English Grammar

advertisement
Passive Voice in English: How to Use the Passive Voice with Different Tenses
The passive voice is a grammatical construction. The noun or noun phrase that would be the object of an active sentence (such as Our troops
defeated the enemy) appears as the subject of a sentence with passive voice (e.g. The enemy was defeated by our troops).
For example:
“… that all men are created equal…”
“We have been cruelly deceived.”
“The captain was struck by a missile.”
“I got kicked in the face during the fight.”
Passive Voice in English: How to Use the Passive Voice with Different Tenses
We can use passive voice with most tenses.
To change the tense of a passive sentence, you change the form of the verb ‘be’. The main verb in a passive sentence is always in the past
participle form.
Using the Passive Voice with Different Tenses
Tenses
Simple Present
Simple Past
Present Perfect
Future I
Present Progressive
Past Progressive
Past Perfect
Future II
Conditional I
Conditional II
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Active
Passive
Subject
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Marry
The food
Verb
serves
is served
served
was served
has served
has been served
will serve
Will be served
is serving
is being served
was serving
was being served
had served
had been served
will have served
will have been served
would serve
would be served
would have served
would have been served
Object
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
By Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
the food
by Marry
English Prepositions Table [English Grammar]
English Prepositions are a class of words that express spatial or temporal relations (in, under, towards) or marking various semantic
roles (of, for).
An English preposition typically combines with a noun or pronoun, or more generally a noun phrase, this being called its complement, or
sometimes object. An English preposition comes before its complement.
This is English prepositions Table. In English, some prepositions are short, mostly containing six letters or fewer. There are, however, many
multi-word prepositions.
English prepositions Table
Single Word English Prepositions
a
abaft
abeam
aboard
about
above
absent
across
afore
after
against
along
given
in
including
inside
into
like
mid (from “amid”. Usually used poetically.)
midst (from “amidst”. Usually used poetically.)
minus
modulo
near
next
alongside
amid
amidst
among
amongst
an (see “a” for usage in front of consonants)
anenst
apropos (“apropos of” is a common derived term)
apud
around
as (also an adverb and a conjunction)
aside
astride
at
athwart
atop
barring
before
behind
below
beneath
beside
besides
between
notwithstanding (also used postpositionally)
of
off
on
onto
opposite
out
outside
over
pace
past
per
plus
pro
qua
regarding
round
sans
save
since
than
through, thru (informal)
throughout, thruout (informal)
till (same as “until”, with prosodic restrictions)
beyond
but
by
chez
circa (sometimes abbreviated as “c.” or “ca.”)
concerning
despite
down
during
except
excluding
failing
following
for
forenenst
from
worth
to
toward
towards
under
underneath
unlike
until
unto
up
upon
versus, commonly abbreviated as “vs.”, or (principally in law or
