Handout09

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Warwick Business School
Agenda: techniques and applications
of conditional code

Finding an optimal solution
 Arts Centre ‘manual optimisation’ (ArtsCentre2)
 Conditional (IF) statements

‘Pseudo-code’

Operational Control system
 (English) Traffic Lights!
 ‘Select - Case’ statements :

Exercises
 Counting and Andrew’s Guessing Game!

More fun next Lesson!
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1
Basic sequence of instructions
This is what we have already seen, and is almost implicit:
Instructions execute in sequence, each
immediately after the previous instruction,
unless the code (or the user) intervenes.
e.g. Any recorded macro, such as:
Importing file of data (Order1);
generating and using a new set of random numbers;
printing a routine set of data or charts from a workbook.
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Sequence of execution of VBA
The White Rabbit put on his spectacles.
“Where shall I begin please, your Majesty?”
he asked.
“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, gravely,
“and go on until you come to the end: then Stop.”
Lewis Carroll: Alice in Wonderland
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2
Conditional instructions
Often you need the application to perform different actions
depending on the situation
(as represented by certain variables).
This diverts (‘branches’) the sequence of instructions.
Basic syntax:
Should I do a
spin on this
programme?
If Condition Then
Instructions
Else
Instructions
End If
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Structured Programming in VBA
Conditional statements in VBA
Example: Arts Centre problem
Dynamic method to find the maximum revenue:
First, express a simple algorithm,
using ‘Pseudo-code’:
Set optimum revenue, optimum # tickets to 0
Add 1 to # tickets
If Revenue for this # tickets > previous maximum Then
Save current # tickets and new optimal revenue
End If
Notice how we use additional cells in the user interface,
and preferably name them for easy use in the macro.
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3
Structured Programming in VBA
Conditional statements in VBA
Next, write the code in VBA
Sub Increment()
'N.B. Ensure variables are initialised before starting
Range("TicketsInput").Value = Range("TicketsInput").Value + 1
If Range("RevenueOutput").Value > Range("OptimalRevenue").Value Then
'new maximum revenue, so replace the old one
Range("OptimalRevenue").Value = Range("RevenueOutput").Value
Range("OptimalTickets").Value = Range("TicketsInput").Value
End If
End Sub
Watch & Test how this VBA code executes,
and how it interacts with the spreadsheet
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ArtsCentre1a -> ArtsCentre2.xlsm
‘Pseudo-code’:
an intermediate representation of code

A method of expressing program logic in a
structured way, whilst not constrained by the need
to know detailed nor accurate VBA code/syntax

“Your own language”
 Keywords for conditions and loops
 Indentation to emphasise blocks of code within
conditions or loops (structure)
 Description of instructions rather than VBA syntax

Uses:
 Planning/designing; Documentation
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4
Flowchart vs Pseudo-code
maps directly
on to
structured VBA
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http://www.slideshare.net/nicky_walters/pseudocode-flowcharts
Conditional statements in VBA
Example: TrafficLights0
Write the pseudo-code:
1.
How do we most easily
refer to the ‘Red light’ cell?
2.
How do we instruct Excel
to change its colour?
3.
How do we express the
conditions?
We examine different ways to code this.
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5
The full logic.
But what is wrong with this ‘pseudo-code’?:
If Red light is on and Yellow light is off Then
Set Yellow light on
End if
If Red light is on And Yellow light is on Then
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light on
End if
If Green light is on Then
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
End if
If Yellow light is on And Green light is off Then
Set Yellow light off
Set Red light on
End if
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TrafficLights0: ChangeError
‘Nested’ IF instructions
You might want to (pseudo-) code:
If Red light is on Then
If Yellow light is off then
Set Yellow light on
Else
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light on
End if
Else
If Green light is on Then
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
Else
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light off
End if
End if
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This will work, but …
TrafficLights0: ChangeNoStateNested
6
‘Nested’ IF instructions
The condition
This block of
instructions is
followed if the
condition is TRUE
These block of
instructions are
followed if the
condition is FALSE
If Red light is on Then
If Yellow light is off then
Set Yellow light on
Else
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light on
End if
Else
If Green light is on Then
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
Else
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light off
End if
End if
The condition
This instruction is
followed if the
condition is TRUE
These instructions
are followed if the
condition is FALSE
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Conditional statements format

