Language Concerns Parent Handout- (derived from TOLD test)

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 Nicole Mikaelian, Natalie O’Connor, Chloe Brown Speech Production ★
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It is difficult for adults and peers to understand your child Your child presents with a stutter when attempting to speak Your child demonstrates avoidance behaviors when asked to speak with peers or adults Pragmatic/Social Language ★
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Your child does not participate in group play/work Your child does not code switch language styles (ex. speaking with a peer, speaking with authority) Your child demonstrates difficulty interpreting things that are not concrete or literal Your child has difficulty expressing his/her emotions Your child has a hard time following conversational rules such as asking questions/turn taking ★
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Receptive Language ★
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Your child has difficulty understanding what other people have said Your child becomes confused when asked “wh” questions Your child has difficulty following directions that are spoken to them Your child requires an extended period of wait time to process spoken words Your child has a difficult time organizing ideas Expressive Language ★
Your child has difficulty with word retrieval and elaboration (he/she may use “um” when having trouble with finding the right word) Your child has difficulty formulating sentences. His/her word order may be off, words may be omitted, and verb tense may be used inappropriately Your child has difficulty sequencing events from a life event/story ★
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What to practice at home with your child: Sentence Combining: To promote grammar and speaking, your child should be forming complex sentences using conjunctions after given at least two simple sentences. Example: ​I like milk. I like cookies →
​ ​ I like milk ​and​ cookies. Picture Vocabulary: To promote semantics and receptive language, your child should be pointing to the appropriate picture after given a series of two-word stimuli. Example: ​Cleans teeth ​→​ Dentist. Nicole Mikaelian, Natalie O’Connor, Chloe Brown Word Ordering To promote grammar and organization, your child should be able to form sentences with words in the correct order, even if the words are not presented in the correct order. Example: ​Party, a, her, surprise, was →
​ ​ Her party was a surprise or was her party a surprise? Relational Vocabulary To promote semantics and organization, your child should be able to explain how three or more word meanings are similar. Example: ​Love, hate, anger ​→​ Emotions Morphological Comprehension To promote grammar and receptive language, your child should be able to identify both correct and incorrect sentences. Example: ​If I was him, I’d go (Correct). Does those boys go to your school? (Incorrect) Multiple Meanings To promote semantics and oral language, your child should be able to create as many different meanings of a word as possible. Example: ​Nails, bark, etc. 
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