MARK 3382 Branding

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Syllabus
Course: MARK 3382 Branding
Instructor: DongJun Rew
Term: Spring 2019
Office: EMAGC 3.506 (***.***.****)
Classroom: EDUC 2.502 (TR 9:25-10:40AM)
Office Hours: M 10:00-11:30 AM and by appointment ([email protected])
Almost always available by email
Textbook and/or Resource Material
Kevin Lane Keller (2013, 4th edition), Strategic Brand Management. (International version would be
accepted.) Students will be provided various reading materials via Blackboard. Lower version of
editions would be accepted.
Course Description and Prerequisites
From red hot irons pressed into cow hides to brand name tattoos , the Nike Swoosh®, air Jordan,
Pizza hut’s red hat, and the spectacle of a Lady Gaga concert, these are all examples of how branding
has evolved over time. Brand experiences are powerful statements and essential to understand how
to use branding as a strategic tool. This course focuses on brand evaluation in terms of various
theories such as brand evolution, brand symbolism, brand personality, consumer-brand
relationships, and brand strategy.
Branding experiences are part of our everyday lives and when carefully considered and
strategically implemented, branding can be the platform to success. For example, when a coffee
company establishes coffee consumption as an essential start to the working day, or when millions
of dollars can be raised for Breast Cancer Research by a simple pink ribbon, or when symbols can
instantly trigger a range of emotions based on perceptions of symbolism. These are examples of the
power of brand meaning and how brand experience can shape the daily life of consumers.
Learning Objectives/Outcomes for the Course
1. Students will learn that strategic branding is an evolutionary phenomenon.
2. Students will learn that brands are symbolic and comprise meaning beyond function.
3. Students will learn that brand personality is multi-dimensional
4. Students will learn that corporate social responsibility is an effective brand strategy
5. Students will produce a professional standard brand evaluation report
Learning objectives for core curriculum requirements
This course will require development of critical thinking skills, creativity, and new ways of thinking.
Each participant in this course has something to learn from the readings, seminars, workshops,
class discussions, and from students-student interaction. Responsible students will come to class
fully prepared to discuss the nominated topics of the day, effectively taking charge of their own
learning journey. More than that, respect for others and an individual’s learning journey, including
your own, entails putting in your best effort for every class. Many questions explored in this class
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do not necessarily have definitive answers. Therefore, it is important to share opinions,
perspectives, and expertise with each other to examine the potential perspectives.
Grading Policies
Three exams, group project (paper submission and presentation) based on the following points:
Midterms (100 points/each exam) .......................................................................................... 300
Quizzes (10 points/each quiz) ................................................................................................... 100
Group Project (Paper submission) ........................................................................................... 100
Presentation ........................................................................................................................................ 100
Total ....................................................................................................................................................... 600
There is no make-up exam, only except for limited cases (ex. Illness, death in your family,
tournament/game for university sports team, etc.). For the exception, you must submit a proper
and official document proving your circumstance within 24 hours. Group project includes a paper
submission, which includes references, and presentation. Please check the rubric for details about
paper and the submission.
Grading scale
Final course grading scale is as follows:
540 and up (90-100%)
A
480 to 539 (80-89%)
B
420 to 479 (70-79%)
C
360 to 419 (60-69%)
D
Below 359 (≤59%)
F
Calendar of Activities
Date
Topic
Week 1 (1/15)
Introduction
Week 1 (1/17)
Make a group
Week 2 (1/22)
What is Brand?
Week 2 (1/24)
Brand management
Week 3 (1/29)
C-B brand equity (CBBE)
Week 3 (1/31)
Brand positioning
Week 4 (2/5)
Brand resonance
Week 4 (2/7)
Brand value chain (BVC)
Reading/Assessment
Ch1
Quiz 1
Ch2
Quiz 2
Ch3
Week 5 (2/12)
Review
Week 5 (2/14)
Midterm 1
Week 6 (2/19)
Brand elements to build brand equity (BE) 1
Week 6 (2/21)
Brand elements to build brand equity (BE) 2
Week 7 (2/26)
Designing marketing programs 1
Week 7 (2/28)
Designing marketing programs 2
Week 8 (3/5)
Integrating marketing communications 1
Week 8 (3/7)
Integrating marketing communications 2
Quiz 3
Ch1, 2, and 3
Choose a brand
Ch4
Quiz 4
Ch5
Quiz 5
Ch6
Quiz 6
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Spring break (no classes, 3/11-15)
Week 10 (3/19)
Leveraging secondary brand associations 1
Week 10 (3/21)
Leveraging secondary brand associations 2
Week 11 (3/26)
Review
Week 11 (3/28)
Midterm 2
Week 12 (4/2)
Developing BE measurement
Week 12 (4/4)
BE management system
Week 13 (4/9)
Measuring sources of BE
Week 13 (4/11)
Capturing customer mind-set
Week 14 (4/16)
Measuring outcomes of BE/market performance
Week 14 (4/18)
Review
Week 15 (4/23)
Midterm 3
Week 15 (4/25)
Individual consultation by appointment
Week 16 (4/30)
Show time (Presentation)
Week 16 (5/2)
Independent study day (no class)
Week 17 (5/8)
Final paper submission (max. 5 pages)
Ch7
Quiz 7
Ch4, 5, 6, 7
Make your own brand
Ch8
Quiz 8
Ch9
Quiz 9
Ch10/Quiz 10
Ch8, 9, 10
Tell us your brand story
Due on 5/8 (11:59PM)
*This schedule is tentative. It could be changed by the instructor. Please stay tuned for updates.