The following is valid:
If Condition then
Else
Instruction
End If

Do nothing if the
condition is true
It could be expressed alternatively:
If Not(Condition) then
Instruction
End If

Or even (if there is only one instruction)
If Not(Condition) then Instruction
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7
Conditional statements in VBA
You can use ELSEIF to separate the different conditions more clearly
If
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed And
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite And
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Note:
‘Compound
conditions’
ELSEIF
...
But beware if your code shows ‘ELSEIF:’
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TrafficLights0: ChangeNoState
Conditional statements in VBA
This ‘shortcut’ works: is it robust?
If Red
Set
ElseIf
Set
Set
Set
ElseIf
Set
Set
ElseIf
Set
Set
ENDIF
light is On And Yellow light is Off Then
Yellow light On
Red light is on and Yellow light is On Then
Red light Off
Yellow light Off
Green light ON
Green light is ON Then
Yellow light ON
Green light Off
Yellow light is ON Then
Red light ON
Yellow light OFF
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TrafficLights0: ChangeNoStateShortcut
8
Conditional statements in VBA
Smarter coding technique: recognise the independent ‘cases’ / ‘states’
Don’t worry about coding the shapes – for now!
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‘State’
If State=4 then
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light off
Set State = 1
Traffic Lights
pseudo-code
Else
If State=1
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
Set State = 2
Else
If State=2
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light on
Set State = 3
…
End If
End If
End If
Note the use of ‘Abstraction’
and the use of a ‘control variable’
to represent the different ‘states’.
Neater, clearer, more systematic,
more robust.
How will we code this instruction?
Uses Nested IF again; the
indentation is a little unwieldy
Add code for State=3 (Ex)
TrafficLights0: ChangeStateNested
9
‘State’
Select Case State
Case 4
Traffic Lights
pseudo-code
i.e. If State=4
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light off
Set State = 1
Case 1
i.e. If State=1
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
Set State = 2
Case 2
i.e. If State=2
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light on
Set State = 3
Now still systematic
and robust,
but also explicitly indicates
exclusive conditions,
and saves VBA some work.
…
End Select
Add code for State=3 (Ex)
TrafficLights0: ChangeStateSelect
‘State’
State = State + 1
If State > 4 Then State = 1
Select Case State
Case 1
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light off
Set Green light off
Case 2
Traffic Lights
pseudo-code:
the most
elegant solution
Set Red light on
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
Case 3
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light off
Automatic increment of ‘State’,
with a condition that makes it
cycle round values 1-4.
Set Green light on
…
End Select
Case 4
Set Red light off
Set Yellow light on
Set Green light off
TrafficLights0: ChangeStateAutoSelect
10
Tips for working with VBA

You cannot record conditions,
(nor loop instructions)!

You cannot ‘Undo’ macro actions! 
Save your model first!
X
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Interactive Guessing Game




