Uploaded by nicole.k.lowe

[P3] Ethics Presentation

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Underlying Issues of Public
Access DNA
Sarah Summerhill
Lauran Cady
Agnes Moldovan
Rita Rudova
Nicole Lowe
Public Access DNA
Popularity of
Genealogy
Websites
Figure 1: This graph illustrates the exponential growth
of genealogy websites from 2013 to 2018
23andMe &
Ancestory.com
Private companies that offer
DNA analysis to millions who
want to identify their ancestors
and countries of origin
GEDMatch
Public database where raw
DNA files can be uploaded and
accessed by anyone with an
account
Identifying the Golden State Killer
Golden State Killer
●
13 murders
1974-1986
●
Over 50 rapes
●
Over 100 burglaries
●
13 murders
●
Over 50 rapes
●
Over 100 burglaries
GSK Identification and Capture
Legislation Regarding the Use of
Genetic Information
Americans with
Disabilities Act
Protects Americans with
disabilities from discrimination
Health Insurance
Portability and
Accountability Act
of 1996
Prohibits group health plans
from using genetic information
to deny or limit eligibility for
coverage of individuals OR
increase the cost of coverage
for the individual
Genetic
Information and
Nondiscrimination
Act of 2008
Protects American employees
from employment related
discrimination and genetic data
collection from employers and
health insurance companies
Fourth Amendment
“The right of the people to be
secure in their persons,
houses, papers, and effects,
against unreasonable searches
and seizures, shall not be
violated, and no warrants shall
issue, but upon probable
cause, supported by oath or
affirmation, and particularly
describing the place to be
searched, and the persons or
things to be seized.”
(U.S. Const. amend. IV)
“Abandoned DNA”
Is DNA considered “property”?
Is it legal for law
enforcement officers to
obtain DNA evidence
“left behind” in a public
space?
Solution: More Oversight for Law
Enforcement Officials
Law Enforcement
Should Obtain a
Warrant Prior to
Accessing Public
Genetic Databases
Current Precedent:
Carpenter v. United
States
On June 22, 2018, the
Supreme Court ruled that law
enforcement must have a
warrant to obtain cell phone
location data.
Our Proposal
Our Proposal
Protect our DNA!