UTRGV Policy Statements
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
If you have a documented disability (physical, psychological, learning, or other disability which
affects your academic performance) and would like to receive academic accommodations, please
inform your instructor and contact Student Accessibility Services to schedule an appointment to
initiate services. It is recommended that you schedule an appointment with Student Accessibility
Services before classes start. However, accommodations can be provided at any time. Brownsville
Campus: Student Accessibility Services is located in Cortez Hall Room 129 and can be contacted by
phone at (956) 882-7374 (Voice) or via email at [email protected] Edinburg Campus: Student
Accessibility Services is located in 108 University Center and can be contacted by phone at (956)
665-7005 (Voice), (956) 665-3840 (Fax), or via email at [email protected]
MANDATORY COURSE EVALUATION PERIOD:
Students are required to complete an ONLINE evaluation of this course, accessed through your
UTRGV account (http://my.utrgv.edu); you will be contacted through email with further
instructions. Students who complete their evaluations will have priority access to their grades.
Online evaluations will be available:
Spring 2019 Module 1
February 13 – February 19
Spring 2019 Module 2
April 10 – April 16
Spring 2019 (full semester) April 10 – May 1
ATTENDANCE:
Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes and may be dropped from the course for
excessive absences. UTRGV’s attendance policy excuses students from attending class if they are
participating in officially sponsored university activities, such as athletics; for observance of
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religious holy days; or for military service. Students should contact the instructor in advance of the
excused absence and arrange to make up missed work or examinations.
For any student, absences in excess of three class hours without acceptable documentation may
result in a failing grade or a drop from the course. The faculty member will check for attendance
randomly in different ways. Students will also be asked to sign the class attendance roll at the end
of the lecture. Please note that any student signing the roll for another student who is absent from
class will be dropped from the course. Random checks of the signed roll will be made periodically.
Any student who has a signature on the roll but is not present when the name is called will also be
dropped.
SCHOLASTIC INTEGRITY:
As members of a community dedicated to Honesty, Integrity and Respect, students are reminded
that those who engage in scholastic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary penalties, including the
possibility of failure in the course and expulsion from the University. Scholastic dishonesty includes
but is not limited to: cheating, plagiarism, and collusion; submission for credit of any work or
materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person; taking an examination for
another person; any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student; or the attempt to commit
such acts. Since scholastic dishonesty harms the individual, all students and the integrity of the
University, policies on scholastic dishonesty will be strictly enforced (Board of Regents Rules and
Regulations and UTRGV Academic Integrity Guidelines). All scholastic dishonesty incidents will be
reported to the Dean of Students.
SEXUAL HARASSMENT, DISCRIMINATION, and VIOLENCE:
In accordance with UT System regulations, your instructor is a “responsible employee” for
reporting purposes under Title IX regulations and so must report any instance, occurring during a
student’s time in college, of sexual assault, stalking, dating violence, domestic violence, or sexual
harassment about which she/he becomes aware during this course through writing, discussion, or
personal disclosure. More information can be found at www.utrgv.edu/equity, including
confidential resources available on campus. The faculty and staff of UTRGV actively strive to
provide a learning, working, and living environment that promotes personal integrity, civility, and
mutual respect in an environment free from sexual misconduct and discrimination.
COURSE DROPS:
According to UTRGV policy, students may drop any class without penalty earning a grade of DR
until the official drop date. Following that date, students must be assigned a letter grade and can no
longer drop the class. Students considering dropping the class should be aware of the “3-peat rule”
and the “6-drop” rule so they can recognize how dropped classes may affect their academic success.
The 6-drop rule refers to Texas law that dictates that undergraduate students may not drop more
than six courses during their undergraduate career. Courses dropped at other Texas public higher
education institutions will count toward the six-course drop limit. The 3-peat rule refers to
additional fees charged to students who take the same class for the third time.
STUDENT SERVICES:
Students who demonstrate financial need have a variety of options when it comes to paying for
college costs, such as scholarships, grants, loans and work-study. Students should visit the Students
Services Center (U Central) for additional information. U Central is located in BMAIN 1.100
(Brownsville) or ESSBL 1.145 (Edinburg) or can be reached by email ([email protected]) or
telephone: (888) 882-4026. In addition to financial aid, U Central can assist students with
registration and admissions.
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Students seeking academic help in their studies can use university resources in addition to an
instructor’s office hours. University Resources include the Learning Center, Writing Center,
Advising Center and Career Center. The centers provide services such as tutoring, writing help,
critical thinking, study skills, degree planning, and student employment. Locations are:
 Learning center:
BSTUN 2.10 (Brownsville) or ELCTR 100 (Edinburg)
 Writing center:
BLIBR 3.206 (Brownsville) or ESTAC 3.119 (Edinburg)
 Advising center:
BMAIN 1.400 (Brownsville) or ESWKH 101 (Edinburg)
 Career center:
BCRTZ 129 (Brownsville) or ESSBL 2.101 (Edinburg)
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