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Essentials of Fire Fighting
6 th Edition
Firefighter I
Chapter 15 — Fire Hose
Learning Objective 1
Explain basic fire hose
characteristics.
15–2
Each type of fire hose transports
water for on scene operations.
15–3
To be reliable fire hose must be
constructed, used, and maintained
appropriately.
15–4
Hose size measurements in
diameter refer to the internal
diameter.
15–5
Hose size measurements in length
refer to a manufactured section of
hose.
15–6
Fire hose couplings are used to make
connections to hose and equipment.
15–7
Fire hose couplings are categorized by
the way they are manufactured.
15–8
Threaded couplings have male and
female parts.
15–9
CAUTION
Connect couplings hand tight to avoid
damage to the coupling and gasket.
15–10
Couplings have other parts
including different cuts, sizes, and
gaskets.
15–11
Lugs and handles help to tighten
and loosen hose connections.
15–12
Nonthreaded couplings are
connected with locks or cams.
15–13
REVIEW QUESTION
What are the three basic fire hose
characteristics a firefighter must
understand?
15–14
Learning Objective 2
Describe different causes of and
prevention methods for hose damage.
15–15
Mechanical damage can occur in
several ways to a fire hose.
Slices, rips,
abrasions, crushed,
cracked
15–16
There are many ways to prevent
mechanical damage.
(Cont.)
15–17
There are many ways to prevent
mechanical damage.
15–18
Thermal damage can result from
exposure to excessive temperatures.
Caused by excessive
heat/cold, direct
flame contact
Can char, melt,
weaken, dehydrate
linings
15–19
There are may ways to prevent
thermal damage to fire hose.
15–20
Organic damage to fire hose can
weaken the jacket and lead to ruptures.
Mildew and mold
15–21
Firefighters should know the
methods to prevent organic
damage.
15–22
There are several types of chemical
damage that may occur to fire hose.
15–23
Preventing chemical damage
requires following specific cleaning
practices.
15–24
Corrosion is a type of damage that
weakens or destroys metal hose
parts.
15–25
Age deterioration is caused by
leaving a hose in an apparatus for a
long time.
15–26
REVIEW QUESTION
How are thermal damage and
corrosion in a hose similar or different?
15–27
Learning Objective 3
Identify basic inspection, care, and
maintenance methods for fire hose.
15–28
Inspecting a fire hose requires
following a schedule and reporting
process if deficiencies are found.
15–29
The method of washing a hose will
depend on the type of hose.
15–30
Drying a hose also requires different
methods for various types of hose.
15–31
Storing hose is usually done on
racks that may be mounted or stand
free.
15–32
CAUTION
Never store solvents, petroleum
products, or other chemicals close to
fire hose and couplings.
15–33
There are several methods to
prevent damage to stored hose
stored in racks.
15–34
Fire hose couplings can be damaged
even though designed to be durable.
Male
Female
15–35
When caring for fire hose couplings
you should follow these guidelines.
15–36
REVIEW QUESTION
for
What are the steps taken to perform
basic inspection and maintenance
fire hose?
15–37
Learning Objective 4
Compare various uses for hose
appliances and tools.
15–38
Hose appliances include a variety of
hardware used in conjunction with
hose.
15–39
There are several types of hose tools
that firefighters should know about.
(Cont.)
15–40
CAUTION
Never stand over the handle of a hose
clamp when applying or releasing it.
The handle or frame may pop open and
swing upward violently.
15–41
There are several types of hose tools
that firefighters should know about.
15–42
REVIEW QUESTION
What are the types of hose
appliances and tools a firefighter
need to use?
15–43
may
Learning Objective 5
Describe basic hose rolls.
15–44
The straight roll is the simplest
of all hose rolls.
15–45
The donut roll is used in situations
where the hose will likely be
deployed for use directly from a
roll.
15–46
The twin donut roll creates a
compact roll that is easily
transported.
15–47
The self-locking twin donut roll adds
a built-in carrying loop for the hose.
15–48
REVIEW QUESTION
When should firefighters use basic
hose rolls?
15–49
Learning Objective 6
Explain basic hose loads and
finishes.
15–50
There are several basic facts about
hose that firefighters should know.
15–51
A flat load is the easiest way to load
fire hose and is suitable for any size.
15–52
The accordion load is named for how
the hose appears after it is loaded.
15–53
A horseshoe load is loaded in a Ushape around the perimeter of the hose
bed and works toward the center.
15–54
A combination load is used with
split hose beds loaded with
threaded-coupling hose.
15–55
Hose load finishes can also be
added to increase the versatility of a
load.
15–56
A high-rise pack provides enough
attack hose to operate from a
standpipe connection and can be
carried alone.
Courtesy of Rick Montemorra, Mesa (AZ) Fire Department
15–57
There are several hose loading
guidelines firefighters should follow.
15–58
REVIEW QUESTION
What hose loads can a firefighter
choose from when storing hose?
15–59
Learning Objective 7
Compare various methods to make
preconnected hose loads for attack
lines.
15–60
Preconnected hose loads are usually
the primary lines used for fire attack.
15–61
A preconnected flat load is adaptable
for varying sizes of hose beds.
15–62
The triple layer load is
designed to be pulled by one
person.
15–63
The minuteman load is designed to
be pulled and advanced by one
person.
15–64
Booster hose reels carry
preconnected rubber-covered hose.
