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Occupational Therapy Course Syllabi
Department of Rehabilitation Science
CHB 450-550 Public Health and Population Wellbeing
ES 370 Biomechanical Dimensions
OT 201 Introduction to Occupational Therapy
OT 217 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
OT 230 THERAPUTIC INTERACTIONS
OT 314 Pediatric Dysfunction and Occupation
OT 322 REHAB MEDICINE 2
OT 333 HUMAN OCCUPATION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
OT 341 Critical Analysis of the Scientific Literature
OT 342 Neuroscience 1 – ES OT 342
OT 344 Neuroanatomy 1 – ES OT 344
OT 346 Introduction to Scientific Writing
OT 352 OT Practice Skills II – Assistive Technology
OT 361 FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY
OT 381 Occupational Therapy Theory
OT 382 ISSUES IN OT SERVICE DELIVERY
OT 402 Group Process Skills
OT 450 ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS LABORATORY
OT 450 ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS
OT 503 Psychosocial Practice
OT 504 MANAGEMENT FOR REHAB PROFESSIONALS
OT 505 Applied Geriatrics
OT 506 Clinical Research Skills for OT
OT 507 THE ART AND SCIENCE OF SENSORY INTEGRATION AND
NEURODEVELOPMENTAL THERAPIES
OT 508 PHYSICAL DISABILITIES PRACTICE
OT 509 Community - Based Practice
OT 510 Applied Neurophysiological Processes
OT 511 APPLICATION OF THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUES
OT 521-RSC521 Statistical Analysis Group Design
OT 522 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY FOR CLINICAL PROBLEMS
OT 530 Computer Access
OT 544 APPLIED PEDIATRICS
OT 563 PROJECT GUIDANCE 1
OT 564 PROJECT GUIDANCE
OTD 517 Principles of Occupational Therapy with the Physically Disabled
OTD 532 SOCIETAL IMPACT ON PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
OTD 551 THEORY OF OCCUPATION
OTE 514 ADVANCED EVALUATION AND TREATMENT PRINCIPLES I
OTE 515 ADVANCED EVALUATION AND TREATMENT PRINCIPLES II
RSC 570 Culture and Disability
RSC 610 Rehabilitation Environments
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
Course Title and Number: Public Health and Population Wellbeing (CHB 450/550) Department Name: Community Health and Health Behavior Semester: Fall Year: 2013 Course No.: CHB 450/550 Class Day/Time: ONLINE + Discussion Section Public Health and Population Wellbeing Class Location: ONLINE + Discussion Section Course Title: Format: LEC Prerequisite(s): 450: Junior/Senior Standing 550: Graduate‐level standing Instructor(s): Marc T. Kiviniemi, Ph.D. Office: 314 Kimball Tower Phone Number(s): (716) 829‐6955 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Monday 1:30‐2:30pm // Tuesday 11am‐12noon, or by appointment During office hours, we will be available for in person meetings in our offices. We will also be available for virtual office hours in UBLearns. To access the virtual office hours, from our course’s UBLearns home page click on the “Office Hours Chat Room” menu link (blue bar on the left side of the page) and then click on “Office Hours”. Phone/Email: Please feel free to phone or email with questions at any time. We maintain a policy of responding to all messages (both email and phone) within 24 business hours (i.e., if you email at 3pm on Thursday, you can expect a response no later than 3pm on Friday; if you email at 3pm on Friday, you can expect a response no later than 3pm the following Monday). Marc Drop By Policy: For Marc, you can also feel free to drop by my office any time during business hours, as long as you’re okay with the possibility that I might be busy with something else or away from the office. Q&A Forums: In addition, you can communicate with us through the question and answer forums on UBLearns. There is a general Q&A forum for overall class policy questions. Specific forums will be available for each class week and for major assignments. As with email/phone, we will monitor and respond to forum‐related needs within 24 business hours. Page 1 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
Teaching Assistant (TA): Susan LaValley / Karen O’Quin TA Office: Kimball Tower 324 TA Phone Number: (716) 829‐6681 TA Email: Susan: [email protected] Karen: [email protected] TA Office Hours: Susan: Thursday 1‐2pm, or by appointment Karen: Wednesday 1‐2pm, or by appointment I. (a) Course Description: Course Overview: CHB 450/550 is designed to provide you with an understanding of and appreciation for population approaches to improving the health of our nation and the world, as well as knowledge of various career paths in public health. Course content will include: 1) public health perspectives on health, wellness, illness, and population well‐being 2) key influences on the health and well‐being of individuals and populations 3) assessing public health problems from a population health perspective 4) using the five core components of public health to address health problems 5) effectively utilizing health information to address public health issues 6) career paths in public health and the training/expertise required to pursue them Course Structure: The course is best described as a “blended learning” course. Your learning will be guided by both online course content (“lecture‐ettes” available online, readings, online discussion and writing activities) and in‐person, discussion section content (group activities, active learning segments, discussions, in‐person “lecture‐ettes”). Our course design for your learning incorporates both types of instructional activities. For each week of the course, there will be a “roadmap” document posted on the course UBLearns website. This document will specify all of the course activities for the week, when online learning activities need to be completed, what will be done in class during the week, and due dates for any in or out of class deliverables for the week. This document will be posted no later than 5pm on Tuesday of the week before (i.e., the Week 3 roadmap will be available no later than 5pm on Tuesday of Week 2). (b) Course Rationale/Relationship to Curriculum Design: CHB 450/550 provides a perspective on public health for students from a variety of health professions programs. As such, the specific relation to the overall program of studies differs depending on the student's program. Completion of the course should, regardless of program, provide students with an understanding of how their role within the health professions relates to and is part of the broader health care system and of how the health issues addressed in their program are influenced by population health issues. For students in academic programs housed in the School of Public Health and Health Professions, the course satisfies a program requirement for an Introduction to Public Health course. Page 2 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
II. Course Objectives / Competency / Instructional Method(s) / Assessment Method(s) Competency Objectives: knowledge, skills, Instruction method Assessment Should be able to: and behaviors 1. Define and Describe the Roles and Functions of Public Health Definepublichealthandexplainthe
characteristicsofthefield(e.g.,
population‐focused,community‐
oriented,prevention‐motivated,
androotedinsocialjustice). Readings and lectures. In class activities; class discussion Exams.
Writing Assignments Capstone project Identifythecoremissions,functions,
andessentialservicesofpublic
healthpractice.
Defineeachofthecoreareasof
publichealthanddescribetherole
ofeachinthecoremissionsand
functionsofpublichealth.
Describetheuseofpopulation‐
basedsurveillancetodeterminethe
prevalenceofchronicdiseaseand
riskforhealthproblems.
Defineanddiscriminatebetween
primary,secondary,andtertiary
prevention
Describetheprocessofusing
epidemiologicalprinciplesto
explaincausesofdiseaseusing
person,timeandplace
Page 3 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
2. Explain the interplay between public health and other health professions Characterizetherolesofhealth
professionalsandpublichealth
practitionersinhealthpromotion
anddiseaseprevention. Readings and lectures. In class activities; class discussion Explainthepublichealthprinciples
forthedevelopmentanddeliveryof
bothcondition‐specific(e.g.
improvingstrokepreventionand
treatment)andpopulation‐specific
(e.g.programstoimprovephysical
activityandnutrition)servicesfor
prevention,healthpromotion,and
wellness Exams.
Writing assignments Capstone project Explainwaysinwhichpublichealth
impactshealthissues(e.g.,
workplaceinjuries)andkey
constituents(e.g.,theelderly)inthe
student’shealthprofession. Explainthedifferencebetween
interventionstrategiesfor
addressinghealthproblemsforan
individualascomparedtoa
population,includingfactorssuchas
riskdetermination,thenatureofthe
intervention,andmechanismsfor
theevaluationofintervention
effectiveness. Usingthesocial/ecologicalmodel,
explaintheoccurrenceofahealth
problem,explainengagementina
healthbehavior,anddescribe
differentwaysofinterveningto
addressapublichealthproblem. 3. Describe and Apply Describebasicprinciplesofhealth
behaviorchangetheories,
Major Concepts of Health includingtherolesofperceived
Behavior and Health risk,expectedutilitybeliefs,social
Education norms,andself‐efficacy. Readings and lectures. In class activities; class discussion Exams.
Writing Assignments Capstone project Describethebasicstepsinvolvedin
planningandevaluatingapublic
healthprogram. Page 4 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
4. Explain the roles of ethics, policy, and government in public health Readings and lectures. Describetheroleof
branches/agenciesofgovernment,
In class activities; non‐governmentalagencies,health
class discussion careproviders,andmembersof
thegeneralpublicinensuring
publichealth. Exams.
Writing Assignments Capstone project Listandexplainbasicprinciplesof
ethicalanalysisandapplythemto
issuesofpublichealthpracticeand
policydevelopment(e.g.social
justiceorientations,PublicHealth
CodeofEthics). Describetheprocesswherebypublic
healthpoliciesaredevelopedand
discusstheinteractionandimpact
ofscience,politics,andadvocacyin
thisdevelopmentalprocess.
III. Textbooks /Equipment /Required Technologies Resource Schneider, M.J. (2014). Introduction to Public Health
(4th Ed.). Boston, MA: Jones and Bartlett.
IV. Course Requirements and Assignments Required Yes Notes Click here to enter text. Components of the Course For students taking the course at the 400‐level, there are 5 core components to your learning in this course. For students taking the course at the 500‐level, there is an additional core component, for a total of 6. 1) Online Learning Modules and Course Readings: For each week of the course, there will be online course activities (including video lecture‐ette segments, readings, and activities/writing assignments to be completed online). These online learning activities will vary from week to week. The activities for each week will be posted in a “roadmap” document on UBLearns – the roadmap will be posted no later than 5pm on Tuesday of the week before. Usually, some of the activities will need to be completed before the discussion section – explicit due dates and orders in which to complete activities will always be provided in the roadmap document. You should expect to spend 5‐6 hours/week completing the online learning modules and the course readings. 2) Discussion Section: You will meet in discussion section once each week during the regularly scheduled discussion section time (please see your individual course schedule for your discussion section time and location). The exact makeup of what we do in discussion section each week will vary Page 5 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
somewhat depending on the topic, but class will chiefly center on active learning activities, group discussion, brief lecture presentations, etc. 3) Exams: There will be three unit exams in the course. Each will take 45‐60 minutes to complete. The exams will consist of a mix of multiple choice and short answer questions. The exams will not be cumulative. In addition, on the third unit exam there will be a short cumulative final session (the third exam will take place during final exam week). 4) What Is Public Health? Assignment: You will complete an individual assignment that involves finding examples of things that you encounter in your community/life that are part of public health. You will describe and explain these things using tools learned in the course. The assignment product will involve presenting what you find and your descriptions/explanations. More details about this assignment will be provided in class. 5) Public Health Problem Analysis Group Assignment: You will be part of a small group assignment involving describing and analyzing a public health problem using concepts/tools learned in the course. Each small group will give a class presentation (during the last two weeks of the semester) about the public health problem. More details about this assignment will be provided in class. FOR STUDENTS TAKING CHB 550 6) Connections Writing Assignment: Graduate students will complete an additional written assignment. In the written assignment, you will draw connections between the public health theories/models/ways of thinking presented in the course and your own work in your area of study/desired health‐related career. This writing assignment will be described in more detail in class. V. Course Evaluation Grading procedures for the what is public health, public health problem analysis, and connections assignments are described in detail in the assignment documents which will be posted on UBLearns. For the discussion section activities and online activity course components, your performance on these activities will contribute 20 points (10 points for in class, 10 points for online) to your grade over the course of the semester. For each individual activity, you will receive a grade of 0 (did not complete), 1 (completed, minimally satisfactory performance), or 2 (completed, strong performance). At the end of the semester, we will count up how many activities you participated in and will count up how many activities were given over the course of the semester; For both the in class and the online activities, we will subtract 1 from the total number of activities so that everyone gets a “freebie”. We will then give you that percentage of the 10 possible activity points (e.g., if there were 5 activities and you completed 3 with grades of 2 on each, with the 1 “freebie” activity credit you would have (3x2)/(4x2) = 6/8 = .75 x 10 = 7.5 activity points). Page 6 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
VI. Grading Final Grade Determination For both courses (450, 550), the following percentage of points translates into letter grades. 92xx‐ 72‐ 77.9 C 92‐ 100 A 90‐ 91.9 A‐ 70‐ 71.9 C‐ 88‐ 89.9 B+ 68‐ 69.9 D+ 82‐ 87.9 B 62‐ 67.9 D 80‐ 81.9 B‐ 60‐ 61.9 D‐ 78‐ 79.9 C+ 0‐ 60 F CHB 450 You can earn a total of 100 points over the course of the semester. Points will be apportioned as follows: Three Unit Exams: 15 points each = 45 points Cumulative Final Section = 10 points Online Activity participation = 10 points Discussion Section Activity participation = 10 points This Is Public Health Project = 10 points Public Health Problem Group Project: 15 points TOTAL POINTS = 100 Undergraduate: Translating Number of Points to Letter Grades A = > 92 points C+ = 78 – 79.9 points A‐ = 90 – 91.9 points C = 72 – 77. points B+ = 88 – 89.9 points C‐ = 70 – 71.9 points B = 82 – 87.9 points D = 60 – 69.9 points B‐ = 80 – 81.9 points F = s< 60 points A note about rounding: please note that the grade translations above include the decimal points. We do not routinely round grade totals in determining letter grades (i.e., 92.1 points equates to a grade of A, 91.9 points equates to a grade of A‐). CHB 550 You can earn a total of 120 points over the course of the semester. Points will be apportioned as follows: Three Unit Exams: 15 points each = 45 points Cumulative Final Section = 10 points Online Activity participation = 10 points Discussion Section Activity participation = 10 points This Is Public Health Project = 10 points Public Health Problem Group Project: 15 points Connection to Graduate Study Paper: 20 points TOTAL POINTS = 120 Page 7 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
Graduate: Translating Number of Points to Letter Grades A = > 110 points A‐ = 108 – 109.9 points B+ = 105 – 107.9 points B = 98 – 104.9 points B‐ = 96 – 97.9 points F C+ = 93 – 95.9 points C = 86 – 92.9 points C‐ = 84 – 85.9 points D = 72 – 83.9 points = < 72 points A note about rounding: please note that the grade translations above include the decimal points. We do not routinely round grade totals in determining letter grades (i.e., 92.1 points equates to a grade of A, 91.9 points equates to a grade of A‐). VII. Other course related information None VIII. Communication We will communicate information regarding the course in three key ways: 1) Weekly “roadmap” postings in UBLearns – routine weekly plans, pre‐class activities, etc. related to the course will be included in the weekly roadmap document posted in UBLearns (described under “Course Structure” above). You are responsible for accessing each week’s roadmap and for all of the information contained there. 2) Discussion section announcements – information will also be presented in person during our regularly discussion section meeting time. If you miss a discussion section for any reason, you are responsible for getting information about in class announcements from one or more of your fellow class members. 3) Email communication – classwide email communication will be done using the email system in UBLearns. You are responsible for making sure that the email address used by UBLearns is one that you check regularly (or setting up an acceptable message forwarding system to an account you do check regularly), that messages from UBLearns and from the instructor and TAs’ email accounts are not sent to a junk email filter, and for regularly checking your email for course messages. IX. Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams, and University Policy on Incompletes in Courses • Class Attendance and Absences A note about discussion section attendance: Attendance will not be regularly taken during discussion sections. However, attendance and participation at discussion sections are essential to your success in this course for at least two reasons. First, the in class work relates to and extends the online activities and readings, but it does not replicate them; you will miss 1/3 of the course content if not in discussion section. Second, 10% of your grade is based on Page 8 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
your performance on discussion section activities. You must be present to take part in and receive a grade for these activities. If you must miss a discussion section for whatever reason, you should get notes from at least one, preferably two, of your fellow students; we will not provide class notes for students, and will not provide summaries of class activities, lectures, or announcements for absent students. • Late Assignments You are expected to complete course activities, assignments, and exams by the due dates listed in the syllabus and in other course documents. For the discussion section activities and weekly online activities, there are no “makeups” or late assignments in place. The “freebie” activity policy described under grading above is in place to account for the fact that people may need to miss class for a legitimate reason. For the major course assignments (current event writing and presentation), an assignment can only be turned in late for full credit in the event of one of the following unexpected, emergency situations: 1) an emergency situation involving an official, University sponsored function prevents you from turning in the assignment on or before the due date; 2) a medical emergency prevents you from turning in the assignment on or before the due date; 3) a family emergency prevents you from turning in the assignment on or before the due date; 4) unexpected jury duty, military service, a religious observance, or a similar obligation prevents you from turning in the assignment on or before the due date. Please note that because the due dates for these assignments are listed in this syllabus and that any of these assignments can be completed before the due date, this policy covers only unexpected, emergency situations that you couldn’t plan for ahead of time. If you know ahead of time that you will not be able to turn in the assignment on the due date, you are expected to turn in the assignment ahead of time. In these cases, you must contact the instructor as soon as possible following the emergency and must provide written documentation of the situation. Please feel free to discuss with the instructor any circumstances that may affect your ability to turn in assignments on the due date. For the major course assignments, turning in an assignment after the due date without a valid reason (as described above) will result in a penalty of 10% per day that the assignment is late (e.g., if a 10 point assignment is turned in 3 days after the due date, a 30% penalty will be deducted, so that 7 is the maximum number of points a student could earn on the assignment). • Exams and Final Exam Make‐up examinations are not normally given in this course. The only circumstances in which a makeup exam will be given are: 1) an official, University sponsored event requires you to be off campus during the exam; 2) a medical emergency prevents you from attending class; 3) a family emergency prevents you from attending class; 4) jury duty, military service, a religious observance, or a similar obligation prevents you from attending class. If you miss an examination for any reason, you must contact the instructor before the exam and you must provide written documentation of the event or emergency in order to schedule a make‐up exam. Page 9 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
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Grade Disputes: If you wish to dispute the grade assigned for any course component, your dispute must be presented IN WRITING within one week after the date when the grade is assigned (i.e., when an exam or paper is returned or when an activity grade is posted in UBLearns). You must include a specific rationale for your dispute (e.g., a reference to a specific page in a reading indicating that an answer is correct). I keep course materials for one full academic year from the beginning of the course. I will keep materials from this course until the beginning of Fall Semester 2014. • Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested. • University Policy on Incomplete Grades A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicate that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well‐defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor must specify a default letter at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12‐month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office. Students must not re‐register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade. Applicable dates regarding the 12‐month provision: Courses taken in (semester): Will default in 12 months on: Fall December 31 Spring May 31 Summer August 31 The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the students plans to graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students Page 10 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
may elect to change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form. A default grade an be “A‐,” “B+,” “B‐,” “C+,” “C‐,” “D+,” “D,” or “F.” (If a student selected an S/U grading option, it will replace the default letter grade when the grade defaults.) Disability Policy  Course Accessibility Accommodations I am more than willing to provide, on a flexible and individualized basis, reasonable accommodations to students who have issues that may affect their ability to participate in course activities or to meet course requirements. I do require that you be registered with UB’s Office of Accessibility Services (http://www.buffalo.edu/accessibility) to determine which accommodations are needed to ensure your full participation in the course. Students in need of such accommodations are encouraged to contact me as soon as possible to discuss their individual needs for accommodations as some accommodations take time to implement.