The computer thinks of a (random) number
between 1 and 10
We guess what the number is
The computer tells us whether our guess is correct,
too low or too high
We win if we guess the number using three or
fewer guesses!
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Guess0
11
Conditional statements in VBA
Conditional instruction patterns - summary
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Conditional statements in VBA
Special case: a single conditional instruction
No ‘Else’ nor ‘Endif’ is needed:
If Condition Then Instruction (on one line only)
The ‘IF’ instruction is terminated after this line
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12
Conditional statements in VBA
Compound conditions
If (Condition1 and Condition2) Then
Instruction
Else
Instruction
End If
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Conditional statements in VBA
Nested conditions
If Condition C1 Then
If Condition C2 Then
Instruction “C1 C2”
Else
Instruction “C1 Not C2”
End If
Else
Instruction “Not C1”
End If
e.g. TrafficLights1, Guessing game (soon); Count2 (Ex)
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13
Conditional statements in VBA
Another variation for exclusive conditions
(ensure Instruction is on a new line)
If Condition1 Then
Instruction1
ElseIf Condition2 Then
Instruction2
ElseIf Condition3 Then
Instruction3
ElseIf Condition4 Then
Instruction4
Else
Error?
End If
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Conditional statements in VBA
General syntax for exclusive conditions that depend on the
value of a single variable
Select Case VariableName
Case 1,5
Instruction 1
Case 2 to 4
Instruction 2
Case 6 to 9
Instruction 3
Case 10
Instruction 4
Case Else
Error?
End Select
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14
Arts_Centre_2.xlsm (a)
Sub Increment()
' N.B. Ensure Tickets_Input, Optimal_Revenue, Optimal_tickets are
initialised to 0 before starting
Range("Tickets_Input").Value = Range("Tickets_Input").Value + 1
If Range("Revenue_Output").Value > Range("Optimal_Revenue").Value Then
'new maximum revenue so replace the old one
Range("Optimal_Revenue").Value = Range("Revenue_Output").Value
Range("Optimal_Tickets").Value = Range("Tickets_Input").Value
End If
End Sub
' Sort_Revenue Macro
'
Sub Sort_Revenue()
' Sort
Application.Goto Reference:="What_If"
Selection.Sort Key1:=Range("D23"), Order1:=xlAscending, Header:=xlNo, _
OrderCustom:=1, MatchCase:=False, Orientation:=xlTopToBottom, _
DataOption1:=xlSortNormal
End Sub
TrafficLights0 macros
' Traffic Lights macros: NoStateVariable
'
' Change Macro, without using the 'State' variable
' If you use 'ElseIf', be careful to start the actions on a new line after 'Then'
' See how much more code is needed to write the conditions to identify each 'state'.
'
Sub ChangeNoState()
If Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
And Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
And Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color =
vbYellow And Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
ElseIf Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color =
vbWhite And Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color =
vbYellow And Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End If
End Sub
Sub ChangeNoStateShortCut()
If Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Then
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
ElseIf Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed And Range("Yellow").Interior.Color =
vbYellow Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
ElseIf Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen Then
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End If
End Sub
Sub ChangeNoStateNested()
If Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed Then
If Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite Then
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Else
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
End If
Else
If Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen Then
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Else
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End If
End If
End Sub
'
Traffic Lights macros: BestSolution
'
' Change Macro
'
Sub ChangeStateAutoSelect()
Range("State").Value = Range("State").Value + 1
If Range("State").Value > 4 Then Range("State").Value = 1
Select Case Range("State").Value
Case 1
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Case 2
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Case 3
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
Case 4
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End Select
End Sub
' Set Lights to 'Off' (state 0)
'
Sub SetOff()
Range("State").Value = 0
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End Sub
'
Sub Auto_Open()
'automatically runs when the spreadsheet is opened
SetOff
End Sub
'
'
Traffic Lights macros
'The rest of these examples show alternative equivalent approaches; some are a little neater
'To use one of these, attach its name to the Change button on the worksheet (Right click|Assign
Macro)
