garabedian, Mikael�����������������������������������������������E31
Garcia, Galo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E8
Garcia-Puig, Anna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
García-Soriano, Daniela A. ��������������������������������� M31
Garde, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Gardel, Margaret L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M126
Gardiner, Jaye C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M65
Gardner, Melissa K.�����������������������������������������������E65
Garshott, Danielle M. ����������������������������������������� M29
Gartenmann, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E12
Gasnier, Maxime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92,M91
Gatlin, Jesse C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E91
Gatto, Laurent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Gauthier, Nils C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Geisinger, Jonathan M.������������������������������������� M213
Gelfand, Vladimir G. ���������������������������������������������E89
Gemble, Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M117
Gerbich, Therese M. ������������������������������������������� M99
Gerlich, Daniel W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M114
Gertbauer, Erica M.�����������������������������������������������E62
Ghazal, Nasab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M202
Ghirlando, Rodolfo�������������������������������������������������E11
Ghosh, Rajarshi P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E96
Ghosh Roy, Anindya�����������������������������������������������E17
Giang, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E60
Gibeaux, Romain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58
Gibson, Matthew C.��������������������������������������������� M89
Gildea, Holly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M21
Gillies, John P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E94
Gilmore, Steve K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130
Gilmour, Darren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E103
Gim, Bopil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Ginestier, Christophe��������������������������������������������� M7
Girard, Juliet R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M198
Gladfelter, Amy S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99
Glatzel, Markus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Glock, Philipp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Gluski, Jacob M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M83
Gluszek, Agata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M70
Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi P. ��������������������������� M225
Gnoth, Sandina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E20
Goins, Lauren M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M198
Gold, Michael R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Golde, Todd E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Golden, Susan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E3
Goldman, Anne E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Goldman, Robert D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49,E57
Goldstein, Bob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M96
Goley, Erin D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M32
Gomes, Edgar R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E48
Gomez, Arianna E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E10
Gönczy, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M209
Gonzalez, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2,M27
Gonzalez Celeiro, Meryem ����������������������������������� M3
Goo, Marisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130
Good, Matthew C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M44,M139
Goode, Bruce L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E31,M151,S10
Goodman, Jay S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E45
Goodwin, Katharine���������������������������������������������E106
Goto, Satoshi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M232
Graef, Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M171
Graham, Todd R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Grainger, Stephanie����������������������������������������������� M2
Graves, Hillary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M55
Graziano, Brian R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E84
Green, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S18
Greenberg, Roger A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M102,M17
Greenwood, Erin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M97
Greune, Lilo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Grewer, Christof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E95
Grigorieff, Niko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M154
Grimsey, Neil J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Grinstein, Sergio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M223
Gromberg, Elena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E29
Gromova, Anastasia����������������������������������������������� M5
Grosheva, Inna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Grossman, Heather M. �����������������������������������������E69
Groulx, Jean-Francois ��������������������������������������� M178
Groves, Jay T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71
Guillaud, Laurent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M132
Gunawardane, Ruwanthi��������������������������������������� M1
Gundersen, Gregg G.���������������������������������������������E56
Guo, Fei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M156
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Gütl, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M128
Gutzman, Jennifer H.����������������������������������������� M153
Gyoergy, Attila . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
H
Haass, Nikolas K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E40
Haka, Abigail S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Hakimi, Mohamed-ali����������������������������������������� M40
Halpain, Shelley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38
Hammer III, John A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34,M77
Han, Kyuho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102
Han, Sangyoon J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Han, Tae Hee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E87
Hancock-Cerutti, William F.��������������������������������� M53
Handel, Tracy M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Hannezo, Edouard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M94
Hansen, Scott D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71
Hao, Piliang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Harabula, Izabela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S2
Hariri, Hanaa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M205
Harker, Alyssa J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M152
Harlen, Kevin M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E42
Harmon, Robert M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M126
Harper, J. W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M188,M75
Harry, Daniela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E52
Hartmann, Jonas M. �������������������������������������������E103
Hartzell, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M136
Hasel, Eva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E99
Hashimoto, Hidehiko����������������������������������������� M124
Hatta, Tomohisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M172
Hausrat, Torben J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Hayashi, Samantha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M25
Hayes, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M136
He, Lian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
He, Shuonan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M89
Heemerick, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Heiman, Maxwell G. ���������������������������������������������E25
Heinz, Sven . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M136
Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp����������������������������������� M128
Helgeson, Luke A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Helm, Jacquellyn M. ���������������������������������������������E37
Henne, William M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M205,M23
Henry, Calmour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Henson, John H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E30
Hernandez, Danielle M.�����������������������������������������E74
Herve, Lionel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Hess, Harald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E81
Hetzer, Martin W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E67
Heydeck, Westley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Heymann, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Higgs, Henry N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38,E55,M150
Hild, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Hildebrandt, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Hill, David S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E40
Hisamoto, Naoki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E17
Hla, Timothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Hochegger, Helfrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M115
Hockemeyer, Dirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M190
Hodgson, Louis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Hoess, Philipp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Hofer, Franziska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E97
Hoffmann, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100
Hollien, Julie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M25
Holt, Liam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99, M104
Holzbaur, Erika L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M144,S6
Honeycutt, Rodney L.������������������������������������������� M66
Hoppins, Suzanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Horenkamp, Florian A.����������������������������������������� M53
Horvath, Jonathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14
Howard, Conor J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M30
Hsu, Ya-Chieh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M3
181
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Htet, Zaw M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E94,M69
Hu, Daniel J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M4
Huang, Ning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Huang, Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M60
Huang, Yinyi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Hübscher, Tania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M209