Course Policy on Academic Misconduct Academic misconduct in any form is a very serious matter and it will not be tolerated in this course. Academic misconduct is broadly defined as being any action on your part that violates the rights of another student in academic work or that involves misrepresentation of your own work. The UB Undergraduate (for students registered for CHB 450) or Graduate School )for students registered for CHB 550) policies for academic misconduct will be followed for any academic misconduct occurring in the course. In general, it should be assumed that a grade of F for the course will be the consequence of an incident of academic misconduct in the course. The Undergraduate Policies are available at http://undergrad‐catalog.buffalo.edu/ policies/course/integrity.shtml. The Graduate School Policies are available at http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/academicintegrity.php#preamble .  Standard School of Public Health and Health Professions Policy on Academic Integrity Academic Integrity Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Department and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples: 
Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted – in whole or in substantial part – in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Page 11 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
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Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s own. Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment. Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment. Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of identification. Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignments, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the sellers knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Page 12 of 13
CHB 450-550_Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE Note: The schedule of topics and readings is subject to change as we work our way through the semester. Based on how quickly we move through topics, the interests and needs of people in the class, and current events in public health, we may decide to make changes to the readings and the topics. If changes are made, an updated schedule will be posted on UBLearns and discussed in class. The dates of the exams and the main assignment due dates will not change. Week Topics Exam/Assignments/ Notes 1: August 26 Course Overview NOTE: NO DISCUSSION SECTIONS ON Sept 2, 3 2: September 2 What Is Public Health? Discussion Sections: September 9, 10 3: September 9 Public Health Problems: What Kills People? I: Social‐Ecological Approaches Discussion Sections: September 16, 17 4: September 16 Public Health Problems: What Kills People? II: Understanding Risk and Causation Discussion Sections: September 23, 24 5: September 23 PUBLIC Health: Population Level Approaches Discussion Sections: September 30, October 1 6: September 30 Unit Wrapup and Exam 1 EXAM 1 – OCTOBER 7, 8 Exam 1 in Discussion Sections on October 7, 8 7: October 7 Causes and Solutions 1: Biological Factors Discussion Sections: October 14, 15 8: October 14 Causes and Solutions 2: Social and Behavioral Factors Discussion Sections: October 21, 22 9: October 21 Causes and Solutions 3: Environmental Health Discussion Sections: October 28, 29 10: October 28 Unit Wrapup and Exam 2 EXAM 1 – NOVEMBER 4, 5 Exam 2 in Discussion Sections on November 4, 5 11: November 4 Policy and Government Discussion Sections: November 11, 12 12: November 11 Health Care System What Is Public Health Discussion Sections: November 18, 19 Paper Due Friday, November 15 13: November 18 Putting It Together: Addressing Key Public Health Problems PRESENTATIONS: NOVEMBER 25, 26 DISCUSSION SECTIONS 14: November 25 Ethical and Philosophical Issues Problem Analysis Group PRESENTATIONS IN DECEMBER 2, 3 DISCUSSION SECTIONS Presentations –Nov 25, 26 THANKSGIVING NOV 28 15: December 2 Course Wrapup Problem Analysis Group Presentations – Dec 2, 3 CHB 550: Connections Paper Due Friday, Dec 6 EXAM WEEK Exam 3 and Final EXAM 3: Tuesday, December 10 11:45‐2:45 Kapoor 190 Page 13 of 13
42-18-06 ES 370: Biomechanical Dimensions: Exercise and Nutrition Sciences Spring 2014 Prerequisite(s): Anatomy, Physics and Calculus or permission of instructor Course Offering Format(s): Class Day/Time: Class Location: LABORATORIES  Lab A: Monday  Lab B: Monday  Lab C: Wednesday  Lab D: Wednesday  Lab E: Friday  Lab F: Friday 4 credits Lecture & Labs Monday ‐ Wednesday ‐ Friday. Rm 148 Diefendorf 9:00 – 9:50 a.m. 12:00 ‐ 1:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) 2:00 ‐ 3:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) 12:00 ‐ 1:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) 2:00 ‐ 3:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) 10:00 ‐ 11:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) 12:00 ‐ 1:50 Kimball 113 (Computer Lab) or 115 (Biomechanics Lab) **Note: Labs have a maximum enrollment cap. Instructor(s) of Record: Office: Phone Number(s): Email: Office Hours: Dr. Scott White Kimball Tower Rm. 119 829‐6780 [email protected] By appointment Dr. Dan Ramsey Kimball Tower Rm. 204A 829‐6794 [email protected] Appointment preferred, drop‐in Teaching Assistant(s) (TA’s): Cory Dungan Emma Denton Lydia Kocher [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] I.
Course Description Biomechanical Dimensions is a first level introduction to the mechanical, neuromuscular and anatomical bases of human movement. The subject matter was specifically developed for students in the Health Related Professions. An interdisciplinary approach is used, in which material from mechanics, anatomy, physiology and electrical sciences are integrated. Quantitative and qualitative biomechanical analyses of human movement will be studied from the perspective of joint mechanics, muscle mechanics, kinematic and kinetic descriptions of multi‐segment motion. Page 1 of 11
II. Course Objectives / Competency / Instructional Method(s) / Assessment of Student Learning Program Competency
Learning Objective(s)
Describe basic human movement
from mechanical, neuromuscular
and anatomical perspectives and
discuss methods and measurement
systems used to evaluate and
assess movement.
Describe the relationship between
structure and function of various
organ systems as related to
movement patterns and exercise
responses and adaptations in
response to exercise training in
healthy and diseased states.
Compare and contrast human
movement and performance
patterns between normal and
selected atypical populations.
Instructional Method(s)
Formal lectures
(PowerPoint), student labs
and demonstrations,
corresponding course
textbook
Describe osteokinematic and
arthrokinematic movement patterns
at each of the major joints of the
body.
Assessment
Method(s)
Four tests:
 Includes
lectures & lab
material 90%.
Lab, assignments
& participation
10%
Public Health Competency
(Epidemiology)
Accreditation/Program Competency
Instructional
Method(s)
Assessment
Method(s)
Understand the basic
epidemiology on the
development and
progression of Arthritis (knee
osteoarthritis).
Describe which individuals are at risk, the risk
factors, the prevalence and incidence, and the
efficacy of various treatments for knee
osteoarthritis.
Formal lecture
(PowerPoint), and in
class demonstrations.
In class exams.
Page 2 of 11
III. Textbooks /Equipment /Required (Optional) Technologies Class, Examination & Laboratory Materials: ‐Scientific calculator (Basic functions) – REQUIRED For Class and Lab ‐Metric ruler, graph paper ‐Shorts, T‐shirt and leisure shoes required for some labs. Resource Required Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement Author Joseph Hamill; Kathleen M. Knutzen ISBN 978‐0‐7817‐9128‐1 Publisher Lippincott Williams&Wilkins Publication Date February 12, 2008 yes Notes The textbook may be found at:  University Medical Bookstore, Harriman Hall, Lower Level Room 20  College Store, 3908 Maple Rd., Amherst, NY. Phone: 716‐332‐3040  Greeks & Sneaks, 3230 Main St, Buffalo, NY Phone: 716‐833‐4913 Basic Biomechanics Author Susan J. Hall ISBN 978‐0‐07‐337644‐8 Publisher McGraw‐Hill Companies, The Publication Date June 22, 2011 Joint Structure and Function Author Pamela Levangie; Cynthia Norkin ISBN 978‐0‐8036‐2362‐0 Publisher F. A. Davis Company Publication Date March 9, 2011 Neuromechanics of Human Movement Author Roger M. Enoka ISBN 978‐0‐7360‐6679‐2 Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers Publication Date June 27, 2008
Optional or on reserve in Library Anatomy, Mechanics, and Human Motion. Hay, J.G. & J.G. Reid (1988). 2nd edition. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1988. (WE 103 H412a) Muscles, Testing and Function Kendall, 3rd edition F. & McCreary, EK (1983). Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia. Page 3 of 11
IV. Course Learning Activities Biomechanical Concepts and Terminology Section Goals: The student will be able to:  describe the scope of scientific inquiry addressed in biomechanics  identify & describe reference positions, planes and axes associated with human movement analysis.  define terms used in biomechanics. Content:  Introduction to Biomechanics  Movement & Mechanics: ‐frames of reference,  Mechanical Concepts and Terminology Kinematic Basis for Analyzing Human Movement Goals: The student will:  demonstrate understanding of position, velocity and acceleration & the relationship between them.  be able to solve quantitative problems employing linear & angular kinematic principles.  demonstrate understanding of the relationship between linear & angular motion. Content:  Linear Kinematics: Position, Displacement, Velocity, Speed, Acceleration  Angular Kinematics: Relative (Joint) & Absolute Angles, Angular Velocity and Acceleration.  Application of Angular Kinematics to Joint Motion  Relationship between Angular and Linear kinematic variables. Joint Structure, Function and Motion Goals: Students will:  be able to describe characteristics of the diathrodial joint & factors that contribute to joint stability.  be able to provide examples of the different types of diathrodial joints.  demonstrate an understanding of the arthrokinematics of major diarthrodial joints.  be able to describe the characteristics of synarthrodial & amphiarthrodial joints, & provide examples of each. Content:  Diarthrodial or Synovial Joint: ‐characteristics  Types of Diarthrodial Joints –regional applications  Arthrokinematics of Diarthrodial Joints: roll, glide, spin, convex‐concave rule.  Other types of joints –Synarthrosis & Amphiarthrosis & Intervertebral joints.
Musculoskeletal Systems Goals: Students will:  be able to describe the gross and microscopic structure of muscle.  demonstrate understanding of mechanical factors at the contractile level of muscle that influences force. Content:  Muscle Structure and organization  Muscle Mechanics  Applications to Single Joint Systems Page 4 of 11
Biomechanics of Tissue and Structures of the Musculoskeletal System Goals: Students will:  be able to describe the characteristics of the stress‐strain curve for different tissues.  be able to explain changes in the stress‐strain curve for different tissues due to adaptation & injury. Content:  Stress and Strain Characteristics of Bone, Cartilage, Ligament and Tendon  Examples of Adaptation and Injury Neuromuscular Considerations in Human Movement Goals: Students will:  demonstrate an understanding of the neuromuscular basis of the EMG signal.  become acquainted with methods of processing EMG for quantitative interpretation.  demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the EMG signal to muscle involvement during movement. –Applications to normal and pathological gait. Content:  Neuromuscular Basis of EMG  EMG as a Measurement Tool  EMG in Relation to Changing Muscle Mechanics  Applications of EMG to movement Kinetic Basis for Analyzing Human Movement Goals: Students will:  be able to define Force and Torque and understand their relationship.  demonstrate understanding of the concepts of center of mass and moment of intertia & how they are determined for humans.  be able to solve quantitative problems employing linear & angular kinetic principles.  be able to compose and resolve force vectors, & represent their interaction in human movement. Content:  Linear Kinetics: Laws of motion, Free Body Diagrams, Types of Force, Center of Pressure, Impulse‐
Momentum.  Linear Kinetics Application: Walking, Running, Balance  Angular Kinetics –Moment of Force (Torque), Moment Arm, Force Couple  Anthropometrics –Mass, Center of Mass, Moment of Inertia  Application of Angular Kinetics –Examples of Statics ‐  Application of Angular Kinetics –Examples of Dynamics ‐Gait Page 5 of 11
V. Course and Instructor Eval Class Participation: You are expected to come to each class prepared. Although attendance is not graded, class participation is a part of your final grade. Thus, showing up unprepared and unwilling to participate is not sufficient to receive your points. i).
Outcome evaluation of the course will be by means of student performance on the two section tests and cumulative examinations, and includes assignments and labs. ii).
No special projects or other mechanisms will be available to enhance a student’s course average. iii).
Formative evaluation of the course and instructor will be conducted via the SPHHP online course evaluation (CourseEval). All students are required to complete the online course evaluation. Each student who submits a completed online evaluation as reported to the Course Coordinator by the SPHHP CoursEval Administrator will be awarded a 1% increase in his/her overall course average. CourseEval procedures protect the anonymity of student respondents – the Course Coordinator will receive a list of names of students who have submitted evaluations, but no faculty member receives evaluation reports (ratings and comments) before grades are submitted, and student names are not included on evaluation reports. VI. Grading Letter grades will adhere to the University at Buffalo +/‐ scale grading policy. Weighting will be based on the following breakdown. Course Component Cumulative Exams (two @ 30% each) Section Tests (two @ 15% each) Assignments & Laboratories Completion of Course & Instructor Evaluation iii) Percentage ……...……………………………… ……...……………………………… ……...……………………………… ……...……………………………… 60% 30% 09% 01% total: 100% VII. Other course related information NONE VIII. Communication Students should check UBLEARNS weekly, at a minimum, to stay current with announcements and assignments.  If you have multiple email accounts, please be sure that you access (or forward) your UB email. Your UB email is the account I will use to send course‐related materials. Page 6 of 11
IX. Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams, and University Policy on Incompletes in Courses • Class Attendance and Absences Class attendance is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. • Late Labs/Assignments All labs are to be turned in to the TA at the designated time and due date. Failure to submit when due will result in a loss of 2 points per day the lab is late. More than 3 days late labs will not be accepted. If there are circumstances that will preclude you from turning in labs on the assigned date, it is imperative that you discuss the situation with the instructor or TA prior to the due date. • Exams and Final Exam Policy on missed tests or exams: Test or exam grades automatically default to 0 if missed. The instructors will consider alternatives if the student presents a doctors certificate, or the student notifies the instructor prior to the exam/test start time. Remediation: Current Department policy requires all students with a grade of F to repeat the course. • Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested. • University Policy on Incomplete Grades A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicate that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well‐defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor must specify a default letter at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12‐month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office. Students must not re‐register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade. Page 7 of 11
The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the students plans to graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form. A default grade an be “A‐,” “B+,” “B‐,” “C+,” “C‐,” “D+,” “D,” or “F.” (If a student selected an S/U grading option, it will replace the default letter grade when the grade defaults.) Disability Policy Applicable dates regarding the 12‐month provision: Courses taken in (semester): Will default in 12 months on: Fall December 31 Spring May 31 Summer August 31 If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645‐2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. The office will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations. http://www.ub‐
disability.buffalo.edu/ Netiquette This course may utilize UBlearns to facilitate online communication between course participants. Please keep in mind the following “Rules of Netiquette” when communicating online. i).
ii).
iii).
iv).
v).
The rules of the classroom are the same regardless of location. Remember just because you’re interacting online, doesn’t mean you stop having respect for your professors, and fellow classmates. You’re communicating with a real person, not a computer screen. Remember your audience. When communicating online it’s important to remember who you’re communicating with. When sending a message to a professor, please refrain from using “text speak”. For example, Shakespeare never intended for you to type “2B or not 2B”. Also, stay away from typing in all capital letters; it will appear as if you’re shouting. Avoid strong language. Language can easily be misinterpreted in an online setting. Be sure to review your work before submitting, making sure the reader won’t be able to misinterpret it as strong, or offensive. Sarcasm doesn’t translate well online. Your audience can’t see your facial expressions, or body language. Try to be as straight forward and professional as possible. Read everything, twice. Be sure to thoroughly read all course materials before beginning to work on your assignments. If you have a question, or need clarification, re‐read the materials. You may have glanced over an important detail the first time. If you’re still having difficulties, then e‐mail your professor. Review all materials before submitting. When responding to discussion board posts, be sure to read all previous postings before you post your own. This way you won’t duplicate someone else’s comments. Also, it’s a good idea to write, and save your work in Microsoft Word first. In case of a technical issue, you have a backup copy. Page 8 of 11
Academic Integrity Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their work. By placing his/her name on academic work, each student certifies the originality of all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgments. Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Department and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Academic Dishonesty Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples:  Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted – in whole or in substantial part – in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.  Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s own.  Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment.  Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.  Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of identification.  Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.  Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignments, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the sellers knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.  Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Student Handbook All students are required to read the student handbook. An online version is available on the ‘Information For Current Students’ page of your department website. COURSE SCHEDULE This schedule is subject to revision due to unforeseen events. Any course schedule changes or additional readings will be posted on UBlearns and will be announced in class as time permits. Note: Additional required readings may be assigned and will be assigned at least one week prior to the class for which they are assigned. Page 9 of 11
5-Feb
7-Feb
10-Feb
12-Feb
14- Feb
17-Feb
19-Feb
21-Feb
24-Feb
26-Feb
28-Feb
3-Mar
5- Mar
7- Mar
10- Mar
12- Mar
17- 22 Mar
Wednesday
Musculoskeletal System -Structure & Mechanics
Lab 6: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development II
Musculoskeletal System -Mechanics
Lab 6: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development II
Musculoskeletal System -Applications
Lab 6: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development II
Lecture Catch up and Review
Lab Review
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
Kimball 115
3-Feb
Biomechanics Introduction
Lab 1: Math Primer & Intro to Excel
Concepts and Frames of Reference
Lab 1: Math Primer & Intro to Excel
Biomechanics Terminology and Definitions
Lab 1: Math Primer & Intro to Excel
Linear Kinematics I
Lab 2: Linear Kinematics Lab
Linear Kinematics II
Lab 2: Linear Kinematics Lab
Linear Kinematics III
Lab 2: Linear Kinematics Lab
Angular Kinematics I
Lab 3: Angular Kinematics Lab
Angular Kinematics II
Lab 3: Angular Kinematics Lab
Angular Kinematics III
Lab 3: Angular Kinematics Lab
Mid-section test I: Intro, Linear & Angular Kinematics
Lab 4: Biomechanics lab demo
Joint Structure & Function. -Characteristics
Lab 4: Biomechanics lab demo
Joint Structure & Function - Diarthrosis
Lab 4: Biomechanics lab demo
Joint Structure & Function -Synarthrosis & Amphiarthrosis
Lab 5: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development I
Joint Structure & Function -Intervertebral
Lab 5: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development I
Musculoskeletal System -Structure
Lab 5: Muscle Mechanics and Force Development I
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
31-Jan
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Lab
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
29-Jan
Monday
Lectures & Labs
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
27-Jan
Day
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
Date
Mid-term Exam I: Cumulative 1st half
Spring Break
Page 10 of 11
2-Apr
4-Apr
7-Apr
9- Apr
11- Apr
14-Apr
16-Apr
18-Apr
21-Apr
23-Apr
25-Apr
28-Apr
30-Apr
2-May
5-May
7-May
9-May
Wednesday May 14
8:00 – 11:00
Computer
Lab
Electromyography (EMG) Neuromuscular Basis
Lab 8: EMG Analysis of Human Motions I
EMG:-Measurement tool
Lab 8: EMG Analysis of Human Motions I
EMG Applications
Lab 8: EMG Analysis of Human Motions I
EMG Applications/Human Movement Analysis
Lab 9: EMG Analysis of Human Motions II
Gait cycle
Lab 9: EMG Analysis of Human Motions II
Linear Kinetics 1: Newton's Laws, Force, Free Body Diagrams
Lab 9: EMG Analysis of Human Motions II
Linear Kinetics II: Friction Forces
Lab10: EMG and Locomotion
Linear Kinetics III: Muscle Force
Lab10: EMG and Locomotion
Linear Kinetics Application/Review
Lab10: EMG and Locomotion
Mid-section test II: Tissue Biomechanics, EMG, Kinetics
Lab11: Kinetics Lab I
Angular Kinetics I: Torque, Center of Mass, Reaction board
Lab11: Kinetics Lab I
Angular Kinetics II: Segment parameters/Anthropometry
Lab11: Kinetics Lab I
Angular Kinetics III: Moment of Inertia, Radius of Gyration
Lab 12: Kinetics Lab II
Angular Kinetics lV: Static Applications
Lab 12: Kinetics Lab II
Angular Kinetics: V: Dynamics
Lab 12: Kinetics Lab II
Angular Statics VI: Dynamics
Lab 13: Kinetics Lab/Tutorial
Angular Statics VII: Dynamic Applications
Lab 13: Kinetics Lab/Tutorial
Other Kinetics: Work, Energy and Power.
Lab 13: Kinetics Lab/Tutorial
Kimball 115
31-Mar
Biomechanics: -Vectors & Freebody diagrams
Lab 7: Stress & Strain Tutorial
Biomechanics: -Tissues & Loading
Lab 7: Stress & Strain Tutorial
Biomechanics: -Tissues Adaptations & Injuries
Lab 7: Stress & Strain Tutorial
Computer
Lab
28-Mar
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Monday
Lab/Tutorial
Wednesday
Lab/Tutorial
Friday
Lab/Tutorial
Lab
Computer
Lab
26-Mar
Monday
Lectures & Labs
Kimball 115
24-Mar
Day
Computer
Lab
Kimball 115
Date
Final Exam: Cumulative 2nd half
Diefendorf Hall 146 & 203
Page 11 of 11
Occupational Therapy Program, Department of Rehabilitation Science
University at Buffalo, State University of New York
OT 201
Introduction to Occupational Therapy
Fall 2013
3 units
Professor:
Office:
Telephone:
Email:
Office Hours:
Class Time: T & Th 9:30 – 10:50 am
Class Location: Diefendorf Hall 146
Jo A. Schweitzer, MS, OTR/L
532 Kimball Tower
829-6737
[email protected];
Tuesdays & Wednesday, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm and by appointment
Course Description
OT 201 is an introductory lecture course designed to offer the entry level student the opportunity to
survey the professional philosophy and practice of occupational therapy as a health profession within the
medical, community service and educational delivery systems.
Pre-requisite Courses none required
Course Rationale
The course focuses on foundational skills to introduce major topics that are studied by the occupational
therapy student both in their academic and clinical educational experiences. It provides an introduction
for the student who is considering future study of occupational therapy or has already selected it as their
major. Within the course, the student is exposed to essential topics that are revisited in the 3rd through
5th years of the BS/MS program in occupational therapy.
Relationship to Curriculum Design
OT 201: Introduction to Occupational Therapy is a 'pre-major' course that is designed to introduce
freshman and sophomore occupational therapy major students to primary topics of interest to practitioners
and researchers in the profession. These topics include education & clinical training, history, governance,
credentialing, practice in facility-based and community-based treatment settings, role delineation and
research.
Course Objectives, Instruction and Assessment
Learning Objectives
The student will articulate an understanding of the
importance of the history and philosophical base of
the profession of occupational therapy.
The student will identify the terminology and
components of the AOTA Practice Framework to
appreciate the meaning and dynamics of occupation
and activity, including the interaction of areas of
occupation, performance skills, performance patterns,
activity demands, context(s) and environments, and
client factors.
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
B.2.1.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Written exam
B.2.2.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Written exam
The student will explain and give examples of the
importance of balancing areas of occupation with the
achievement of health and wellness for the clients.
The student will practice task analysis in areas of
occupation, performance skills, performance patterns,
activity demands, context(s) and environments, and
client factors to formulate an intervention plan.
The student will express support for the quality of
life, well-being, and occupation of the individual,
group, or population to promote physical and mental
health and prevention of injury and disease
considering the context (e.g., cultural, personal,
temporal, virtual) and environment.
The student will compare and contrast the role of the
occupational therapist and occupational therapy
assistant in the screening and evaluation process
along with the importance of and rationale for
supervision and collaborative work between the
occupational therapist and occupational therapy
assistant in that process.
The student will evaluate and adapt processes or
environments (e.g., home, work, school, community)
applying ergonomic principles and principles of
environmental modification.
The student will become familiarized with the current
trends in models of service delivery, including, but
not limited to, medical, educational, community, and
social models, and their potential effect on the
practice of occupational therapy.
The student will demonstrate knowledge of
applicable national requirements for credentialing
and requirements for licensure, certification, or
registration under state law.
The student will demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of
Ethics Standards and AOTA Standards of Practice.
The student will discuss and justify how the role of
the professional is enhanced by knowledge of and
involvement in international, national, state, and local
occupational therapy associations and related
professional associations.
The student will discuss and evaluate personal and
professional abilities and competencies as they relate
to job responsibilities.
The student will explain and justify the importance of
supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative
professional relationships between the occupational
therapist and the occupational therapy assistant.
B.2.4.
Lecture
B.2.7.
Lecture
Paired peer
activity
Written exam
Written
teaching/learning
assignment
Written exam
B.2.9.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Use of case
studies
Written exam
B.5.9.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Lecture
Group
discussion
Case studies
B.6.5.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Written exam
B.7.3.
Lecture
Written exam
B.9.1.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Written exam
B.4.5.
B.9.6.
Lecture
Group
discussion
Lecture
Group
discussion
B.9.8.
Lecture
Group
discussion
B.9.2.
Written exam
Written exam
Written exam
Written exam
Written exam
ACOTE Standards:
B.2.1.
B.2.2.
Articulates an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of the
profession of occupational therapy.
Explain the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including the interaction of
areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s)
and environments, and client factors.
B.2.7.
Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with the achievement of health
and wellness for the clients.
Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns,
activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to formulate an
intervention plan.
B.2.9.
Express support for the quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the individual, group,
or population to promote physical and mental health and prevention of injury and disease
considering the context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment.
B.4.5.
Compare and contrast the role of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy
assistant in the screening and evaluation process along with the importance of and rationale
for supervision and collaborative work between the occupational therapist and occupational
therapy assistant in that process.
B.2.4.
B.5.9.
B.6.5.
Evaluate and adapt processes or environments (e.g., home, work, school, community)
applying ergonomic principles and principles of environmental modification.
Analyze the trends in models of service delivery, including, but not limited to, medical,
educational, community, and social models, and their potential effect on the practice of
occupational therapy.
B.9.1.
Demonstrate knowledge of applicable national requirements for credentialing and
requirements for licensure, certification, or registration under state law.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics Standards and AOTA Standards
of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision making in professional interactions,
client interventions, and employment settings.
B.9.2.
Discuss and justify how the role of the professional is enhanced by knowledge of and
involvement in international, national, state, and local occupational therapy associations and
related professional associations.
B.7.3.
B.9.6.
B.9.8.
Discuss and evaluate personal and professional abilities and competencies as they relate to
job responsibilities.
Explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative
professional relationships between the occupational therapist and the occupational therapy
assistant.
Required Readings (Additional readings may be assigned)
The course textbook has been ordered at Talking Leaves Bookstore, 3158 Main Street,
Buffalo, NY 14214
Schell, B., Gillen, G., & Scaffa, M.E. (2014). Willard & Spackman's occupational therapy, 12th ed.
Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Note: Students must use the new 12th edition Willard & Spackman’s Occupational Therapy for this
course.
Articles from OT Practice: see separate listing provided for optional extra credit assignment.
Grading
Note: no late assignments will be graded. Late assignments earn a grade of zero.
Due Date
Assignment
Percentage of Course Grade
Attendance: course requirement
Note – students are not permitted Each incidence of lateness = minus .5 point
to use electronic devices in class. from total grade
The student will be marked absent Each incidence of absence = minus 1 point
from total grade (max. of 2 excused absences
for the class if observed using an
All dates
permitted)
electronic device.
Class participation: responses in
All dates
class and group work
Professional expectation
09/12
Teaching/learning assignment
05
9/26
Exam I
20
10/29
Exam II
25
11/21
Exam III
25
12/12
Exam IV
25
Optional extra credit assignment:
11/07
OT Practice article review
0 or 8-10
Student Grade Determination
95 -100
90-94.99
87-89.99
84-86.99
80-83.99
A
AB+
B
B-
77-79.99
74-76.99
70-73.99
65-69.99
0-64.99
C+
C
CD
F
Class Policies
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through the student’s
UB e-mail account.

UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for
classroom use.
Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams and University Policy on Incompletes
in the course
Attendance Policy
If a student is absent from a class, it will result in a 1 point loss from their total earned grade.
No unexcused absences from class are permitted. When a student does not contact the instructor prior to
a missed class or within 24 hours after a missed class, the date will be counted as an unexcused absence.
Students should expect to present supporting documentation for any excused absence. Determination of
an “excused” absence is at the discretion of the professor. A maximum of two excused absences is
permitted.
No use of electronic devices is permitted during class. Students found to be ignoring this class rule will
be marked as absent for the class.
Late Attendance Students are expected to be on time for all classes. When a student arrives late it will
result in .5 point loss from their total earned grade. Arriving late by 10 minutes or more constitutes an
absence from class.
Late Assignments No late assignments will be accepted by the professor unless the student has obtained
prior approval for an agreed upon alternate due date. Note: sending an email message or leaving a phone
message for the professor does not constitute approval for an alternate due date. The student must
receive the professor’s response to their request. If a student fails to submit an assignment on this
approved alternate due date, the late assignment will not be graded by the professor and the student will
earn a grade of zero for the assignment.
Make-up Exams A make-up exam will only be given when extenuating circumstances prevent the
student from attending the scheduled exam. At the discretion of the professor, the make-up exam may be
of a format different from the originally scheduled exam taken by the class. The student must contact the
professor within 24 hours following a scheduled exam or a grade of 0 will be assigned. The professor
may require supporting documentation for an absence and the student should be prepared to present it.
Course Evaluation:
Registered students in OT 201 will automatically be prompted to complete an online evaluation of the
course. Students are encouraged to participate in this voluntary evaluation process at the conclusion of
the course. Final grades will be posted after 80% of the students complete the online evaluation.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES Incomplete Grades A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergrad‐
catalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php) catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail. Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645‐2608, http://www.ub‐
disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations. Academic Integrity Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing. Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples: 



Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or




examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Course Schedule (Any changes when necessary, will be announced). Additional readings will be
posted on Blackboard.
Date
8/27
8/29
9/3
9/5
9/10
9/12
9/17
Lecture Topic
Course Introduction
Class exercise to introduce
occupations
Course introduction continued:
Defining OT
Teaching/learning assignment
Independent study and office hours
9:30 – 11:00 am
No classes scheduled: Rosh
Hashanah holiday (observed by UB)
Discussion about OT PreProfessional Student Handbook
Dr. Susan Nochajski, OT Program
Director UB
Lecture Topics: profile of the
profession
Lecture topic: occupational nature
of humans
9/19
Lecture topic: occupation in context
Occupational therapy practice
settings: pediatrics
9/24
Lecture topic: personal factors &
occupational performance
Assignment
Due
Readings
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Teaching/learning
assignment due 9/12
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
Chapters 1-7; 14-20
9/26
10/1
10/3
10/8
10/10
10/15
10/17
10/22
10/24
10/29
10/31
11/5
11/7
11/12
11/14
11/19
11/21
11/26
11/28
12/3
12/5
12/12
Exam I: 20% of course grade
Lecture topic: analyzing
occupations
Lecture topic: occupational therapy
process
Lecture topic: occupational therapy
process
OT practice settings: psychosocial
practice
Lecture topic: core concepts and
skills
OT practice settings: adult physical
disabilities
Lecture topic: core concepts and
skills
OT practice settings: adult
developmental disabilities &
geriatrics
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Chapters 21, 23-36
Exam II: 25% of course grade
Lecture topic: occupational
performance theories of practice
Lecture topic: theories informing
practice
OT practice settings: hand therapy
Lecture topic: evaluation,
intervention and outcomes of
occupation
Lecture topic: evaluation,
intervention and outcomes of
occupation
Lecture topic: evaluation,
intervention and outcomes of
occupation
Exam III: 25% of course grade
Independent study time and office
hours 9:30 – 11 am
No classes scheduled:
Thanksgiving holiday
Lecture topic: theory guided
interventions - examples
Lecture topic: professional
development & OT management
Exam IV: 25% of course grade
DFN 146 (8:00 – 11: 00 am)
Chapters 37-41, 4352
Chapters 37-41, 4352
OT Practice article review
(optional extra credit
assignment) due 11/7
Chapters 37-41, 4352
Chapters 37-41, 4352
Chapters 37-41, 4352
Chapters 37-41, 4352
Chapters 53-58, 6673, 8-13
Chapters 53-58, 6673, 8-13
Chapters 53-58, 6673, 8-13
Chapters 53-58, 6673, 8-13
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT217
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
Semester
Units
Lecture
1
Labs
0
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
125 Kapoor
Robert Burkard
510 Kimball Tower
716 829-6720
[email protected]
By appointment
No TAs
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces language used by health-care professionals whose medical decisions
affect and determine the course of rehabilitation and therapeutic process
This will be run as an on-line course, but 3 examinations will be given in class, which will be on
Friday mornings 8-8:50 AM, in room 125 Kapoor (on South Campus). These 3 exams are
scheduled for 2/28/14 (chapter 1-5), 4/4/14 (chapters 6-10) and 5/9/14 (chapters 11-15).
COMMUNICATION
For the most part, I will use email to communicate with all students in the class. I ask you all to
check your email at least once daily.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
There are no prerequisites
COURSE RATIONALE
Future health-care professionals will be reading literature, and taking coursework, that assumes
knowledge of medical terminology. This course provides an introduction to the suffixes,
prefixes and root words used in medicine and related health-care professions.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
1
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
The course gives students who wish to pursue a career in a clinical profession the medical
terminology used in future coursework in both normal aspects and disorders
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
Reading of
chapters in
textbook; Use
of web-based
instructional
materials
Objective
Examination
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
Construct medical terms using prefixes,
suffixes, word roots and combining forms
B.1.1.
Demonstrate
knowledge and
understanding
of the structure
and function of
the human
body to
include the
biological and
physical
sciences.
Course content
must include,
but is not
limited to,
biology,
anatomy,
physiology,
neuroscience,
and
kinesiology or
biomechanics.
2
University at Buffalo
Pronounce, spell and define medical terms
related to body structure, and specific body
systems and associated pathology including
the skeletal muscular, circulatory,
respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive,
integumentary, nervous and endocrine
systems
Recognize some commonly used
abbreviations for medical terms and phrases
OT217 Spring 2014
B.1.1.
Demonstrate
knowledge and
understanding
of the structure
and function of
the human
body to
include the
biological and
physical
sciences.
Course content
must include,
but is not
limited to,
biology,
anatomy,
physiology,
neuroscience,
and
kinesiology or
biomechanics.
B.1.1.
Demonstrate
knowledge and
understanding
of the structure
and function of
the human
body to
include the
biological and
physical
sciences.
Course content
must include,
but is not
limited to,
biology,
anatomy,
physiology,
neuroscience,
and
kinesiology or
biomechanics.
3
Reading of
chapters in
textbook; Use
of web-based
instructional
materials
Objective
Examination
Reading of
chapters in
textbook; Use
of web-based
instructional
materials
Objective
Examination
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
REQUIRED READINGS
Each week you will be required to review one book chapter (see schedule below). I recommend
you read the chapter first. There are quizzes and exercises in the chapters—go through them as
you proceed through each chapter to test your knowledge. Next, go to the same chapter using
the online course (see below) to review the material again.
TEXTBOOK
Peggy Leonard (2013) Quick & Easy Medical Terminology, Elsevier.
Purchase the book (bundled with the web-based software) at the UB bookstore on South Campus
(i.e., the book/web-based course for OT217):
Code on book in bookstore: 978-1-4557-7245-2: Leonard, Quick and Easy Medical
Terminology 7th edition with the Online User guide and Code
NOTE: The Medical Bookstore has recently moved to the South Campus, in the basement of
Harriman Hall.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
The course will also use the Medical Terminology online package (bundled with the book),
which will review each chapter, and offers exercises and quizzes to test your knowledge.
NOTE: BUY THE BOOK BUNDLED WITH THE WEB-BASED COURSE FROM THE
MEDICAL SCHOOL BOOKSTORE ON SOUTH CAMPUS. IF YOU BUY ELSEWHERE
YOU MIGHT NOT PURCHASE THE BOOK WITH THE ON-LINE COURSE!
Instructions for Registering for the Web-Based Materials:
Take the small cardboard document bundle with the book. This card says ‘Keep This Card’ on
the top, followed by ‘Medical Terminology Online’.
This card will include your unique access code, which is for your use only.
To start, go to your web browser, and type in:
http://evolve.elsevier.com/courses
You will see the following:
Redeem Your Access Code
For Elsevier Online Courses
4
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
STEP 1: Talk to your instructor
Before you can redeem your code, you'll need to find out if your instructor is hosting his or her course on Evolve or on
a local learning system like Blackboard, Desire2Learn, Angel,... etc.
STEP 2: Do one of the following:
1.
2.
3.
If your instructor is using a local learning system, close this browser and visit the url given to you by your
instructor to redeem.
If your instructor is using Evolve to host the course, click here.
If you don't have an instructor and you plan to take the course for self-study purposes, click here.
Having problems?
For technical requirements, click here.
To learn more about how to redeem your code, read these instructions or view an online tutorial.
Still having problems? Contact us for help.
IMPORTANT NOTE: FOR STEP 2, click on option 3: ‘If you don’t have an instructor, and you
plan to take the course for self-study purposes, click here
ANOTHER IMPORTANT NOTE: I am not having you enroll as part of a course, as I have no
need to see what you have been doing, or how you are doing on any quizzes or exercises. Work
at your own pace (of course keeping at or ahead of the pace of the chapters listed per week).
For Resources option, you can look through them and see if any will be useful to you. In looking
through them, I thought the Flashcard option and Learning Activities seem most useful.
If you are having problems with the web site, you need to contact the publisher help line, as I am
quite sure I know little more about the software than you do. As noted in the booklet, if you are
having trouble, you can contact the Evolve helpline at:
http://evolvesupport.elsevier.com
or by phone at: 1-800-222-9570
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
GRADING
There will be 3 examinations, held in room 125 Kapoor on Friday mornings, from 8- 8:50 AM
The dates and chapters assessed for these examinations:
2/28/14: Chapters 1-5
4/4/14: Chapters 6-10
5/9/14: Chapters 11-15
5
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
NOTE: For the purposes of course review and for accreditation purposes, we require high
response rates in the course evaluation at the end of the semester. I recognize that in a course
such as this one (with self study and on-line materials) that all of the questions may not be
directly relevant. Please answer those that you have a meaningful response for. The third exam
and final course grades will not be posted until after 70% of the students have completed the
course evaluation, or on the day that final grades are due, whichever comes first.
Each examination will be objective, and include 50 multiple questions. The results of the 3
examinations will be averaged, and grades awarded as follows:
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
Percentage
≥90%
≥ 87% and <90%
≥ 84% and <87%
≥ 81% and <84%
≥ 78% and <81%
≥ 75% and <78%
Letter Grade
C
CD+
D
F
Percentage
≥ 72% and <75%
≥ 69% and <72%
≥ 66% and <69%
≥ 63% and <66%
< 63%
NOTE: I do not round-up grades. If your 3-test average is 89.67, then you will earn an A-.
Should you want to come in to look at your examination, please request to do so within one week
of my posting the exam grades. You can come in to review your exam, look up the answers
and/or to discuss with me why one answer is correct and others incorrect. Once this one-week
test review time has expired, you will not be able to review your exam.
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
This course is largely an independent study/on-line format, and thus class attendance is not
applicable for this course.
Exams and Final Exam
This will be run as an on-line course, but 3 examinations will be given in class, which will be on
Friday mornings 8-8:50 AM, in room 125 Kapoor (on South Campus). These 3 exams are
scheduled for 2/28/14 (chapter 1-5), 4/4/14 (chapters 6-10) and 5/9/14 (chapters 11-15).
Missed Exams
Only medical excuses, other serious personal issues or University-sanctioned events (such as
those participating in sports at UB) are valid excuses for missing an examination. In all
emergency cases, I expect to be called or sent an email before the exam to be missed. If a
medical emergency, I will require a note written and signed by a physician, explaining that you
were not able to take the exam, listing the date of the exam that you missed. If there is a death in
the family, then I expect to see a copy of the death notice. Missing an exam for other reasons
should be discussed with me prior to your missing the exam, as you might not be given a makeup
exam. For University-sanctioned events, I expect to hear from the student at the beginning of the
6
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
semester, to know the exams that might be missed, and the student must arrange for a coach or
other university official to monitor the examination, which should be administered as close to the
date and time (i.e., 8 AM Friday) as is practical.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Course communications will be typically via email from UBLearns
Late Assignments
Not applicable
Site Visits and Lab Visits
Not applicable
Lab Requirements
Not Applicable
Lab Competencies
Not Applicable
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the
student has not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a
default grade that will become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by
formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be
assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade
better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of
a least ‘D’) in the requirements already completed. The instructor will provide the student
specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade
with twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an
earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
7
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any
one of: ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim
grade of ‘I’ will be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Note from Instructor: I rarely agree to give an incomplete. I consider only serious health issues
or other major personal life crises as reasons to grant an incomplete.
Accommodations Policy
If you require classroom or testing accommodations due to a disability, please contact
Accessibility Resources, located at 25 Capen Hall. AR can be reached by phone at (716) 6452608 or by email at [email protected] Please inform me as soon as possible about
your needs so that we can coordinate your accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial
part in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
c) Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
d) Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
e) Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
8
University at Buffalo
OT217 Spring 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
Schedule:
Week of 1/27/14: Chapter 1: Essential Information for Learning by this Quick and Easy Method
Week of 2/3/14: Chapter 2: Writing Terms with Suffixes and Combining Forms
Week of 2/10/14: Chapter 3: Writing Terms with Prefixes, Suffixes, and Combining Forms
Week of 2/17/14: Chapter 4: Diagnostic Procedures and Therapeutic Interventions
Week of 2/24/14: Chapter 5: Organization of the Body
2/28/14: Exam 1
Week of 3/3/14: Chapter 6: The Musculoskeletal System
Week of 3/10/14: Chapter 7: The Circulatory System
Week of 3/17/14: Chapter 8: The Respiratory System (As this week is spring break, you can
work on this chapter the week before or the week after)
Week of 3/24/14: Chapter 9: The Digestive System
Week of 3/31/14: Chapter 10: The Urinary System
4/4/14: Exam 2
Week of 4/7/14: Chapter 11: The Reproductive System
Week of 4/14/14: Chapter 12: The Integumentary System
Week of 4/21/14: Chapter 13: The Nervous system and Psychologic Disorders
Week of 4/28/14: Chapter 14: Special Sense Organs of the Peripheral Nervous System
Week of 5/5/14: Chapter 15: The Endocrine system
5/9/14: Exam 3
Study suggestions:
Read the chapter in the book each week. Then, run through the web-based course for that
chapter, and, most importantly, take the quizzes. Make a note of the questions that you missed,
and look through the chapter, reviewing the sections covering the material that you missed one or
more questions on. Then, read the chapter one more time—perhaps making flash cards with one
side including a term, and the other side the definition. Make sure you can look at a term, and
state a reasonable definition of each term, AND, that you can read the definition and identify the
correct term.
9
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 230
THERAPUTIC INTERACTIONS
Spring 2014
3 Credits
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Lecture
Tuesday/Thursday 9:30-10:50
Labs
N/A
Location
Kimball 125
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L
Kimball 534
829-6734
[email protected]
Tuesdays 11:00-1:00 (In person and online) or by appointment
Kathleen Saint [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces students to the basic skills that individuals need to communicate and
interact effectively with others. Although the course is geared towards the health care
professional, students from a variety of majors will find the course information to be useful.
Students are given the opportunity to practice communication skills through role play exercises
and other team activities. A helping model and selected therapeutic approaches utilized by
health care professionals in treating patients/clients are also presented in this course. These
therapeutic approaches are drawn from the fields of occupational therapy, nursing, psychology,
sociology, anthropology, personal adjustment, and psychiatry.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
There are no prerequisite courses for this class.
COURSE RATIONALE
In order to be an effective “helper”, whether in professional or personal relationships, basic
communication and interaction skills are required. Students will be able to use information and
skills gained in this course in practical and clinical situations. Those students who go on to study
occupational therapy or other health related professions will find this course basic to assessment
and treatment, while others will gain the skills of helping which can be used in interpersonal
interactions.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course is offered as a pre-requisite course for the occupational therapy program.
1
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Identify and discuss their own values
related to helping others.
B5.4
B.5.7
“Blind walk”
Lecture, small
group work
“Blind walk”
Lecture, small
group work
Reading,
Lecture
In class
assignment
2. Discuss characteristics of the
helper/helpee relationship.
B5.4
B.5.7
3. Demonstrate basic understanding of
various theories of helping used in
therapeutic settings.
4. Recognize the psychological, emotional,
and social needs of people with various
challenges and their families, including
people with physical disabilities, psychiatric
problems, chronic and terminal illnesses and
the elderly.
5. Demonstrate appropriate communication
skills needed to work effectively with
patients or clients, their families, care
providers and other team members.
B5.4
B.1.3
Reading,
Lecture,
Interview
scenarios
Interview
practical,
Exam; Role
Play
B5.4
B5.5
B5.9
Reading,
Lecture,
Interview
scenarios
Interview
Practical
6. Describe approaches to use in resolving
personal and organizational ethical conflicts.
B9.10
Exam; Role
Play
7. Differentiate between therapeutic and
social/personal relationships.
B5.4
8. Discuss their own cultural background
and describe the impact cultural differences
may have on the therapeutic relationships.
9. Apply information from class to work
effectively in teams for small group activities
and semester long projects.
B.1.4
Reading,
Lecture, group
work
Reading,
lecture, group
work
Reading,
lecture, group
work
Team
activities; role
Play
B5.4
2
Exam
Exam
Exam
Exam, Culture
paper
Team
evaluation
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.3
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts of human behavior to
include the behavioral sciences, social sciences, and occupational science.
Course content must include, but is not limited to, introductory psychology,
abnormal psychology, and introductory sociology or introductory anthropology.
B.1.4
Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the role of sociocultural,
socioeconomic, and diversity factors and lifestyle choices in contemporary
society. Course content must include, but is not limited to, introductory
psychology, abnormal psychology, and introductory sociology or introductory
anthropology.
Design and implement group interventions based on principles of group
development and group dynamics across the lifespan.
Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management and
maintenance, home management, and community and work integration.
B.5.4
B.5.5
B.5.7
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights,
perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual
and group interaction.
B.9.1
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational
Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics
Standards and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical
decision making in professional interactions, client interventions, and
employment settings.
Demonstrate strategies for analyzing issues and making decisions to resolve
personal and organizational ethical conflicts.
B.9.10
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Davis, C.M. (2011). Patient practitioner interaction: An experiential manual for developing the
art of health care (5th ed.). Thorofare, NJ: Slack Incorporated.
*Either the 4th or 5th edition is required for this class.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Additional readings will posted on UBLearns at least one week prior to due date
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
All assignments are to be in APA format and submitted online through UBLearns unless
otherwise indicated. All assignments should be submitted in Word or compatible format. Include
your name and the assignment name in the file (ex.: Smith Culture Paper.docx).
Prerequisite Online Writing Assignment- Students will complete an online tutorial on using
the writing format of the American Psychological Association. The tutorial may be taken as
many times as the student would like. Students must complete this tutorial and correctly answer
ALL questions on the tutorial by the time the first written assignment is due. No written
assignments will be accepted until this prerequisite is met.
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University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
Class Attendance and Participation- Students are required to attend and participate in all class
sessions.
Exams- Students will complete two written exams and one cumulative final exam.
Without Pity Reflection Paper- After viewing the film Without Pity in class, students will
complete a paper reflecting on their feelings and reactions to the lives of the individuals with
disabilities depicted in the film.
Cultural Identity Paper- Students will write a paper reflecting on their own culture including
their family of origin, community during formative years, and current environmental culture.
Interview Practical- Each student will be assigned a helper/helpee case scenario. Students will
interview the helpee using the interview skills learned in class. You must pass this practical in
order to pass the class.
Interview Portfolio and Reflection Paper- Students will compile their interview scenario
feedback forms. Students will write a paper reflecting on the interview experience including the
interview practical, and feedback from team members. Submit all feedback sheets and reflection
paper in one folder.
Team Activities- Students will be assigned to teams that will work together throughout the
semester. Students will participate in a variety of team activities in class to supplement textbook
and lecture material. Teams will occasionally be required to submit written material as part of
each activity at the end of class.
Team Member Evaluation- Students will evaluate their team members’ participation,
preparedness, and professional behaviors during in-class and outside of class group work.
Team Role Play Presentations- The major team assignment will be the development and
presentation of team skits. Groups will submit their group skit script prior to their presentation.
The skits are approximately 5-7 minutes in length and should include many aspects of
professional relationships learned in the course. All members of the team should participate in
the skit performance.
4
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
GRADING
Assessment Method
Class attendance and participation
Exams (exam I, exam II & final exam)
Team activities
Without Pity Reflection Paper
Cultural Identity Paper
Team Role Play Script and Presentations
Team Member Evaluation
Interview Practical (You must pass in order to pass the course)
Interview portfolio and reflection paper
Online writing tutorial (All students must take until they reach 100%
mastery)
Total
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Percentage
Grade
A
93-100%
A90-92.99%
B+
87-89.99%
B
83-86.99%
B80-82.99%
C+
77-79.99%
Letter
Grade
C
CD+
D
F
Points
70
100
20
10
10
15
5
5
15
0
250
Percentage
73-76.99%
70-72.99%
67-69.99%
63-66.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam will result in a
grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor within 24 hours if a medical
emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations, including alternate exams, may be made at the discretion of the instructor. A
final cumulative exam will be scheduled during finals week.
5
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format,
using proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible
for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 10% of
points per day that the assignment is late. Assignments more than 3 days late will not be
accepted.
Technology in the Classroom
Students may use laptops or tablets in the classroom. Cell phones (including smart phones) may
not be used. Students who are observed using a device for anything unrelated to the course will
be asked to leave the classroom for that day, will receive a zero on any related assignments, and
will lose the privilege of using technology in the classroom for the remainder of the course.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
6
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
7
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
*Course schedule is subject to change
Date
January 28
Tuesday
Topic
Assigned Assigned
Readings Readings
5th
4th
Edition
Edition
of Text
of Text
Introduction to Course
Helper-Helpee
Relationships
“Without Pity” Video
D: Ch. 1,
5
D: Ch. 1,
6:
February 4
Tuesday
Effective Communication
D: Ch. 6
D: Ch. 7
February 6
Thursday
Communication in Health
Care Relationships
February 11
Tuesday
February 13
Thursday
February 18
Tuesday
Attending/ Listening/
Nonverbal communication
Interview process
-Requesting information
-Paraphrasing&
summarizing
-Reflecting feelings
Interview process
- Providing feedback
- Establishing goals &
Plans
February 20
Thursday
Interview process
Practice scenarios
February 25
Tuesday
Interview Practical
Assignment
Due
Blind Walk
January 30
Thursday
The Interview process
- Format
- Groundbreakers
- Phases
- Purposes
Interview process
Class
Activity
Team
Activity:
Introduction
to Team
Members
D: Ch. 10 D: Ch. 11 Team
Activity:
Interview
Scenarios
DUE:
Online Writing
Tutorial
Without Pity
Reflection
Paper
D: Ch. 8
D: Ch. 9
Team
Activity:
Scenarios
D: Ch. 10 D: Ch. 11 Team
Activity:
Scenarios
D: Ch. 10 D: Ch. 11 Team
Activity:
Scenarios
Team
Activity:
Scenarios
Class attends
as assigned
8
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
February 27
Thursday
March 4
Tuesday
March 6
Thursday
Interview Practical
Working on a Team:
 Professional
behavior
 Roles of Team
Members
 Stages of Team
Development
 Leadership
Online
reading
Online
reading
March 11
Tuesday
Conflict and
Communication
Online
reading
D. Ch. 7
Online
reading
D. Ch. 8
March 13
Thursday
Awareness of self and
family
Values as Determinants of
Behavior
D: Ch.
1,2,3
D: Ch.
1,2,3
Team
Activity:
Values
March18
Tuesday
March 20
Thursday
March 25
Tuesday
Spring Break
No Class
Spring Break
No Class
Ethical Issues
HIPAA
D: Ch. 4
D: Ch. 4
Team
Activity:
Ethics
March 27
Thursday
Cultural Influences & The
Role of Culture in Health
Care
Guest Presenter:
Dr. Mary Matteliano
D: Ch. 9
D: Ch.
10
April 1
Tuesday
Skills for Personal
Development:
 Stress and Time
Management
 Assertiveness
DiSC-R Profile –
Guest Presenter:
Jude Butch, Center for
Student Leadership &
Community Engagement
D: Ch.
7,15
D: Ch.
5,8
April 3
Thursday
Class attends
as assigned
EXAM I
9
Team
Activity:
Straw
Sculpture
Due: Interview
Portfolio
Work on
team role
plays
University at Buffalo
OT 230 Spring 2014
April 8
Tuesday
Health Behavior
D: Ch. 11 D: Ch. 13
April 10
Thursday
Crisis Intervention
D: Ch. 13 D: Ch. 15
DUE:
Cultural
Identity
Paper
Communicating About
Sexuality
April 15
Tuesday
April 17
Thursday
EXAM II
End of life decisions
Guest Presenter:
Dr. Mary Matteliano
Online
Reading
April 22
Tuesday
Humor
Online
Online
Work on
Reading
Reading
team role
D: Ch. 11 D: Ch. 13 plays
Effective Patient
Education
April 24
Thursday
Understanding Persons
with Disabilities & The
ICF Framework
April 29
Tuesday
Role Play Presentations
May 1
Thursday
May 6
Tuesday
May 8
Thursday
May 15
Thursday
Role Play Presentations
Online
Reading
D: Ch. 16
D: Ch. 12 D: Ch. 14 Work on
team role
plays
Due: Team
Role Play
Script
Team
Member
Evaluations
Role Play Presentations
Review for Final
Final Exam
8:00 – 11:00am
10
OT 314
Pediatric Dysfunction and Occupation
Spring 2014
3 credits
Instructor:
Class Time: Wednesday, 9:00 – 11:50 AM
Class Location: Kimball 111
Sutanuka Bhattacharjya, MS, OTR/L
505 Kimball Tower
Office:
[email protected]
Email:
Office Hours: Monday 3 pm – 4 pm, Wednesday 12.30 am – 1.30 pm or by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course consists of a series of lectures, discussion, and presentations that describe the
etiology, symptomatology, course, prognosis, and medical management of diseases and
disabilities that are frequently encountered in children treated by occupational therapists. The
ways in which these diseases and disabilities can affect the development, functioning and
occupational behavior of children and their families will be reviewed and examined.
Implications for occupational therapy intervention and precautions for practice will be addressed.
Issues of ethical considerations will be introduced on select topics.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES:
Pre-requisite: ANA 407, OT 201, OT 333
COURSE RATIONALE/RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course allows students to use the information learned in anatomy, physiology,
psychology, and sociology in preparation for entry into the professional OT program, as well as
information gained in the pre-requisite course (ANA 407: Gross Human Anatomy) and the pre
requisite courses (OT 201: Introduction to Occupational Therapy, and OT 333: Human Growth
and Development). Information from these courses is applied as the student gains an
understanding of the impact of biological and psychological systems and social environments on
occupational role performance in pediatrics. The course also serves as a precursor to more
advanced courses in pediatric OT evaluation and treatment, including: OT 544: Pediatric
Practice; OT 507: Art and Science of Sensory Integration and Neurodevelopmental Therapy;
1
OTE 514: Advanced Evaluation and Treatment: High Risk Infants and Toddlers; OTE 515:
Advanced Evaluation and Treatment: Pre-School Children; and OTE 516: Advanced Evaluation
and Treatment: School-Aged Children.
COURSE OBJECTIVES and ACOTE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:
Learning Objective(s)
ACOTE
Standard
1. Recognize the etiology, symptomatology,
(B.1.1)
incidence, prognosis and general medical
management of selected pediatric
conditions.
2. Discuss the general implications the above
(B.2.7;
information has for the practice of
B.2.10)
occupational therapy in selected conditions.
3. Discuss the impact of the social
environment on the occupational
development of children with selected
pediatric conditions.
4. Discuss the functional implications of select
pediatric conditions on the on the
occupational development of the child and
on the family system.
(B 1.4)
(B.1.2;
B.2.9;
B.2.4;
B.2.6;
B.8.3)
(B.8.3)
5. Identify medical precautions and the safe
practice of occupational therapy with
children (with selected pediatric conditions.
6. Discuss current ethical and legal concerns
related to pediatric practice.
(B.9.1)
Instructional
Method
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Reading
Internet
search
Discussion
Reading
Internet
Search
Discussion
Reading
Lecture
Video
Reading
Lecture
Reading
Discussion
Assessment
Method
Objective portion
of Pediatric
Condition Project,
Quiz, Exam
Analytical portion
of Pediatric
Condition Project,
Quiz, Exam
Subjective portion
of Pediatric
Condition Project,
Quiz, Exam
Analytical and
subjective portions
of Pediatric
Condition Project,
Quiz, Exam
Objective portion
of Pediatric
Condition Project,
Quiz, Exam
Quiz, Exam
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.1
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human
body.
B.1.2
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human development throughout the
lifespan
2
B.1.4
Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic,
and diversity factors and lifestyle choices in contemporary society.
B.2.4
Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with the achievement of
health and wellness for the clients.
Analyze the effects of heritable diseases, genetic conditions, disability, trauma, and injury
to the physical and mental health and occupational performance of the individual.
B.2.6
B.2.7
Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance
patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors.
B.2.9
Express support for the quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the individual, group,
or population to promote physical and mental health and prevention of injury and disease.
B.2.10
Use clinical reasoning to explain the rationale for and use of compensatory strategies when
desired life tasks cannot be performed.
Use scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions.
B.8.3
B.9.1
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards and
AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision making in
professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings and in client
treatment and employment settings.
COURSE STRUCTURE
The course is best described as a “blended learning” course. Your learning will be guided by
both home assignments and in-person, classroom content. For each week of the course, there will
be a “roadmap” document posted on the course UBLearns website providing learning objectives
from each topic. The document will specify learning objectives for the week, objectives for the
homework assignment, objectives for the class during the week, and due dates for any in or out
of class submissions for the week.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
1. Preparation for, attendance, and active participation in class. All students are expected to
be on time for class.
2. Reading and outside activities: Each week you are responsible to read the chapters in
advance. To help you do so, learning objectives will be posted in that week’s roadmap.
3. Completion of all assignments including Child abuse online-tutorial and
4. Pediatric Condition Semester Project
3
5. Quizzes: There will be weekly quizzes based on the objectives to be covered in your
homework assignment. Quizzes will be administered at the beginning of the class.
Quizzes cannot be made up; students arriving late to class will have limited time to
complete quizzes. Students who are not present will not receive credit for that particular
quiz.
6. Exams: There will be three non-cumulative exams. All students must be present & on
time for the exams. There are no make-ups allowed for exams. If you are sick, you need
to make arrangements before the exam. Documentation for any illness or extenuating
circumstances will be required. No excuses will be accepted after the exam
REQUIRED READINGS (Additional readings may be assigned)
Batshaw, M.L., Roizen, N., & Lotrecchiano G. (2012). Children with disabilities. Baltimore,
MD: Paul H. Brookes. (Available at the Medical Bookstore on Main and Bailey) Please
purchase the 7th edition of the book.
AOTA website. All students will need to become student members of the American
Occupational Therapy Association. Assignments & readings utilizing the AOTA website will be
interspersed throughout the semester.
Any additional readings will be posted on UBLearns
ASSIGNMENTS
1. Child Abuse – Online tutorial
Students must complete the New York State Central Registry Child Abuse training, print the
certificate of completion and bring it to class on 11-29-11. To access the tutorial go to:
http://nysmandatedreporter.org/TrainingCourses.aspx . Self-Directed Online Training: Register
for Self-Directed Online Training, and begin. This is a pass/fail distance learning assignment,
and you must submit the certificate of completion in order to receive credit for completion.
2. Pediatric Condition Semester Project
Students will participate (in groups of 4) in a project to select a pediatric condition of interest and
explore that condition from the following perspectives: objective, subjective, analytical and
theoretical.
Objective: Identify one website/blog of a child/ family with a pediatric condition, explore the
4
website/blog, and describe the condition including the etiology, symptoms, course, typical
interventions, and prognosis (use at least 2 sources for this section).
Subjective: Develop an understanding of the life of an individual with this pediatric condition
and the life of the family. Journal about your reaction to the child / family’s life experience with
this condition.
Analytical: Using the information from the objective and subjective findings and from the OT
practice framework, 2nd edition, analyze the impact of the disability on a child/ family with this
condition. Specifically, list the Areas of Occupation, Client Factors, Performance Patterns and
Performance Skills that would be impacted in the child you have studied in your website.
Theoretical: Based on all of the information above, name and describe a theory/model that you
think would be applicable for this child. Present your rationale/application of this approach with
this child.
Group Presentation: Prepare and present your case. The presentation should be about 5 - 8
minutes in length, and should present the objective, subjective, analytical and theoretical aspects
of the case. Rubrics will be presented in the “Assignment” page on UBLearns.
GRADING
Attendance & participation
Pediatric condition project
 Objective (5), subjective (5), analytical (5) and theoretical
(5)sections
 Group presentation (5)
Child abuse tutorial
Class quiz
Exam 1
Exam 2
Final exam
Total
Student Grade Determination:
Final Grade
Percentage
A
93-100
A90-92.999
B+
87-89.999
B
83-86.999
B80-82.999
Final Grade
C+
C
CD
F
5
10.00
25.00
5.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
100.00
Percentage
77-79.999
73-76.999
70-72.999
67-69.999
63-66.999
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Information regarding the course will be communicated in three ways:
1. Weekly roadmap postings in UBLearns – Routine weekly plans, pre-class activities,
etc. related to the course will be included in the weekly roadmap document posted in
UBLearns (described under “Course Structure” above). You are responsible for
accessing each week’s roadmap and for all of the information contained there.
2. In class announcements – Information will also be presented in person during our
regularly scheduled class meeting time. If you miss class, you are responsible for
getting information about in class announcements from one or more of your fellow
class members.
3. Email communication – Class wide email communication will be done using the
email system in UBLearns. You are responsible for making sure that the email
address used by UBLearns is one that you check regularly, that messages from
UBLearns and from the instructor’s email accounts are not sent to a junk email filter,
and for regularly checking your email for course messages.

UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UBLearns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. http://ublearns.buffalo.edu Students are responsible for printing out
handouts for classroom use.
Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams and University Policy on
Incompletes in the course
 Class Attendance, absences and conduct
Class attendance is required for this course and will count toward your participation grade. In the
case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me
prior to the start of class or on the day of class by email. Please be aware that an absence from
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance. Students are not
permitted to use any electronic devices in class (other than for taking notes).

Late Assignments
6
All assignments are due in the beginning of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit a paper version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in
a loss of 5% per day that the assignment is late. Assignments that are more than 3 days late will
not be accepted, except in the case of extenuating circumstances.
 Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam will result in a
grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor within 24 hours if a medical
emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations may be made at the discretion of the instructor.
 Grade Disputes
If you wish to dispute the grade assigned for any course component, your dispute must be
presented IN WRITING within one week after the date when the grade is assigned (i.e., when an
exam or paper is returned or when an activity grade is posted in UBLearns). You must include a
specific rationale for your dispute (e.g., a reference to a specific page in a reading indicating that
an answer is correct).
 Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
7
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
3. Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
1.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
2.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
3.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
4.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
5.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
6.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
7.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Additional information on the university’s academic integrity policy can be found at:
http://undergrad-catalog.buffalo.edu/policies/course/integrity.html
8
COURSE SCHEDULE
(Any course schedule changes, additional readings or assignments will be announced in class and
posted on UBLearns)
Jan. 29



Feb. 5
Feb. 12



TOPIC
Introduction to course
Discuss Pediatric
Condition Project
Premature & High Risk
Infants
OT Practice Framework II
Neural Tube Defects
Cerebral Palsy





READING
Ch. 7
Ch 25
Ch 24
Ch 26
Ch 27
Ch 13
Ch 13
Mar. 19
Cerebral Palsy continued
Traumatic brain injury
Epilepsy
Neuromuscular disorders
Musculoskeletal
conditions
 Orthopedic conditions
EXAM I
(Monday instead of
Wednesday)
 Vision
 Hearing
 Sensory Processing
Disorders
 Intellectual Disabilities
 Down Syndrome
 X- Linked Syndromes
 PKU & Errors of
Metabolism
 Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
SPRING RECESS
Mar. 26

Feb. 19
Feb. 24
Mar. 5
Mar. 12
Pediatric Mental Health
o Disruptive disorders
o Anxiety disorders
o Mood disorders
o Psychoses
 Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder
ASSIGNMENT
Ch 13
Class quiz
DUE: 3 ideas for Pediatric
Condition Project topics.
Your topic will be reviewed
and assigned.
Class quiz
Class quiz
DUE: Objective section of
pediatric project
Ch 11
Ch 10
Class quiz
Ch 17
Ch 18
Ch 19
Class quiz
Ch 29
Class quiz
Ch. 22
9
DUE: Subjective section of
pediatric project
Apr. 2
Apr. 9
Apr. 16

Autism Spectrum
Disorders

Learning Disabilities
Ch 21
OT Practice
articles
Ch 23
OT Practice article


Class quiz
DUE: Analytical section of
pediatric project using the
OT practice Framework II.
DUE: Theoretical section of
pediatric.
Tourette Syndrome
PANDAS (Guest
Presenter: Janice Tona,
PhD, OTR)
EXAM II


Nutrition & Feeding
Childhood Obesity
Ch 8, 9
Online reading
-------------------
Class quiz
Apr. 30