'N.B. Each of these needs finishing off to code the final situation (state 4, yellow light only)
(Ex)
Sub ChangeStateNested()
' Change Macro using nested IFs
' This works fine, but does not demonstrate that each state is mutually exclusive
'
If Range("State").Value = 4 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("State").Value = 1
Else
If Range("State").Value = 1 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("State").Value = 2
Else
If Range("State").Value = 2 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
Range("State").Value = 3
End If
End If
End If
End Sub
Sub ChangeStateSelect()
' Change Macro using Select
' This works fine, and clearly demonstrates that each state is mutually exclusive
Select Case Range("State")
Case 4
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("State").Value = 1
Case 1
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("State").Value = 2
Case 2
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
Range("State").Value = 3
End Select
End Sub
Sub ChangeStateAutoNested()
' This version uses independent IF statements.
' Only one If statement will be true, so why make VBA check the others?
Range("State").Value = Range("State").Value + 1
If Range("State").Value > 4 Then Range("State").Value = 1
If Range("State").Value = 1 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End If
If Range("State").Value = 2 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
End If
If Range("State").Value = 3 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
End If
End Sub
Sub ChangeStateAutoElseIf()
' Change Macro using Elseif for exclusive conditions
' If you use Elseif, be careful to start the actions on a new line after 'Then'
'
Range("State").Value = Range("State").Value + 1
If Range("State").Value > 4 Then Range("State").Value = 1
If Range("State").Value = 1 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("State").Value = 2 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbRed
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbYellow
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbWhite
ElseIf Range("State").Value = 3 Then
Range("Red").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Yellow").Interior.Color = vbWhite
Range("Green").Interior.Color = vbGreen
End If
End Sub
Guess0
' Can you cheat on your score if you win in two guesses?
'
Guess0 Module 1
'
' Button1_Click Macro
' Generate
'
Sub Button1_Click()
Range("Number") = Int(Rnd() * 10 + 1)
'Generate number and put in Answer sheet
'(uses range name)
Range("Number_of_Guesses") = 0
'Initialise number of guesses
for new game
End Sub
'
' Button2_Click Macro
' Guess
'
Sub Button2_Click()
Range("Number_of_Guesses").Value = Range("Number_of_Guesses").Value + 1
'
Increment the number of guesses
'
Test the guess
If Range("Guess").Value = Range("Number") And
Range("Number_of_Guesses").Value <= 3 Then
'
Guess is correct and <=3 guesses
MsgBox ("You won; did you cheat?!")
Else
If Range("Number_of_Guesses").Value < 3 Then
'
Guess is wrong but guesses remaining
If Range("Guess").Value < Range("Number") Then
MsgBox ("Too low, try again")
Else
MsgBox ("Too high, try again")
End If
Else
'
Guess is wrong - too late!
MsgBox ("Ha Ha, I won : the number was " & Range("Number"))
End If
End If
End Sub
Mod, Quotient: Worksheet Function vs VBA
This table should help to understand the roles of Mod, Quotient etc. They are not the most common
functions, but happen to have been useful for my examples. It is unfortunate that these are amongst
the few worksheet functions that do not work in VBA!
Meaning
The whole number of
multiples of B in A
The remainder of A when
divided by B
Formula
Quotient (A, B)
VBA
A\B
Example
5\3=1
Mod (A, B)
A Mod B
5 Mod 3 = 2
Excel / VBA Exercises 2018-2019
Lesson 9
1.
*In the macros of TrafficLights0 example, note the alternative instructions for changing the sequence
in the ‘AlternativeStructures’ module. These all use the ‘State’ variable, that offers a simple
representation of the current signal from the lights. The different macros simply use alternative
conditional controls constructs; which is the best?
For practice, finish each of these to manage the final change of lights from green to yellow.
2.
*Add buttons to reset the lights to an initial state (state 0) of ‘all lights off’, and if necessary to start
the sequence of lights. Compare the code in TrafficlLights0.
3.
Code instructions that implement in VBA the method introduced in the lecture but without using the
‘State’ variable i.e. (in VBA) ‘If Red light is on and Yellow light is on Then Set Red light off …’.
Compare with TrafficLights0: ChangeNoState () in Module ‘NoStateVariable’. Note how ‘wordy’ this
is, and how the logic is less clear as a result.
4.
In the pseudo-code examples for Traffic Lights in the lecture slides, check which versions are exactly
equivalent and work as required, and make sure you understand why one version (ChangeError) does
not work.34
5.
*Note that you cannot record a macro to ‘Count’. Check out why, by trying.35
6.
Enhance the counting macro to help support you play the following game with a young niece or a