Hueschen, Christina L.��������������������������������������� M111
Hughes, Adam L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M165,M182
Hughes, Thom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E42
Huis in ’t Veld, Pim J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M112
Humbel, Bruno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M121
Humbert, Sandrine �����������������������������������������������E63
Hurley, James H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Huttenlocher, Anna������������������������������������������������� S4
Hyman, Anthony A. . . . . . . . . . . . . M131,M87,M108
I
Iizuka, Yoshie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Ikmi, Aissam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M89
Inoue, Daisuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Ioannou, Maria S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M56
Ireton, Keith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M227
Isaacson, Robin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E60
Iserman, Christiane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M100
Ishihara, Keisuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E29
Isogai, Tadamoto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Ivanovska, Irena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M17
J
Jackson, Lauren P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Jackson, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M197
Jaffe, Aron B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Jagrić, Mihaela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
James, Carissa C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Jan, Calvin H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M167
Jang, SoRi K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Janke, Carsten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157,M88
Janota, Catia S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E48
Jarnik, Michal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E87
Jaroenlak, Pattana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Jasper, Heinrich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M4
Jasso, Kalene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E9
Jawerth, Louise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Jean, Steve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178
Jeng, Edwin E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102
Jia, Jie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Jiang, Chunhua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E78
Jiang, Connie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S3
Jiang, Shuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M158
Jin, Huajun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13
Jin, Yishi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M133
Jing, Shuaiyang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Joanny, Jean-François �������������������������������������������E80
John, Karin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Johnson, Heath E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M6
Johnson, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Johnston, Jessica F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M48
Jones, Steven L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38
Jonsson, Erik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M185
Jorgens, Danielle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E45
Joshi, Bharat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M181
Joshi, Devashish S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Joshi, Pallavi R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E19
Josselin, Emmanuelle ������������������������������������������� M7
Ju, Robert J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E40
Juliano, Celina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Jülicher, Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E29
Jullié, Damien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Jung, Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
182
Jungmann, Ralf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
K
Kadandale, Pavan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178
Kai, FuiBoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71
Kaksonen, Marko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Kalinina, Iana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58
Kampinga, Harm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M179
Kandula, Viswajit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Kang, Jeong-Han . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E74
Kannan, Muthukumar��������������������������������������� M167
Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.���������������������������������E13
Kanthasamy, Arthi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13
Kaplan, Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M20
Kaplan, Kenneth B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M173
Kapoor, Tarun M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M155,M71
Katanski, Christopher D. ����������������������������������� M100
Katkar, Harshwardhan H.����������������������������������� M152
Kats, Lee B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Katsumata, Eri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M232
Kaverina, Irina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1
KC, Birendra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Ke, Huiling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Kearns, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M137
Kearns, Sarah E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Kelley, Megan E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M71
Kelly, Marcus R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102
Kempfer, Rieke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S2
Kendall, Amy K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Kendrick, Agnieszka A.����������������������������������������� M75
Kennedy, Bridget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Kenny, Connor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M134
Kenny, Samuel J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M20
Kentrup, Dominik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E77
Kershner, Leah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E90
Khodjakov, Alexey ���������������������������������������������������E1
Kiger, Amy A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178,M60
Kim, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Kim, Chan Hyuk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E35
Kim, Do Jin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Kim, Hye Young Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M197
Kim, Sumin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M135
Kim, Tae-Sung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Kim, Yeun Ju . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
King, Grant A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E45
King, Megan C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M48
Kinoshita, Taroh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M232
Kiuchi, Tai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E32
Klein, Allon M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Klein, Dennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Klein, Ophir D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Klip, Amira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E75
Klumperman, Judith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M234
Knehr, Judith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Kneussel, Matthias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Knouse, Kristin A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M116
Knutson, Christina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M182
Koch, Bailey A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M183
Kodani, Andrew T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M134
Köhler, Simone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M142
Kolotueva, Irina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M121
Kong, Dong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210,M212
Kopito, Ron R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Koreny, Ludek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Kosmrlj, Andrej . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E106
Kostyrko, Kaja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102
Koushika, Sandhya P.���������������������������������������������E17
Kovar, David R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M152
Kowalczyk, Andrew�����������������������������������������������E60
Krendel, Mira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Krndija, Denis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M94,E51
Kroesen, Amanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M89
Krokowski, Sina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M33
Krueger, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Krueger, Eugene W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Ku, Pei-I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M158
Kufareva, Irina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Kühling, Lena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Kuhn, Jonathan A.���������������������������������������������������E5
Kukalev, Alexander��������������������������������������������������� S2
Kukulski, Wanda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100,E21,M143
Kulkarni, Sucheta S.�����������������������������������������������E17
Kumar, Nikit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M53
Kumar, Sudha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M178
Kurhanewicz, Nicole A.�����������������������������������������E37
Kuzmić, Barbara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Kwiatkowski, Adam V.�������������������������������������������E59
Kwong, Jennifer Q. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M202
L
LaBarge, Mark A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M196
Labbé, Katherine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Labouesse, Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Lacomme, Sabrina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Ladoux, Benoit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M15
Lagal, Vanessa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
Lakins, Johnathon N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71,M127
Lakoduk, Ashley M.�����������������������������������������������E69
Lam, Vinson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E3
Lambowitz, Alan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M164
Lampidis, Theodore�����������������������������������������������E78
Lampson, Michael A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M102,M113
Lander, Gabriel C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Landry, Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Langdon, Erin M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99
