The Raven flip book

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The Raven
Flip Flap Book
Each flap is ready for you to easily line up by using the directions on
how to assemble the organizer.
Includes:
Writing Prompts and answer key
Flip Flap Book
Questions and answer key
Directions
Literary devices and answer key
http://studyallknight.blogspot.com/2014
/09/fliptorial.html
For The Raven Flip Flap Book
Go to Print PDF.
1.
Print all the pages .I recommend card stock. If you print on white paper grayscale have
students color in tabs with crayons or pencils.
2.
The flip book is already in portrait format. There is no need to change any printer settings.
3.
Cut each page along the dashed guideline.
4.
Stack in order and line up neatly.
5.
Fasten them all together with staples in each corner along the left close to the edge.
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Design by Danielle Knight (Study All Knight), 2014
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DASHED GUIDELINE
CUT ALONG
Design by Danielle Knight (Study All Knight), 2014
Reading
Comprehension
Questions
1. What does the
narrator first think of the
raven?
a. He is scared.
b. He is intrigued.
c. He is angry that it
won't leave.
d. He is happy that it
takes his mind off
Lenore.
CUT ALONG
DASHED GUIDELINE
2. What does the reader
know is true about the
narrator?
a. He is insane.
b. He was once engaged
to Lenore.
c. He is afraid of ghosts.
d. He has had friends
leave him.
3. What does the
narrator order the raven
to do in the second-tolast stanza?
a. leave
b. speak
c. stay
d. bring Lenore back
5. What is the narrator
doing to forget his
sorrows over losing
Lenore?
a. napping
b. reading
c. drinking
d. nothing
Design by Danielle Knight (Study All Knight), 2014
4. Which of the
following does the
narrator ask the raven?
a. Will you leave me
tomorrow?
b. Who sent you?
c. Will I be reunited with
Lenore?
d. Are you a bird or
devil?
6. How does the narrator first explain how the
raven can talk?
a. The raven must be a spirit.
b. The raven is a prophet.
c. He must have misunderstood the raven.
d. A previous owner taught it to speak.
CUT ALONG
DASHED
GUIDELINE
7. The phrase “the lamplight gloated o’er” is an
example of what kind of figurative
language?
a. personification c. hyperbole
b. metaphor
d. Simile
8. Which of the following statements best
expresses the central idea of “The Raven”?
a. The raven will never leave the chamber.
b. The poet will grieve Lenore’s death forever.
c. The poet will never sleep again.
d. A talking raven is a symbol of madness.
9. The first line of each stanza
a. rhymes with the last line of the stanza.
b. rhymes with the third line of the stanza.
c. contains a rhyme with the last word of the line.
d. always ends with the word “nevermore.”
10. What happened to the narrator's love, Lenore?
a. She was killed.
c. She committed suicide.
b. She left him.
d. She died of unknown causes.
“The Raven” has how many unique
internal rhyme schemes?
Internal
Rhyming
What is the external rhyme scheme
used?
Design by Danielle Knight (Study All Knight), 2014
External
Rhyming
The rhyme schemes are found where
in each stanza?
Alliteration
Example #1:
Example #2:
What does the raven represent to the narrator?
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
Characterize the narrator’s state of mind…find 2 pieces of evidence to
support this claim. _________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
Find 5 descriptive words about the Raven from the poem.
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________
The Raven Answer Key
1. B
2. D
3. A
4. C
5. B
6. D
7. A
8. B
9. C
10. D
Find 5 descriptive words about the Raven
from the poem.
Raven itself is described as stately, ebony, ghastly, grim and ancient.
What does the raven represent to the narrator?
The hope of the speaker throughout the poem is that somehow his lost Lenore will come back to him. The raven repeatedly
tells the narrator that this is not going to happen. So the symbolic meaning of the raven is despair: the utter loss of all hope.
“The Raven” has how many unique
internal rhyme schemes? Two
Internal
Rhyming
External
Rhyming
The rhyme schemes are found where
in each stanza?
one in the 1st line of each stanza,
and a second in the 3rd and part of
the 4th line of each stanza.
What is the external rhyme scheme
used?
ABCBBB
Alliteration
Example #1:
What is this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt
and ominous bird of yore?
Doubting, dreaming, dreams no mortal
ever dared to dream
Example #2:
While I nodded, nearly napping
There are many examples throughout
Characterize the narrator’s state of mind…find 2 pieces of evidence to support this claim
He describes himself as "weak and weary." He was so weary that he didn't even get up to answer the knocking at his
door. He then describes, in more detail, his emotional state. He is longing for his lost love, a bit depressed, and had sought
an escape from that longing in his book. He says, "eagerly I wished the morrow," and he has "sorrow for the lost Lenore".
But then, he starts to become alarmed and scared. He says the knocking "filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before"
and he gathers courage to go open the door. He stands there, describing his emotional state. He is "wondering, fearing,
doubting, dreaming." He is really disturbed now, and getting a bit freaked out. He stays pretty scared. Later he opens the
door again "with many a flirt and flutter" of his heart.
Once the raven appears, his fear turns to awe and amazement as it speaks the words, "Nevermore." He says, "much I
marvelled", and he was "startled much that the stillness was broken". He then turns ponderous. He sits down and "betook
myself to linking Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—...Meant in croaking 'Nevermore.'" But then, he
gets anxious and angry that he can't figure out what the bird means. He demands to know, he yells, he frets, "implores",
"shrieks", to no avail.
So, throughout the course of the poem he goes from weary, to terrified, to startled and awed, to ponderous, to angry and
demanding.
Design by Danielle Knight (Study All Knight), 2014
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