sports) as “v.”
via
vice, meaning “in place of”
with (sometimes written as “w/”)
within (sometimes written as “w/in” or “w/i”)
without (sometimes written as “w/o”)
Two Words English Prepositions
according to
ahead of
apart from
as for
as of
as per
near to
next to
on to (contracted as onto)
opposite of
opposite to
out from
as regards
aside from
astern of
back to
because of
close to
due to
except for
far from
in to (contracted as into)
inside of (note that inside out is an adverb, not a
preposition)
instead of
left of
out of
outside of
owing to
prior to
pursuant to
rather than
regardless of
right of
subsequent to
such as
thanks to
that of
up to
Three words English Prepositions
as far as is one example of the many expressions which can be analyzed as as+adjective+as rather than a multiword
preposition
as long as in the sense of if or since, rather than of the same length
as opposed to
as soon as
as well as
Irregular Verbs in English [English Grammar]
A regular verb is any verb whose conjugation follows the typical pattern, or one of the typical patterns (“-s”, “-ed”). A verb whose conjugation
follows a different pattern is called an irregular verb.
For example
Verbs such as play, associate are regular, since they form their inflected parts by adding the typical endings -s, and -ed, to give forms such as
plays, associated.
On the other hand, verbs such as drink, hit and have are irregular, since some of their parts are not made according to the typical pattern – drank
and drunk (not “drinked”); hit (as past tense and past participle, not “hitted”) and has and had (not “haves” and “haved”).
Please note that many of the most frequent verbs are irregular. Thus it is essential to learn all the English irregular verbs.
Irregular verbs in English
Base Form (and present)
alight
arise
awake
be (am, is, are)
bear
beat
begin
bend
bereave
Past Simple
alighted, alit
arose
awoke, awaked
was (were)
bore
beat
began
bent
bereaved
Past Participle
alighted, alit
arisen
awoken, awaked
been
borne (born)
beaten/beat
begun
bent
bereaved (bereft)
beseech
bet
bid
bid
bide
bind
bite
bleed
blow
break
breed
bring
build
burn
burst
buy
can
cast
catch
chide
choose
cleave1
cleave2
cling
besought
bet/betted
bid
bade/bid/bidded
bided/bode
bound
bit
bled
blew
broke
bred
brought
built
burned/burnt
burst/bursted
bought
could
cast
caught
chode/chided/chid
chose
clove/clave
cleft/cleaved
clang/clung
besought
bet/betted
bid
bidden/bid/bidded
bided/bidden
bound (bounden)
bitten
bled
blown
broken
bred
brought
built
burnt/burned
burst/bursted
bought
–
cast
caught
chidden/chided
chosen
cloven/claven
cleft/cleaved
clung
clothe
come
cost
creep
crow
cut
deal
dig
dive
do (does[dʌz])
draw
dream
drink
drive
dwell
eat
fall
feed
feel
fight
find
fit
flee
fling
clothed
came
cost
crept
crowed/crew
cut
dealt
dug
dived/dove
did
drew
dreamt/dreamed
drank/drunk
drove
dwelt/dwelled
ate
fell
fed
felt
fought
found
fit/fitted
fled
flung
clothed (clad)
come
cost
crept
crowed/crown[kroʊn]
cut
dealt
dug
dived/dove
done
drawn
dreamt/dreamed
drunk (drunken)
driven
dwelt/dwelled
eaten
fallen
fed
felt
fought
found
fit/fitted
fled
flung
fly
forsake
freeze
get
gird
give
go
grind
grow
hang
have (has)
hear
hew
hide
hit
hold
hurt
keep
kneel
knit