Lange, Jeffrey J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M95
Langhinrichs, Maurice��������������������������������������� M140
Lanzavecchia, Antonio���������������������������������������������A8
Lapek, John J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Lardennois, Alicia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Lariviere, Patrick J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M32
Larsen, Ida S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Lassadi, Imen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Latorraca, Naomi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Latour, Brooke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E10
Lawrence, Rosalie E. ���������������������������������������������E72
Leahy, Shannon N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E62
Le Bivic, Andre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E36
Leboucher, Sophie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Leclair, Pascal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E16
Leconte, Ludovic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51
Lee, Cheng-Yun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M76
Lee, Hyun O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M87,M108
Lee, Intaek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Lee, Joanna Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Lee, Kyung S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Lee, Michael K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Lee, Moosung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E35
Lee, Qian Yi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M189
Lee, YoungHo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E35
Lees, Joshua A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M53
Le Friec, Julien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Lehmann, Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A2
Leitner, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Lele, Tanmay P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Lenne, Pierre-François�������������������������������������������E36
Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria �������������������������������E80
Leof, Edward B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E74
Leonard, Marilyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M29
Leonzino, Marianna��������������������������������������������� M53
Le Pichon, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M83
Leptin, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E99
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Leroy, Olivier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M94
Leterrier, Christophe������������������������������������������� M69
Leto, Dara E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Levental, Ilya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M57
Levental, Kandice R.��������������������������������������������� M57
Levorse, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M90
Levy, Dan L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E68
Lewis, Samantha C.�����������������������������������������������E24
Li, Ang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Li, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E104
Li, Li . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M86
Li, PeiQi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M53
Li, Pengpeng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M134
Li, Qingsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Li, Rong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Li, Siyang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Li, Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E59
Li, Younan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M147
Li, Yuwei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Liang, Fengxia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E83
Liang, Jesse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Liao, Yacheng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M56,M85
Libuda, Diana E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E37
Lilley, Kathryn S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Lim, Chun-Yan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M207
Lim, Hui Yi Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M91,E92
Lim, Jun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Lim, Koini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E21
Limeri, Lisa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
Limper, Andrew H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E74
Lin, Athena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E2
Lin, Pei-ann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M136
Lin, Sung-Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M3
Lin, Tzu-han . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M60
Linsenmeier, Luise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Liphardt, Jan T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E96
Lippincott-Schwartz,
Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M175,M236,M56,M85
Litwiller, Alyssa M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M165
Liu, Allen P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E43
Liu, Baohong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Liu, Chi-Chao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E16
Liu, Lydia Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M23
Liu, Michel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M102
Liu, Patrick Z. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Liu, Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Liu, Sihan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Liu, Su-Ling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Liu, Xing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Liu, Xu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Liu, Zetao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M223
Llense, Flora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Lo, Stanley M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M63
Loftus, Kyle M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E95
Lombard, Chloe K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Loncarek, Jadranka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210,M212
Long, Alexandra F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M111
Lonquich, Brianna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Loof, Gesa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S2
Lopez, Kristina E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M116
Lopez-Almeida, Leonor����������������������������������������� M7
Louka, Panagiota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Low-Nam, Shalini T.�����������������������������������������������E71
Lozano, Guillermina�������������������������������������������������A1
Lu, Bin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Lu, Wen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E89
Luan, Qing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Lund, Frederik W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Luo, Jie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13
Lusk, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M166
Luxton, G.W. Gant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E43,M115
Lynch, Anne M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
M
Ma, Hanhui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
MacEwen, Melissa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M199
Maddox, Amy S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M148,M78
Maeda, Yusuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M232
Magalhaes, Yuli T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E101
Magescas, Jeremy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M211
Magidson, Valentin�������������������������������������������������E1
Magiera, Maria M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157,M88
Mahajan, Mukesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Mahjoub, Moe R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210,M212
Mahnoor, Serena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M72
Mahone, Christopher R. ������������������������������������� M32
Maiuri, Paolo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Majumder, Sagardip����������������������������������������������E43
Makarenkova, Helen P. ����������������������������������������� M5
Makela, Tomi P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M214
Malbec, Odile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Malengo, Gabriele . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E20
Mall, Moritz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M189
Malmberg, Eric J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M57
Malovic, Emir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E13
Maly, Dustin J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Manalo, Annabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Mandal, Abhishek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Mandula, Ondrej . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Mangeol, Pierre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E36
Mani, Nandini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M158
Manohar, Subrajaa�������������������������������������������������E98
Manor, Uri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38
Mapua, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Marchetto, Sylvie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Marek, Magdalena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M160
Marko, John F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M49
Marshall, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M168
Marshall, Wallace F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E2,E44
Marthiens, Veronique E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51,M117
Martin, Adam C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M125
Martin, Andreas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M185
Martin, Sophie G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M160
Martina, Jose A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M24
Martinčić, Jelena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Martinez-Guillamon, Catalina��������������������������� M106
Martini, Rudolf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Mason, Frank M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E54
Massey-Harroche, Dominique �����������������������������E36
Masureel, Mattieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Mathur, Aastha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58
Matic Vignjevic, Danijela������������������������������������� M94
Matsumoto, Kunihiro���������������������������������������������E17
Matus, David Q. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E4
Maurin, Mathieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Maxfield, Frederick R.����������������������������������������� M59
