NAPLAN PERSUASIVE WRITING MARKING CRITERIA

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NAPLAN PERSUASIVE WRITING MARKING CRITERIA
0
Audience
Text
structure
How well the writer
oriented, engaged
and persuaded the
reader
Combination of an
introduction, body
and conclusion into
an appropriate and
effective text.
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Unreadable
symbols or
drawings
No evidence of
any structure
Incorrect
genre
1
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Ideas
Are ideas relevant to
the topic and
elaborated on?
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No evidence
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Persuasive
devices
Are persuasive
devices used
effectively?
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No evidence
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Vocabulary
Cohesion
Is there a range of
language used
accurately?
Does the text flow
together nicely
through use of
referring words,
ellipsis, connectives
etc.
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Symbols or
drawings
Symbols or
drawings
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Very short text
with very simple
content. (1 or 2
sentences)
Only one element
of persuasive
structure (ie
introduction or
body)
List of beliefs or
statements
One statement of
opinion and/or
reason.
One idea OR
Ideas appear
unrelated OR
Ideas are off topic
Uses a statement of
personal opinion
AND/OR
Uses simple
devices (“I think…”,
‘very very’; ‘should…
because’)
Very short script
Few words
Links are missing
or incorrect
Short and
confusing for the
reader
2
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Text might be short
but easy to read
Attempt to orient the
reader.
3
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Two clearly
identifiable structural
components OR
All components
present but weak.
Underdeveloped
introduction and
conclusion
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One idea with simple
elaboration OR
Ideas are related but
not elaborated
Lots of simple ideas
but no elaboration
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Uses persuasive
devices 3 or more
times (at least two
types) that support the
position but do not
persuade the reader
Ineffective devices
Mostly simple words
Simple comparisons
May include 2 or 4
precise words or word
groups
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Some correct links
between sentences.
Reader may need to
re-read to clarify
meaning
Small selection of
simple connectives
Ordinal adverbs
(firstly, secondly)
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Orients the reader
Contains enough
information for reader to
follow quite easily.
Text contains an
introduction, body and
conclusion; OR
Detailed longer text with
two well developed
components and one
weaker.
Body is developed with
reasons and supporting
evidence
Ideas supported with some
elaborations OR
4+ unelaborated ideas that
relate to argument
One idea with more
developed elaboration
Uses some devices that
persuade
Use is effective but not
sustained
May be some ineffective use
4
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Supports the reader’s
understanding (more than just
assertions and opinions)
Begins to engage and persuade
the reader through language
choices
5
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Supports, engages and
persuades the reader with
deliberate language
choices and persuasive
techniques
Ideas may include:
 Reflection on the wider world/universal issues
Elaboration by:
 Range of issues both for and against position
 Effective rebuttal of other positions and opinions
 Explaining cause and effect
 Sustained and effective use of
persuasive devices
 Many devices used which appeal
to one or more of the reader’s
reason, values or emotions.
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Controls the writer/reader
relationship
Strong, credible voice
Takes reader values and
expectations into account
 Polite, formal, personal connection with reader;
 Reveals values and attitudes and challenges reader’s values
 Appeals to reason, emotions and cultural values
Coherent, controlled and
complete argument.
Introduction with clear position
statement AND body with
reasons and supporting
evidence AND conclusion which
reinforces writer’s position.
Conclusion may recommend
action and/or reflect on issues
raised.
Ideas are elaborated and
 Ideas have been thought
contribute effectively to the
of, chosen and crafted to
writer’s position
be highly persuasive.
Sustained and consistent use of
 A range of precise and
precise words and word groups
effective words and word
that enhance meaning (some
groups used fluently and
may be inaccurately used)
articulately.
Precise words (citizen, urge, budget, consider, solution, protect, supportive, research)
Modal adjectives and adverbs (ultimate, certain, extreme, possibly, definitely, rarely)
Precise word groups (duty of care, quick-minded person, a positive impact on society)
Modal groups (it would seem that, it is unlikely that)
Technical (habitat, life expectancy, politician, global warming, financial crisis)
Figurative language – alliteration, metaphor, simile, personification
Meaning is clear on first
 An extended, highly cohesive
reading and text flows well
piece of writing showing
in a sustained piece of
continuity of ideas and tightly
writing
linked sections of text.
Word associations to avoid
 Consistent use of devices such as
repetition
referring words, ellipsis, text
(sanctuaty/enclosure)
connectives, substitutions and
word associations that enhance
May use other connectives
meaning.
(however, although,
therefore, additionally,
instead, even though, finally,
in saying this)
Four or more precise words
or word groups
6
Paragraphing Isthe text organized
into paragraphs that
make it easy to
follow?
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Block of text
No paragraphs
Random
breaks
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Contains at least
one correct
paragraph break
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Sentence
structure
Is writing
grammatically
correct and
meaningful?
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No sentences
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Some correct
sentences
Overuse of ‘and’
and ‘then’.
