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MO Liberty and Law EOC Study Guide

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EOC Study Guide
Springfield Government
Instructions: This is in NO WAY a comprehensive list of everything that could possibly be on the EOC (50
questions) or Constitution (100 question) tests, but it is a very good starting point to study. The
Constitution Test will be all multiple choice question and the EOC is MC, technology enhanced, and short
answer questions. Both are done on the computer. This study guide will serve for both exams.
You must write out information for EACH item (except italics) and EACH section of the study guide to
receive full credit IN YOUR OWN WORDS (no copying/pasting from the Internet or friends). Complete
your work in a DIFFERENT COLOR if doing electronically.
If the term is in ITALICS, memorize it. No additional information is needed on the study guide for
those terms.
No notes, study guides, or aides can be used on the tests. Everything must be memorized!
4 Qualities of a Government
Maintaining Order, Providing Public Services, Providing National Security, Providing for the
Economy
Economic Terms
Supply and Demand
Opportunity Cost
Did Government Involvement Increase or Decrease in each of these periods? What are these
periods of time?
New Deal, Great Society, Reaganomics, New Conservatism-1970s/80s theory to use
government power
to pursue conservative domestic/foreign policies. Decrease of government
involvement.
Fiscal Policy
Market Economy
Socialism
Mixed Economics- Elements of free market economies and government controlled economies (a
combo)
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics
Laissez-Faire
Taxes
Capitalism/Free-Market v. Government-centered solutions (i.e. who is making policy decisions?)
Evolution of Government
Magna Carta
Social Contract Theory
Continental Congresses
Enlightenment- 1500-1700s, time period with philosophes that promoted ideas of liberty,
equality, & justice
Self-Rule- nation/people choosing its’ government and controlling its’ activities- like a (in)direct
democracy.
Mayflower Compact- 1st document framing a government in America (self-govern, consent of
the people).
Establishment of Colonial Legislatures (House of Burgesses)- 1619 formed in Virginia, first
democratically elected
representatives in the colonies, bicameral like England
Salutary Neglect- Britain did not strictly enforce its’ laws in the colonies, so they started selfgovernance. Common Sense- pamphlet by Thomas Paine in 1776, promoted independence with
moral and political reasons.
Continental CongressesIdeas from Declaration of Independence:
Social Contract
Due Process
Popular Sovereignty
John Locke’s Theories- Natural Law= Natural Rights= Unalienable RightsRight to Revolution
Articles of Confederation
StrengthsWeaknessesInfluences during Constitutional Convention
Hammurabi’s CodeGreece- Direct Democracy
Rome- Indirect Democracy/Republic
British Parliament- Bicameral Parliament, Rule of Law (every person has to follow the rules in the
gov’t)
Social Contract Theory
Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau
The ColoniesProblems During the Constitutional Convention
Connecticut (Great) Compromise
New Jersey Plan
Virginia Plan
3/5 Compromise
Bill of Rights
Federalist v. Anti-Federalists
Federalist Papers
Bill of Rights
Purposes of Government- list/give examples
Principles
Checks and Balances (KNOW THE CHART!)
Separation of Powers
Federalism
Judicial Review
Limited Government
Popular Sovereignty
Articles of Confederation v. Constitution- compare trade, monetary policy, and taxation
Ideas from Constitution:
Due Process of Law
Popular Sovereignty
Rule of Law
Representation
Federalism
Economics- Trade, Monetary Policy, and Taxation are controlled by Central Government
Legislative Branch- Article 1 of the Constitution
What does it do?
Federal, State, and Local Example
Senator and Representative Qualifications
How many people are in the Senate, House, and Congress (and how are they picked?)
Bicameral v. Unicameral
How a Bill Becomes a Law
Committees
Oversight
Necessary and Proper Clause/ Elastic Clause
Expressed (Enumerated), Concurrent, and Implied Powers
Gerrymandering, Filibustering, Cloture
Supremacy Clause
17 Amendment
27 Amendment
Executive Branch- Article 2 of the Constitution
What does it do?
Federal, State, and Local Example
Executive Orders
Executive Appointments
Pardons
President’s Cabinet
8 Roles of the President
20 Amendment- moves up Pres. Inauguration date so no “lame duck” or ineffective legislatures
and Presidents
22 Amendment
Direct Election
Presidential Primaries
Electoral College
How Demographics Affect Voting
Impeachment
Judicial Branch- Article 3 of the Constitution
What does it do?
Federal, State, and Local Example
Federal Court Structure (Supreme, Appeals, District)
Jurisdiction
Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, Miranda v. Arizona, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v.
Board of Edu.
Judicial Review
Judicial Activism
Judicial Restraint
Double Jeopardy
th
th
th
nd
Writ of Habeas Corpus
Affirmative Action
Right-to-Work- cannot forced to join a union. Conflict between more job opportunities v.
decreased wages
4 Branch of Government- Parties and Groups and Media
Functions of a Political Party- Provide Candidates for Elections, Inform Public about Issues
Interest Group, Lobbyists
PACs and Super PACs
Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission
Media Bias
Partisanship
Bill of Rights
1 (Limit of the government)
2 (Protect the Individual)
3
4 Amendment (limit of the government)
5 Amendment (limit of the government, property rights)
6 (Protect the Individual)
7
8 Amendment (limit of the government)
9
10
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ST
nd
rd
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Civil Rights/Amendments for Equality
13 Amendment
14 Amendment
15 Amendment
19 Amendment
24 Amendment- no poll taxes
26 Amendment
State and Local Government- Powers of Citizens to Make Change
Initiative
Referendum
Recall
Petition
Advocacy
Selective Service
Voting, Taxes, Jury Duty, Follow Laws
The myth of Nullification- States can invalidate any law they think is unconstitutional
Different Government Types
Monarchy
Parliament
How Parliamentary Leaders are Chosen
Authoritarian
Totalitarian
Democratic
5 Components of a Democracy
Laissez-Faire
th
th
th
th
th
th
Oligarchy
Theocracy
Other Words to Know
Stratification- to divide or arrange by social classes, economic classes, ethnicity, gender
Sovereignty
Liberty
Ratification
Common Good
For this section of the study guide, please memorize any terms in italics as well as what terms
go with each bold concept. You do not need to write anything additional:
Government Power Expanding
Elastic Clause
Commerce Clause- a line in the Constitution that says Congress has exclusive power over trade
between states,
foreign countries, and Indian tribes. A loophole that expands the power of Congress.
Marbury v. Madison
New Deal- expansion of executive bureaucracy
Civil Rights- 14 Amendment and Judicial Activism (Roe, Brown)
War on Terrorism (Patriot Act): Response to 9/11 attacks, gives federal government expanded
ability to collect
information on peoples to combat terror at home and around the world.
Federal versus State Power
Federalism
Exclusive Powers- aka Executive/Expressed powers- only belonging to the Nat’l gov’t, listed in
Constitution
Reserved Powers, Concurrent Powers
Supremacy Clause
McCulloch v. Maryland
10 Amendment, 14 Amendment
13 Colonies Geography
How did the physical AND cultural geography affect the creation of the Declaration and Constitution as
well as other changes in our government?
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th
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