nephew at Christmas or New Year celebrations (with embarrassment for exposing my sad
childhood!):
If the number shown is divisible by 5, the person must shout ‘Fizz’
If the number shown is divisible by 7, the person must shout ‘Buzz’
If the number shown is divisible by both 5 and 7, the person must shout ‘Fizz-Buzz’
The computer should show whether the person got it right, a) using a cell formula and a message in a
cell36 and b) using a macro and showing a message box!
34
This macro is coded in Change_Error Module Error() of TrafficLights0 if you want to check it out (run the macro
directly from VBA or right click the Button and attach it to that macro). If you wish,
Trace it using the ‘Step into’ (F8) button in the Debug toolbar in VBA to see where it goes wrong.
35
You can record putting the value 1 in a cell, but if you run it again, of course it just puts the number 1 in the cell again
(not 2, 3, …). There is not a built-in Excel command to add 1 to a cell.
36
For the formula you will need a nested IF statement. You can make use of the formula =MOD(Number,5)
which returns the remainder after dividing by 5 (try it) (QUOTIENT(Number,5) gives the number of times 5
divides into Number). Use separate cells to indicate ‘Fizz’ and ‘Buzz’ at first, then in one cell. In VBA you
can use X Mod Y and X \ Y as equivalent to the worksheet functions. Compare Count2.
(* : most important; † : difficult)
20
Excel / VBA Exercises 2018-2019
7.
* My eldest son Ben used to like to practising football shooting in the garden (now he is 30 and
prefers golf, rugby and paediatric surgery!). I kept a score of his ‘hit rate’ as he went along e.g. 1 goal
out of 4 shots, or 25%. That was OK, but 2 out of 7 was harder to calculate as a percentage, so I
decided we needed the computer to help - not to simulate, simply to record whether he scored, and to
calculate the ‘hit rate’, after each individual shot. Can you write macros that use two buttons called
‘Scored’ and ‘Saved’ to control two cells that count the number of shots and goals so far37, and use an
ordinary formula in a cell to display the ‘hit rate’ for us as a percentage?
What happens to the hit-rate if there are zero shots? Use an IF function to display something more
appropriate in this case.
Finally, add another button which will reset the score.
Optional: add a stochastic element that uses just one ’Shoot’ button and randomly determines whether
a goal is scored, and updates the hit-rate automatically.38
8.
Optional. Consider how you might like to make the guessing game more interesting and user-friendly.
9.
Design one or more ways to ensure that the user enters a valid guess in the guessing game (in
particular, they might enter text by mistake, or enter a guess outside the range 1-10):
First, use a nested IF formula39 in a nearby cell in Guess1, that displays an appropriate message
depending on the contents of ‘Guess’.
Better, add a separate ‘Check’ button that uses VBA to check whether the user has entered a valid
number for a guess, and alerts them if not.40 Even better, incorporate this code to the Guess button
code so that Guess will check that the data is valid before it goes ahead to evaluate the guess.
Even better, use Data | Data Validation method to ensure the input is valid (set up a list of numbers 110; compare with the Orders example).
a.
b.
c.
10. †Optional: puzzle. In the Count example, the counting or accumulation is done by triggering a macro.
Is it possible to have a cell which accumulates its value from a given ‘input cell’, each time the input
cell changes value, without using a macro?41
You could simply have one button to increment the value of each cell (shots, goals), but it’s more
meaningful for the user if they can press one button if they scored, and another if they missed.
38
In VBA, use ‘IF Rnd < 0.5 …’ Notice the different function name, not Rand(). Most VBA function names
are the same, but not this one! Note that you will get the same stream of random numbers every time you run
the program, unless you insert the statement RANDOMIZE (spelled with a ‘z’) to be executed ONCE, early in
the program. This command ‘shakes up’ the box of random numbers (or more technically, sets a truly random
‘seed’ for generating the numbers). Cf Goal.
37
39
Consider using the ISNUMBER(cell) and ISBLANK formula and combine two conditions by using
AND(Condition1,Condition2), which is true only if both condition 1 and condition 2 are true, or
OR(Condition1,Condition2), which is true if either condition 1 or condition 2 are true,
inside an IF statement. Check out Guess0a
40
You must first check that the entry is indeed a number, and not text. Use the VBA function
IsNumeric(range(“Guess”).value) . Nested inside this condition, you can check whether it is between 1 and 10.
Unfortunately there is no ‘IsInteger(x)’ function in VBA, but you can check whether x = Int(x), once you know that x is a
number! There are few short-cuts to such detailed checks.
41
Hint: you may use the F9 key to recalculate, together with iteration and circular references
(* : most important; † : difficult)
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