Mayor, Satyajit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E26
McBirney, Margaux A.����������������������������������������� M97
McBride, Heidi M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S17
McClellan, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
McGillivary, Rebecca M. ���������������������������������������E44
McHugh, Toni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M70
McIntosh, J. R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M110
McIntyre, Jeremy C.�������������������������������������������������E9
McKinley, Kara L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
McLaughlin, Grace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99
McMillan, Erin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M51
McNamara, Josh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
McNew, James A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M52
McNiven, Mark A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Medalia, Ohad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Meech, Robyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Megason, Sean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E108
Mege, René-Marc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M15
Meints, Joyce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Melia, Thomas J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M170
Melkonian, Arin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M221
Mella, Jessica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M25
Memarzadeh, Sanaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Meraldi, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E52
Merkel, Chelsea D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E59
Merta, Holly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Merz, Alexey J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E22
Meshram, Dipak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Metcalf, Melissa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M21
Metha, Sohum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Mettlen, Marcel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E69
Meyer, Barbara J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A6
Milligan, Ronald A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M158
Minic, Zoran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M26
Mirvis, Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E7
Misova, Michaela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Misteli, Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M101,M186
Mitchell, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Mitchison, Timothy J. �������������������������������������������E91
Miyano, Masaru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M196
Mizuno, Naoko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Mizushima, Noboru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M172
Mladenov, Miroslav . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M215
Mochrie, Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M48
Mohammadzadeh, Yahya��������������������������������� M181
Moldavski, Ofer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Mondal, Bama C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M198
Monier, Bruno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E46
Monster, Jooske . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Moon, Seonah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M238
Mooney, Nancie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E102
Mooneyham, Ashley���������������������������������������������E65
Moore, Andrew S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M144
Moore, Breanna M.��������������������������������������������� M97
Moore, Jeffrey K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E85,M156
Moore, Kristin A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M25
Mooseker, Mark S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Moreau, Hélène D.�������������������������������������������������E80
Moreau, Philippe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Moreno-Roman, Paola ������������������������������������� M121
Morgens, David W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Morozova, Viktoriya�����������������������������������������������E15
Morphew, Mary K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M110
Mostov, Keith E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M214
Mostowy, Serge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M33,M34
Motegi, Fumio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M141
Mourier, Tobias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Moutin, Marie-Jo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Muecksch, Jonas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Mui, Keeley L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Muir, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M203
Mukherjee, Richik Nilay�����������������������������������������E68
Mukherjee, Shaeri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M220
Muncie, Jonathon M.���������������������������������������� M127
Mund, Markus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Munjal, Akankshi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E108
Munro, Edwin M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M124,M147
Murade, Chandrashekhar����������������������������������� M43
Murray, Andrew W.�������������������������������������������������E6
Musacchio, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M112
Muthusamy, Saravana��������������������������������������� M195
Myers, Cynthia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E60
N
Na, Chan Hyun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Nabi, Ivan R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M181
Naghavi, Mojgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M38
Nakagawa, Terunaga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Nakamura, Muneaki ���������������������������������������������E96
Nakano, Akihiko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M229
183
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Nam, Sungmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Nanjundappa, Rashmi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210,M212
Nano, Maddalena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M117
Narala, Rachan V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Narayanan, Vani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Narla, Avaneesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Naseri, Ardalan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Nathanson, David A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Natsume, Tohru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M172
Nedelec, François J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58,M159,M78
Nedozralova, Hana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Neininger, Abigail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Nelson, Celeste M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E106
Nelson, Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Nelson, William J.�����������������������������������������������������E7
Newby, Jay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99
Newton, Felicity R.�������������������������������������������������E62
Nguyen, Eileen K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M83
Nguyen, Emmanuelle ����������������������������������������� M15
Nguyen, Nicole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Nguyen, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E87
Nguyen, Thinh T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E39
Nicastro, Daniela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Nicolas, Emmanuelle����������������������������������������� M206
Nievergelt, Adrian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M209
Nilsson, Peter R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Nirschl, Jeffrey J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M144
Nishikawa, Masatoshi��������������������������������������� M141
Niwa, Maho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Nixon, Benjamin R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Nixon-Abell, Jonathon��������������������������������������� M236
Noell, Crystal R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E95
Nolen, Brad J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Nomura, Dan K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Norkett, Rosalind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E89
Norris, Stephen R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E54
Nottingham, Ryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M164
Novak, Maja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Nunnari, Jodi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E24,M167,M26
O
O’Neill, Ryan S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M81
Oakes, Patrick W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Oakey, John S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E91
Obara, Christopher J.����������������������������������������� M236
O’Brien, Lucy E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M121
O’Bryan, Christopher S.�����������������������������������������E56
Ochrietor, Judith D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M208
Odorizzi, Greg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E22
O’Halloran, Thomas��������������������������������������������� M49
Ohashi, Kazuto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Ohi, Ryoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E54
Okada, Yasushi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M50
Old, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Oliveira, Joana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E53
Olson, Sara K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M61
Olziersky, Anna-Maria�������������������������������������������E52
Oon, Chet Huan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Orth, Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Ory, Daniel S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14
O’Shaughnessy, Ben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M146
O’Shea, Clodagh C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M41
Osking, Zachary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Ostap, E. M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M73
Oster, Liya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M74
Otegui, Marisa S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M168
Otomo, Chinatsu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Otomo, Takanori . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
O’Toole, Eileen T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M110
Ou, Guangshuo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M216
Ou, Guanqing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71
Ou, Horng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M41
184
Owoyemi, Olutosin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M188