Cardiovascular disease
Pediatric HIV
Childhood cancers
Ch. 28
Class quiz
May 7
Group Presentations
TBA
EXAM III
During the week of May 12
Apr. 23
Due: Certificate of
completion from the Child
abuse (online tutorial)
http://nysmandatedreporter.
org/TrainingCourses.aspx
You must have certificate of
completion in order to
receive credit for
completion of the tutorial.
10
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 322
REHAB MEDICINE 2
Semester: Spring
Credits: 4
Lecture
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Tuesday and Thursday
9:00 – 10:50 a.m.
111 Kimball Tower
Deanna C Hostler DPT, PhD, CCS
512 Kimball Tower
829-6723
[email protected]
Wednesday 1-3 or by appointment
E-mail addresses for other speakers:
Paul O’Keefe, PT: [email protected]
Lynn Steinbrenner, M.D.: [email protected]
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L: [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This lecture course covers topics in the medical sciences relevant to rehabilitation professionals. The
intent of the course is to provide students with knowledge of medical disorders commonly encountered
by occupational therapists, and to provide an understanding of the medical management of these
disorders. This course will focus upon the pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory,
endocrine, immunologic and neuromuscular systems and their clinical management. Emphasis is placed
on etiology, cellular, tissue and structural pathologies, impairments, medical diagnosis and management,
including pharmacologic management, and indications/contraindications for rehabilitation.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
3rd year student in Occupational Therapy.
COURSE RATIONALE
Knowledge of human pathophysiology is critical to the rehabilitation process, since states of health,
disease, and disorder are the foundation of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International
Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The Occupational Therapy Practice
Framework, which guides occupational therapy practice, complements the ICF, and requires an
understanding of human pathology and the impact of related disability on the individual, family and
society.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course serves to provide a basic competency in the knowledge of human pathophysiology and
builds upon previously acquired knowledge of medical terminology, physiology, gross and
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University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
neuroanatomy. Students will obtain an understanding of the cellular and structural changes that can lead
to disability. This basic knowledge is necessary for the occupational therapy practice courses.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Identify the pathophysiology,
impairment, functional limitations,
disability and societal limitations
associated with musculoskeletal,
cardiorespiratory, endocrine,
immunologic and nervous system
diseases and disorders.
2. Understand the effects of health,
disability, disease processes, and
traumatic injury to the individual
within the context of family and
society.
3. Describe the interdisciplinary
management of musculoskeletal,
cardiorespiratory, endocrine,
immunologic and nervous systems
conditions and understand the role of
specialists in consultation and
examination.
4. Describe the general implications this
information has for medical
precautions and the safe practice of
occupational therapy with individuals
with these selected conditions.
B.1.1
Lecture
Exam
Assignments
B.2.5
B.2.6
Lecture
Discussion
Exam
Assignments
B.5.26
Lecture
Exam
Assignments
B.2.5
B.2.8
Lecture
Discussion
Exam
Assignments
5. Understand the purpose of
rehabilitation in the process of
restoring or compensating for life tasks
affected by injury or disease.
B.2.10
Lecture
Discussion
Exam
Assignments
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.1
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human
body to include the biological and physical sciences.
B.2.5
Explain the role of occupation in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease
and disability for the individual, family, and society.
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University at Buffalo
B.2.6
B.2.8
B.2.10
B.5.26
OT 322 Spring 2014
Analyze the effects of heritable diseases, genetic conditions, disability, trauma, and
injury to the physical and mental health and occupational performance of the
individual.
Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others, and adhere to safety
regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting
and scope of practice.
Use clinical reasoning to explain the rationale for and use of compensatory strategies
when desired life tasks cannot be performed.
Understand when and how to use the consultative process with groups, programs,
organizations, or communities.
REQUIRED READINGS
REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Conditions in Occupational Therapy Effect on Occupational
Performance Fourth edition, Atchison and Dirette
ADDITIONAL READINGS: As assigned during class or on UBLearns
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS:
Students must:
1. Attend and participate fully in all lectures.
2. Complete all assigned readings.
3. Complete homework and in-class assignments/quizzes
5. Take the required exams.
6. Consult UBLearns regularly for class notes, readings and updates.
GRADING
Evaluation
Exam 1
Exam 2
Exam 3
Final Exam
Homework and in class assignments
Attendance and Professionalism
Percent of Grade
20%
20%
20%
20%
15%
5%
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Percentage
93 - 100
90 – 92.99
87 – 89.99
83 – 86.99
80 – 82.99
Letter Grade
C+
C
CD
F
3
Percentage
77 – 79.99
73 – 76.99
70 – 72.99
60 – 69.99
< 60
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Professional behavior towards your classmates and instructors is expected. Promptness and consistent
attendance are also expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or
absent, you must contact Dr. Hostler prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a
telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not
excuse you from any required assignments. Chronic tardiness, absence, or unprofessional behavior can
result in lost points towards the final grade. Any missed in-class assignments or quizzes will result in a 0
unless a valid, written excuse is presented (MD note from illness, etc.)
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 5% per
day that the assignment is late. Assignments that are more than 3 days late will not be accepted,
except in the case of extenuating circumstances. If a group presentation is due ALL members of
the group should be presenting, failure to present with your group may result in a 0.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam will result in a
grade of 0 for that exam. Students must contact the instructor before the exam class for a nonemergency, and within 24 hours if a medical emergency precludes exam attendance. Written
documentation will be required and accommodations may be made at the discretion of the
instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB email account.
All students are required to access UB Learns for class handouts, and announcements. Students should
frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes. Web site address:
http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe
documented illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must
have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed the exams up until the time
an incomplete is formally requested.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the
student has not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a
4
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
default grade that will become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by
formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be
assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade
better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of
a least ‘D’) in the requirements already completed. The instructor will provide the student
specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade
with twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an
earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any
one of: ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim
grade of ‘I’ will be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. Accessibility
Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for
reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial
part in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
5
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
c) Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
d) Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
e) Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
COURSE SCHEDULE
Spring 2014*
* Subject to change. (Any course schedule changes, additional readings or assignments
will be announced in class and posted on UB Learns)
Week
1
Date
1/28
Lecture Topic
Course Introduction
Speaker
Hostler
Introduction to Pharmacology
1
1/30
Connective tissue/soft tissue response
to injury and healing – part 1
General treatment ideas; methods of
assessing soft tissue health; cases
Paul O’Keefe, PT
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
2
2/4
Connective tissue/soft tissue response
to injury and healing – part 2
Paul O’Keefe, PT
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
2
2/6
Common shoulder pathologies
Paul O’Keefe, PT
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
3
2/11
Osteoarthritis/Osteoporosis
Hostler
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
3
2/13
Disorders and injuries of the hip and
knee
Hostler
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
4
2/18
Hostler
Ch. 17: Orthopedics
4
2/20
Disorders and injuries of the foot and
ankle
Review
Exam 1
5
2/25
Infectious diseases
Hostler
Hostler
Ch 19. Infectious Diseases
6
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
5
2/27
Pulmonary Diseases
Hostler
Ch. 10 Cardiopulmonary
disorders
Hostler
Ch.10 Cardiopulmonary disorders
6
3/4
Pulmonary Diseases
6
3/6
Cardiovascular Disease
7
3/11
Cardiovascular Diseases
Review
7
8
3/13
3/18
Exam 2
Spring Break
8
3/20
Spring Break
9
3/25
Oncology
9
10
3/27
4/1
Immunology, inflammation and repair
Endocrine Diseases, Diabetes,
Hypothyroid
10
4/3
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L
Ch 5,6,7 Mood Disorders,
Schizophrenia, Anxiety disorders
11
4/8
Mental Health Disorders –
Schizophrenia, Bipolar disorder,
depression, anxiety, post-traumatic
stress disorder, etc.
Rheumatic Diseases –Rheumatoid
Arthritis
11
4/10
Rheumatic Diseases – Juvenile
Idiopathic Arthritis, Fibromyalgia,
Lupus, Gout, etc.
Hostler
12
12
4/15
4/17
Review
EXAM 3 –
13
4/22
13
4/24
14
4/29
Neurologic diseases and Disorders:
Dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s
Neurologic diseases and disorders:
Traumatic Brain injury
Neurologic diseases and disorders:
Multiple Sclerosis, Infectious diseases
of the central and peripheral nervous
systems
Hostler
Ch. 10 Cardiopulmonary
disorders
Hostler
Ch. 10 Cardiopulmonary
disorders
Lynn Steinbrenner, M.D
Hostler
Hostler
Ch 11: Diabetes
Hostler
Ch. 15 Rheumatic Diseases
Hostler
7
Hostler
Ch 8 Dementia
Hostler
Ch. 12 Acquired Brain Injury
Hostler
Ch. 14 Progressive Neurological
disorders
University at Buffalo
OT 322 Spring 2014
14
5/1
Neurologic diseases & disorders:
Spinal Cord Injury
Hostler
Ch .16 Spinal Cord Injury
15
5/6
Neurologic diseases & disorders:
Stroke
Hostler
Ch. 9 Cerebrovascular accident
15
5/8
Neurologic diseases and disorders:
Stroke
Review
16
5/15
FINAL EXAM 8-11am Kimball 111
Hostler
Please check UBLearns for
additional readings weekly,
they will be posted under
Course Documents
8
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 333
HUMAN OCCUPATION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
Fall 2012
3 Units Lecture
2 Units Lab
Lecture
Mon 1:30-4:20
Labs
A: Th 1:00-2:50
F 8:00-9:50
B: Th 3:00-4:50
F 10:00-11:50
Lecture DFN 146
Lab Th DFN 7
F Kimball 124
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistant
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L
534 Kimball
716-829-6734
[email protected]
Tuesdays 10-12
Kathleen Saint [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the development of human
occupation, from conception through senescence. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the
interaction of the person, environment, and task components that support the engagement in
occupation. As such, the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework will be introduced and will
serve as the cornerstone of occupational task analysis.
The student will be introduced to the importance of understanding developmental concepts and
their relationship to occupational therapy. Knowledge of the typical acquisition of occupation
will be stressed for its significance in formulating a basis for understanding atypical development
and for planning appropriate OT intervention for individuals of all ages. Students will read and
analyze literature related to the development of occupation.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
Pre-requisite: PSY 336 Developmental Psychology
Pre-requisite/co requisite: OT 201 Orientation to Occupational Therapy
COURSE RATIONALE
Occupation is the core of the profession. This course allows students to apply the anatomy,
psychology, and sociology information gained in preparation for entry into the professional OT
program, as well as information gained in the pre/co requisite courses (OT 301: Orientation to
1
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
Occupational Therapy). In doing so, the impact of biological and psychological systems and
social environments on occupational development is stressed.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course builds on the traditional theories of development introduced in PSY 336
(Developmental Psychology), to incorporate the development of occupation. These theories of
human development provide a foundation in Occupation-centered philosophical & theoretical
basis for OT practice, and The impact of biological, psychological, and social systems on
occupational role, two of the main themes of the program. In addition, the course presents
development as a process that is influenced by the systems within which the individual functions,
which provides a foundation in Understanding OT in a broader institutional and societal context,
another main theme of the program.
Information from this course is built upon in more advanced courses in pediatric and adult OT
evaluation and treatment in the fourth and fifth year. It also serves as a basis for evaluation and
treatment planning during fieldwork in the spring of the fourth year.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Discuss the development of occupation
from infancy through senescence.
B.1.2.
2. Discuss the importance of understanding
typical human growth and development as a
basis for understanding occupational therapy
evaluation and treatment throughout the
lifespan.
3. Apply various developmental theories that
are used in describing human development to
the development of occupation.
B.1.3.
B.3.1.
B.3.2.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Lecture
Readings
Group discussion
Exams
Lab work
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Exams
Group
Discussions
Position Paper
Exams
Lab work
Reflexes Practical
4. Delineate specific physical, psychological, B.1.2.
sensory, cognitive, linguistic, and emotional
B.1.3.
aspects of development from infancy through
senescence.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group discussion
5. Describe how cultural, socioeconomic and B.1.4.
environmental contexts affect the
development and performance of occupations
across the lifespan.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group discussion
2
Exams
Group discussion
Exams
Lab work
Group
Discussions
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
6. Analyze tasks relative to occupational
performance, performance skills,
performance patterns, contexts, activity
demands, and client factors.
7. Articulate the importance of balancing
areas of occupation with the achievement of
health and wellness.
B.2.7.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Activity Analyses
Lab work
B.2.4.
Lab work
Personal Pattern
Profile
8. Develop and implement a plan to teach a
craft, electronic media, or other task to an
individual.
B.5.19.
9. Describe the meaning and dynamics of
occupation and purposeful activity including
the interaction of areas of occupational
performance, performance skills,
performance patterns, contexts, activity
demands, and client factors.
B.2.2.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group discussion
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group discussion
Lecture
Readings
Teaching Project
Exams
Group discussion
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.2.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human development throughout
the lifespan (infants, children, adolescents, adults, and older adults).
Course content must include, but is not limited to, developmental psychology.
B.1.3.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts of human behavior
to include the behavioral sciences, social sciences, and occupational science.
Course content must include, but is not limited to, introductory psychology,
abnormal psychology, and introductory sociology or introductory
anthropology.
B.1.4.
Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the role of sociocultural,
socioeconomic, and diversity factors and lifestyle choices in contemporary
society. Course content must include, but is not limited to, introductory
psychology, abnormal psychology, and introductory sociology or
introductory anthropology.
B.2.2.
Explain the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including the
interaction of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns,
activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors.
B.2.4.
Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with the
achievement of health and wellness for the clients.
B.2.7.
Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills,
performance patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments,
and client factors to formulate an intervention plan.
B.3.1.
Apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
3
University at Buffalo
B.3.2.
B.5.19.
OT 333 Fall 2012
Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are used
in occupational therapy.
Apply the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational
methods to design experiences to address the needs of the client, family,
significant others, colleagues, other health providers, and the public.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Cronin, A. & Mandich, M. (2005). Human development & performance throughout the lifespan.
Clifton Park, NY: Thomson-Delmar Learning.
CHECKLISTS
Hawaii Early Learning Profile Checklist (HELP Checklist) Birth to 3. Vort Publishers.
Hawaii Early Learning Profile for Preschoolers Checklist (HELP for preschoolers). Vort
Publishers.
All are available at the University at Buffalo Medical Bookstore
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Will be assigned and posted online at UBlearns.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
All assignments are to be in APA format and submitted online through UBLearns unless
otherwise indicated. All assignments should be submitted in Word or compatible format. The file
name should be formatted with your last name then the assignment name (ex. Smith Position
Paper.docx).
Lecture
Assigned Readings: Assigned readings are posted on the course schedule. Additional reading
may be posted on UBLearns. Students are expected to complete required readings prior to class.
Participation in Lecture: All students are expected to participate class discussions.
Participation in lecture includes being prepared for class, attendance, and punctuality.
Position Paper: Research a controversial developmental topic and develop a written paper
describing one side of the controversy. Topics must be approved by instructor. Students will also
prepare to debate their topic in class.
Examinations: Students will be evaluated using three written examinations and one cumulative
final. Exam is based on content from lecture and lab portion of class.
Developmental Observation: Students will have two opportunities to observe individuals of
specific ages and analyze their observations using developmental information from class, along
with formal and informal checklists. The observations will include one preschool or school-aged
child, and one older adult.
4
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
AOTA Membership: Students are required to be members of the AOTA to access materials and
resources. Students will provide instructor with membership card (or other documentation of
membership). You must be a member of AOTA to pass this course.
In-Class Assignments- Students will complete a variety of in-class assignments in groups and
individually. In-class assignments may include case studies, discussions, or quizzes.
Lab
Activity Analyses: Students will have four opportunities to formally analyze activities based on
the OT Practice Framework: Domain and Process. Students will complete an activity analysis on
two crafts- mosaic tiling (group) and basket weaving (individual), and an occupation-based
activity analysis on two people- middle-aged child (group) and a college-age student
(individual).
Teaching Project: Working in pairs, students will select an activity to teach to another person.
Students will develop a teaching plan, including steps and measurable objectives. They will then
implement the plan on a partner, and reflect on the teaching experience in writing.
Environmental Geriatrics: Students will complete an online learning module on environmental
geriatrics.
Cultural Object: Students will bring an object that represents their culture to class. Students
will present their object and explain its significance to their personal culture.
Personal Pattern: Students will maintain a week-long journal of their own activities and will
use this journal in lab to analyze their own personal patterns with regard to areas of occupation.
Reflex Practical: Students will be expected to recall and demonstrate randomly-selected
reflexes. Students will be evaluated on an individual basis.
Crafts- Students will complete 4 graded crafts. Mosaic tiling and copper tooling will be
completed in lab. Basket weaving and a craft of the student’s choice will be completed out of
class. Crafts will be graded on creativity, effort, and aesthetics.
GRADING
Lecture
Item
Position Paper
Pediatric Observations
Older Adult Observation
Exams (3)
Final
Participation in Lecture
In-Class Assignments
AOTA Membership
Total
Points
40
30
30
120 (40 each)
40
15
20
Complete/Incomplete
295
5
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
Lab
Item
AA: Mosaic Tiling
AA: Basket weaving
AA: Child
AA: Adult
Teaching Project
Personal Pattern Profile
Environmental Geriatrics
Cultural Object
Reflex lab practical
Craft: Mosaic Tiling
Craft: Copper Tooling/Wood
burning
Craft: Basket weaving
Craft: Student selection
Total
Points
15
15
15
15
35
15
10
5
20
10
10
10
10
185
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Percentage
Grade
A
93-100%
A90-92.99%
B+
87-89.99%
B
83-86.99%
B80-82.99%
C+
77-79.99%
Letter
Grade
C
CD+
D
F
Percentage
73-76.99%
70-72.99%
67-69.99%
63-66.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam on time will result
in a grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor prior to the start of the exam
if medical emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations, including alternate exams, may be made at the discretion of the instructor.
6
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UBLearns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible
for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 10% of
points per day that the assignment is late. Assignments more than 3 days late will not be
accepted.
Lab Requirements
Students are expected to participate in all lab activities. Students who come to lab wearing
clothing that restricts their movement or clothing that is immodest will receive one warning, after
that they will be required to leave the lab for that session. Inappropriate clothing is considered to
be the following: any clothing that reveals cleavage or underwear or that exposes low back
tattoos and belly buttons.
Students will have several opportunities to observe individuals in the lab and community.
Students are expected to adhere to a professional dress code, as described in the student
handbook and on UBLearns. Students are also expected to display professional behaviors,
including timeliness, appropriate discussions, and maintaining confidentiality of all that is
observed.
Technology in the Classroom
Students may use laptops or tablets in the classroom and in the lab. Cell phones (including smart
phones) may not be used. Students who are observed using a device for anything unrelated to the
course will be asked to leave the classroom or lab for that day, will receive a zero on any related
assignments, and will lose the privilege of using technology in the classroom for the remainder
of the course.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
7
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
8
University at Buffalo


OT 333 Fall 2012
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
9
University at Buffalo
OT 333 Fall 2012
COURSE SCHEDULE
* Course schedule is a general outline and subject to change based on the needs of the class
Week Date
Lecture Topic
1
2
8/26
9/2
Reading/
Assignment
Due
Lab
Lab Topic
Intro to course
OT Practice Framework
(OTPF)
8/29
Occupational Profile
8/30
OTPF
Labor Day No Class
9/5
No Class
Rosh Hashanah
Intro to Activity
Analysis
9/6
3
4
5
6
7
8
9/9
9/16
9/23
9/30
10/7
10/14
OT Assessments
Crafts related to OT
Developmental Theories
Culture of Development
Ch. 21
Sladyk
reading
Tubbs &
Drake
Reading
Ch 2, 4
Exam 1
Prenatal Development
Infant development
Toddler development
Family Issues
Preschool Development
Ch. 6-8
9/12
Craft-Mosaic Tiling
9/13
Examine assessments
9/19
Mosaic Tiling cont.
9/20
Culture
9/26
9/27
Wood burning and
Copper Tooling
Teaching/Learning
10/3
Oral Motor/Feeding
10/4
Reflexes
Ch. 8, 9
10/10
AOTA
Membership
Card
Ch. 10
10
Reading/
Assignment Due
OT Practice
Framework
(Bring to class)
Cultural object
to share with
class
AA Mosaic
Tilling
Ch 7 Bring your
text book to class
10/11
Motor Development Lab Reading: SchultzKrohn Feeding
Basket Weaving
Craft and AA
Due
Preschool Observations
10/17
10/18
Toys
Reflex Lab Practical
Reading: Toys
University at Buffalo
Week Date
Lecture Topic
9
Middle Childhood
10
10/21
10/28
OT 333 Fall 2012
Reading/
Assignment
Due
Ch. 11
Pediatric
Observation
Due
Exam 2
Lab
Lab Topic
Reading/
Assignment Due
10/24
Present teaching project
10/25
Play/School Systems
Teaching/
Learning Project
Due
Reading:
AOTA Play tips
Role of Recess
10/31
Childhood Activity
Analysis
Analyze Personal
Patterns
Adolescent Mental
Health
Personal
Patterns Due
11/8
Older Adult
Observations
AA Childhood
Due
11/14
Young Adult
Transitions
11/15
Position Papers Debate
11/21
Wellness
11/22
12/5
Environmental
Geriatrics
No Class
Thanksgiving
No Class
Thanksgiving
End of Life Issues
12/6
Review for Final
11/1
11
12
13
14
15
11/4
11/11
11/18
11/25
12/2
Finals 12/13
Week 11:45
-2:45
Adolescence
Young Adult
Middle Adult
Older Adults
Ch. 12
11/7
Ch. 14
Position
Papers Due
Ch. 15
Ch. 16
Reading:
Well-Elderly
Study
Exam 3
Final Exam
Subject to Change
11
11/28
11/29
AA College
Student Due
Ch. 19
Wellness Reading
Environmental
Geriatrics
Reading: Death
and Dying
Selected Craft
Due
Older Adult
Observations
Due
OT 341 2013
Course Title/Number: OT 341 Critical Analysis of the Scientific Literature
Department Name: Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Program Name: Exercise Science BS
Semester: Fall Year: 2013
Class
Day/Time:
Wednesday (section A/C) & Friday (section B/D), 12:00-1:50 PM
Class Location:
Diefendorf 02 (Wednesday) & Diefendorf 203 (Friday)
Format(s):
LEC
Prerequisite(s):
STA 119 Statistical Methods or PSY 207 Psychological Statistics and enrolled in
Exercise Science Professional Sequence (upper division)
Instructor(s) of Record:
John Wilson, PhD
Stephen Bauer, PhD
Course Coordinator
Office:
Farber G10
Kimball 521
Phone Number(s):
(716) 829-5596
(716) 829-6760
Email:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Office Hours:
By appointment
By appointment
Teaching Assistant (TA): None
TA Office:
None
TA Phone Number:
None
TA Email:
None
TA Office Hours:
None
I.
(a)
Course Description:
This 2-credit course introduces OT students to the principles of critical analysis of scientific literature.
Completion of this class will enable students to access, interpret and analyze research articles and
information presented in oral presentations pertinent to their respective fields and to make application
of the findings to clinical practice, rehabilitation and/or exercise training.
Rationale: Development of clinical reasoning and decision making is a crucial aspect of the education of
health care professionals. In their 1998 report The Future of Public Health, the Institute of Medicine of
the National Academy of Sciences identified evidence-based practice (EBP) as one of five key
Page 1 of 9
OT 341 2013
competencies necessary for delivery of effective and safe health care in modern-day society, and EBP is
becoming widely accepted as essential for the advancement of public health in the 21st century.
Decision making using an EBP requires the practitioner to utilize the highest-level of research-based
evidence available, combined with the resources available, skills of the practitioner, and needs of the
patient or client when charting a course for clinical care. This course in scientific inquiry is designed to
introduce students to the steps of evidence-based practice, enable students to find and critique
evidence, and promote application of evidence-based practice to case studies, in preparation for future
work with patients and clients.
II.
Course Objectives / Competency / Instructional Method(s) / Assessment of Student Learning
Learning Objectives
After completion of this course the student will be
able to:
Discuss the role of scientific knowledge to the
development of a profession and its application to
clinical practice. Specifically, discuss the role of
EBP in making informed, accurate, and safe
professional decisions.
Determine the applicability of scientific research
to professional practice.
Describe basic features of quantitative research
design including: introduction, background,
method (research questions and hypothesis,
independent, dependent and confounding
variables, effect size, populations, random, and
convenience sampling), results (tools and
instruments, descriptive and inferential statistics,
significance).
Describe the basic features of qualitative research
design: including introduction, background,
method (research questions), method (purposive
sampling, interviews, surveys, focus groups,
phenomenological), results (coding, analysis).
Differentiate study design types (true
experimental, quasi-experiment, non-experimental,
qualitative), and understand their associated
strength of evidence.
Critique research articles in terms of internal and
external validity, and reliability.
ACOTE Instructional
Standard
Method
Assessment
Method
B.8.1.
Lecture
Small Group
Work
In Class Assignment 1
B.8.2.
Lecture
Small Group
Work
B.8.4.,
B.8.5
Lectures
Small Group
Work
Readings
In Class Assignments
(2)
Out of Class
Assignment
In Class Assignment 2
Individual Out of Class
Assignments (2)
In Class Test 2
B.8.4.,
B.8.5
Lecture
Small Group
Work
In Class Assignment
In Class Test 2
B.8.4.,
B.8.5
Lectures
Small Group
Work
Readings
Lectures
Small Group
Work
In Class Assignment
Individual Out of Class
Assignments (2)
In Class Test 2
In Class Assignment
Individual Out of Class
Assignments (2)
In Class Test 2
B.8.4.,
B.8.5
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OT 341 2013
Use online tools (e.g. Cochrane Collection,
Medline, CINAHL) to locate systematic reviews,
levels of evidence, rated peer-reviewed articles,
unrated peer-reviewed articles and grey literature
(e.g. codes of ethics, practice guidelines).
B.6.6.
Lecture
Small Group
Work
In Class Assignment
In Class Test 1
Individual Out of Class
Assignment
Identify the steps of Evidence Based Practice (EBP)
and apply to specific cases, considering: level of
evidence, resources available, skills of the
practitioner, and needs of the client.
Discuss Principles of Ethics and their application to
clinical practice.
B.4.2
Lecture
Small Group
Work
Individual Out of Class
Assignment
B.9.1.
Lecture
Small Group
Work
In Class Assignment
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.4.2.
B.6.6.
B.8.1.
B.8.2.
B.8.4.
B.8.5.
B.9.1.
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual
factors, and psychometric properties of tests. These must be culturally relevant,
based on available evidence, and incorporate use of occupation in the assessment
Utilize
national and international resources in making assessment or intervention
process.
choices and appreciate the influence of international occupational therapy
contributions to education, research, and practice.
Articulate the importance of how scholarly activities contribute to the
development of a body of knowledge relevant to the profession of occupational
Effectively
therapy. locate, understand, critique, and evaluate information, including the
quality of evidence.
Understand and use basic descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative
statistics and code, analyze, and synthesize qualitative data.
Understand and critique the validity of research studies, including their design
(both quantitative and qualitative) and methodology.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards and
AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision making in
professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings.
III. Textbooks /Equipment /Required Technologies
Resource
Access to UBlearns for course documents and assignments
Required
Yes
Helewa, A. & Saunders, J.W. (2000). Critical evaluation of research in physical rehabilitation: An
integrated approach. ISBN-13: 978-0721673905 [Recommended text. Available in the Medical
Bookstore.]
Page 3 of 9
OT 341 2013
IV. Course Learning Activities
Students will be expected to read lecture outlines and assigned readings that will be posted on
UBlearns. Class format will be lecture to clarify the material and class discussion and activities to
reinforce concepts.
V.
Course and Instructor Eval
Each student who submits a completed online evaluation of the course and instructors, as reported to
the course coordinator by the SPHHP CoursEval Administrator, will be awarded 1%. CourseEval
procedures protect the anonymity of student respondents – the course coordinator will receive a list of
names of students who have submitted evaluations, but no faculty member receives evaluation reports
(ratings and comments) before grades are submitted, and student names are not included on evaluation
reports.
VI. Grading
There are 5 in-class assignments (worth 3% each), an out-of-class assignment for seminar critique (15%),
an in-class exam about literature searches (15%), an out-of-class assignment about evidence-based
article analysis (15%), an in-class final exam (20%), a departmental seminar critique (20%), and the
CoursEval participation (1%).
Course Component
Five in-class assignments @ 3% each
Assignment: initial seminar critique
Exam #1 about literature searches
Assignment: evidence-based article analysis
Assignment: departmental seminar critique
Exam #2
Course evaluation completion
Due date
Sep 4/6, Sep 25/27, Oct
9/11, Nov 6/8, Nov 13/15
Sep 18/20
Oct 16/18
Oct 30/Nov 1
Nov 20/22
Dec 4/6
Close of CoursEval
Percentage
15%
15%
15%
15%
20%
20%
Additional 1%
Final Grade Determination - Cutpoints:
92 90 88 82 80 78 -
100
91.9
89.9
87.9
81.9
79.9
A
AB+
B
BC+
72 70 68 62 < 62
77.9
71.9
69.9
67.9
C
CD+
D
F
VII. Other course related information
In the event that you are having difficulties with the course material, or want further
information about a topic, please let the instructors know.
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OT 341 2013
Students will be expected to check their UB email account and UBlearns regularly, and prior to
each class, to read important information, updates and changes in assignments. Students are
also responsible for printing the readings for classroom use.
VIII. Communication
If you have multiple email accounts, please be sure that you access (or forward) your UB email. Your UB
email is the account we will use to send course-related materials.
IX.
Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams, and
University Policy on Incompletes in Courses
•
Class Attendance and Absences
As many in-class activities will be completed throughout the semester, class attendance
is expected. On the first day of class, students will be assigned to small groups and each group
will be given an attendance sheet. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you
being late or absent, you must contact the instructor prior to the start of class (either by
email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under
these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. At the end of the
semester, the attendance sheets will be collected and 1% will be deducted from the final
grade for each unexcused absence.
•
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the designated time and due date. Failure to submit the
assignment when due will result in a loss of 1% (of the final course grade) per day that the
assignment is late. If there are circumstances that will preclude you from turning in
assignments on the due date, it is imperative that you discuss the situation with the
instructor prior to the due date.
•
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe
illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have
satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up
until the time an incomplete is requested.
•
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicate that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a
passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well-defined parameters to
complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade.
An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end
of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the
instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor.
Page 5 of 9
OT 341 2013
The instructor must specify a default letter at the time the “I” grade is submitted.
A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is
completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be
completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing
an incomplete than the 12-month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, the instructor shall
provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be
fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office.
Students must not re-register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade.
Applicable dates regarding the 12-month provision:
Courses taken in (semester):
Will default in 12 months on:
Fall
December 31
Spring
May 31
Summer
August 31
The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the students plans to
graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to
change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form.
A default grade an be “A-,” “B+,” “B-,” “C+,” “C-,” “D+,” “D,” or “F.” (If a student selected an
S/U grading option, it will replace the default letter grade when the grade defaults.)
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate
in this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645-2608, and
also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. The office will provide you with
information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/
Netiquette
This course may utilize UBlearns to facilitate online communication between course participants.
Please keep in mind the following “Rules of Netiquette” when communicating online.
1. The rules of the classroom are the same regardless of location. Remember just because
you’re interacting online, doesn’t mean you stop having respect for your professors, and
fellow classmates. You’re communicating with a real person, not a computer screen.
2. Remember your audience. When communicating online it’s important to remember who
you’re communicating with. When sending a message to a professor, please refrain from
using “text speak”. For example, Shakespeare never intended for you to type “2B or not 2B”.
Also, stay away from typing in all capital letters; it will appear as if you’re shouting.
3. Avoid strong language. Language can easily be misinterpreted in an online setting. Be sure to
review your work before submitting, making sure the reader won’t be able to misinterpret it
as strong, or offensive. Sarcasm doesn’t translate well online. Your audience can’t see your
facial expressions, or body language. Try to be as straight forward and professional as
Page 6 of 9
OT 341 2013
possible.
4. Read everything, twice. Be sure to thoroughly read all course materials before beginning to
work on your assignments. If you have a question, or need clarification, re-read the materials.
You may have glanced over an important detail the first time. If you’re still having difficulties,
then e-mail your professor.
5. Review all materials before submitting. When responding to discussion board posts,
be sure to read all previous postings before you post your own. This way you won’t duplicate
someone else’s comments. Also, it’s a good idea to write, and save your work in Microsoft
Word first. In case of a technical issue, you have a backup copy.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Department and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment
and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:

Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted – in whole or in substantial part – in another course, without prior and
expressed consent of the instructor.

Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as
one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s
own.

Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another
student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular
phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual
assignment.

Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any
forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s
authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or
any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible
for the assignment.

Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official
document, record, or instrument of identification.

Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations
or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.

Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at
the University at Buffalo any academic assignments, or any inappropriate assistance in the
preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the sellers knows, or has reason
to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program
requirement.
Page 7 of 9
OT 341 2013

Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
COURSE SCHEDULE
This schedule is subject to revision. Any course schedule changes or additional readings will be posted
on UBlearns and will be announced in class as time permits. Note: Additional required readings may be
assigned and will be assigned at least one week prior to the class for which they are assigned.
Date
Topics (instructors)
Required Readings/Assignments
(class
number)
Aug
Introduction to scientific
Reading #1: USPSTF evidence-based recommendations.
28/30
hypotheses (Dr. Wilson)
Reading #2: RCT example.
(#1)
Sep 4/6 Designing research studies to test
Reading #3: Hill criteria for causation.
(#2)
causal hypotheses (Dr. Wilson)
Reading #4.
Assignment #1, done by students working in groups inclass, for 3% of course grade
Sep
Understanding evidence: critical
Assignment #2, done by students working in groups in11/13
analysis of seminars (Dr. Wilson)
class, for 15% of course grade. Observe a brief seminar
(#3)
in class, write an individual critique of it, and upload
the critique to UBlearns by due date.
Sep
Research design: quantitative
Start of class is due date for Assignment #2.
18/20
types of studies (Dr. Bauer)
(#4)
Sep
Research design: qualitative types Assignment #3, done by students working in groups in25/27
of studies (Dr. Bauer)
class, for 3%.
(#5)
Oct 2/4
Introduction to evidence based
Reading: Thompson, C. B., & Panacek, E. A. (2006).
(#6)
practice (Dr. Bauer)
Clinical research and critical care transport: How to get
started. Air Medical Journal, (25)3, 107-111
Oct 9/11 Searching for scientific evidence
Assignment #4, performing online literature searches
(#7)
online (Drs. Zafron and Wilson)
with Dr. Zafron, for 3%.
Oct
Searching for evidence (Dr. Bauer) Exam #1, done by each student individually, about
16/18
literature searches, for 15%.
(#8)
Oct
Critical analysis of empirical
Reading: Giannini, M. J., & Protas E. J. (1992). Exercise
23/25
research papers (Dr. Wilson)
response in children with and without Juvenile
(#9)
Rheumatoid Arthritis: A case-comparison study. J.
Physical Therapy, 72(5) 365-72, 294-308.
Oct 30/
Critical analysis of empirical
Assignment #5, done by each student individually,
Nov 1
research papers continued (Dr.
about evidence-based article analysis, for 15%.
(#10)
Bauer)
Nov 6/8 Ethics in research and application
Assignment #6, inter-group ethics debate, for 3%.
(#11)
of population health (Dr. Bauer)
Nov
Critical analysis of other scientific
Assignment #7, done by each student individually, for
Page 8 of 9
OT 341 2013
Date
Topics (instructors)
(class
number)
13/15
information (Dr. Bauer)
(#12)
Nov
20/22
(#13)
Nov
27/29
(#14)
Dec 4/6
(#15)
Catch-up and review (Dr. Wilson)
Required Readings/Assignments
3%.
Reading: Kwakkel, G. et al. (2003). Effects of
augmented exercise therapy time after stroke: A metaanalysis. Stroke. 1-12
doi: 10.1161/01.STR.0000143153.76460.7d URL:
http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/35/11/2529.long
Assignment #8, departmental seminar critique, done
by each student individually, is due by start of class, for
20%.
No class because of Fall Recess
Exam (Drs. Bauer and Wilson)
Exam #2, done by each student individually, for 20% of
course grade.
August 23, 2013
Page 9 of 9
OT342_Fall 2013
Course Title and Number: Neuroscience 1 – ES/OT 342 Department Name: Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Rehabilitation Sciences Program Name: Exercise Science and Occupational Therapy Semester: Fall Year: 2013 Course No.: ES 342 / OT 342 Course Title: Neuroscience 1 Class Day/Time: Tues/Thurs 8:00 ‐9:20 am Class Location: DIEF 148 Format: LEC Instructor(s): Gaspar A. Farkas, PhD Office: Kimball 207 Phone Number(s): 716‐829‐6756 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tues/Thurs before (DIEF 148) or immediately after (DIEF 2) class or by appointment. Course Description: This lecture course is an introductory neuroscience course for exercise science, occupational therapy and pre‐physical therapy students. Topics include principles of neurophysiology, cellular communication, organization and gross morphology of the CNS, functional anatomy of motor and somatosensory pathways, and various aspects of neuropathology and neuroplasticity. Course Rationale/Relationship to Curriculum Design: Neuroscience employs the tools and perspectives of biology, psychology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and medicine to achieve a comprehensive understanding of brain function. Neurologic illnesses affect millions of people in the United States and represent some of the least understood, wide ranging, and catastrophic disorders. A strong foundation of basic neuroscience is a prerequisite to understanding neurological diseases and will enhance ES and OT (and pre‐PT) students understanding of the pathogenesis, loss of function, and the potential for recovery of a wide range of neurological diseases. Course Objective and Competencies: Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the basic principles of how the neurological system functions, the pathogenesis of a variety of common neurological diseases, and the modes of recovery of function. The student will be able to apply these principles to the evaluation, diagnosis, and prognosis of common neurological disorders. Below are specific competencies and learning objectives: Page 1 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
II. Course Objectives / Competency / Instructional Method(s) / Assessment Method(s) Learning Objective Describe the organization, function
and neurological control of the motor
system Describe the basic pathologies that
underlie selected neurological
disorders including myasthenia
gravis, multiple sclerosis, peripheral
neuropathies, and disorders of
sensory systems Accreditation/Program Competency Describe the anatomy of major
organ systems and tissue
structures in the human body
(ES Competency 6).
Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the structure
and function of the human
body to include the biological
and physical sciences. Course
content must include, but is
not limited to, biology,
anatomy, physiology,
neuroscience, and kinesiology
or biomechanics (OT
Competency B 1.4).
Instructional Methods Lectures Assessment Methods Exam Lectures Exam III. Textbooks /Equipment /Required Technologies 1.
2. Bear et al, Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, 3rd ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, 2007. ISBN: 0‐7817‐6003‐8 Class Manual (down‐loaded lecture‐by‐lecture from UB Learns). All class material will remain available on line throughout the entire semester. Students need to print copies prior to class. IV. Course Requirements and Assignments There are several assignments posted in UB Learns Assignment Section. These assignments are not collected or graded and are intended solely to supplement material covered in class. In addition, practice exams for all three semester block exams are also posted on the UB Learns Assignment Section. Descriptive videos for each practice block exam are also available. All course materials will remain available on UB Learns for the duration of the semester. V. Course Evaluation Students will be asked to complete a course evaluation at the end of the semester. Page 2 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
VI. Grading The +/‐ grading system will be used, with letter grades roughly corresponding to the following plan: 90s=A 80s=B 70s=C 60s=D <60=F Three semester multiple choice "Block" exams and one "Final" exam will be scheduled. "Block" exams will test on information covered exclusively during the block. The "Final" exam (scheduled during UB's Final Exam Period), will test on information from Blocks A, B, and C. The final grade will be based on the average from the three (and no less than three) best scores. Any missed exam will be graded as a "ZERO". All EARNED GRADES WILL BE FINAL. VIII. Communication If you have multiple email accounts, please be sure that you access (or forward) your UB email. Your UB email is the account I will use to send course‐related materials. IX. Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams, and University Policy on Incompletes in Courses • Class Attendance and Absences As many in‐class activities will be completed throughout the semester, class attendance is expected. Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. • Late Assignments There are no graded assignments in this course. • Exams and Final Exam Since the final grade is calculated from the average of your “best” three (of four) exam grades, any student who is unable to sit for a scheduled exam will automatically be given a grade of “Zero”. Prior approval is not required. EXAMS WILL NOT BE RESCHEDULED UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE. • Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested. Page 3 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
• University Policy on Incomplete Grades A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicate that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well‐defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor must specify a default letter at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12‐month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office. Students must not re‐register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade. Applicable dates regarding the 12‐month provision: Courses taken in (semester): Will default in 12 months on: Fall December 31 Spring May 31 Summer August 31 The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the students plans to graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form. A default grade an be “A‐,” “B+,” “B‐,” “C+,” “C‐,” “D+,” “D,” or “F.” (If a student selected an S/U grading option, it will replace the default letter grade when the grade defaults.) Disability Policy If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645‐2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations. http://www.ub‐disability.buffalo.edu/ Page 4 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
Academic Integrity Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Department and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Any observed unprofessional behavior will be brought to the attention of the corresponding Program Director. Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples: 
Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted – in whole or in substantial part – in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. 
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s own. 
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment. 
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment. 
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of identification. 
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. 
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignments, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the sellers knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. 
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Page 5 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE Date Lecture Topic Lecture Notes BLOCK A ‐ Signal Transduction AUG SEPT OCT OCT 27 Introduction to course sequence (Syllabus/Handout 1) 29 Cytology of Neurons (Handout 1) 03 Resting Membrane Potential (Handout 2) 05 NO LECTURE – Rosh Hashanah 10 Resting Membrane Potential (Cont) (Handout 2/3) 12 Action Potential (Handout 3) 17 Action Potential (Cont) 19 Clinical Correlations (Handout 4) 24 Synapses / Neuromuscular Junction (Handout 5) 26 Neurotransmitters/Clinical Correlations (Handout 6 and 7) 01 Block A Review 03 EXAM I ‐ Block A OCT (Handouts 8 and 8a and Video) BLOCK B ‐ Anatomy and Systems Overview 08 Neuro‐anatomy Overview/Cerebral Blood Flow (Handout 9 and 10) 10 15 NO LECTURE ‐ Neuroanatomy (ES/OT 344) EXAM I Cerebral Blood Flow / Metabolism (Handout 10) 17 22 Sensory System I ‐ Ascending pathways (Handout 11) Sensory System II ‐ Clinical Correlations (Handout 12) Page 6 of 7
OT342_Fall 2013
NOV NOV 24 Motor Systems I ‐ Descending Pathways (Handout 13) 29 31 05 Motor Systems II ‐ Clinical Correlations Clinical Correlations (Handout 14) Block B Review (Video) 07 EXAM II ‐ Block B BLOCK C ‐ Systems Overview NOV 12 Autonomic Nervous System I (Handout 15) 14 Autonomic Nervous System II (Handout 16) 19 Higher Cortical Functions I (Handout 17) 21 NO LECTURE ‐ Neuroanatomy (ES/OT 344) EXAM II 26 Higher Cortical Functions II (Handout 18) 28 NO LECTURE ‐ Thanksgiving recess (Video) DEC 03 Clinical Correlations / Block C Review 05 Exam III – BLOCK C 10 Exam IV ‐ FINAL EXAM* 8:00‐11:00 am *EXAM IV (Final examination) will consist of 45 questions (equal distribution) pertaining to material from Blocks A, B, and C (15 questions per Block). Prior to each exam, recitations or reviews will be scheduled outside of normal class hours. Page 7 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
Course Title and Number: Neuroanatomy 1 – ES/OT 344 Department Name: Exercise and Nutrition Sciences and Rehabilitation Sciences Program Name: Exercise Science and Occupational Therapy Semester: Fall Year: 2013 Course No.: ES 344 / OT 344 Course Title: Neuroanatomy 1 Class Day/Time: Tues/Thurs 9:30‐10:20 am Class Location: DIEF 2 Format: LAB Instructor(s): Gaspar A. Farkas, PhD Office: Kimball 207 Phone Number(s): 716‐829‐6756 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Tues/Thurs before ES/OT 342 (DIEF 148) or prior to or after class (DIEF 2) or by appointment. Course Description: This laboratory course is designed to provide students with a 3 dimensional appreciation of various neurological structures. The course will use videos instructional format of cross‐
sections, models, and diagrams to identify structures. Topics will include the external and internal morphology of the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, and the arterial system of the CNS. This class is a valuable compliment to the ES/OT 342 Neuroscience I lecture course. This course is required for all students in the OT program, and is a pre‐requisite course for entry into the DPT program. The course serves as an elective for students in the ES program. Course Rationale/Relationship to Curriculum Design: Neuroanatomy is an essential knowledge for all rehab specialist and Neuroanatomy I is a foundation course for all programs in biomedical sciences and rehabilitation. Technological advances have changed anatomy education by supplementing or replacing the traditional use of cadaver dissection. The course will emphasize a 3‐dimensional approach of the human brain and will enable students to navigate and identify structures while also providing clinical relevance. Course Objective and Competencies: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and locate various neurological structures and their blood supply. The student will also be able to assign major function to various structures and summarize clinical features following injury to various brain structures. Below are specific competencies and learning objectives: Page 1 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
II. Course Objectives / Competency / Instructional Method(s) / Assessment Method(s) Learning Objective Accreditation/Program Competency Describe the relationship between structure and function Describe various central and of various organ systems as peripheral structures involved in related to movement patterns neuro‐muscular control and exercise responses and adaptations in response to exercise training in healthy and diseased states Describe the anatomy and major Describe the location and function of designated structures forming the organ systems and tissue external and internal morphology of structures in the human body (ES the brain, brainstem and spinal cord. Competency) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure Identify the arteries and their area and function of the human body of supply of the brain and spinal to include the biological and cord. physical sciences. Course content Describe the basic anatomical must include, but is not limited relationships among structures. to, biology, anatomy, physiology, neuroscience, and kinesiology or biomechanics (OT Competency B Describe a basic three‐dimensional 1.4). picture of the CNS Instructional Methods Weekly preparatory homework assignments Video Lectures Weekly preparatory homework assignments Video Lectures Assessment Methods Weekly quizzes Exam Weekly Quizzes Exam III. Textbooks /Equipment /Required Technologies 1.
Haines, Neuroanatomy: Atlas of Structures, Sections and Systems, 8th ed., Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD 2012. ISBN‐10: 1605476536 ; ISBN‐13: 978‐
1605476537 (older editions can also be used). Bear et al, Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, 3rd ed., Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, 2007. ISBN: 0‐7817‐6003‐8 2.
3.
Course Manual/Homework assignments/Videos (down‐loaded lecture‐by‐lecture from UB Learns). Once available, class material will remain available on line for the remainder of the semester. Students need to print copies prior to class. Page 2 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
IV. Course Requirements and Assignments Weekly Worksheets: The worksheet prepares you for class and has practice questions to prepare you for the exam. The worksheet for class is to be handed in each week (see due date on UB Learns) by 10:00 am. If you are unable to attend class that day, a friend may hand in your worksheet for you. The worksheet must be handwritten. One question will be randomly graded on the worksheet and your grade will be based on your response to that question. Grading of worksheets will be as follows: complete with correct answer = +1 incomplete, poor or incorrect answer = 0 failure to hand in worksheet on time = ‐1 Weekly Quizzes: The best eight out of nine quiz scores will be used to determine the final quiz grade. Each quiz will consist of 4 questions and will be worth 4 points. Quizzes are given at the beginning of each lab ‐ students arriving late may be denied from completing the quiz and will be given a score of “0”. Please note that Quiz V and Quiz X (4 questions each) will be given as supplements to Exam I and Exam II, respectively. Exams: Two semester exams will be given: Exam I and Exam II are required. There will be no FINAL EXAM V. Course Evaluation Students will be asked to complete a course evaluation at the end of the semester. Students will be awarded, if and only if, the evaluation is completed by the last day of classes for the Fall semester. VI. Grading
Final Grades will be calculated as follows: 9 Worksheets (1 point each, best 9 of 10) 9 8 Class Quizzes (4 points each, best 8 of 9) 32 Exam I 25 Exam II 33 Course Eval (if completed by last day of semester) _1__ TOTAL 100 The +/‐ grading system will be used, with letter grades roughly corresponding to the following plan: 90s=A 80s=B 70s=C 60s=D <60=F Page 3 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
VIII. Communication If you have multiple email accounts, please be sure that you access (or forward) your UB email. Your UB email is the account I will use to send course‐related materials. IX. Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams, and University Policy on Incompletes in Courses • Class Attendance and Absences As many in‐class activities will be completed throughout the semester, class attendance is expected. Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. • Late Assignments Due dates for Weekly Assignments are posted on UB Learns. Short (4 Questions) weekly quizzes are given on Tuesday or Thursday starting at 10:00am. Once quiz has started, late attendees will not be able to complete the quiz. • Exams and Final Exam There are 2 exams (see course schedule) given during the course of the semester. These exams will be scheduled at 8:00am in DIEF 148, and not during normally scheduled lab time. No Final Exam will be given. • Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested. • University Policy on Incomplete Grades A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicate that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well‐defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor must specify a default letter at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12‐month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, Page 4 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office. Students must not re‐register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade. Applicable dates regarding the 12‐month provision: Courses taken in (semester): Will default in 12 months on: Fall December 31 Spring May 31 Summer August 31 The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the students plans to graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form. A default grade an be “A‐,” “B+,” “B‐,” “C+,” “C‐,” “D+,” “D,” or “F.” (If a student selected an S/U grading option, it will replace the default letter grade when the grade defaults.) Disability Policy If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645‐2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations. http://www.ub‐disability.buffalo.edu/ Academic Integrity Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Department and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Any observed unprofessional behavior will be brought to the attention of the corresponding Program Director. UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOR FOR A TESTING SITUATION (QUIZ OR EXAM): WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO TAKE YOUR PAPER AWAY AND AWARD YOU A ZERO – NO QUESTIONS ASKED ‐ IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOR IS OBSERVED DURING A QUIZ OR EXAM: *Any verbal or nonverbal communication with any individual sitting for the quiz or exam. *Looking at the paper of any individual sitting for the quiz or exam. *Using electronic technology. Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples: Page 5 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013








Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted – in whole or in substantial part – in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s own. Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment. Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment. Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of identification. Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignments, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the sellers knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Page 6 of 7
OT344_Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE WORKSHEET
TUES Aug 27 ALL STUDENTS THURS Aug 29, TUES Sept 03 THURS Sept 05 TUES Sept 10, THURS Sept 12 TUES Sept 17, THURS Sept 19 TUES Sept 24, THURS Sept 26 TUES Oct 01, THURS Oct 03 TUES Oct 08 THURS OCT 10 ‐ 8:00AM ALL STUDENTS TUES Oct 15, THURS Oct 17 TUES Oct 22, THURS Oct 24 TUES Oct 29, THURS Oct 31 TUES Nov 05, THURS Nov 07 TUES Nov12, THURS Nov 14 TUES Nov 19 THURS NOV 21 ALL STUDENTS Course overview During ES/OT 342 lecture UNIT I: INTRODUCTION NO LAB UNIT II: CEREBRUM UNIT III: DIENCEPHALON UNIT IV: DORSAL BRAINSTEM QUIZ on UNIT
‐‐ III I & II IV III UNIT V: VENTRAL BRAINSTEM V IV OPEN CLASS – Review ‐‐‐ ‐‐‐ EXAM I (Units I – V) – 8:00AM ES/OT 342 Lecture Hall ‐‐‐ V UNIT VI: MIDBRAIN VI UNIT VII: PONS VII VI UNIT VIII: MEDULLA VIII VII UNIT IX: SPINAL CORD IX VIII UNIT X: VASCULAR X IX OPEN LAB – SIGN UP __ __ EXAM II – (Units VI – X) 8:00 AM ES/OT 342 Lecture Hall X I II Page 7 of 7
University at Buffalo
OT346 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT346: Introduction to Scientific Writing (#19141)
Semester
Spring 2014
Lecture
Tuesday 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Labs
N/A
Credits
1 Unit
Location Kimball 111
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching Assistants
Stephen Bauer, Ph.D.
521 Kimball Tower
829-6760
[email protected]
Stop by or By appointment
N/A
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to introduce BS/MS OT students to the process of finding and understanding
research literature and summarize this information in a literature review. The course will briefly
review and build on limited topics from OT341 “Critical Analysis of Scientific Literature”. Upon
course completion, students will be able to write up analyses of research articles and to begin to
develop research questions.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
Pre-requisite completion of ES/OT341 Analysis of Scientific Writing and STA119: Statistical
Methods
COURSE RATIONALE
The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) has identified the
development a research proposal, collection of data, analyzing of data, and writing of results as
entry-level requirements. In addition to understanding how to read research articles, occupational
therapy students need to develop skills to communicate these findings in writing.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
OT346 is a required course in the OT BS/MS curriculum.
1
University at Buffalo
OT346 Spring 2014
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
On completion of this course, students will be able to:
Discuss the role of the literature review process in
B.8.1.
developing research topics and research questions.
Access the AOTA website to locate guides to
practice, codes of ethics, position papers, standards
and other grey literature pertaining to literature
review and professional development.
Use on line tools to locate systematic reviews
(Cochrane Collection), rated peer-reviewed articles
(e.g. OTSeeker), and peer-reviewed articles (e.g.
Medline) from open and closed sources.
Use standard APA style in writing an abbreviated
literature review.
B.6.6.,
B.8.1.
Instructional
Method
Lectures 1, 7-8.
Read Literature
Review Guideline.
Lectures 9-10.
Assessment
Method
Final Project Outline.
Final Project.
Worksheet 6
AOTA Quiz.
B.6.6.,
B.8.2.
Lectures 9-12.
Computer Labs.
Worksheets 7-8.
B.8.8.
Lectures 6-8.
Read APA
Tutorial.
Use EndNote to build references and citations.
B.8.8.
Lectures 9-11.
Computer Labs.
Identify and extract key information from
quantitative and qualitative articles for use in
literature reviews.
B.8.5.
Summarize peer-reviewed articles in a coherent
abbreviated literature review with research
questions.
B.8.8.
Lectures 2-5.
Read Literature
Review Guideline.
Read & analyze
articles.
Lectures 6-8, 1214.
Read & analyze
articles.
Worksheets 5.
APA Quiz.
Annotated Bibliography.
Abbreviated Literature
Review
Worksheet 6.
Abbreviated Literature
Review.
Worksheets 1-4.
Peer-review.
Annotated Bibliography
Worksheets 7-8.
Abbreviated Literature
Review Online literature
search.
Peer-review.
ACOTE STANDARDS
ACOTE Section
B.6.6.
B.8.1.
B.8.2.
B.8.5.
B.8.8.
ACOTE Description
Utilize national and international resources in making assessment or intervention choices and
appreciate the influence of international occupational therapy contributions to education,
research, and practice.
Articulate the importance of how scholarly activities contribute to the development of a body
of knowledge relevant to the profession of occupational therapy.
Effectively locate, understand, critique, and evaluate information, including the quality of
evidence.
Understand and critique the validity of research studies, including their design (both
quantitative and qualitative) and methodology.
Demonstrate skills necessary to write a scholarly report in a format for presentation or
publication.
2
University at Buffalo
OT346 Spring 2014
REQUIRED READINGS


Selected readings from: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).
(2009). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. [Note: Referred to as “The APA
Manual” above.] (required purchase by students, University Medical Bookstore, Main Street)
Selected readings from Pan, LM. (2008). Preparing literature reviews: quantitative and qualitative
approaches (3rd edition). Pryczak Publishing: California. (provided by instructor, no purchase
required)
WRITING RESOURCES
The Center for Excellence in Writing (http://writing.buffalo.edu/resources-students/) provides
additional (optional) assistance to student writers.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Activity
4 Worksheets
2 Worksheets
APA Quiz
Annotated
Bibliography
EndNote
Literature Review
Peer Review
Description
Group assignments. Lecture based. 5 points each.
Individual assignments. “Lab” (out of class) based. 5 points
each.
Individual out of class quiz. APA style.
Points
20
10
Individual activity. Peer reviewed. Based on Lectures 1 to 7.
10
Create EndNote Database to be used on Literature Review.
Individual activity. Peer reviewed. Based on Lectures 1 to 12.
Group members are required to a) participate in all six group
activities (6 points) and review one Final Project (4 points).
10
20
10
20
GRADING
Student grading will be based on eight worksheets, one quiz, the final project outline, the final
project and peer contributions/reviews. Grades are based on the percentage of total points earned
during semester.
Assignment
Instructor
Bauer
Group Worksheets 1, 2, 3, 4
Individual Worksheets 5, 6 Bauer & Zafron
Bauer
APA Quiz
Bauer
Annotated Bibliography
Bauer
EndNote
Bauer
Literature Review
Bauer
Peer Review
Points
20
10
20
10
10
20
10
Peer Review: Each student will be randomly assigned to one of (about) eight-ten groups. Each
student will be required to review a draft Annotated Bibliography (5 points) and a draft Final
Project (5 points) for another student within their group. Peer reviews will be with other group
members but one-to-one exchanges (people reviewing each other’s work) is precluded.
3
University at Buffalo
OT346 Spring 2014
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Grades will be earned based on the percentage of total points that you earn for the semester.
A
AB+
B
B-
93-100%
90-92.99%
86-89.99%
83-85.99%
80-82.99%
C+
C
CD+
D
F
76-79.99%
73-75.99%
70-72.99%
66-69.99%
63-65.99%
< 62.99%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that
result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by email or by
leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does
not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all information covered in
class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are required to complete the APA quiz during prescribed days and times unless a valid
medical, personal, or other excuse has been confirmed (in advance excepting obvious
emergencies) in writing with the instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail
account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format, using proper grammar,
punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
See below.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit a paper
version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 1 point per day
that the assignment is late.
Lab Requirements
There are two labs. The first lab has an associated homework assignment. The second lab has an
associated project.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
4
University at Buffalo
OT346 Spring 2014
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
5
University at Buffalo




OT346 Spring 2014
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
6
OT346 – Spring 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
WK
DATE
1
1/28
2
2/4
3
2/11
Introduction
Abstracts
Introduction,
Background
Quantitative
Methods,
Results,
Discussion…
Qualitative
Methods,
Results,
Discussion…
4
2/18
5
2/25
6
3/4
APA Style
7
3/11
Annotated
Bibliography
3/17-3/22
8
9
3/25
4/1
EndNote
‘Intro’
EndNote
‘Intro’
4/8
Literature
Review
11
4/15
EndNote ‘Use’
(Bring Laptop)
4/22
READINGS
Articles assigned.
Purchase APA
Manual
Your 3 article
abstracts.
Worksheet 1 (G)
Your 3 article
introductions &
backgrounds. Pan.
Worksheet 2 (G)
Your quantitative
articles method &
results. Pan.
Worksheet 3 (G)
Your qualitative
articles method &
results. Pan.
Worksheet 4 (G)
Begin Annotated Bibliography.
Q&A.
Find Articles
(Bring Laptop)
Introduction to EndNote. Group A.
(Zafron, K113)
Review APA QUIZ, Annotated
bibliography. Peer review. Group A.
(Bauer, K111)
Introduction to EndNote. Group B.
(Zafron, K113)
Review APA QUIZ, Annotated
bibliography. Peer review. Group A.
(Bauer, K111)
Review Annotated Bibliographies.
Intro to Literature Review. Finding
peer reviewed articles.
Use online databases to find relevant
peer-reviewed articles. Use EndNote to
build references and add citations.
Use OTSeeker, PEDRO (and other
tools) to find additional article(s) [TBD]
for Literature Review.
Literature
Literature Review. In class peer-review.
Review
Q&A.
(Bring Laptop)
Literature
Literature Review. In class peer-review.
14
5/6
Review
Q&A.
(Bring Laptop)
G=Group Activity, I=Individual Activity
13
ASSIGNMENTS
APA manual
sections. APA
tutorial.
Annotated
Bibliography
Guideline.
Out of Class APA
QUIZ (I)
APA QUIZ (I)
DUE
MID-SEMESTER BREAK
10
12
DESCRIPTION
Greetings. Logistics (assignment to
groups, choosing article types, class
curriculum, and grading).
Overview - abstracts, APA,
annotated bibliography, EndNote,
and literature review.
Structured and unstructured abstracts.
What do we look for? Why do we
care?
Brief review of introduction and
background. Finding key information
for lit review.
Brief review of quantitative article
methods, results, discussion and
conclusion. Finding key information
for lit review.
Brief review of qualitative article
methods, results, discussion and
conclusion. Finding key information
for lit review.
Introduction to American
Psychological Association (APA)
style conventions.
4/29
7
EndNote
tutorial.
Worksheet 5 (I)
EndNote
tutorial.
Worksheet 5 (I)
Annotated
Bibliography and
Peer Reviews DUE
Literature
Review
Guideline.
Worksheet 6 (I)
EndNote (I)
Out of class
peer-review.
EndNote DUE
Out of class
peer-review.
Literature Review
and Peer Reviews
DUE
OT 352 – Fall 2013
OT 352: OT Practice Skills II – Assistive Technology
Department of Rehabilitation Science
University at Buffalo
Fall 2013
3 credits - Reg #24133
Instructor:
Office:
Telephone:
Email:
Office Hours:
Class Time: Tuesday/Thursday 11:30 - 12:50
Location: Diefendorf 146
James A. Lenker, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA
621 Kimball
Office: 829-6726 Cell: 491-2378
[email protected]
By appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces students to assistive technology (AT) devices that support mobility,
posture, seating, computer usage, and environmental control, as well as environmental
modifications – all of which may enhance occupational performance in home, school, work and
community environments. Students will learn strategies for assessment, training, and
implementation of these interventions, enabling them to consider the relevance of AT for a
variety of populations and treatment settings.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSE: OT 301
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
OT 352 features a variety of learning methods, including lectures, small group activities,
readings from the course text, supplementary readings, videotapes, homework assignments,
guest lectures from service providers in the community, and hands-on product demonstrations
from manufacturers and vendors.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
1. Required readings
2. Active participation in class discussions and activities
3. Completion of in-class and homework assignments
4. Two mid-terms and a final exam
RECOMMENDED TEXT
Cook, A.M., & Polgar, J.M. (2008). Cook & Hussey’s Assistive Technologies: Principles &
Practice (3nd ed.). St. Louis: Mosby-Elsevier.
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Final Grade Total Points Final Grade
Total Points
Final Grade
Total Points A
93-100
B-
80-82
D
60 – 69
A-
90-92
C+
77-79
F
< 60
B+
87-89
C
73-76
B
83-86
C-
70-72
p. 1
OT 352 – Fall 2013
COURSE GRADING
Assignment
Midterm I
Midterm II
Final Examination
Homework and participation
Course Evaluation
Total
Date
Oct 1, 2013
Nov 5, 2013
TBA
Ongoing
Dec 6, 2013
Weighting
25%
30%
30%
12%
3%
100%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. Please contact me prior to
the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message) if exceptional
circumstances will cause you to be absent. Under no circumstances does absence from
class excuse one from completing required assignments.
Midterms, Final – Make-up Policy
There will be 2 mid-terms and a final exam for this course. There will be no make-up
exams. If you miss a midterm exam due to illness or family emergency, you may take
a cumulative final exam as a replacement for the missed exam.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly
and prior to every class for important information and updates. All e-mail
communications will be sent to your UB e-mail account.
All students are required to access UB Learns (ublearns.buffalo.edu) for assignments,
class handouts, and announcements, including updates and changes in assignments.
Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
See below under University Policies.
Late Assignments
All students are expected to complete all assignments for this course. All homework
assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete
and submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a
point deduction for the assignment. Students are expected to notify the instructor if
illness or family emergency precludes timely completion of a graded assignment,
including homework and class attendance. Alternate arrangements to make-up the
p. 2
OT 352 – Fall 2013
assignment will be negotiated between student and instructor based on individual
circumstances.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate
(http://undergrad-catalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml ) or graduate
(http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php ) catalog for the complete policy on
incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the
instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for
completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore
courses for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a
pre-requisite course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to
rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start of the next semester may result in the student
decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources (25 Capen
Hall, 645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/) and the instructor of this course
during the first week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information
and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in
accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may
include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not
be tolerated. Please review the websites listed in the Course Information section of
UB Learns and at the end of the Course Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and
paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty
Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following
examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has
been previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course,
without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
p. 3
OT 352 – Fall 2013







Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that
material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to
the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner
representing the work of another as one’s own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information
to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic
sources such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while
completing an examination or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes,
reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials;
resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been
altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper,
materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof)
prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University
or Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the
instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any
inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any
assignment, which the seller knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for
submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic
assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic
program requirement.
Professional Behavior
Students who participate in acts of cyber-bullying or other peer harassment will receive
an F grade in the course.
COURSE EXPECTATIONS
Learning is not a spectator sport! -- i.e., you will learn in proportion to your
commitment and active participation.
p. 4
OT 352 – Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
Date
Aug 27
Topic
Course Overview
Case study: BSC college professor
Aug 29
Psychosocial impact of assistive devices
Video: Rolling
Assign HW: Psychosocial impact of AT as seen in Rolling (due: 9/3)
Sept 3
Accessibility in the home and home modifications
Assign: Building Accessibility HW (due: 9/26)
Sept 5
Rosh Hoshanah – no class
Sept 10
Americans with Disabilities Act (Title I)
Case studies: Job accommodation
Sept 12
Americans with Disabilities Act (Title III)
Case study: Greiner Hall
Sept 17
Class release time: Building accessibility evaluation
Sept 19
Wheelchair transportation: public / private
Sept 24
Occupational ergonomics
Sept 26
Community planning for an aging population
Oct 1
Midterm #1
Oct 3
Discuss midterm #1
Computer ergonomics
Assign HW: Making computer ergonomics adjustments for yourself (due: 10/10)
Oct 8
Computer access for physical disability
Windows/Mac accessibility features, filter keys, keyboard & mouse settings,
keyboard & mouse alternatives, mouthsticks, sticky keys, keyboard shortcuts,
onscreen keyboards, head pointing devices.
Oct 10
Computer access for physical disability (cont.)
Oct 15
Computer software to accommodate vision limitations
Assign: Teaching AT Software to Someone Else (due: 10/29)
Oct 17
Automatic speech recognition
p. 5
OT 352 – Fall 2013
Date
Oct 22
Topic
Computer software to accommodate learning disability: word prediction,
screen reading, handwriting
Oct 24
iPad software for OT practice
Oct 29
Assistive devices for low vision
Oct 31
Environmental controls / Environmental aids to daily living
Nov 5
Midterm #2
Nov 7
Manual wheelchairs, Pt. I
Nov 12
Wheelchair cushions
Nov 14
Manual wheelchairs, Pt. II
Nov 19
Powered wheelchairs
Nov 21
Powered wheelchairs, Pt. II
Nov 26
Case study
HW: Problem-based learning assignment (due: 12/5)
Nov 28
No class – Thanksgiving!
Dec 3
Postural supports for wheelchair users
Assessment
Dec 5
Pressure mapping
Course evaluation
TBD
Review session
TBA
Final Exam (Non-cumulative. All material since 2nd midterm)
Any changes in schedule or assignments will be announced in class and posted on UB Learns
p. 6
OT 352 – Fall 2013
COURSE RATIONALE & RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
Assistive technology and environmental modifications are tools that occupational therapists may
apply to a variety of age groups, disability populations, and treatment contexts. Incorporating
these practice tools appropriately requires integration of key themes in the BS/MS curriculum
design:
 The impact of biological, psychological, and social systems on performance of
occupational roles -- which can suggest the need for AT and/or environmental
interventions, as well as explain the usability of AT for specific individuals.
 Occupation-centered philosophical & theoretical basis for OT practice. In the context of
this course, AT devices and environmental interventions are the “means to a purposeful
end”, not an end unto themselves.
 Understanding OT in a broader institutional and societal context. Successful integration
of AT devices and environmental modifications requires OT’s to interact with a variety of
professional disciplines, family members, co-workers, teachers, and funding agencies in
a spectrum of environmental contexts (home, school, work, & community) – the totality
of which may or may not be particularly supportive of an AT intervention.
Understanding these multi-factorial dynamics is crucial for OT’s engaged in the assistive
technology practice area.
 Professionalism. Respect for the needs of people with disabilities and collaborating team
members from other disciplines is paramount to OT’s practicing in the area of assistive
technology.
 Assessment, treatment planning, and therapeutic interventions. Understanding AT
device features and types of environmental interventions is only a starting point.
Development of practice skills requires strategies for assessment and appropriate
implementation of AT and environmental interventions.
 Research and evidence-based practice. OT’s practicing in this area must be prepared to
apply existing evidence in order to justify reimbursement for AT devices and services
required to provide AT assessment & training. Students must become effective
consumers of the latest AT research and knowledge bases that support OT practice.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION, AND ASSESSMENT
OT 352 features a variety of learning methods, including lectures, small group activities,
readings from noted clinicians and scholars, video, homework assignments, guest
lectures from the community, and hands-on product demonstrations from
manufacturers and vendors.
ACOTE STANDARDS ADDRESSED IN THIS COURSE
B.1.3
B.2.10
B.5.8
B.5.9
Demonstrate competence in basic computer use, including the ability to use
databases and search engines to access information, word processing for
writing, and presentation software (i.e., PowerPoint). (P)
Use clinical reasoning to explain the rationale for and use of compensatory
strategies when desired life tasks cannot be performed. (P)
Modify environments (e.g., home, work, school, or community) and adapt
processes, including the application of ergonomic principles (P)
Articulate principles of and be able to design, fabricate, apply, fit, and train in
p. 7
OT 352 – Fall 2013
B.5.11
B.5.19
B.5.20
assistive technologies and devices (e.g., electronic aids to daily living, seating
systems) used to enhance occupational performance (P)
Provide recommendations and training in techniques to enhance mobility,
including physical transfers, wheelchair management, and community mobility,
and address issues related to driver rehabilitation (I)
Grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and interventions
to reflect the changing needs of the client and the socio-cultural context (S)
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology,
adaptations to the environment, and involvement of humans and nonhumans in
the completion of tasks (S)
Learning Objectives 1. Define standard wheelchair
terminology used by seating and
wheeled mobility practitioners and
researchers. (B.5.12)
ACOTE Std B.2.10 B.5.9 B.5.10 B.5.12 2. Describe the functional goals
associated with specific seating and
wheeled mobility interventions,
including surface contour, properties of
cushion materials, and trunk and lower
extremity supports. (B.2.10, B.5.9,
B.5.10, B.5.12)
3. Contrast the functional implications
of typical seating and mobility product
features. (B.2.10, B.5.9, B.5.10,
B.5.12)
p. 8
Instructional Assessment Method Method Lecture, product Final examination demonstration, (MC, SA) case studies, video OT 352 – Fall 2013
4. Demonstrate computer software use
without reliance on a mouse or other
pointing device. Students will be able
to articulate the functional implications
of this skill for persons with physical
disability. (B.1.8, B.2.10, B.5.10,
B.5.24)
B.1.8 B.2.10 B.5.10 B.5.24 Lecture, product Midterm #2 (MC, SA) demonstration, HW #3 B.2.10,
B.5.9, B.5.10, B.5.23, B.5.24 Lecture, product Midterm #1 (MC, SA) demo, hands‐on HW #1 and #2 lab & HW assignments #1 and #2 5. Characterize adaptive computing
interventions with respect to the skills
and abilities required of an end user for
functional performance. (B.1.8, B.2.10,
B.5.10, B.5.24)
6. Describe the strengths and
limitations of adaptive computing
interventions in terms of the end user
and his/her environment. (B.1.8,
B.2.10, B.5.10, B.5.24)
Environmental Accommodation
7. Conduct a job task summary that
identifies risks to worker health and
safety and factors that limit worker
productivity. (B.5.9)
8. Identify ergonomic interventions
that reduce health and safety risks
experienced by workers and increase
worker productivity (B.5.9, B.2.10,
B.5.10, B.5.23, B.5.24)
9. Evaluate a public building for its
conformity to the ADA Accessibility
Guidelines. (B.5.9)
10. Conduct a home computer
ergonomics evaluation that will
increase safety for computer users.
(B.2.10, B.5.9)
p. 9
University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION SCIENCE
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROGRAM
OT 361 SPRING 2014
FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY
Credits 3
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Lecture
Wednesday: 2:00-3:50
Labs
Friday: Lab A: 8:30-10:20
Lab B: 10:30-12:20
Location
Lecture: DFN 2
Labs: Kimball 124
Mary A Matteliano, PhD, OTR/L
Kimball Tower room 624
829-6728
[email protected]
by appointment
Laura Lederhouse [email protected]
Ashley Dudek [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to include selected topics from biomechanics, kinesiology, functional
anatomy and ergonomics. Information from these areas of study are applied to understanding
joint structures and functions as well as how this translates into assessment of movement and
subsequent treatment. Topics are incorporated both into lecture and laboratory formats.
Laboratory sessions will also incorporate the learning of manual muscle testing, range of motion
assessments, application of therapeutic exercise, and treatment of musculoskeletal problems.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
ANA 407; Gross Human Anatomy
COURSE RATIONALE
In order to assess and treat movement dysfunction the student must appreciate normal movement
and be able to analyze normal movement in the context of functional activities. The course will
focus on skeletal and muscular movement that is both normal and pathological. Upon completion
of this course the student will recognize and understand normal movement and be capable of
assessing skeletal and muscular structure. The student will further understand the impact that
abnormal movement has on participation in daily activities and demonstrate the ability to
evaluate problems and intervene with effective treatment strategies.
1
University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
Students take Functional Anatomy in the spring of their first year in the occupational therapy
program. They have taken foundational courses in occupational therapy and gross anatomy and
are concurrently taking courses that have applicability for Functional Anatomy. At this point in
the curriculum, students will rely on their foundational knowledge in occupational therapy to
develop clinical skills in the assessment and treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal
system. Additionally, students are expected to appreciate and make use of the information they
are learning in concurrent courses including Rehabilitation Medicine and Practice Skills II, and
apply this information in Functional Anatomy. As students make use of the information they are
learning in each course they are encouraged to appreciate the complementary relationship of
these courses in the OT curriculum design.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
ACOTE
Standard
ACOTE
Competency
Describe the basic principles of skeletal and
muscular design as it relates to normal
movement. Describe the structures contributing
to joint stability and mobility for a specific task.
Demonstrate understanding of the impact of
various biomechanical principles (i.e. center of
gravity) upon the body and its segments in
B.1.1
different positions and activities
Understand the role of the Occupational
Therapist in the development of wellness and
prevention programs that reflect good body
mechanics and ergonomic design.
Demonstrate the ability to analyze areas of
occupation and their impact on the
musculoskeletal system and the role of OT in
promotion of health and prevention of disability
Discuss upper and lower extremity movements
relative to functional activities, work, self-care,
and leisure.
Analyze the effects of disability, disease process,
and traumatic injury to the individual within their
cultural context.
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
Exams,
quizzes,
competencies,
case studies
B.2.4, B 2.5
Lecture,
readings, lab
practice, videos
Independent
reading
assignments,
lab case studies
B.2.5, B 2.6
Classroom
examples and
case studies
B.2.7
Lecture, group
discussion
Ergonomic
assignment
Community
ergonomic
assignment
(poster
demonstration,
exercise plan
& adaptations)
Exam, case
studies,
ergonomic
assignment
Case studies
Ergonomic
assignment
B.2.6
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University at Buffalo
Learning Objectives
OT 361 Spring 2014
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
Lab practice
Lab
competencies,
lab practical
ACOTE
Competency
Develop competence in manual muscle and range
of motion assessment through the process of
screening, skilled observation, goniometry and
MMT, and assessment of relevant contextual &
cultural factors.
Understand the principles of ergonomics relative
to safety in everyday functional activities.
Determine the role the musculoskeletal system
plays relative to role performance and human
adaptation.
Develop an awareness of factors that might bias
assessment results including culture, disability
status and environmental factors.
Understand the role of exercise in rehabilitation
and the implementation of a therapeutic exercise
program.
Provide therapeutic use of occupation and
activities that are specifically tailored to a client’s
needs.
Modify environments and adapt processes,
including the application of ergonomic principles
Demonstrate the ability to educate the client,
family and significant others as well as other
health professionals in prevention, health
maintenance and safety.
Grade and adapt the environment, tools,
materials, occupations, and interventions to
reflect the changing needs of the client and the
sociocultural context.
B 4.1
B.4.2
B.4.3
B.4.4
B.4.7
B.5.2
B.5.3
Lecture,
independent
readings, case
studies
Case studies,
independent
readings,
community
observations
Exercise lecture,
independent
readings,
community
observations
Independent
research/lecture,
case studies, lab
Exams, quizzes,
ergonomic
project
Exams, quizzes,
ergonomic
project
Ergonomic
project (tailor
exercise
program to
meet individual
needs)
Ergonomic
assignment
B.5.19
Independent
research/lecture,
case studies
Lecture,
readings,
community
observations,
independent
research
Ergonomic
assignment
Ergonomic
assignment
(discuss risk
factors, body
mechanics,
adaptations)
B.5.24
Lab case studies,
independent
research
Ergonomic
assignment
B.5.9
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OT 361 Spring 2014
ACOTE STANDARDS
B 4.1
Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for
occupational therapy intervention. These tools include, but are not limited to, specified screening
tools; assessments; skilled observations; occupational histories; consultations with other
professionals; and interviews with the client, family, significant others, and community.
B 4.2
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual factors, and
psychometric properties of tests. These must be culturally relevant, based on available evidence,
and incorporate use of occupation in the assessment process.
B 4.3
Use appropriate procedures and protocols
(including standardized formats) when administering assessments.
B 4.4
Evaluate client(s) occupational performance in activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities
of daily living (IADLs), education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. Evaluation
of occupational performance using standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools includes

The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and
necessary for the client to carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.

Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular,
sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g.,
cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems).

Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).

Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social).

Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–perceptual skills, emotional
regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills.
B 4.7
Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture, disability status, and
situational variables related to the individual and context.
Interventions address the following components:

The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and
necessary for the client to carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.

Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular,
sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g.,
cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems).

Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).

Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social).

Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–perceptual skills, emotional
regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills.
B 5.2
B 5.3
Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety,
health and wellness, and performance in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure,
and social participation.
B 5.9
Evaluate and adapt processes or environments (e.g., home, work, school, community) applying
ergonomic principles and principles of environmental modification.
B 5.19
Apply the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational methods to design
experiences to address the needs of the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other health
providers, and the public.
B 5.24
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and adaptations to the
environment, that support performance, participation, and well-being.
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OT 361 Spring 2014
REQUIRED READINGS & TEXTBOOKS
Clarkson, H.M. (2012). Musculoskeletal assessment: Joint range of motion and manual muscle
strength (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins.
Green, D.P. & Roberts, S.L. (2005). Kinesiology : Movement in the context of activity (2nd ed.).
St. Louis: Elsevier Mosby.
Texts are available at the University Medical Bookstore – 3610 Main Street.
Additional required readings will be posted on Ublearns.
Required Assessment Tools: Goniometers are available for students while in lab; each student is
required to purchase a goniometer. They are available at the medical book store or online.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
LAB COMPETENCIES
Students will be asked two times throughout the semester to demonstrate competency with ROM
and/or MMT learned the previous week in lab. This will occur randomly throughout the
semester. Usually students will be asked to perform this during lab time before the end of the
session. Each competency is worth a total of 5 points. If a student misses a lab competency, they
receive a zero for their grade unless they arrange with the professor before the lab and have a
valid excuse. Re-takes on competencies are not permitted.
QUIZZES
Quizzes are based on the assigned readings, lecture and lab material. They are brief and worth
either 5 or 10 points (quizzes will be given at the beginning of class or online). Students, who
arrive late for class, will not be allowed to take the quiz. No make-up quizzes will be allowed
unless a student has made arrangements with the instructor prior to the quiz.
PATIENT ASSESSMENT LAB
Students are provided with the opportunity to try out their assessment skills on individuals with
disabilities or ROM limitations. Students from the 5th year class will mentor 3rd year students
throughout the assessment process. Students will be scored on a 5 point rubric according to their
ability to assess limitations, develop a rapport with their “patient”, and provide accurate ROM
assessment.
LAB PRACTICAL (I & II)
Students are expected to prepare for the lab practical throughout the semester. Since the assigned
lab time does not allow students the time needed to demonstrate competency with goniometry
and MMT, students are expected to practice and review material outside of the lab setting. This
means that they should make appointments with the instructor or teaching assistants to review
material that they do not understand. In addition, the teaching assistants will be available one day
a week at a time when most students are available. Students must sign up if they plan on
attending the open lab session ensuring that the teaching assistant’s time is well utilized.
Students should not wait until the week before the lab practical to contact the instructor and
teaching assistants since the material is best understood when it is practiced throughout the
semester. The week of lab practical, students may need to be available during times when
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University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
Functional Anatomy classes are not in session or when other OT classes are not in session.
Students will be randomly assigned their date and time for the lab practical two weeks
prior to their lab practical exam. A student fails the lab practical if they receive a grade below
70% or 21/30 points. Students must receive a score of 70% for both lab practicals, which is a
cumulative score of 42 out of a potential 60 points. Students will be allowed to take one
additional lab practical after remediation and the two grades will be averaged. The student must
score 70% or 42/60 cumulative points to pass the class.
ERGONOMIC PROJECT & PEER REVIEW
The ergonomics project is a group or paired project that will be worked on throughout the
semester. Refer to the ergonomic project assignment on UBlearns for details and due dates.
Rating group or partners’ participation is required on March 14 and the final week of school
(May 9). The instructor will carefully consider students’ ratings from their peers when
calculating the final grade. Note: if a student receives a midterm peer evaluation from their
partner(s) that indicates the rated student has been unavailable and unprepared for meetings,
demonstrates lack of interest, and poor participation with the group project assignment, the
instructor will examine if the situation can be remediated and discuss this with all members of
the group. If the situation is beyond remediation, the student may be asked to complete their
project independently.
LIFT AND TRANSFER LAB
Students will attend a lift and transfer lab on ergonomically based lifting techniques and
technology used in local hospitals and rehabilitation facilities. This lab is an interdisciplinary lab
and will be required for OT, PT and Nursing students. Students are required to participate once
during the semester. Lift labs will be held on the south campus. Attendance is required for a
passing grade in this course. Students will receive notice regarding scheduling
GRADING
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
93-100 = A
90-92 = A87-89 = B+
84-86 = B
80-83 = B-
77-79
74-76
70-73
66-69
65 <
= C+
=C
= C=D
=F
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University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
STUDENT EVALUATION FOR ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS
Grade
Percent
Total Points
A
93-100
260-280
A-
90-92
252-258
B+
87-89
244-249
B
84-86
235-241
B-
80-83
224-232
C+
77-79
216-221
C
74-76
207-213
C-
70-73
196-204
D
66-69
185-193
F
65 or less
182 or less
COURSE ASSIGNMENTS
Assignment
Quizzes
Lab Competencies (2)
Exam
Peer Review
Lab Practical 1 & 2 (30 points each)
Points
75
(5 10 point
quizzes, 1
final quiz 25
points)
10
80
Percent of
Total Grade
26%
4%
29%
60
21%
Ergo meeting
Poster presentation
Therapeutic Exercise Program
5
25
25
2%
9%
9%
Total
280
100
Due Date
2/12 – 5/7
2/14 – 4/25
3/12
3/14 & 5/9
3/26 - 3/28
(practical 1)
4/30- 5/2
(practical 2)
TBA
5/9
5/9
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Students are expected to attend class on a regular basis and participate in class discussions and
lab activities. In order for class discussions and lab activities to be beneficial for all, it is
expected that students will have read all assigned material from the text and review lab material
prior to the class/lab. Participation and preparation will figure into the final grade.
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University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
All students must access http://ublearns.buffalo.edu for assignments and lecture/lab handouts.
Exams and Final Exam
There is a midterm and final exam in this course. The exam date, time and location will be
posted on UBlearns and discussed in class. Once the exam begins, a late student will not be
allowed to take the exam. The late student will receive a zero grade for the exam. There are no
make-up exams without a medical excuse.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
The instructor will only use the university email when communicating with students; private
email addresses are not recognized. Note: all students are expected to use professional email
etiquette when addressing the professor through email (that includes a salutation, no text
abbreviations, and signature).
Incomplete Grades
An "incomplete" for the course will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances and
documentation may be required.
Late Assignments
No late assignments will be accepted by the instructor unless the student has obtained prior
approval for an agreed upon alternate due date. If the student fails to submit an assignment on
this approved alternate due date, the late assignment will not be read by the instructor and the
student will earn a zero grade for it. Assignments will not be read before the due date but
students are encouraged to meet with the professor and discuss their assignments. Assignments
may only be submitted once. Additions to the assignment are not accepted either online or in
class. Students are encouraged to review their final assignment prior to submission since the first
submission will be the version that is graded. Once assignments are graded, there are no resubmissions.
Lab Requirements
Students must bring the lab manual to class along with lab handout and goniometer. Students
must purchase a goniometer (available at UB Medical Bookstore) and practice and review
material prior to lab.
Labs are active and students must dress in a manner that allows for palpation, facilitation, and
flexibility. That means that clothing that is too tight or too cumbersome is not conducive to lab
interaction therefore, the dress code requires that students wear:

Clothing that they can move in (no jeans or tight pants). Gym shorts that sit at the waist
and are not more than 3-4 in above the knee or,

sweat pants or scrub pants that sit at the waist and are loose

t shirts that have a crew collar and are long enough to tuck in

If it is cold you can wear a sweatshirt over your t shirt but be prepared to take off the
sweat shirt for lab activities
Students who come to lab wearing clothing that restricts their movement or clothing that is
immodest will receive one warning, after that they will be required to leave the lab for that
session.
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OT 361 Spring 2014
Course Evaluation
All students are requested to participate in the online course evaluation at the end of the
semester. One aspect of professionalism is to offer constructive feedback on a course and make
this available to the instructors. Useful student input will assist the instructors in improving the
course for future classes. Please take the time to participate in the online course evaluation as a
professional courtesy.
Technology
The instructor encourages the use of technology to enhance the learning environment.
Technology that is misused in the classroom or lab will be considered a disruption. Misuse of
technology includes: using cell phones, text messaging, tweeting, answering emails, or using the
computer/smart phone/I Pad for activities not immediately related to class work. Students will
be warned once during the semester about using technology inappropriately and after that they
will be asked to leave the classroom for that session. Students are responsible to make up the
work they missed if asked to leave class or lab. If a student has a need to be available for a phone
call that is considered very important, and cannot be delayed, they may leave the room when the
phone call is received if they cleared this with the instructor first.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the
student has not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a
default grade that will become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by
formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be
assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade
better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of
a least ‘D’) in the requirements already completed. The instructor will provide the student
specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade
with twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an
earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any
one of: ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim
grade of ‘I’ will be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
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University at Buffalo
OT 361 Spring 2014
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. Accessibility
Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for
reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial
part in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
c) Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
d) Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
e) Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
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COURSE SCHEDULE
Date
Jan 29 & 31
Feb 5 & 7
Feb 12 & 14
Feb. 19 &
21
Feb. 26 &
28
March 5 & 7
March 12 &
14
March 19 &
21
March 26 &
28
Lecture Topic
Monday
Introduction to course,
review of assignments,
Kinesiology concepts,
joints & planes, ROM
Factors Influencing
Strength, human
movement, gravity &
forces
The Proximal UE
Shoulder
The Elbow
The Distal UE
The Wrist
The Hand
Assigned
Lecture
Readings
Green chap 1
&2
Greene chap 3
&4
Greene chap 7
Greene chap 7
Greene chap 8
Greene chap 8
MMT of scapula
ROM/MMT assess of
shoulder movements
ROM/MMT assess of
elbow/forearm and wrist
ROM/MMT hand (review
wrist as needed)
Hand goniometry and
MMT
Review lab
Spring Recess
Spring recess
Lab Practical
Posture: Functional
interactions of spine and
pelvis
Lab Practical
Greene chap 6
April 9 & 11
The Hip and Knee,
Greene chap 9
April 16 &
18
Functional Ambulation
Lecture: TBA
Online
handouts
May 7 & 9
Basic Movement
Evaluation, PROM/AROM
Assessment, goniometry
Exam
April 2 & 4
April 23 &
25
April 30 &
May 2
Lab Topic
Friday
Biomechanical
Intervention &
Adaptation/compensation
Online
handouts
ROM/MMT of head, neck
& trunk
ROM/MMT assess of hip
and knee
Ankle, & ROM/MMT of
foot and ankle
Patient Assessment lab:
DFN 7
Group assessment with
guest patients
Lab Practical
Poster Presentations
Kimball 1st floor lobby
11:00-1:00
Lab Practical
Final Quiz
11
Assigned
Lab
Readings
Clarkson
OT 381: Occupational Therapy Theory Department of Rehabilitation Science University at Buffalo Class Time: Tuesday 3:00‐4:50 pm Location: 111 Wende Hall Fall 2013 2 credits ‐ Reg # 18992 Instructor: James A. Lenker, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA Office: 621 Kimball Telephone: Office: 829‐6726 Cell: 491‐2378 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: By appointment COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will examine the nature of occupation and the fields of knowledge that have shaped occupational therapy since its inception. This will include the history of the profession of occupational therapy, and the study of theory development and philosophy, including contributions of related fields. Students will examine in depth the theories and models that guide the occupational therapy profession, and their impact on practice. Case studies and examples will be utilized to allow for analyzing and selection of appropriate theoretical approaches, models of practice, and frames of reference in OT practice. Various occupational therapy assessment tools will be introduced related to the conceptual practice models under study. The importance of evidenced‐based therapeutic intervention and use of research in practice and development of the profession will be stressed. PRE‐REQUISITE COURSES: Pre‐requisite or co‐requisite: OT 301 COURSE RATIONALE The course is designed as an introduction to the development of theory and models of practice in occupational therapy with an emphasis on the major models currently used by the occupational therapy profession. An understanding of theory development and its importance to occupational therapy allows for the application of theoretical constructs in client evaluation and intervention and the assessment and selection of meaningful occupation. This class forms the foundation for theoretical concepts in later applied courses. RELATIONSHIP TO THE CURRICULUM DESIGN This course serves to develop knowledge of occupational therapy theory so students understand the theoretical frameworks underlying practice and research in the occupational therapy profession. This basic knowledge is expanded upon further at the graduate level in OT 551. 1
LEARNING ACTIVITIES Reading, lecture, discussion & case studies will be used as methods of learning in this course. COURSE REQUIREMENTS 1. Required readings completed for the class date assigned. 2. Preparation for, attendance and participation in class. 3. Active participation in class discussions and activities. 4. Semester project 5. Midterm and final examinations. REQUIRED READINGS (Additional readings may be assigned) Kielhofner, G. (2009). Conceptual foundations of occupational therapy practice. Philadelphia, PA: F.A.Davis The text is available at the University at Buffalo Medical Bookstore. Any additional readings will be posted on UBLearns ASSIGNMENTS There will be a number of class exercises and activities, as well as occasional homework assignments that will be a mix of individual and group work. There will be a semester project that will involve a presentation during the final 3 weeks of the course. GRADING Assignment Date
Weighting Midterm I 25%
Final Examination TBA
30%
Semester project presentation 25%
Homework and participation Ongoing
17%
Course Evaluation
Dec 6, 2013
3%
Total 100% Student Final Grade Determination Grade Total Points Grade Total Points Final Grade Total Points A 93‐100 B‐ 80‐82 D 60 – 69 A‐ 90‐92 C+ 77‐79 F < 60 B+ 87‐89 C 73‐76 B 83‐86 C‐ 70‐72 2
Communication (E‐mail and UB Learns) Students must check their UB e‐mail account and UBLearns regularly and prior to every class for important information and updates. Any e‐mail communication must be through your UB e‐mail account.  UB Learns: Internet Access All students are required to access UBLearns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. http://ublearns.buffalo.edu Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use. Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams and University Policy on Incompletes in the course  Class Attendance, absences and conduct Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. Students stand to lose full credit for attendance if they are late to class. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class or on the day of class by email. Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance. Students are not permitted to use any electronic devices in class unless specifically instructed to do so. These include, but are not limited to laptops, cellphones, iphones, ipads, and ipods. Additionally, please avoid getting up and leaving class during instruction.  Late Assignments All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit a paper version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 5% per day that the assignment is late. Assignments that are more than 3 days late will not be accepted, except in the case of extenuating circumstances.  Exams and Final Exam Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam will result in a grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor within 24 hours if a medical emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and accommodations may be made at the discretion of the instructor.  Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested. 3
University Policy on Incomplete Grades 2009‐10 A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that has been completed and have well‐defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not attend the course. Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor must specify a default letter grade at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12‐month time limit. Upon assigning an “I” grade, the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office. Students must not re‐register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade Applicable dates regarding the 12‐month provision: Courses taken in (semester): Will default in 12 months on: Fall December 31 Spring May 31 Summer August 31 The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the student plans to graduate in that semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to change the “I” grade to the default grade using the Grade Retrieval Form. Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre‐requisite course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program. Disability Policy If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this course please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 25 Capen Hall, 645‐2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations. 4
Academic Integrity Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program Policies and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the following examples: 







Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted ‐‐ in whole or in substantial part ‐‐ in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one's own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one's own. Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and Pads), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment. Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor's name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor's authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment. Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of identification. Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor. Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement. Additional information on the university’s academic integrity policy can be found at: http://undergrad‐catalog.buffalo.edu/policies/course/integrity.html 5
COURSE SCHEDULE (Any course schedule changes, additional readings or assignments will be announced in class and posted on UBLearns) DATE TOPIC READING Aug. 27 Introduction to course K: Ch. 1 Theory in occupational therapy Sept. 3 Occupational Science Online reading Occupation‐Centered Research Sept. 10 Layers of Knowledge K: Ch. 2, 3, 4 & 5 Pre‐paradigm, paradigm of occupation, emerging paradigm Sept. 17 Special Class Session! Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare – 100 Allen Hall Sept. 24 Conceptual Practice Models K: Ch. 6 Biomechanical Model K: Ch. 7 Oct. 1 Motor Control Model K: Ch. 8 & 12 Cognitive Model Oct. 8 MIDTERM EXAM Oct. 15 Sensory Integration Model K: Ch. 13 Oct.22 Model of Human Occupation K: Ch. 11 Oct. 29 Canadian Model of Occupational K: Ch 18 Performance Nov. 5 Related knowledge K: Ch. 14, 15, 16 & 17 - Cognitive‐behavioral therapy - Disability studies Nov. 12 Nov. 19 Nov. 26 Dec. 3 TBA Project Presentations Project Presentations No class ‐ Thanksgiving Project Presentations Final Exam During the week of Dec. 11 6
COURSE OBJECTIVES and ACOTE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: Learning Objectives ACOTE Instructional Standard Method 1. Acknowledge and understand the (B.2.1) Reading importance of the history and philosophical Lecture base of the occupational therapy Class activities profession. 2. Understand and discuss the nature and (B.2.4) Reading contribution of occupation for individuals (B.2.5) Lecture and how it organizes time, behaviors, and Class activities performance 3. Understand and discuss the theories (B.3.1) Reading that are relevant to occupational therapy (B.3.6) Lecture practice and research. Class activities 4. Understand the models of practice and (B.3.2) Reading frames of reference that are used in (B.3.3) Lecture occupational therapy and how professional Class activities knowledge is organized and used in the model building process. 5. Understand the theoretical assumptions, (B.3.3, Reading concepts, and therapeutic intervention B.3.5) Lecture techniques of a variety of occupational Class activities therapy practice models and how they are used in intervention and treatment. 6. Discuss the contributions of related fields (B.3.4) Reading and political, sociocultural, and Lecture technological influences on the Class activities development of theory in occupational therapy. 7. Apply the theoretical concepts and (B.3.5) Reading constructs in the treatment planning Lecture process to promote meaningful occupation.
Class activities 8. Demonstrate an understanding of the (B.3.6) Reading history and contributions of occupational Lecture 7
Assessment Method Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion Classroom Presentation
Exam Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion Exam Classroom discussion science and its relationship to occupational Class activities Exam therapy practice. 9. Demonstrate an ability to develop an (B.4.1) Reading Classroom occupational profile through the use of Lecture discussion standardized and non‐standardized Class activities Exam occupation‐centered assessments when applied to a case. 10. Develop a working knowledge of the (B.4.8) Reading Classroom professional terminology and language Lecture discussion used in philosophical and theoretical Class activities Exam discussions and research. 11. Demonstrate the ability to use (B.8.3) Reading Classroom professional literature on occupation‐
Lecture discussion centered evidenced‐based practice to Class activities Class develop informed practice decisions. presentation
Exam ACOTE STANDARDS B.2.1 Articulate an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of the profession of occupational therapy. B.2.4 Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with the achievement of health and wellness. B.2.5 Explain the role of occupation in the promotion of health and the prevention of disease and disability for the individual, family, and society. B.3.1 Describe theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy. B.3.2 Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are used most in occupational therapy. B.3.3 Discuss how theories, models of practice, and frames of reference are used in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention B.3.4 Analyze and discuss how history, theory, and the sociopolitical climate influence practice. B.3.5 Apply theoretical constructs to evaluation and intervention with various types of clients and practice contexts to analyze and effect meaningful occupation. 8
B.3.6 B.4.1 B.4.8 B.5.2 B.8.3 Discuss the process of theory development and its importance to occupational therapy. Use standardized and non‐standardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for occupational therapy intervention. These include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools; assessments; skilled observations; checklists; histories; consultations with other professionals; and interviews with the client, family, and significant others. Interpret the evaluation data in relation to accepted terminology of the profession and relevant theoretical frameworks. Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, wellness, and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, wok, play, leisure, and social participation. Use research literature to make evidence‐based decisions. 9
University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 382
ISSUES IN OT SERVICE DELIVERY
Spring 2013
3 Credits
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Lecture
Monday 12:00-2:50
Labs
N/A
Location
Kimball 125
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L
534 Kimball
829-6734
[email protected]
Tuesdays 11:00-1:00
Kathleen Saint [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Occupational therapy services are delivered across a variety of systems. Contemporary issues
within each of those systems affect service delivery. This course is designed to educate students
about the service delivery systems, including the educational system, medical system,
community based practice, and other emerging practice areas. Students will learn about the
social and political forces that have shaped those systems, and the current issues within each of
those systems. Issues include legislation, reimbursement, credentialing, and the role of the
occupational therapist. Knowledge of these issues is imperative for students prior to embarking
on Level I and Level II fieldwork.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 301
COURSE RATIONALE
Occupational therapy services are delivered across a variety of systems. Contemporary issues
within each of those systems affect service delivery. Students must be prepared to practice in
current and future settings. This course prepares students to understand contemporary issues
from an historical perspective while preparing students to shape and embrace future service
delivery settings.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course provides a foundation for understanding OT in a broader institutional and societal
context. Students will apply information from OT 382 while on Level I and Level II fieldwork.
In addition, students will re-visit many of the concepts in the fifth year in OT 504: Advanced
Management for OT, as they analyze and prepare to manage various service delivery settings.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Apply concepts of public health to
occupational therapy practice for persons
with or at risk for disabilities and chronic
illness, including the ethical and practical
considerations of social injustice,
occupational deprivation, disparity of
services for at-risk populations, and global
social issues.
2. Promote occupational therapy by
educating others about the unique nature and
value of occupation to support performance
including consumers, policy makers, third
party payers, regulatory bodies, the public,
and other audiences.
3. Analyze current policy issues and the
social, political, geographic and demographic
factors that influence these factors and
advocate for policy that positively impacts
the provision of occupational therapy
services for consumers.
4. Analyze trends and policy issues in service
delivery including medical, educational, and
social models and discuss the impact of
occupational therapy history, theory,
sociopolitical climate and other contextual
factors on the delivery of these systems, and
discuss the varied roles of OT in these
settings including practitioner, educator,
researcher, consultant, and entrepreneur.
5. Identify and discuss documents from the
American Occupational Therapy Association
including the OT code of ethics, Ethics
standards, AOTA Standards of Practice.
B.1.5.
B.1.6.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
Exams
In-Class
Assignments
B.2.3.
B.9.3.
Advocacy
Assignment
Advocacy
Assignment
B.6.2.
B.6.3.
B.6.5.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
Exams
Advocacy
Assignment
B.3.4.
B.6.1.
B.6.2.
B.6.5.
B.7.1.
B.9.7.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
Exams
Program
Suggestion
Paper
B.9.1.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
AOTA online
tutorial
Exams
Professional
Organizations
online tutorial
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
6. Describe the process of creation of federal
and state legislation and regulations and the
impact of such legislation on occupational
therapy and discuss the role and
responsibility of occupational therapy
practitioners to advocate for changes in
service delivery policies to affect current
delivery and impact emerging practice areas.
7. Differentiate federal, state, third party, and
private payer reimbursement including
mechanisms for appeals and documentation
requirements as it applies to occupational
therapy and discuss strategies to assist
consumers in gaining access to OT services.
8. Discuss the benefits of involvement in
international, national, state, and local
professional organizations and demonstrate
professional advocacy by participating in
such associations.
9. Identify national and state requirements for
credentials and discuss strategies for ongoing
professional development that is consistent
with such requirements.
B.6.4.
B.7.2.
B.9.12.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
Exams
Evidencedbased practice
presentations
B.7.4.
B.9.13.
Lecture
Class
discussion
Readings
Exams
B.9.2.
B.9.13.
Exams
Professional
Organization
Tutorial
10. Explain and justify the importance of
supervisory roles, responsibilities, and
collaborative professional relationships
between the occupational therapist and
occupational therapy assistant using
documents that explain techniques of
supervision and collaboration with
occupational therapy assistants and other
professionals.
B.5.25.
B.7.9.
B.9.8.
Lecture;
Discussion;
Readings;
NYSOTA
involvement
NBCOT online
tutorial;
Lecture;
Discussion;
Readings
Lecture;
Discussion;
Readings
B.9.5.
Exams
Exams
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.5.
Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical and practical considerations that affect
the health and wellness needs of those who are experiencing or are at risk for social
injustice, occupational deprivation, and disparity in the receipt of services.
B.1.6.
Demonstrate knowledge of global social issues and prevailing health and welfare
needs of populations with or at risk for disabilities and chronic health conditions.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
B.2.3.
Articulate to consumers, potential employers, colleagues, third-party payers,
regulatory boards, policymakers, other audiences, and the general public both the
unique nature of occupation as viewed by the profession of occupational therapy and
the value of occupation to support performance, participation, health, and well-being.
B.3.4.
Analyze and discuss how occupational therapy history, occupational therapy theory,
and the sociopolitical climate influence practice.
B.5.25.
Identify and demonstrate techniques in skills of supervision and collaboration with
occupational therapy assistants and other professionals on therapeutic interventions.
B.6.1.
Evaluate and address the various contexts of health care, education, community,
political, and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy.
B.6.2.
Analyze the current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic, and
demographic factors that influence the various contexts for practice of occupational
therapy.
B.6.3.
Integrate current social, economic, political, geographic, and demographic factors to
promote policy development and the provision of occupational therapy services.
B.6.4.
Articulate the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in
service delivery policies, to effect changes in the system, and to identify opportunities
in emerging practice areas.
B.6.5.
Analyze the trends in models of service delivery, including, but not limited to,
medical, educational, community, and social models, and their potential effect on the
practice of occupational therapy.
B.7.1
Describe and discuss the impact of contextual factors on the management and
delivery of occupational therapy services.
B.7.2.
Describe the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and
regulations and their implications and effects on practice.
B.7.4.
Demonstrate knowledge of various reimbursement systems (e.g., federal, state, third
party, private payer), appeals mechanisms, and documentation requirements that
affect the practice of occupational therapy.
B7.9.
Develop strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical supervision of
occupational therapy and non–occupational therapy personnel.
B.9.1.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards and
AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision making in
professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
B.9.2.
Discuss and justify how the role of a professional is enhanced by knowledge of and
involvement in international, national, state, and local occupational therapy
associations and related professional associations.
B.9.3.
Promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers,
consumers, third- party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public.
B.9.4.
Discuss strategies for ongoing professional development to ensure that practice is
consistent with current and accepted standards.
B.9.5.
Discuss professional responsibilities related to liability issues under current models of
service provision.
Discuss and justify the varied roles of the occupational therapist as a practitioner,
educator, researcher, consultant, and entrepreneur.
B.9.7.
B.9.8.
Explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and
collaborative professional relationships between the occupational therapist and the
occupational therapy assistant.
B.9.12.
Describe and discuss strategies to assist the consumer in gaining access to
occupational therapy services.
Demonstrate professional advocacy by participating in organizations or agencies
promoting the profession (e.g., AOTA, state occupational therapy associations,
advocacy organizations).
B.9.13.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Crepeau, E.B., Cohn, E.S., & Schell, B.A.B. (Eds.). (2008). Willard and Spackman’s
occupational therapy (11th ed.). Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Goldsteen, R.L. & Goldsteen, K. (2013). Jonas’ introduction to the U.S. Healthcare System (7th
ed). New York: Springer Publishing Company.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Johnson, S. (1998). Who Moved My Cheese? An amazing way to deal with change in your work
and in your life. New York: Vermillion.
Additional readings will be posted on UBLearns.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
All assignments are to be in APA format and submitted online through UBLearns unless
otherwise indicated. All assignments should be submitted in Word or compatible format. Include
your name and the assignment name in the file (ex. Smith Position Paper.docx).
To access course materials, all students are required to be student members of the American
Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and the New York State Occupational Therapy
Association (NYSOTA).
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
Class Participation- Students are expected to attend and participate in all classes.
Exams- Students will complete 2 written exams.
Who Moved My Cheese? Assignment- Students will read the Who Moved My Cheese?
document posted on UBLearns then complete the reflection questions. Students will submit
responses through UBLearns and be prepared to discuss in class.
DisAbilities Tutorial- Students will complete an online tutorial of the history of disability law
through the Museum of DisAbility History.
Professional Organizations Tutorial- Students will complete an online tutorial of occupational
therapy professional associations including AOTA, AOTF, ACOTE, NBCOT, WFOT, and
NYSOTA.
Emerging Practice Area Presentation- Working in groups, students will be assigned to one of
AOTA’s emerging practice areas. Each group will present a 5-10 minute presentation on that
practice area.
Community-based Occupational Therapy – Students will attend the community-based project
presentations by the 5th year occupational therapy students. Students will select one of the
presentations and complete a summary.
Program Suggestion Paper- Students will individually select a service delivery issue of interest
and will review at least 5 sources (articles, books, web sites, as delineated in the assignment) on
the topic. Students will then complete a literature review of the topic. The literature review will
culminate in a suggestion for a program to address the issue.
Advocacy Project- Working individuality or in small groups, students will select one OT-related
issue that they believe should be acted upon. The student must research the issue to develop an
understanding of all sides of the issue. The student must then develop a persuasive project
intended to educate others (such as legislators, administrators, or the public in general), and
advocate for OT. Examples of such projects include (but are not limited to): Letters to
legislators, scripts for telephone calls or visits to legislators, letters to the editor of a newspaper, a
script for a Public Service Announcement, attending Albany Day in February, and carrying out
publicity events for OT Month (April). Students will present their projects in class and complete
a written summary.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
GRADING
Assignment
Class Participation
Exams- 2
Who Moved My Cheese? Assignment
DisAbilities Tutorial
Professional Organizations Tutorial
Emerging Practice Areas Presentation
Community-based Occupational Therapy
Program Suggestion Paper
Advocacy Project
Total
Points
10
100
10
10
25
25
10
50
40
280
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
Letter Grade
C
CD+
D
F
Percentage
73-76.99%
70-72.99%
67-69.99%
63-66.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam will result in a
grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor within 24 hours if a medical
emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations, including alternate exams, may be made at the discretion of the instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format,
using proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible
for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 10% of
points per day that the assignment is late. Assignments more than 3 days late will not be
accepted.
Technology in the Classroom
Students may use laptops or tablets in the classroom. Cell phones (including smart phones) may
not be used. Students who are observed using a device for anything unrelated to the course will
be asked to leave the classroom for that day, will receive a zero on any related assignments, and
will lose the privilege of using technology in the classroom for the remainder of the course.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
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University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
9
University at Buffalo
OT 382 Spring 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
* Course schedule is subject to change
Week
1
Date
1/27
Topic
Introduction to Course
Overview of the Healthcare System
 Legislation
 Healthcare Policy
Evolution of Health Care
 OT Service Delivery History
Reading
G&G Ch 1 & 4
Assignment
2
2/3
G&G Ch 7
Who moved my cheese?
Discussion questions
3
2/10
Healthcare Delivery Systems
 Medical Systems
 Educational Systems
4
2/17
5
2/24
Healthcare Delivery Systems
 Community-based systems
Healthcare for underserved
populations
OT 314 will meet 2/24 12-3pm
G&G Ch 2
Batshaw Ch.
30- Early
Intervention &
31 Special
Education
Services
On-line
Reading
2/26
Advocacy projects
Albany Day
6
3/3
Financing Healthcare
Healthcare Providers
7
3/10
Meeting CMS requirements for
documentation and billing through
use of the ICF and ICD-9 coding
Guest Presenter: Dr. Stephen
Bauer
8
3/17
9
10
3/24
3/31
Spring Break
No Class
Exam I
Healthcare for underserved
populations
Healthcare Cost, Access, Quality
Online DisAbility History
Museum assignment
Approval for advocacy project
G&G Ch 3&5
W&S Payment
for Services
(online)
Approval of topic for literature
review
G&G 8
On-line
Reading
10
University at Buffalo
11
4/7
Professional Issues
 OT Education
 Registration and Licensure
 NBCOT requirements
12
4/14
13
4/21
Professional Issues
 OTR/COTA roles
 Ethics
Emerging Practice Areas
14
4/28
Emerging Practice Areas
15
5/5
Advocacy Project Presentations
Finals
Week
5/14
Exam II
11:45-2:45
OT 382 Spring 2014
W&S
Professional
Organizations
(online)
AOTA
Documents
(online)
W&S
Supervision
(online)
AOTA online tutorial
Program Suggestion Paper
Emerging Practice Areas
Presentation
Advocacy Project and
Summary
Community-based OT
11
University at Buffalo
Occupational Therapy Program
Department of Rehabilitation Science
OT 402: Group Process Skills
Summer 2013
Credits: 4
Day/Time: M & T 8:00 am – 1:00 pm
Location: DFN 5-8
Office Hours: immediately after class
and by appointment
Professor: Jo A. Schweitzer, MS, OTR/L
Email: [email protected]
Office: Kimball Tower, Room 532
Phone: 829-6737
“Living Life to Its Fullest”
“Occupational therapy helps people live life to the fullest. It does this by helping people of all ages who have
suffered an illness, injury or some form of debilitation relearn the skills of daily living. By focusing on the physical,
psychological and social needs of its patients, OT helps people function at the highest possible level, concentrating
on what’s important to them to rebuild their health, independence and self-esteem. “ – AOTA http://www.aota.org
Course Description
The course includes a survey of groups used by occupational therapists, theoretical constructs,
and principles of application. Within the course, an emphasis is placed on observing groups and
analyzing small group processes. The student benefits from learning about groups designed and
led by their peers. The student learns experientially by participating in class exercises as well as
by being involved in group design, participation, observation, and critique of therapeutic group
sessions. The student has opportunities to test their own behaviors and leadership styles through
these practical exercises.
Pre-requisite Courses
All pre-requisite first and second year courses for the OT major, OT 333, OT 341, OT 346,
OT 381, and OT 382 in the third year are considered pre-requisites for this course. OT 402 is a
co-requisite with OT 503.
Course Rationale/Relationship to Curriculum Design
The importance of understanding group dynamics, small group constructs and therapeutic use of
groups is essential for occupational therapy practitioners in facility-based practice, communitybased practice, and non-traditional and/or emerging practice settings. Designing and practicing
use of therapeutic groups is an essential skill in clinical practice across intervention settings. The
themes and actions in this course are consistent with the occupation-based philosophy of the
curriculum.
Program
Competency
B.2.7.
B.2.9.
B.2.11.
B.2.12.
B.3.2.
B.5.3.
B.5.7.
B.5.19.
Learning Objectives - After
completion of this course the
student will be able to:
The student will analyze tasks
relative to areas of occupation,
performance skills, performance
patterns, activity demands,
contexts, & client factors to
formulate a group intervention
plan.
The student will consider quality
of life, well-being, occupational
role performance, and other
contextual factors when writing,
presenting and critiquing an
original group protocol.
The student will analyze,
synthesize, and apply models of
occupational performance and
theories of occupation in the
development and implementation
of an intervention group.
The student will compare and
contrast models of practice and
frames of reference that are used in
OT as they apply to the
development and implementation
of a group intervention plan.
The student will provide
therapeutic use of occupation and
activities in the development and
implementation of their group
intervention plan.
The student will provide
therapeutic use of self, including
their personality, insights,
perceptions, and
judgments as part of the
therapeutic process within a group
context.
The student will apply the
principles of the teaching-learning
process using educational methods
to design experiences for a target
population of participants
including clients, family members,
health providers or members of the
general public.
Instructional Methods
Lecture
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project development
Assessment Method(s)
Lecture
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project development
Written group project
Written exam
Written group project
Presentation of group
session
Critique of peers and
self for group sessions
Exam
Group presentations
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project development
Small group
presentations
Exam
Written group project
Group presentations
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project development
Small group
presentations
Exam
Written group project
Group presentations
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project development
Small group
presentations
Exam
Written group project
Group presentations
Lab exercises
Critique of small group
presentations
Small group
presentations
Critique of own
leadership
Critique of peers’
leadership
Lecture
Lab exercises
Mentoring of group
project design
Critique of small group
presentations
Written group project
Exam
Critique of own
leadership
Critique of peers’
leadership
ACOTE Standards:
B.2.9.
Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance
patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to formulate
an intervention plan.
Express support for the quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the individual,
group, or population to promote physical and mental health and prevention of injury
and disease considering the context (e.g. cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and
environment.
B.2.11.
Analyze, synthesize, and apply models of occupational performance.
B.2.12.
Apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are used in occupational
therapy.
Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g. occupation-based
intervention, purposeful activity, preparatory methods).
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and
judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interactions.
Apply the principles of the teaching-learning process using educational methods to design
experiences to address the needs of the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other
health providers, and the public.
B.7.
B.3.2.
B.5.3.
B.5.7.
B.5.19.
Required Readings
The textbook has been ordered at Talking Leaves Bookstore, 3159 Main Street, Buffalo:
Cole, M.B.(2012). Group dynamics in occupational therapy – the theoretical basis and practice
application of group treatment – 4th ed. Thorofare, NJ: Slack, Inc.
Additional readings may be assigned.
Learning Activities
1. Frame of Reference: class presentation - Each student will work with cohorts to
study one of six frames of reference (FOR) used as the conceptual framework in
group intervention. The assignment entails outlining a textbook chapter and selecting an
activity that demonstrates use of the FOR. Each group of students will share their findings
with the class and lead an activity to demonstrate the application of this theoretical
construct.
2.
Exam I– Written exam about the theoretical frames of reference used to develop groups.
3.
Exam II - Textbook readings, class notes and terminology associated with parts of written group
project .
4. Written Group Intervention Project – This is a structured group intervention project that
addresses the needs of a target population in six hour long sessions. It is fully described in
Section Three of the Cole textbook.
5. Group Intervention Project: Leadership – Each student will have the opportunity to co-lead
a group intervention session with their peers as participants.
6. Group Intervention Project: Critique of Group Leadership by Others – This is a structured
written critique of other students’ leadership based on observation in class groups.
7. Group Intervention Project: Critique of Own Leadership – This is a structured written critique
of the student’s own leadership based on review of a video tape of the session led in class.
8. Participation in Group Sessions – Each student will simulate the role of a participant for sessions
led by their peers.
Assignment/Due Date/Percent of Course Grade
Note: Peer review will be incorporated in the grading for all group assignments in OT 402.
Assignment
Frame of reference: class presentation
Exam I: 6 frames of reference reviewed in
class
Group Intervention Project: Written
The student needs to pass this assignment to pass
the course.
Exam II: textbook readings and template
associated with parts of written group project
Group Intervention Project: Leadership
The student needs to pass this assignment to pass
the course.
Providing written feedback and participation in
group sessions
Group Intervention Project: Critique of a
session (submitted individually)
Group Intervention Project: Critique of own
leadership (submitted with peer leaders)
Due Date
5/20, 21, 22
Percent of Course
Grade
10%
5/23
10%
6/12
35%
6/14
10%
6/17,18,19 or
6/24,25,26
6/17, 18,19 or
624, 25, 26
Week 1: 6/24
Week 2: 7/1
Week 1: 6/24
Week 2: 7/1
15%
05%
10%
05%
100%
Student Grade Determination
Note: Students are required to provide peer evaluations for selected group assignments.
Appraisals by peers may influence the grade assigned by the course professor. Likewise, the
attendance record is factored into the final grade as described under section regarding
attendance policies.
Both whole grades and plus/minus grades can be earned, with the exception of there being no A+ or +/for D or F grades:
A 95-100
A- 90-94.99
B+ 87 – 89.99
B 84 – 86.99
B- 80 – 83.99
C+ 77 – 79.99
C
74 – 76.99
C - 70 - 73.99
D
F
65 – 69.99
< 65
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail account.
 UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom
use.
Policy Regarding Make-up Exams, Dress Code, Late Attendance, Late
Assignments and Group Work
Use of Computers in Class Computer use by students during lectures is prohibited. Computers may be
used in labs for group work for working on designated assignments.
Use of Cell Phones and other Personal Communication Devices in Class
Unauthorized use of cell phones and other personal communication devices during class will result in the
student being marked absent for the day. Note: Each unexcused absence results in a point being
subtracted from the student’s course grade.
Make-up Exams A make-up exam will only be given when extenuating circumstances prevent the
student from attending the scheduled exam. At the discretion of the professor, the make-up exam may be
a format different from the exam taken by the class. The student must contact the professor within 24
hours following a scheduled exam or a grade of 0 will be assigned. The professor may require supporting
documentation for a missed exam and the student should be prepared to present it.
Late Assignments No late assignments will be accepted by the professor unless the student has obtained
prior approval for an agreed upon alternate due date. If a student fails to submit an assignment on this
approved date, the late assignment will not be evaluated by the professor and the student will earn a grade
of 0 for the assignment.
Extenuating Circumstances & Due Dates for Assignments
For reasons of extenuating circumstances shared with the professor, a student may request an alternate
due date for an assignment or ask to have an exam rescheduled only one time for this course. Additional
requests will be denied and the student will be advised to drop either or both courses if they are unable to
complete the course assignments as scheduled.
Group Work
Success with group work is essential for attaining learning objectives in this course. Students will have
numerous opportunities and requirements for working together in dyads and small groups to complete
assignments. It is expected that within these groups, students will equally contribute to group efforts to
attain quality context and amicable process. If a student fails to contribute equally to a group assignment
or creates an obstruction to attaining successful outcomes by such means as being argumentative,
unavailable, or lacking in production of their part, etc., the professor may need to dissolve the student
dyad or group and each student will work alone. Student partners who are responsible for this outcome as
assessed by the professor’s observations as well as by peer reviews, will be required to work alone to
complete the assigned work and can earn no greater than 80% on the assignment that was intended to be
shared by group members.
Dress Code OT 402 & OT 503 are courses taught to prepare the OT student for clinical participation.
Therefore, students in this course are instructed to dress in “clinic casual” attire. The professional dress
code is detailed as a separate document.
Attendance Policy
It is essential that students attend all class sessions. The course is experiential by design and most
assignments cannot be duplicated outside of the class milieu. For each unexcused absences, the student
will have one (1) point deducted from their final grade.
Late Attendance Students are expected to be on time for all classes. Arrival 10 minutes after the start of
class is considered an absence for the day and the student will have one (1) point deducted from their final
grade each time this happens. Likewise, if a student is late for class, meaning they arrive after 8:00 am,
and before 8:10, they will have .5 point deducted from their final grade for each incident of lateness.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Accessibility Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Course Schedule
Date
Monday
5/13
Tuesday
5/14
Topics
Viewing of: The Hobart Shakespeareans
Course introduction for: OT 402 & OT 503
Level I fieldwork lottery & site selections
Introduction to group intervention project
Book Club
Introduction to Project I: Case study on ‘self’
OSHA meeting: Blood borne pathogens & universal
precautions Leona Zak, Biosafety Officer
UB Dept of Environmental Health & Safety
Course introduction for OT 402 & OT 503
Frame of reference (FOR) assignment
Group exercises for development of project
Movie 1: Unforgotten – 25 Years after Willowbrook
or Profoundly Normal (11:30)
Readings
chapters 11-14
chapters 5-10
Monday
5/20
Tuesday
5/21
Wednesday
5/22
Thursday
5/23
Monday
5/27
Frame of reference presentations:
Psychodynamic, Allen’s Cognitive Disabilities
Group exercises for development of project
[Class ends at 11:30 to meet with incoming 3rd year
OT students]
Frame of reference presentations:
Behavioral Cognitive Continuum & Model of Human
Occupation
Group exercises for development of project
Movie 2: No Kidding! ME 2!! (11:30)
Book Club meeting #2
Frame of reference presentations:
Developmental Approaches & Sensorimotor
Approaches
402: Exam I
TBA
Tuesday
6/4
Monday
6/10
Memorial Day holiday: no class scheduled
Group work in class on intervention plan projects
(meetings with instructor)
Movie 3: Tattooed Under Fire (11:30)
Group work in class on intervention plan projects
(meetings with instructor)
Group work in class on intervention plan projects
(meetings with instructor)
Movie 4: Murder Ball (11:30 )
Group work in class on intervention plan projects
(meetings with instructor)
Tuesday
6/11
Mon 6/17
Tues 6/18
Wed 6/19
Preparation for group presentations
Movie 5: Sunset Story (11:30 )
Group Presentations: Groups 1-2-3 (or FW)
Group Presentations: Groups 4-5-6 (or FW)
Group Presentations: Groups 7-8 (or FW)
Mon 6/24
Tues 6/25
Wed 6/26
Group Presentations: Groups 9-10-11 (or FW)
Group Presentations: Groups 12-13-14 (or FW)
Group Presentations: Groups 15-16 (or FW)
503: Exam III
503: Project II – Intervention plans
Guest speaker: James Lenker, Ph.D., OTR
PIADS and Caregiver Burden assessments
(11:30- 1:00)
503: Project II - Intervention plans
Discussion about Level I fieldwork experiences
(Alternate date) Guest speaker: Marvin
Henchbarger, Executive Director of GLYS
Movie 6: Cry for Help (11:30 )
Tuesday
5/28
Monday
6/3
Monday
7/1
Tuesday
7/2
chapters 5-10
chapters 5-10
Exam I – 5/23/13
chapters 1-4
chapters 1-4
chapters 1-4
Online HIPPA tutorial
certificates due
Written group project due
6/12
Exam II: 6/14
Group Session critiques from
Week 1 due
Group Session critiques from
Week 2 due
University at Buffalo
ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS LABORATORY
OT 450
Fall 2013
Lab - 1 credit
Instructor :
Amy S. Barrett, OTR, CHT
Email: [email protected]
Class Time:
Lab A: 10:45a.m.-12:30p.m.
Lab B: 12:45p.m.-2:30p.m.
Location:
Diefendorf Hall- Room 7
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The laboratory section for OT 450 is designed to provide the student with the essential
knowledge and practical skills to manufacture and/or select orthotic devices. Use of
thermoplastic materials in ADL adaptations, plaster skills, and the mechanics of prosthetic
training will be introduced.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES: OT322, OT343, OT345, OT352, OT361
COURSE RATIONALE/RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN:
Psychomotor skills must be practiced and integrated with theoretical knowledge to prepare the
student for clinical orthotics and prosthetic APPLICATIONS. The principals presented in the
lecture portion of this course are utilized by the student to fabricate and design orthotics and
adapted equipment.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
Upon completion of the course the student will demonstrate:
1) Knowledge of the indications and contraindications for various orthotic and prosthetic
interventions in relation to disease and disability. (B. 5.4)
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2) Skill in the fabrication and design of splints in a variety of materials including low
3)
4)
5)
6)
temperature thermoplastics and plaster. (B.1.4)
Application of splinting principles presented in lecture section to static and dynamic hand
splints. (B.5.10)
The ability to cost out custom orthoses. (B.1.6)
A creative approach to designing and fabricating an ADL adaption, using low temperature
plastics. (B.5.10)
Plaster skills for use in orthotic applications. (B.5.10)
ACOTE STANDARDS:
B.1.4.
B.1.6.
B.5.4.
B.5.10
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the
human body to include the biological and physical sciences.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts of human behavior
to include the behavioral and social sciences.
Employ relevant occupations and purposeful activities that support the
intervention goals and are meaningful to the client.
Use therapeutic adaptation with occupations pertinent to the need of the client.
This shall include, but not be limited to, family/care provider training,
behavioral modifications, orthotics, prosthetics, assistive devices, equipment,
and other technologies.
LEARNING ACTIVITIES:
Lab manual reading, lecture, video, splint fabrication and activity analysis will be used as
methods of learning in this course.
MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
The program in Occupational Therapy has ordered sufficient materials and made them available
for purchase through the medical bookstore for all students to try each material. You MUST buy
the lab manual and material packet in order to participate in the lab.
Open lab times for fabricating graded splints will be limited to the dates indicated on the outline.
In order to maximize splinting time, it is imperative to come prepared with patterns and ideas
and work effectively as you would be required to do in a clinic setting.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.) Lab manual readings.
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2.) Each student is to choose a partner with whom to fabricate splints. Partners are
3.)
4.)
5.)
6.)
responsible to one another as well as to the instructor to attend labs and work together.
No one is to fabricate final splints on themselves or someone outside class WITHOUT
instructor approval.
Splint grading during session of 2 splints and ADL projects as outlined in assignments
section.
Paper accompanying graded splints as outlined in assignments section.
Weekly attendance sign-in----see instructor for variance/needs.
Ongoing quiz grades may be used for extra credit.
REQUIRED READINGS:
1.) OT 450 Lab Manual
2.) Coppard, Brenda & Lohman, Helene. Introduction to Splinting: A Clinical Reasoning ad
Problem Solving Approach, C.V. Mosby, 2007.
ASSIGNMENTS:
1.) For grading, one optional custom hand splint-student’s choice of pattern-as well as one
assigned splint fabricated together in class (see class schedule for due date). One design
must be forearm based. Optional splints must be pre-approved by instructors. Refer to lab
manual for grading guidelines.
2.) For the Optional Splint, an accompanying ONE page paper is required (no cover sheet;
name, date, lab #, top right corner only, please). See class schedule for due date. The
paper must include the following information:
a. Type of splint and classification given.
b. Disabilities for which splint would be appropriate.
c. 3 positive and 3 negative aspects for the design selected and/or the fabrication process
and/or the material used.
d. Brief description of wearing schedule that is appropriate for common use (or for the
specific diagnosis which the splint was created).
e. Itemized cost of splint , including total cost(LTT, Strapping, Velcro, Time).
f. Proper grammar and spelling.
3.) Adaption of an ADL activity using LTT (low temperature thermoplastic material):
Choose a patient from the following or see instructor for another disability.
a. 13 year old female, Right dominant hand median nerve injury (regeneration to wrist
crease).
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b. 60 year old Left dominant male with rheumatoid arthritis/hand ROM limitations
affecting grasp and pinch.
c. 40 year old female with multiple sclerosis affecting grasp strength in both upper
extremities.
4.) ADL paper-write a ONE page paper (no cover sheet; name, date and lab #, top right
corner only, please) which includes the following:
-
Accurate and complete synopsis of the chosen disability.
Specific limitations of the patient with respect to the chosen daily living activity.
Comprehensive explanation of how the ADL project is utilized by the patient and how
it will improve his/her quality of life.
Brief description of actual adaption.
Utilization of good grammar and spelling.
GRADING:
Grading is on a 100 point scale:
•
•
•
25 points: Optional, Classroom Splints and ADL Adaption = 75 points, (25 points each)
15 points: Optional Splint Paper
= 15 points
10 points: ADL Paper
= 10 points
Letter grades will be awarded as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
A = 90-100
B = 80-89
C = 70-79
D = 60-69
F = 59 and below
POLICY REGARDING ABSENCES, ATTENDANCE, ASSIGNMENTS, EXAMS AND
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON INCOMPLETES IN THE COURSE:
•
Class Attendance and Absences:
As many in-class activities will be completed throughout the semester, class attendance is
mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that
result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by
email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class
under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments.
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•
Late Assignments:
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete
and submit the assignments at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss
of 5 points per day that the assignment is late
*Splint Grading Session – November 6, 2013
See assignment section of outline and sign-up sheets.
•
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course:
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe
illness) that precludes the student from completing the course. The student must have
satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better)
up until the time an incomplete is requested.
•
University Policy on Incomplete Grades:
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (“I”) may be assigned if
the student has not completed all requirements for the course. The “I” will be
accompanied by a default grade that will become the permanent course grade of the
record if the “I” is not changed by formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s
completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim “I” is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of “I” is to
be assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in
a grade better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average
(equivalent to a grade of at least a “D”) in the requirements already completed. The
instructor will provide the student specifications, in writing or by electronic mail, of the
requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the “I” is not replaced by a
permanent grade by twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I”
was assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If
an earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in
writing or by electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”.
When a student graduates, an “I” grade in any course included in the student’s degree
program will default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or
multi-degree program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which
the student has an interim grade of “I” that is not included in the courses constituting the
5
University at Buffalo
student’s degree program will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to
the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of “I”
will be any one of: “B”, “C”, “D”, or “F”. For all graduate courses the default grade
accompanying an interim grade of “I” will be “U”. Neither “A”, “P”, nor “S” will be
assigned as a default grade.
•
Note from the OT program:
A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for which a student
receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course. Due to the
sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start
of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
•
Disability Policy:
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen
Hall, 645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course
during the first week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information
and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
•
Academic Integrity Policy:
Preamble
Academic integrity is a fundamental university value. Through the honest completion of
academic work, students sustain the integrity of the university while facilitating the
university’s imperative for the transmission of knowledge and culture based upon the
generation of new and innovative ideas.
When an instance of suspected or alleged academic dishonesty by a student arises, it shall
be resolved according to the following procedures. These procedures assume that many
questions of academic dishonesty will be resolved through consultation between the
student and the instructor (a process known as consultative resolution, as explained
below).
It is recommended that the instructor and student each consult with the department chair,
school or college dean, or the Office of the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education if
there are any questions regarding these procedures.
Examples of Academic Dishonesty:
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:
•
Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without
prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
6
University at Buffalo
•
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that
material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the
source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the
work of another as one’s own.
•
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such
as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
•
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports,
or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting
an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
•
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
•
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the
instructor.
•
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any
course or academic program requirement.
•
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program
requirement.
7
University at Buffalo OT 450 : Orthotics and Prosthetics Laboratory A and B
Class Schedule 2013
Lab # / Date
Lab Topic
Assignment
Due
Mandatory
Readings
Lecturer
# 1: August 21
Pattern making;
Safety; Syllabus
review; Thumb H.
C/U
Weekly Sign-In
Sheets
Coppard Ch. 3
Lab manual per lab
topic
A. Barrett
# 2: August 28
Wrist C/U Splint
NCM CLINIC
Ongoing Quizzes
Coppard Ch. 7
Lab manual per ...
A. Barrett
# 3: September 4
Short Opponens
ENCORE
Coppard Ch. 8
Lab manual per ...
A. Barrett
# 4: September 11
Resting Hand Spl.
Sign up for grading
SOLARISSMOOTH sessions
Coppard Ch. 9
Lab manual per....
A. Barrett
# 5: September 18
AdaptingEquipment
with LTT/Pre-Fabs
Lab Manual per lab
topic
A. Barrett
TAs
# 6: September 25
Long Opponens
Optional Splint
NCM PREFERRED IDEAS due 4 appr.
Coppard Ch. 8
Lab manual per..
A. Barrett
# 7: October 2
Mobilization
Splinting
ADL Project Ideas
due for approval
Coppard Ch. 11
Lab manual per ....
A. Barrett
# 8: October 9
Optional Splint
Fabrication Lab
(NCM VANILLA)
# 9: October 16
Neoprene/
Circumferential +
N. Loss Splints
Topic Cont’d:
Alternate Materials
Coppard - See
Index; Lab Man.....
A. Barrett
TAs
# 10: October 23
ADL Project Fab.
(Personal Materials
from home, etc.)
A. Barrett
# 11: October 30
Plaster Skills/
Inhibitory and--------
A. Barrett
-----Serial Casting
***JOINT LAB at
10:45*********
#12: November 6
Grading Sessions
See Sign-Up Sheet
# 13: December 4
Prosthetics
*******JOINT LAB
at 10:45**********
Page 8
A. Barrett
A. Barrett
To be announced
Guest Lecturer
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 450
ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS
2 Credits
Lecture
Wednesday, 8:30-10:15AM
Labs
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
205Diefendorf Hall
Donna Sullivan Niswander, MS, OTR, CHT
(716) 836-6346
[email protected]
By Appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The lecture section of this course provides the student with the theoretical basis and practical applications
of orthotics and prosthetics for practicing therapists. Effective orthotics and prosthetic approaches
incorporate anatomical, medical, and biophysical information with specific psychomotor skills. The
lecture and lab sections of this course provide an introduction to these processes.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT322, OT343, OT345, OT352, OT361
COURSE RATIONALE
Physically challenged patients often require orthotic devices to prevent and correct deformities which
may cause role dysfunction. Traumatic upper extremity injuries, arthritis, burns and amputation often
require the selection and design of orthotic or prosthetic devices and the integration of these devices into
the daily living environment. An occupational therapist may be asked do design, fabricate, recommend
and integrate orthotic devices into the patient’s rehabilitation program. The knowledge gained during pre
requisite courses includes anatomy, neuroscience, activity analysis and disease processes are incorporated
into skills and treatment approaches in orthotic and prosthetic implantation.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
Physically challenged patients often require orthotic devices to prevent and correct deformities which
may cause role dysfunction. Traumatic upper extremity injuries, arthritis, burns and amputation often
require the selection and design of orthotic or prosthetic devices and the integration of these devices into
the daily living environment. An occupational therapist may be asked do design, fabricate, recommend
and integrate orthotic devices into the patient’s rehabilitation program. The knowledge gained during pre
requisite courses includes anatomy, neuroscience, activity analysis and disease processes are incorporated
into skills and treatment approaches in orthotic and prosthetic implantation.
1
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional Assessment
Method
Method
After completion of this course the student will be
able to:
Application of the anatomical and physical principles of
splinting
Understanding of medical conditions requiring orthotic
intervention and their relation to orthotic or prosthetic
selection.
The ability to incorporate the orthotic and prosthetic devices
into the patient’s total occupational therapy program
Awareness of the impact of such devices on the daily living
and roles of the client/patient
Knowledge of the checkout procedures in orthotics and
prosthetics
The ability to develop appropriate training and rehabilitation
programs for child and adults U/e amputees
Understanding of work hardening continuum of acute upper
extremity treatment
B.1.4
B.2.6
B. 2.3., B.
3.5
B.2.7
B.4.1
B.5.4
B.5.2,B.5.10
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.4
B. 2.6
B.2.3
B.2.7
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the
human body to include the biological and physical sciences.
Understand and appreciate the role of occupation in the promotion of health and the
prevention of disease and disability for the individual, family, and society.
Understand the meaning and dynamics of occupations and purposeful activity
including the interaction of performance areas, performance components, and
performance contexts
Understand the effects of health, disability, disease processes, and traumatic injury
to the individual within the context of family and society.
B. 3.5
Be able to apply theoretical constructs to evaluation and intervention with clients to
analyze and effect meaningful occupation.
B.4.1
Use standardized and non-standardized screening tools to determine the need for
occupational therapy intervention. These include, but are not limited to, specified
screening assessments, skilled observation, checklist, histories, interviews with the
client/family/significant other, and consultation with other professionals.
B. 5.2
Develop occupational based intervention plans and strategies, including goals and
methods to achieve them, base on the stated need of the client as well as data
gathered during the evaluation process.
B. 5.4
Emply relevant occupations and purposeful activities that support the intervention
goals and are meaningful to the client.
B.5.10
Use therapeutic adaptation w9ith occupations patient to the need of the client. This
shall include, but not be limited to, family/care provider training, behavioral
modifications, orthotics, prosthetics, assistive devices, equipment, and other
technologies.
2
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Available at University Bookstore:
1). Coppard, Brenda & Lohman, Helene. Introduction to Splinting: A
clinical Reasoning and Problem Solving Approach. C.V. Mosby, 20007.
2). Lab Manual
3). Supplemental Text: Radomski, M.V and Trombly Latham, C.A., (Eds).
(2008). Occupational therapy for physical dysfunction, (6th ed.) Philadelphia,
Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.
LEARNING ACTIVITIES
Reading text, lab manual, video and discussions will be used as methods of learning in this course.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
1. Required reading completed for class on date assigned
2. Active participation in class discussions and activities
3. Exams I & II (given in class) Final exam will be given during exam week
4. Journal Articles due on date assigned
5. Out of Class Assignments*
*Two journal articles Due: 9/11/13 and 10/30/13