15–65
WARNING
Booster lines are not appropriate for
interior fire fighting operations or for
vehicle fires because they do not deliver
a sufficient volume of water to protect
firefighters if conditions suddenly
deteriorate.
15–66
REVIEW QUESTION
How do the various methods to
make preconnected hose loads for attack
lines compare with one another?
15–67
Learning Objective 8
Explain the methods used for supply
hose lays.
15–68
Hose lay procedures will vary from
department to department.
15–69
When hose is deployed from
a water source to the
incident, this is a forward
lay.
15–70
The reverse lay is used when a
pumper must go to the fire
location before laying a supply
line.
15–71
A combination lay is any of the
different methods to lay multiple
supply hose with a single engine.
15–72
REVIEW QUESTION
What methods can be used for
supply hose lays?
15–73
Learning Objective 9
Recognize different methods for
handling hoselines.
15–74
There are several methods that can
be used to deploy preconnected
hoselines.
15–75
Different types of hoselines can be
deployed with other methods as well.
15–76
REVIEW QUESTION
How do firefighters decide what
technique to use when handling
hoselines?
15–77
Learning Objective 10
Describe methods for advancing
hoselines in various ways.
15–78
Advancing a charged hoseline can
be done using the working line drag.
15–79
You should be alert for potential
dangers when advancing hose
into a structure.
15–80
Follow these safety guidelines for
advancing hose into a structure.
15–81
Advancing hoseline up and down a
stairway can be very difficult.
15–82
Advancing hose from a standpipe is
easiest with preassembled hose.
Courtesy of Rick Montemorra, Mesa (AZ) FD
15–83
Improvising a standpipe may be
necessary under certain conditions.
15–84
CAUTION
When firefighters must improvise a
standpipe system, there will be a delay
in applying water to the fire. This delay
must be considered in planning the
overall fire fighting strategy.
15–85
There are several methods to use
when improvising a standpipe.
15–86
Advancing hose up a ladder is easier
and safer with an uncharged line.
Uncharged
Charged
15–87
WARNING
Do not exceed the rated weight capacity
of the ladder. If the hose cannot be
passed up the ladder without exceeding
the load limit, it should be hoisted up.
15–88
It may be necessary to operate a
hoseline from a ladder.
15–89
REVIEW QUESTION
What are the safety guidelines for
advancing a hose into a structure?
15–90
Learning Objective 11
List the considerations that can
impact operating attack hoselines.
15–91
There are two methods to consider
when operating small hoselines.
Courtesy of Shad Cooper, Wyoming State
Fire Marshal’s Office
15–92
Operating large hoselines may also
be accomplished with different
methods.
15–93
Extending a section of hose may be
necessary during operations.
15–94
There are several methods that can
be used to control a loose hoseline.
15–95
The task of replacing a burst section
of hoseline may also be needed on
scene.
15–96
REVIEW QUESTION
What considerations can impact
operating attack hoselines?
15–97
Summary
• Fire hose is a basic tool used to carry
water from its source to the point it is
needed to extinguish a fire.
• Firefighters must know the types of
hose their department uses, how it is
constructed, the way hose can be
damaged, and how to care for it.
(Cont.)
15–98
Summary
• Firefighters must know the differences
between supply and attack hose, and
how to deploy, advance and operate
both kinds of hose.
• It is critical that firefighters know the
types of fire hose loads and finishes
and how they relate to various hose
deployments.
15–99
Learning Objective 12
Couple and uncouple a hose.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-1.
15–100
Learning Objective 13
Inspect and maintain a fire hose.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-2.
15–101
Learning Objective 14
Make a straight hose roll.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-3.
15–102
Learning Objective 15
Make a donut hose roll.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-4.
15–103
Learning Objective 16
Make the flat hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-5.
15–104
Learning Objective 17
Make the accordion hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-6.
15–105
Learning Objective 18
Make the horseshoe hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-7.
15–106
Learning Objective 19
Make a finish.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-8.
15–107
Learning Objective 20
Make the preconnected flat hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-9.
15–108
Learning Objective 21
Make the triple layer hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-10.
15–109
Learning Objective 22
Make the minuteman hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-11.
15–110
Learning Objective 23
Make a hydrant connection from a
forward lay.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-12.
15–111
Learning Objective 24
Make the reverse hose lay.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-13.
15–112
Learning Objective 25
Advance a hose load.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-14.
15–113
Learning Objective 26
Deploy a wye-equipped hose during a
reverse hose lay.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-15.
15–114
Learning Objective 27
Advance a charged hoseline using the
working line drag method.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-16.
15–115
Learning Objective 28
Advance a line into a structure.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-17.
15–116
Learning Objective 29
Advance a line up and down an
interior stairway.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-18.
15–117
Learning Objective 30
Connect to a stairway standpipe
connection and advance an attack
hoseline onto a floor.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-19.
15–118
Learning Objective 31
Advance an uncharged line up a
ladder into a window.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-20.
15–119
Learning Objective 32
Advance a charged line up a ladder
into a window.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-21.
15–120
Learning Objective 33
Operate a charged attack line from a
ladder.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-22.
15–121
Learning Objective 34
Operate a small hoseline – Onefirefighter method.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-23.
15–122
Learning Objective 35
Operate a large hoseline for exposure
protection – One-firefighter method.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-24.
15–123
Learning Objective 36
Operate a large hoseline – Twofirefighter method.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-25.
15–124
Learning Objective 37
Extend a hoseline.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-26.
15–125
Learning Objective 38
Replace a burst hoseline.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 15-I-27.
15–126
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