Oztan, Asli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M81
P
Pain, Arnab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Paivinen, Pekka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M214
Pak, Eowyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Pakdel, Mehrshad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230
Palanisamy, Bharathi���������������������������������������������E13
Pani, Ariel M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M96
Pappas, Samuel S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M135
Park, In Young . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E54
Park, Jung-Eun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Park, Yongkeun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E35
Parton, Robert G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92
Pasapera-Limon, Ana M.������������������������������������� M14
Pasca, Sergiu P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M79
Pasti, Gabriella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Pastuzyn, Elissa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M137
Patel, Avinash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Patel, Ketan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Patel, Saloni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M58
Patrick, Gentry N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130
Paulo, Joao A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M188
Pavin, Nenad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Pavlou, Georgios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
Pederson, Thoru . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Pelletier, James F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E91
Pennetier, Carole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51
Peris, Leticia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Perlman, Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Perrat, Paola N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E25
Perucho Jamies, Luis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M173
Peschek, Jirka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E41
Peterson, Amy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Peterson, Jeffrey R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Petreaca, Melissa L.��������������������������������������������� M61
Petrolli, Vanni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E105
Petrovic, Mina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M114
Pfanzelter, Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M34
Phan, Allen V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Phan, Sebastien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M41
Phillips, Rob . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Picco, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M159
Pickett, Melissa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E28
Piel, Matthieu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Pilipenko, Evgeny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M100
Pincus, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M28
Piolot, Tristan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E51
Pisa, Rudolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M71
Pizzo, Donald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Plachta, Nicolas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92,M91
Placone, Jesse K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Plasschaert, Lindsey W.������������������������������������� M193
Plemel, Rachel L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E22
Pohl, Emma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E20
Polak, Bruno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Pollard, Thomas D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M146
Pombo, Ana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S2
Pontabry, Julien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Pontano Vaites, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M188,M75
Popravko, Anna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E66
Portran, Didier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Prabhakara, Chaitra�����������������������������������������������E26
Prakash, Manu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M119
Prakash, Vivek N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M119
Prashad, Shavanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Prinz, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S15,M167
Procter, Dean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M37
Przybyla, Laralynne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M127
Puertollano, Rosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M24
Puliafito, Alberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M145
Purdy, Amanda K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M65
Pustova, Iryna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M51
Putnam, Andrea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M105
Pyrpassopoulos, Serapion����������������������������������� M73
Q
Qamar, Seema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M85
Qi, Xin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E23
Qian, Yi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Qiu, Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Quidwai, Tooba . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58
Quinlan, Margot E.�������������������������������������������������E33
Quinn, Anne Marie M.�������������������������������������������E42
R
Rada, Cara C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Radhakrishnan, Dhwani�������������������������������������� M58
Rafat, Marjan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Raff, Jordan W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E12
Raj, Arjun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S3
Ramachandran, Rajesh�����������������������������������������E23
Ramm, Beatrice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Ramnarayan, Venkat R.��������������������������������������� M54
Rands, Thomas J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M151
Rappold, Ronja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Rashid, Harun-Or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M161
Ratheesh, Aparna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Rathmell, Wendy K.�����������������������������������������������E54
Raya, Angel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
Rayer, Mégane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E46
Raza, Qanber S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E59
Read, Tracy A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Reck-Peterson, Samara L. . . . . . . . . . . E94,M69,M75
Redwine, William B.��������������������������������������������� M75
Reid, Brian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Reiff, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E2
Reilly, Nicholas S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Reinhart-King, Cynthia����������������������������������������� M12
Reinisch, Karin M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M170,M53
Reinke, Aaron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M228
Reiter, Jeremy F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E8,M214
Renda, Fioranna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Rennefahrt, Ulrike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Rice, Allyson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M104
Richon, Sophie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M94
Richter, Beatrice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E77
Richter, Jenna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Ries, Jonas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E58,M159
Rillo-Bohn, Regina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M142
Risteski, Patrik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Rivera, Io G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Robert, Lindsay S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Roberts, Anthony J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M215
Roberts, Jonte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E9
Roblek, Marko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Roca-Cusachs, Pere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
Rodal, Avital A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Rodgers, Nicole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Rodin, Rachel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M134
Rodriguez, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Roepman, Ronald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E10
Rogers, Crystal D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E98
Roll-Mecak, Antonina ��������������������������������������� M154
Roma, Guglielmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Roper, Marcus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M99
Röper, Katja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M122
Rosen, Michael K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M103,M104
Rossen, Ninna S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Rothman, James E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Roudot, Philippe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E69,E79
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Roux, Kyle J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Royer, Loic A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Ruan, Linhao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Rudnik-Schönebor, Sabine���������������������������������� M88
Rudolf, Aebersold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M177
Ruijgrok, Paul V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E96
Rusan, Nasser M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M81
Rusterholz, Tamara D.�������������������������������������������E10
Ryu, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
S
Sabatini, David M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S16
Sabharwal, Vidur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E17
Sacco, Alessandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Samwer, Matthias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M114
Sancak, Yasemin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M199
Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro ����������������������������� M95
Sanchez Corrales, Yara E.����������������������������������� M122
Sancho, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130
Sanders, Daquan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
Sandlin, Clifford W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M139
Sandoval, Daniel R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Sang, Dajun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M104
Sanséau, Doriane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Santoni, Marie-josee��������������������������������������������� M7
Santos, Ana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E53
Santos da Silva, Eveline��������������������������������������� M38