know
lay
lead
lean
flew
forsook
froze
got
girded
gave
went
ground
grew
hung/hanged
had
heard
hewed
hid
hit
held
hurt
kept
knelt/kneeled
knit/knitted
knew
laid
led
leaned/leant
flown
forsaken
frozen
gotten/got
girded (girt)
given
gone
ground
grown
hung/hanged
had
heard
hewed/hewn
hid/hidden
hit
held
hurt
kept
knelt/kneeled
knit/knitted
known
laid
led
leaned/leant
leap
learn
leave
load
lose
lend
let
lie
light
make
may
mean [miːn]
meet
melt
mow
pay
plead
prove
put
quit
read [riːd]
rend
rid
ride
leaped/leapt
learned/learnt
left
loaded
lost
lent
let
lay
lit/lighted
made
might
meant [mɛnt]
met
melted
mowed
paid
pleaded/pled
proved
put
quit
read [rɛd]
rent
rid/ridded
rode
leaped/leapt
learned/learnt
left
loaded (laden)
lost (lorn)
lent
let
lain
lit/lighted
made
–
meant [mɛnt]
met
melted (molten)
mowed/mown
paid
pleaded/pled
proved/proven
put
quit
read [rɛd]
rent
rid/ridden
ridden
ring
rise
run
saw
say (says[sɛz])
see
seek
seethe
sell
send
set
sew
shake
shall
shape
shave
shear
shed
shine
shit
shoe
shoot
show
shrink
rang
rose
ran
sawed
said [sɛd]
saw
sought
seethed
sold
sent
set
sewed
shook
should
shaped
shaved
shore/sheared
shed
shined/shone
shit/shat
shoed/shod
shot
showed
shrank/shrunk
rung
risen
run
sawed/sawn
said [sɛd]
seen
sought
seethed (sodden)
sold
sent
set
sewed/sewn
shaken
–
shaped (shapen)
shaved (shaven)
shorn/sheared
shed
shined/shone
shit/shat
shoed/shod
shot
shown/showed
shrunk (shrunken)
shrive
shut
sing
sink
sit
slay
sleep
slide
sling
slink
slit
smell
smite
sneak
sow
speak
speed
spell
spend
spill
spin
spit
split
spoil
shrove
shut
sang
sank/sunk
sat
slew/slayed
slept
slid
slung/slang
slunk/slank
slit
smelled/smelt
smote/smit
sneaked/snuck
sowed
spoke
sped/speeded
spelled/spelt
spent
spilled/spilt
span/spun
spit/spat
split
spoiled/spoilt
shriven
shut
sung
sunk (sunken)
sat
slain/slayed
slept
slid/slidden
slung
slunk
slit
smelled/smelt
smitten
sneaked/snuck
sowed/sown
spoken
sped/speeded
spelled/spelt
spent
spilled/spilt
spun
spit/spat
split
spoiled/spoilt
spread
spring
stand
steal
stick
sting
stink
strew
stride
strike
string
strive
swear
sweep
swell
swim
swing
take
teach
tear
tell
think
thrive
throw
spread
sprang/sprung
stood
stole
stuck
stang/stung
stank/stunk
strew/strewed
strode/strided
struck
strung
strove/strived
swore
swept
swelled
swam
swang/swung
took
taught
tore
told
thought
throve/thrived
threw
spread
sprung
stood
stolen
stuck
stung
stunk
strewn/strewed
stridden/strided
struck (stricken)
strung
striven/strived
sworn
swept
swelled (swollen)
swum
swung
taken
taught
torn
told
thought
thrived/thriven
thrown
thrust
tread
wake
wear
weave
wed
weep
wet
will
win
wind[waɪnd]
work
wring
write
thrusted/thrust
trod
woke
wore
wove
wed/wedded
wept
wet/wetted
would
won
wound [waʊnd]
worked
wrung
wrote
thrusted/thrust
trodden/trod
woken
worn
woven
wed/wedded
wept
wet/wetted
–
won
wound [waʊnd]
worked (wrought)
wrung
written
English Prefixes with Meanings and Examples [Grammar English]
English prefixes are affixes (i.e., bound morphemes that provide lexical meaning) that are added before either simple roots or complex bases (or
operands) consisting of (a) a root and other affixes, (b) multiple roots, or (c) multiple roots and other affixes. Examples of these follow:




Undo (consisting of prefix un- and root do)
Untouchable (consisting of prefix un-, root touch, and suffix -able)
Non-childproof (consisting of prefix non-, root child, and root proof)
Non-childproofable (consisting of prefix non-, root child, root proof, and suffix -able)
English words may consist of multiple prefixes: anti-pseudo-classicism (containing both an anti- prefix and a pseudo- prefix).
In English, all prefixes are derivational. This contrasts with English suffixes, which may be either derivational or inflectional.
English prefixes
English prefixes
aaantiarchbecocounterdedisdisen-/emexforehindmalmid-
Meanings
Examples
verb > predicative adjective with progressive
afloat, atremble
aspect
not
acyclic, asexual, atonal, atheist
against, opposite
anti-freeze, antivirus, anticlimax, Antichrist
supreme, highest, worst
arch-rival, archangel
equipped with, covered with, beset with
bedeviled, becalm, bedazzle, bewitch
(pejorative or facetious)
joint, with, accompanying
co-worker, coordinator, cooperation
against, in opposition to
counteract, counterpart
reverse action, get rid of
de-emphasize
not, opposite of
disloyal, disagree
reverse action, get rid of
disconnect, disinformation
to make into, to put into, to get into
enmesh, empower
ex-husband, ex-boss, ex-colleague, exformer
friend
before, in front
forearm, forehead, forehand, forerunner
after
hindsight, hindquarters
bad(ly)
malnourish, maladjusted
middle
midstream, midlife
midiminimisoutoverpost-
medium-sized
small
wrong, astray
better, faster, longer, beyond
excessive, above
after, behind
pre-
before
proreselfsteptranstwiunun-
for, forward, in favor of
again, back
self
family relation by remarriage
across, from one place to another
two
not, against, opposite of
reverse action, deprive of, release from
below, beneath, lower in grade/dignity,
lesser, insufficient
greater, higher, or better
against, back, away (from)
relating to Africa
both
around, two, both, on both sides
not, without
up, against
underupwithAfroambiamphian-/aana-, an-
midi-length
minimarket, mini-room, minivan
misinformation, misguide, misfortune
outreach, outcome
overreact, overact, overbearing
post-election, post-graduation, post-war
prevent, previous, pre-election, pre-enter,
pre-select
propulsion, propound, pro-life
redo, revisit, rerun, reorganize
self-sufficient, self-explanatory
stepbrother, stepmother
transatlantic, transSiberian
twibill, twilight
unnecessary, unequal, undesirable, unhappy
undo, untie, unexpected, unlock
underachieve, underground, underpass,
underdeveloped, underrated
upgrade, uplift, upsurge
withstand, withcall
Afro-American, Afro-Caribbean
ambidextrous, ambitendency
amphiaster, amphitheatre, amphibian
anemic, asymmetric
anacardiaceous, anode
Anglo-
relating to England
anteantiapo-, apastroautobibiocircumcis-
before
opposite, against
away from, detached
star
self
two
life, biological
around, surrounding
on this side of
con-/com-/col-/cor-/co- together or with
contracryocryptodedemidemodeuterdidiadis-/di-/difdu-/duoeco-
opposite
ice
hidden, secret
down
half
people
second
two
through
apart
two
ecological
Anglo-Norman, Anglo-Saxon, AngloAmerican
antenatal, antechamber, antecedent
antivenom
aphelion, apogee, apomorphine
astrobiology, astrology, astronomy
autobiography, automatic, autonomy,
bicycle, biped
biology
circumnavigate
cislunar
confederation, commingle, colleague,
correlation, cohabit
contradict, contraindication
cryogenics
cryptography
depress, descend
demigod
democracy, demography
deuteragonist, deuterogamy
dicotyledon, digamy, dioxide
dialysis, diameter
differ, dissect, divide
dual, duet
ecosystem
electroen-, el-, emepi-, epEuroexextra-
electric, electricity
in
upon, at, close upon, in addition
European
out of
outside
Franco-
French, France
geogyroheterohemihomohydrohyperhypoideoidioinIndoin-, il-, im-, irinfrainterintra-
relating to the earth or its surface
spinning on an axis
different
half
same
relating to water, or using water
above, over
under or below something, low
image, idea
individual, personal, unique
in, into
relating to the Indian subcontinent
not, opposite of
below, beneath
among, between
inside, within
electro-analysis, electromagnetic
ellipsis, emphasis, energetic
ephemeron, epicentre, epidermis
Eurocentric
exit, expel, explode, exploit, explore, export
extracurricular
Francophile, Franco-British, FrancoGerman
geography, geology, geometry
gyrocopter, gyroscope, gyrosphere
heterosexual
hemimorphic, hemisphere
homogenous, homologous
hydroelectricity, hydrant
hyperthermia
hypothermia
ideograph, ideaology
idiolect, idiopathic
insert, include
Indo-European
illicit, impossible, inexact, irregular
infrared
interact, intercede, international
intravenous
isomacrmaximega-, megalometamicromono-, monmulti-, multneononomniorthopaleopanparapedperperiphotopodpolypostprepreter-
equal
long
very long, very large
great, large
after, along with, beyond, among, behind
small
sole, only
many
new
not
all
correcting or straightening
old
all, worldwide
beside, beyond
foot
through, completely, wrongly, exceedingly
around, near or adjacent
light
foot
many
after
before
beyond, past, more than
isochromatic, isotherm
macrobiotic
maxi-skirt