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Paragraphs are correct
but basic
Not all topic sentences
are successful
Body needs at least 2
paragraphs
May use an extended
one sentence
paragraph that
contains an elaborated
idea
Correct sentences are
mostly simple and/or
compound sentences
Meaning is mostly
clear.
2 or more correct
sentences required
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Paragraphs are ordered and
build the argument up
gradually across the text
Deliberately structured to
pace and direct the reader’s
attention
Single sentence may be
used as a final comment for
emphasis
Most simple and compound
sentences correct AND
Some complex sentences
are correct
Meaning is predominantly
clear
4 or more correct sentences
required
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Most simple, compound and
complex sentences are correct
OR
All simple, compound and
complex sentences are correct
but do not demonstrate variety.
Meaning is clear
Allow for occasional minor error
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Punctuation
Is punctuation
correct and
appropriate
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No evidence
Spelling
Is spelling accurate
and does it include
some difficult words?
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No
conventional
spelling
SIMPLE WORDS
 Single syllable words with:
 Short vowels (cat, men, fit, fun)
 Consonant digraphs (shop, thin, much)
 Consonant blends (clap, drop, bring, just)
 Double final consonants (egg, will, less)
 High frequency long vowel single syllable words (day,
name, feet, like, food , you)
 Other high frequency single-syllable words with long
sounds (park, new, bird, her, good, for, our, how)
 High frequency short 2 syllable words (into, undo, even,
going)
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All sentences correct
(allow occasional slip ie
missing word)
Writing contains controlled
and well developed
sentences that express
precise meaning and are
consistently effective
Variety:
Clause types and patterns (verbless, adjectival, adverbial,
multiple, non-finite)
Dependent clause position
Length and rhythm
Increased elaboration and extension
Some correct use of
 All sentence punctuation
 Writing contains accurate use of
sentence level
correct
all applicable punctuation
punctuation (at least 2  Mostly correct use of other
 Provides precise markers to
accurately punctuated
punctuation, including noun
pace and control reading of the
sentences – beginning
capitalisation
text
and end) OR
 One correctly
punctuated sentence
and some other form
of punctuation corrent
where required
 Sentence Punctuation – capitals to begin sentences, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to end sentences
 Other Punctuation – apostrophes for contractions, commas in lists, commas to mark clauses and phrases, apostrophes for possession, capital letters and commas used
within quotation marks, quotation marks for text extracts, highlighted words and words used with ironic emphasis (‘sneer’ quotes), brackets and dashes, colons and semicolons, points of ellipsis
 Noun capitalization includes – first names and surnames, titles, place names, institution names, days/months, street names, book and film titles, holidays, historic events
 Few examples of
 Correct spelling of
 Correct spelling of most
 Correct spelling of simple words,  Correct spelling of simple
 Correct spelling of all
conventional
most simple words
simple words, most
most common words, some
words, most common
words AND at least 10
spelling
common words (at least 20)
difficult words (at least 2)
words, at least 10 difficult
difficult words and some
 Some common words
words
challenging words OR
 Incorrect difficult words do not
 Errors evident in
outnumber correct difficult
 Incorrect difficult words
 At least 15 difficult words if
common words
words
do not outnumber correct
no challenging words
difficult words
 Allow for 1 or 2 minor slips
COMMON WORDS
DIFFICULT WORDS
CHALLENGING WORDS
 Single syllable words with:
 Uneven stress patterns in multi-syllabic words
 Unusual consonant patterns (guarantee)
(chocolate, mineral)
 Harder 2 consonant blends (crack, square)
 Longer word with unstressed syllables (responsibility)
 Uncommon vowel patterns (drought, hygiene)
 3 consonant blends (stretch, catch)
 Vowel alteration patterns (brief to brevity, propose to
 Difficult subject specific (disease, habitat, predator)
proposition)
 Common long vowels (sail, again, shiny, hurt)
 Difficult homophones (practice/practise)
 Suffixes to words ending in e c or l (physically, changeable,
 Multi-syllabic words with even stress patterns (litter, plastic,
plasticity)
between, hospital)
 Suffixes where base word changes (prefer/preferred)
 Foreign words (lieutenant, nonchalant)
 Compound words
 Consonant alteration patterns (confident/confidence)
 Common homophones (there/their write/right)
 Many 3 and 4 syllable words (invisible, organize,
community)
 Suffixes that don’t change base word (jumped, sadly, adults)
 Multi-syllabic words ending in tion, sion, ture,
 Common words with silent letters (know, wrong, comb)
ible/able, ent/ant, ful, el , al, gle (hovel, brutal, ogle)
 Single syllable words ending in ould, ey, ough
 Most rule driven words (having, spitting, heavier)
Correct use of
capitals to start
sentences OR full
stops to end
sentences
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Sentences are correct
(allow for occasional
error in more
sophisticated structures)
Demonstrates variety
Meaning is clear and
sentences enhance
meaning
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