Sarkleti, Florian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M175
Saunders, Timothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E26
Saurya, Saroj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E12
Savage, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E21
Savova, Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Sawyer, Eric M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E19
Sayaman, Rosalyn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M196
Schaedel, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Schartner, Christoph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Schekman, Randy W.����������������������������������������� M164
Schelhaas, Mario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Schlichthaerle, Thomas������������������������������������� M157
Schmid, Eva M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E82
Schmid, Sandra L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E69
Schmidt, Markus A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Schmoller, Kurt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M140
Schneider, Maximilian W. ��������������������������������� M114
Scholz, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Schöneberg, Johannes����������������������������������������� M20
Schott, Micah B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Schroeder, Lena K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Schuh, Amber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M51
Schuh, Melina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A5
Schuler, Max-Hinderk ��������������������������������������� M165
Schulze, Ryan J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Schwager, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M108
Schwappach, Blanche����������������������������������������� M54
Schwarz, Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M81
Schweighofer, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Schwille, Petra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M31
Scott, John D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Scurll, Josh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Sebbagh, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Seidlits, Stephanie K.����������������������������������������� M191
Senderek, Jan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Seo, Arnold Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M175
Serpe, Mihaela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E87
Setayesh, Jordan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Setlow, Barry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E9
Seto, Elaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M55
Sevillano, Alejandro��������������������������������������������� M82
Seydoux, Geraldine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M105
Shahbazi, Marta N. �����������������������������������������������E29
Shakya, Viplendra P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M182
Sharifnia, Panid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M133
Sharp, Judith A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E49
Shashi, Vandana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Shaw, Janet M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M165
Sheen, Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Sheetz, Michael P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M15
Sheng, Zu-Hang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Sheoran, Seema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E17
Shepherd, Jason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M137
Shestopalov, Val I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5
Shetty, Mihir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Shevade, Kaivalya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M8
Shi, Jian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Shi, Yonghong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E24
Shih, Andy Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38
Shim, Kyuhwan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M210
Shimizu, Shigeomi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M233
Shindo, Yuki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M45
Shkarina, Kateryna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E99,M98
Shridhar, Viji . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Shtengel, Gleb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E81
Shubeita, George T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M43
Shulman, Josh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Shurtleff, Matthew J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M164
Shutova, Maria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M19
Shvartsman, Stanislav Y. ��������������������������������������� M6
Shwartz, Yulia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M3
Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste��������������������������������������� M163
Siekhaus, Daria E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Siemers, Kathy A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E7
Sigurdson, Christina��������������������������������������������� M82
Silberberg, Hanna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M83
Simon, Anthony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M117
Simpson, Cory L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M144
Simunić, Juraj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Singh, Arun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Singh, Rajesh K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Singh, Tanu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M206
Sixt, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S5
Skotheim, Jan M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M140
Skruber, Kristen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Skruzny, Michal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E20
Sladewski, Thomas E.������������������������������������������ M39
Slanchev, Krasimir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Slepak, Natalia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M130
Smith, F D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E50
Smith, Jayson J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E4
Smith, Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E30
Smith, Trevor H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E86
Smyth, James W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Sochacki, Kem A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Sohn, Mira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Sohrabi, Alireza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Sokolova, Olga S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E31
Soldau, Katrin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M82
Solinger, Jachen A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M161
Solmaz, Sozanne R. �����������������������������������������������E95
Son, Sungmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E82,M20
Song, Xiaoyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Sood, Pranidhi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E44
Soragni, Alice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Sourjik, Victor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E20
Spang, Anne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M161
Spannl, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M108,M87
Sparks, Thomas M.�������������������������������������������������� S2
Spector, Jeffrey O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M154
Spoerri, Loredana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E40
Springer, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M28
Sreenivasan, Lakshana�������������������������������������������E16
Sruckenholz, Carsten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M197
St. George-Hyslop, Peter������������������������������������� M85
Stahley, Sara N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M93
Stamos, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M219
Stampfer, Martha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M196
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ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Stauffer, Weston T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M142
Stearns, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E7,M210,M213
Stehbens, Samantha J.�������������������������������������������E40
Steinacker, Thomas L. �������������������������������������������E12
Stephens, Andrew D.������������������������������������������� M49
Stephens, Bryan S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Stern, Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M52
Stoddard, Daniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Stolz, Donna B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E59
Stopp, Julian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Stradal, Theresia E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M36
Streichan, Sebastian J.��������������������������������������� M123
Strothman, Claire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Stuurman, Nico . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Suber, Ayana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Subramanian, Radhika��������������������������������������� M158
Sui, Haixin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M212
Sullivan, Mark R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M203
Sun, Shufeng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M212
Sundaramoorthy, Elayanambi����������������������������� M29
Sundberg, Emma L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230,M235
Sunyer, Raimon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M127
Suresh, Pooja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M111
Suzanne, Magali . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E46
Suzuki, Emiko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M232
Svitkina, Tatyana M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E38,M19
Swaffer, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M140
Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro�����������������������������������E102
Swift, Cheryl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Syed, Salahuddin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E63
Szczesna, Ewa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M154
T
Takahashi, Tomoyuki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M132
Tam, Arvin B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M22
Tamashunas, Andrew C. ���������������������������������������E56
Tan, Kai-Li . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M55
Tan, Peng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Tan, Zhi Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M46
Tanaka, Elly M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E29
Tanaka, Soichiro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E32