megastar, megalopolis
metabolism, metaphysics
microbacillus
monogamy, monotone, monosyllabic
multicultural, multi-storey, multitude
neolithic, neoclassical
nonexistent
omnipotent, omnipresent, omnivore
orthodontics, orthotropic
paleolithic
pan-African, pandemic, panorama
parallel, paranormal
pedal, pedestrian
permeate, permute
perihelion, periphrase
photoelectric, photography
podiatrist
polygon, polyhedron
postfix, postpone, postscript
predict, prepare, preview
preternatural
proproprosprotopseudopyroquasiretrosemisociosub-, supsupersuprasursyn-, sy-, syl-, symteletranstriultraunivice-
for, substitute, deputy
before
toward
first, original
false, imitation
fire
partly, almost, appearing to be but not really
backwards
half
society, social, sociological
below, under
above, over
above, over
above, over
together, with
at a distance
over, through, across
three
beyond
one, consisting of only one
deputy
proconsul
procambium
prosthesis
protoplasm, prototype
pseudonym
pyrokinetic, pyrotechnic
quasi-religious
retrograde
semicircle
sociopath
submarine, subterranean, suburban, support
supervisor, superintendent
suprarenal
surreal, surrender
syllable, symbol, synthesis, system
telegraph, telephone, telescope, television
transverse
tricycle, tripartite
ultramagnetic, ultrasonic, ultraviolet
unicycle, universal
vice-president, vice-principal, vice-admiral
Parts of Speech in English [English Grammar Lessons]
A part of speech is a category of words which have similar grammatical properties. Words that are assigned to the same part of speech generally
display similarly—they play similar roles within the grammatical structure of sentences. Commonly listed English parts of speech are noun,
verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, conjunction, interjection (08 parts of speech).
Many English words can belong to more than one part of speech. Words like neigh, break, outlaw, laser, microwave, and telephone might all be
either verbs or nouns.
This is a summary of the eight parts of speech.
Parts of Speech Table
Parts of speech
Functions
Example words
Example sentences
Noun
a word or lexical item
denoting any abstract or
concrete entity
a person (police officer, Michael),
place (coastline, London),
The cat sat on the mat.
thing (necktie, television), idea
(happiness), or quality (bravery)
Verb
a word denoting an action
(walk), occurrence
(happen), or state of being
(be)
an action (walk), occurrence
(happen), or state of being (be)
That idea is interesting
Tell me something interesting.
Adjective
a modifier of a noun or
pronoun
big, brave
That’s an interesting idea
a modifier of an adjective,
very, quite
verb, or other adverb
a substitute for a noun or
them, he
noun phrase
a word that relates a noun to
another word or phrase in
in, of
the sentence and aids in
syntactic context
Frankly, I don’t believe you
Conjunction
a syntactic connector; links
and, but
words, phrases, or clauses
He is not only handsome, but also
brilliant.
Interjection
an emotional greeting or
exclamation
Well, that’s great
Adverb
Pronoun
Preposition
Hurrah, Alas, well
That reminds me of something.
The cat is in the box
Grammar English Mistake: Most Common Grammatical Mistakes
of English Learners
The English Language is a difficult beast to tie down. Even those rules which we consider mandatory may actually change very quickly,
especially with words moving into ever more fleeting media. However, there are a few mistakes which – for now at least – can make you look
very silly…
Most Common Grammatical Mistakes of English Learners
Grammar English Mistake 1. Adapt vs. Adopt
‘Adapt’ and ‘adopt’ share similar spellings and similar meanings, but they are not one and the same.
To ‘adapt’ is to become or make something suitable to an environment or condition.
For Example:
“It took me a long time after college to adapt to life in the office.”
“An inability to adapt will prove an obstacle on the road to success.”
To ‘adopt’ is to take something and use it as or make it your own.
For Example:
“I adopted his policy of neutrality and stayed out of trouble.”
“We are planning to adopt a child.”
Grammar English Mistake 2. Lose vs. Loose
“Lose” is a verb, to come to be without something; to suffer the loss of something.
For Example:
“I do not wish to lose more weight.”
“I was about to lose my ear ring.”
“She cannot stand the thought of losing him.”
“Loose” is an adjective, free or released from attachment; not bound together; not strict.
For Example:
“My belt is very loose around my waist.”
“She likes to wear her hair loose and free.”
“That is a loose interpretation of our document.”
Grammar English Mistake 3. Will vs. Going to
‘Will’ and ‘going to’ are the two forms of simple future used in English. They are used more or less interchangeably, but there are certain subtle
differences between them that even many experienced English speakers are not aware of. The main rule to keep in mind is that: if the decision to
act was made before the time of speaking, ‘going to’ must be used; if not, ‘will’ must be used.
Will
There are two primary distinct uses for‘will’:
To express voluntary action. Voluntary action refers to the following:









Any action that the speaker offers to perform.
“I will take you up on that offer.”
“I will get you your breakfast in bed.”
Any action that the speaker declines to perform.
“I will not (won’t) be able to come for your party.”
“I will not do your work for you.”
Any action that the speaker requests the listener to perform.
“Will you come home on Friday night?”
“Will you take me to the amusement park?”
To express a promise.
“I will come back to work as soon as I make a full recovery.”
“I will call you later tonight.”
Going to
There is one primary distinction for use of ‘going to’: it is used to express plans, i.e. the intention of the speaker to do something in the future.
This can take two forms:
To state such an intention:
“I am going for the match on Thursday”
“I am going to ensure that we have fun on this trip.”
To ask about such an intention:
“Are you going to watch the match on Thursday?”
“Are you going to the Zoo with the others?”
Will/Going to
Both ‘will’ and ‘going to’ can be used when making predictions about the future.
“It looks like it will rain today”. = “It looks like it is going to rain today.”
“I don’t think he will do it” = “I don’t think he’s going to do it.”
Grammar English Mistake 4. Write vs. Right.
“Write” is a verb, to express in writing.
For Example:
“I want to learn how to write well.”
“Did you write this? Write a letter to Mom”
“Right” is an adjective, correct, justified, suitable, opposite of left.
For Example:
“The little boy knew right versus wrong.”
“It’s the right way to do things.”
Grammar English Mistake 5. Beside vs. Besides
It is easy to confuse ‘beside’ and ‘besides’, but they are not one and the same thing. ‘Beside’ is a preposition, whereas ‘besides’ works as both a
preposition and an adverb, and although ‘ besides’ is sometimes used in place of ‘beside’, they have distinct meaning.
‘Beside’ means ‘by or at the side of’.
For example: “He stood beside his new car proudly.”
As a preposition, ‘besides’ means ‘in addition to’ or ‘apart from’.
For example: “What are you working on besides the research project?”
As an adverb, it means ‘furthermore’.
For example: “He was not selected because he did not have a good grasp of his concepts. Besides, he did not seem very keen.”
Grammar English Mistake 6. Here vs. Hear
“Here” is an adverb, in this place; in this spot.
For Example:
“I am here and planning to stay.”
“I wish you were here.”
“Hear” is a verb, to be within earshot; to perceive by ear.
For Example:
“I hear you.”
“We do not want to hear the policies one more time.”
Grammar English Mistake 7. Can vs. May
Many English speakers are confused about the usage of the words ‘can’ and ‘may’. For example, ‘Can I drink water?’ is incorrect. ‘May I drink
water?’ is the correct phrase to use in this case.
The key difference between ‘can’ and ‘may’ is that ‘can’ talks about ability and ‘may’ talks about permission.
Can
Can is used in two cases:
To talk about ability.
“I can finish my homework by 5 pm.”
“Can you finish your homework tonight?”
To ask or give permission informally (normally between friends)
“Can I use your pen?”
“You can use my pen?”
May
May is generally used to ask or give permission formally.
Let us take a situation between a student and a teacher.
“May I drink water?
Teacher: Yes, you may.”
Let us take a situation between two strangers.
“May I borrow your pen?
Yes, you may”
Grammar English Mistake 8. Compliment vs. Complement
Both words sound the same when pronounced, but their meanings are very different. “Compliment” means to give praise, express admiration or
giving congratulations. “Complement”, on the other hand, means completing something or to make something perfect. A good way to always
remember the difference is to remember that the word with the “e” means complete. In fact, the word complete is almost entirely spelled within
complement.
Complement
Complement is used when what you are trying to convey that something is essentially made complete with something else. For example, if you
were describing colors that look good together or a relationship involving two people who seem well matched, complement is the correct choice.
Complement functions as both a noun and a verb.

Incorrect: “The striped throw pillows complimented the sofa colors quite nicely.” (This implies that the pillows gave praise to the sofa,
which is impossible).

Correct: “The colors in the pillows complemented the stripes in the sofa very well.” (Complement is a verb in this sentence).
Compliment
Compliment is used when you are aiming to offer praise. For example, you might compliment someone on a new hairdo or on an outfit that is
particularly flattering. In its plural form it can mean you are offering multiple expressions of praise, or it can mean best wishes. Compliment
functions as both a noun and a verb.


Incorrect: “She paid her boss a complement about how well her hair highlights complement her complexion”. (The first complement is
incorrect because “her boss” does not complete anything, which is implied by spelling the word with an “e.”
Correct: “She paid her boss a nice compliment on how well her new hairdo complemented her complexion.” (Compliment is a noun in
this sentence).
Download
Related flashcards

Markup languages

– Cards

Punctuation

– Cards

Parts of speech

– Cards

Markup languages

– Cards

Linguistic morphology

– Cards

Create flashcards