Tanaka, Tomoyuki U. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M115
Taneja, Nilay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Taniguchi, Daisuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E32
Tanouchi, Yu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M221
Taraska, Justin W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Tardieux, Isabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
Taschner, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M157
Taylor, J. Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S7
Taylor, Jordan D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Taylor, Susan S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E64
Tedeschi, Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M165
Tekeli, Isil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
Temoche-Diaz, Morayma M.����������������������������� M164
Templin, Rachel M. �����������������������������������������������E92
Teng, Xiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M141
Thakar, Dhruv . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71
Thaller, David J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M166
Theriot, Julie A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M18
Théry, Manuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Thiam, Hawa Racine R.��������������������������������������� M14
Thieme, Christoph��������������������������������������������������� S2
Thiyagarajan, Sathish����������������������������������������� M146
Thomas, Aaron J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M97
Thompson, James H.������������������������������������������� M83
Thorn-Seshold, Oliver�������������������������������������������E92
Thrun, Anna F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Ti, Shih-Chieh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M155
Tian, Songhai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M222
Tiscione, Scott A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14
Titov, Denis V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M204
185
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Todhunter, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M196
Todkar, Abhijeet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Toettcher, Jared E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M6
Tofaute, Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72
Tokarz, Victoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E75
Tolić, Iva M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
Toropova, Katerina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M215
Toulmay, Alexandre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M167
Touquet, Bastien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M40
Toyama, Yusuke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M141
Toyooka, Kazuhito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E86
Tran, Phuoc T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M75
Traver, David . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Trejo, JoAnn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Trepat, Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M127,M13
Triclin, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M69
Trimm, Emily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M113
Tronnes, Sarah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M21
Tseng, Chun-Chih . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Tuma, Trevor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M68
Turgut, Alper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Turner, Jonathan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M140
Tye, Blake W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M28
Tyska, Matthew J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
U
Uchiyama, Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E24
Ugrankar, Rupali . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M205
Ünal, Elçin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E19,E45
Urbach, Jeffrey S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M14
Uroz, Marina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M13
V
Vachharajani, Vipul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E107,E96
Vahabikashi, Amir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Vakhrushev, Sergey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Vale, Ronald D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M194
Valenzuela, Hector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Valoskova, Katka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M98
Valverde, Diana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M170
Vander Heiden, Matthew G.����������������������������� M203
van der Wel, Patrick�����������������������������������������������E23
Van De Weghe, Julie C. �����������������������������������������E10
Van Elgort, Alexandria��������������������������������������� M173
Vargas-Hurtado, Diana-Carolina���������������������������E51
Vasquez, Claudia G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E107
Vassal, Helene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E52
Vaughan, Kevin T. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E62
Vaughan, Patricia S.�����������������������������������������������E62
Vavylonis, Dimitrios�����������������������������������������������E32
Velichkova, Michaella ��������������������������������������� M178
Velle, Katrina B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M35
Vemu, Annapurna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M154
Vergassola, Massimo����������������������������������������� M145
Verhey, Kristen J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Vetrone, Sylvia A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M66
Vidak, Sandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M186
Vierstra, Richard D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M168
Villa, Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E3,E64
Visetsouk, Mike R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M153
Vitriol, Eric A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E18
Vivas, Oscar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E14
Vizcarra, Christina L. ���������������������������������������������E33
Voituriez, Raphael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E80
Volkov, Vladimir A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M112
Von Blume, Julia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M230
von Zastrow, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M163
Voronina, Ekaterina����������������������������������������������� M9
Vorselen, Daan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M18
186
Voth, Gregory A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M152
Vukušić, Kruno . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M109
W
Waas, Bridget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M217
Wachner, Stephanie��������������������������������������������� M98
Wagner, Andrew R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M149
Wainman, Alan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E12
Walczak, Chris P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Walczak, Claire E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M72
Walker, Cheryl L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E54
Waller, Ross F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M224
Walpole, Glenn F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M223
Walsh, Christopher A.��������������������������������������� M134
Walsh, Derek F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M37
Walsh, Rylie B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Walter, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E41,S19
Walz, Gerd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Walz, Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M170
Wang, Chunxin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100
Wang, Dongmei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Wang, Hui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E16
Wang, Lingyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E30
Wang, Meng C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M174
Wang, Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E87
Wang, Shanshan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Wang, Shuhao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M107
Wang, Shuyuan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M146
Wang, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Wang, Wanjuan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Wang, Xinnan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M86
Wang, Yifan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M18
Wang, Yijing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Wang, Yuan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Wang, Yu-li . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E104
Wang, Zhaoquin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M156
Wang, Zhiping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M133
Wangler, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M55
Ward, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M85
Warsinger-Pepe, Natalie���������������������������������������E47
Watanabe, Naoki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E32
Watanabe, Reika . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E64
Waterman, Clare M. ������������������������������������������� M14
Way, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M34
Weaver, Joseph S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M64
Weaver, Lesley N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M72
Weaver, Valerie M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E71,M127
Weber, Miriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Weigel, Aubrey V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M56
Weiner, Orion D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E84
Weissman, Jonathan S.������������������������������������� M167
Weitz, David A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Welburn, Julie P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M70
Welf, Erik S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E79
Weller, Shaun G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E76,M176
Welshhans, Kristy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E90
Werner, Michael E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M148
Wernig, Marius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M189
West, Anthony P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
West, Matthew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E22
West, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M16
Wheeler, Heather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M53
White, Melanie D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M91
White, Melanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E92
Wicinski, Julien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M7
Widelitz, Randall B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Wiegel, Johannes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Wikramanayake, Athula ���������������������������������������E30
Wilhelm, Therese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E52
Willert, Karl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M2
Willey, Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E43
Willis, Alexandra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M228
Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.��������������������������� M158
Winding, Michael . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E89
Winey, Mark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Winick-Ng, Warren�������������������������������������������������� S2
Wisdom, Katrina M.��������������������������������������������� M16
Wlaschin, Josette J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M83
Wong, Mie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E103
Woolley, Thomas E.����������������������������������������������� M5
Wozniak, Jacob M.������������������������������������������������� M2
Wrenn, Emma D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M97
Wu, Colin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S18
Wu, Huayin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E57
Wu, Ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Wu, Wei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E30
Wu, Xufeng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E34
Wu, Zilu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M133
X
Xia, Peng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M128
Xia, Yuntao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M17
Xiao, Weikun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Xie, Boyang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Xie, Yu-Xiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Xiong, Yuquan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M59
Xu, Ke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M20,M238
Xu, Peng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M162
Xu, Shiyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M52
Xuan, Zhao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M131
Y
Yakulov, Toma A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E73
Yamaguchi, Norihiro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M118
Yamamoto, Ami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M97
Yamamoto, Shinya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M55
Yamamoto-Hino, Miki��������������������������������������� M232
Yamashiro, Sawako �����������������������������������������������E32
Yamashita, Yukiko M.���������������������������������������������E47
Yan, Hao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M48
Yan, Rui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M238
Yanagawa, Jane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M192
Yang, Haidi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Yang, Qing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E65
Yang, Xinyi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M120
Yang, Yi An . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M15
Yang, Ying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M214
Yanucil, Christopher�����������������������������������������������E77
Yao, Jun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M164
Yao, Phil Y. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Yao, Xuebiao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M195
Yap, Shyong-Quin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E16
Yazdi, Shahrzad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M225
Ye, Hui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Yeh, Anna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Yeh, Chao-Yuan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Yevick, Hannah G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M125
Yildiz, Ahmet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M74
Yin, Jingwen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M41
Yin, Xueqian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E74
Yoo, Haneul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M100
Youle, Richard J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E100
Yu, Hong-Guo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M183
Yu, Jessica C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E27
Yu, Qi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Yu, Shenliang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M170
Yue, Qiang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
Yue, Xihua . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Yue, Zuojun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M115
ABSTRACT AUTHOR INDEX
Z
Zalyte, Ruta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M215
Zanic, Marija . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E93
Zehr, Elena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M154
Zeinert, Rilee D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M32
Zeitz, Michael J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M226
Zenker, Jennifer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M91,E92
Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena ��������������������������E29,S14
Zhang, Fangliang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E78
Zhang, Hong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M169
Zhang, Huaiying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M102
Zhang, Jian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M12
Zhang, Jin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M27
Zhang, Junmei . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E70
Zhang, Liang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E11
Zhang, Liangyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M142
Zhang, Lichao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M184
Zhang, Qiao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E56
Zhang, Rongyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M191
Zhang, Shaojie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Zhang, Stephanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M72
Zhang, Xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Zhang, Xiaoguo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M168
Zhang, Xu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M103
Zhang, Yongdeng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M237
Zhang, Zhaojie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E68
Zhao, Guoli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M81
Zhao, Min . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Zhao, Peng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M141
Zhao, Winnie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M228
Zhao, Yan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M169
Zhao, Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Zhao, Ying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M218
Zheden, Vanessa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M128
Zheng, Jing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M47
Zhou, Bing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M187
Zhou, Yubin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M92
Zhu, Jin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M180
Zhu, Kuangzheng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M17
Zhu, Lianhui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Zhu, Xiaodong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E1
Ziak, Jakub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M88
Zid, Brian M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M107
Zierhut, Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M118
Zilionis, Rapolas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M193
Ziltener, Pascal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M231
Zoncu, Roberto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E72,M207
Zonka, Jennifer C. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M211
Zunitch, Matthew A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M138
Zyrianova, Tatiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M5,M5
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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NOTES
188
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
ABSTRACT AUTHOR DISCLOSURES
The ASCB requires that audiences be informed of presenters’ (speakers, authors, and contributors) academic and professional affiliations,
and disclosure of any significant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) discussed in a
presentation. This policy allows the listener/attendee to be fully informed in evaluating the information being presented. Disclosure includes any
relationship that may bias one’s presentation or which, if known, could give the perception of bias. These situations may include, but are not
limited to: 1) stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation or self-directed pension plan, 2) research grants, 3) employment (full-or
part-time), 4) ownership or partnership, 5) consulting fees or other remuneration, 6) non-remunerative positions of influence such as officer, board
member, trustee, or public spokesperson, 7) receipt of royalties, and 8) speakers bureau.
Author
Disclosure–Institution
Betsholtz, Christer
Research Grant- AstraZeneca
Bewersdorf, Joerg
Receipt of royalties- Bruker Corp.
Blanchard, Guy
Research Grant- Wellcome Trust
Conkar, Deniz
Stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation
or self-directed pension plan- Koc University
DiAntonio, Aaron
Consulting fees or other remuneration- Disarm Therapeutics
Ownership or partnership- Disarm Therapeutics
Receipt of royalties- Disarm Therapeutics
Faul, Christian
Other- Klotho Therapuetics
Research Grant- U3 Pharma
Firat-Karalar, Elif
Stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation or
self-directed pension plan- Koc University
Goto, Satoshi
Research Grant- MEXT
Kwong, Jennifer
Research Grant- American Heart Association
Lambowitz, Alan
Stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation or
self-directed pension plan- InGex LLC
Lee, Moosung
Stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation or
self-directed pension plan- Tomocube Inc.
Maddox, Amy
Ownership or partnership- Mizar Imaging
Nunnari, Jodi
Consulting fees or other remuneration- Mitobridge
Park, Yongkeun
Stock options or bond holdings in a for-profit corporation or
self-directed pension plan- Tomocube Inc.
Rennefahrt, Ulrike
Employment (full or part-time)- Metanomics Health, GmbH
Röper, Katja
Employment (full or part-time)- Medical Research Council
Sanchez Corrales, Yara
Employment (full or part-time)- Medical Research Council
Shimizu, Shigeomi
Research Grant- Japanese government
Vander Heiden, Matthew
Consulting fees or other remuneration- Aeglea BioTherapeutics
Consulting fees or other remuneration- Agios Pharmaceuticals
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
189
NOTES
190
The 2018 ASCB | EMBO Meeting l ascb-embo2018.ascb.org
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