The student will select and read an article from a professional journal relating to
Advancements in hand surgery and rehabilitation, orthotics or prosthetics.
The student will then write:
a). a short review to include a synopsis of the authors main point,
research or theory
b). applicability of the article to occupational therapy practice.
Papers are to be typed and referenced appropriately
(1-2 pages approximately)
3
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
GRADING
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
GRADING
Exam I
Exam II
Exam III
Journal Article I
Journal Article II
Total Points
Possible:
STUDENT GRADE
DETERMINATION
A
AB+
B
BC+
TOTAL POINTS
60
120
80
20
20
300
LETTER GRADE
TOTAL POINTS
EARNED
280-300
270-279
260-269
250-259
240-249
230-239
LETTER GRADE
C
CD
F
PERCENTAGE
TOTAL POINTS
EARNED
220-229
210-219
195-209
<195
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
As many in-class activities will be completed throughout the semester, class attendance is mandatory and
promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent,
you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please
be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required
assignments.
Exams and Final Exam
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances ( i.e. severe illness) that
precludes the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all
course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit the
assignments at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 5 points per day that the
assignment is late
4
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
Lab Requirements
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
5
University at Buffalo





OT450 Fall 2013
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
6
University at Buffalo
OT450 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
DATE
August 21
Lecture:
8:30-10:15AM
August 28
September 4
September 11
September 18
September 25
October 02
October 09
October 16
October 23
October 30
Nov. 06
December 4
Final Exam
LECTURE TOPIC
ASSIGNMEN
T DUE
READINGS
LECTURER
Course orientation
Nomenclature, prehension
Splint Classifications
Coppard, Ch. 1
D. Niswander
Splinting Designs and
Principles, Dynamic and
Static Splinting, Part I
Dynamic and Static Splinting
Functional Capacity
Evaluations/Work
Hardening
Exam I 8:30-9:30AM
Lecture 9:45-10:30AM
Coppard, Ch. 6
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 4 & 11
D. Niswander
Jamie Orrange
Journal
Article
Due
Exam I
Overview of Hand Anatomy
Examination and Splint
Selection
Hand injuries and Common
Splint Applications
Antispasticity/Geriatric
Pediatric/Splinting
Neoprene - Lower Extremity
Orthotics
Orthotics for Arthritis
Splinting for nerve injuries
Case Studies/Exam Review
Exam II
Prosthetic Video
Intro to Prosthetics
Pre-prosthetic training
Coppard, Ch. 4 & 5
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 14, 16
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 14, 16
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 13 & 17
Exam II
Journal
Article Due
Conventional Components
UE Prosthetic Training
Myoelectric
Juvenile Amputees
During Exam Week
D. Niswander
Exam III
7
Coppard, Ch. 13 & 17
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 18
D. Niswander
D. Niswander
Coppard, Ch. 18
D. Niswander
D. Niswnader
University at Buffalo
Occupational Therapy Program
Department of Rehabilitation Science
OT 503: Psychosocial Practice
Summer 2013
Credits: 5
Professor: Jo A. Schweitzer, MS, OTR/L
Day/Time: W & Th: 8:00 am – 1:00 pm Email: [email protected]
Location: DFN 5-8
Office: Kimball Tower, Room 532
Office Hours: immediately after class
Phone: 829-6737; classroom 829-3244
and by appointment
“Ultimately, what determines how children survive trauma, physically, emotionally, or psychologically, is whether
the people around them – particularly the adults they should be able to trust and rely on – stand by them with love,
support and encouragement. Fire can warm or consume, water can quench or drown, wind can caress or cut. And
so it is with human relationships: we can both create and destroy, nurture and terrorize, traumatize and heal each
other.” - from The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog, p.5.
Course Description
This course provides an overview of psychiatric and psychosocial topics used by occupational
therapy practitioners to effectively understand psychiatric diagnoses incurred across the life span,
in the community, and the greater societal response to psychosocial issues. It includes an
introduction to the role of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in service
delivery to persons with psychiatric disabilities. The Level I fieldwork experience provides the
student with the opportunity to observe and participate in clinical evaluations and interventions.
Pre-requisite Courses
All pre-requisite freshman & sophomore course for the OT major, OT 333, OT 341, OT 346,
OT 381, and OT 382 in the third year are considered pre-requisites for this course. OT 503 is
a co-requisite with OT 402.
Course Rationale/Relationship to Curriculum Design
The importance of understanding psychosocial dysfunction and clinical practice is essential for
occupational therapy practitioners in facility-based practice, community-based practice, and nontraditional and/or emerging practice settings.
Program
Competency
B.4.1.
B.4.2.
Learning Objectives
Instructional
Methods
Assessment
Method(s)
The student will use standardized and
non-standardized screening and
assessment tools to determine the need
for OT intervention.
The student will select appropriate
assessment tools based on client needs,
contextual factors, and psychometric
properties of tests.
Lecture
Interviewing
Practice with use
of assessments
Lecture
Interviewing
Practice with use
of assessments
Project I
Project II
Observed practice with
use of assessment tools
Project I & II
Observed practice using
assessment tools
Exam II
B.4.3.
B.4.4.
B.4.10.
B.5.1.
B.5.2.
B.5.8.
B.5.3.
B.5.7.
B.5.29.
The student will use appropriate
procedures and protocols (including
standardized formats) when
administering assessments.
The student will evaluate client(s)
occupational performance. Evaluation
of occupational performance using
standardized and non-standardized
assessment tools will include
consideration of the occupational
profile, client factors, performance
patterns, and life contexts.
The student will identify the need for
documentation of OT services and will
demonstrate the ability to write an
evaluation summary, intervention plan,
progress note and discharge note.
The student will use evaluation
findings based on appropriate
theoretical approaches, models of
practice, and frames of reference to
develop occupation-based intervention
plans and strategies. Intervention
strategies will address the occupational
profile, client factors, performance
patterns, multiple contexts, and
performance skills.
The student will select and provide
direct OT interventions and procedures
to enhance safety, wellness, and
performance of ADL, IADL,
education, work, play, leisure, and
social participation including a focus
on cognitive status.
The student will provide therapeutic
use of occupation and activities (e.g.
occupation-based activity, practice
skills, preparatory methods).
The student will provide therapeutic
use of self, including their personality,
insights, perceptions, and judgments as
part of the therapeutic process in both
individual and group interaction.
The student will determine the need for
discontinuation of intervention plan
and identify specific goals to identify
when and to where a client should be
discharged from OT services.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Project I
Project II
Observed practice with
use of assessment tools
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Project I
Project II
Observed practice with
use of assessment tools
Lecture
Lab practice
Project I
Project II
Progress note writing
samples
Lab practice
Case studies
Intervention plans
Project I
Project II
Exam
Lab practice
Case studies
Interview with
students & client
Lab practice
Case studies
Interview with
students & clients
Project I
Project II
Exam
Project I
Project II
Exam
Lab practice
Case studies
Interview with
students & clients
Project I
Project II
Lecture
Lab practice
Case studies
Project I
Project II
Exam
B.6.2.
The student will discuss the current
policy issues and the social, economic,
political, geographic, and demographic
factors that influence psychosocial
contexts for the practice of OT.
Lecture
Discussion
Exam
ACOTE Standards:
B.4.1
B.4.2.
B.4.3.
B.4.4.
B.4.10.
Use standardized and non-standardized screenings and assessment tool to determine
the need for OT intervention. These include, but are not limited to, specified
screening tools; assessments; skilled observations; occupational histories;
consultations with other professionals; and interviews with the client, family,
significant others and community.
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual factors,
and psychometric properties of tests. These must be culturally relevant, based on
available evidence, and incorporate use of occupation in the assessment process.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats) when
administering assessments.
Evaluate client(s) occupational performance in activities of daily living (ADLs),
instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), education, work, play, rest, sleep,
leisure, and social participation. Evaluation of occupational performance using
standardized and non-standardized assessment tools includes
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are
meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles at home, work, and
community environments.
 Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g.
neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and
body structures (e.g. cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary,
integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g. habits, routines, rituals, roles).
 Context (e.g. cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g.,
physical, social).
 Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory-perceptual
skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and
social skills.
Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service
provision and to meet standards for reimbursement of services, adhering to the
requirements of applicable facility, local, state, federal, and reimbursement
agencies. Documentation must effectively communicate the need and rationale for
occupational therapy services.
Use evaluation findings based on appropriate theoretical approaches, models of
practice, and frames of reference to develop occupation-based intervention plans
and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve them) on the basis of the
stated needs of the client as well as data gathered during the evaluation process in
collaboration with the client and others. Intervention plans and strategies must be
B.5.1.
B.5.2.
B.5.3.
B.5.7.
B.5.8.
B.5.29.
B.6.2.
culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice, and based on
available evidence. Interventions address the following components:
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are
meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles at home, work,
and community environment.
 Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g.
neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and
body structures (e.g. cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary,
integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g. habits, routines, rituals, roles).
 Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g.,
physical, social).
 Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory-perceptual
skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and
social skills.
Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to
enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in ADLs, IADLs, education,
work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation.
Provide therapeutic use of occupation exercises, and activities (e.g. occupationbased intervention, purposeful activity, preparatory methods).
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights,
perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and
group interaction.
Develop and implement intervention strategies to remediate and/or compensate for
cognitive deficits that affect occupational performance.
Plan for discharge, in collaboration with the client, by reviewing the needs of the
client, caregiver, family, and significant others; available resources; and discharge
environment. This process includes, but is not limited to, identification of client’s
current status within the continuum of care; identification of community, human,
and fiscal resources; recommendations for environmental adaptations; and home
programming to facilitate the client’s progression along the continuum toward
outcome goals.
Analyze the current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic,
and demographic factors that influence the various contexts for practice of
occupational therapy.
Required Readings & Required Textbooks
Textbooks have been ordered at Talking Leaves Bookstore, 3158 Main Street, Buffalo.
Brown, C. & Stoffel, V.C. (2011). Occupational therapy in mental health – A vision for
participation,. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
Perry, B.D. & Szalavitz. (2006). The boy who was raised as a dog and other stories from
a child psychiatrist’s notebook. NY: Basic Books.
Additional readings may be assigned.
Learning Activities and Course Requirements
Lecture Grade: Exam I – Chapters 1-4, 6-17 (see study guide) – May 31st
Exam II - Chapters 18-25 (see study guide) – June 6th
Exam III - Chapters 45–55 (see study guide) – July 1st
Exam IV – Chapters 26-29, 33, 35-44 (see study guide) – July 3rd
In-class discussions – with professor & guest speakers
‘Movie Tuesdays’ – documentaries will be shown in class, one each week, for six weeks.
Groups of students will write a reaction paper for any one of the six films. Reports are due one
week after the film is viewed.
Lab Grade:
1. Project I: Assessment & Intervention – This is a structured assessment and intervention
experience practiced with a peer to learn the skills of interviewing, assessment and
intervention planning in preparation for repeating the assignment with a client during Level I
fieldwork – due June 7th at 4:00 pm.
2. Project II: Assessment & Intervention – This is a structured assessment and intervention
experience conducted with a client at the Level I fieldwork site. The student will further
practice the skills of interviewing, assessment and intervention planning as introduced with
Project I – due July 5th at 4:00 pm.
3. Book Club – students will meet weekly for 4 weeks to discuss a book chosen by the course
Professor. Assigned groups of students will prepare a written synopsis from each week’s
discussion – reports due May 21, 28, and June 4, 11 at 8:00 am.
4. Level I fieldwork- Each student will actively participate in a week long, full-time fieldwork
experience at a facility-based or community-based treatment setting – week of June 17th or
June 24th. It is essential to pass the fieldwork assignment to pass the lab section of OT 503.
Assignment/Due Date/Percent of Course Grade
Note: Peer review will be incorporated in the grading for all group assignments in OT 402 & OT 403.
Percent of
Assignment
Due Date
Course
Grade
Lecture: 3 credits
Exam I – chapters 1-4, 6-17
5/31
25%
Exam II – chapters 18-25
6/6
20%
Exam III– chapters 45-55
7/1
20%
Exam IV – chapters 26-29, 33, 35-44
7/3
25%
One week from the time film
Written review of one documentary
is viewed in class
10%
Lab: 2 credits
Project I: Evaluation & Intervention
6/7 (Friday) – 4:00 pm
40%
Project II: Evaluation & Intervention (at FW site)
7/5 (Friday) – 4:00 pm
Papers due: 5/21,28, 6/4,11
at 8:00 am
Monday – Friday:
6/17-21- FW Group 1
6/24-28- FW Group 2
Printed certificates of
completion due 6/10
In class presentation on
5/13
40%
Book Club – group discussions on 5/15,22,29, & 6/5
Level I fieldwork: student must pass fieldwork to
pass the course
HIPAA tutorial: TBA
Universal Precautions (blood-borne pathogens)
inservice
20%
P/F
Mandatory
training
Mandatory
training
Student Grade Determination
Note: Students are required to provide peer evaluations for selected group assignments.
Appraisals by peers may influence the grade assigned by the course professor.
Both whole grades and plus/minus grades can be earned, with the exception of there being no A+ or +/for D or F grades:
A 95-100
A- 90-94.99
B+ 87 – 89.99
B 84 – 86.99
B- 80 – 83.99
C+ 77 – 79.99
C 74 – 76.99
C - 70 - 73.99
D
F
65 – 69.99
< 65
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail
account.
 UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom
use.
Policy Regarding Make-up Exams, Dress Code, Late Attendance, Late
Assignments and Group Work
Use of Computers in Class Computer use by students during lectures is prohibited. Computers may be
used in labs for group work while working on designated assignments.
Use of Cell Phones and other Personal Communication Devices in Class
Unauthorized use of cell phones and other personal communication devices during class will result in the
student being marked absent for the day. Note: Each unexcused absence results in a point being
subtracted from the student’s course grade.
Make-up Exams A make-up exam will only be given when extenuating circumstances prevent the
student from attending the scheduled exam. At the discretion of the professor, the make-up exam may be
a format different from the exam taken by the class. The student must contact the professor within 24
hours following a scheduled exam or a grade of 0 will be assigned. The professor may require supporting
documentation for a missed exam and the student should be prepared to present it.
Late Assignments No late assignments will be accepted by the professor unless the student has obtained
prior approval for an agreed upon alternate due date. If a student fails to submit an assignment on this
approved date, the late assignment will not be evaluated by the professor and the student will earn a grade
of 0 for the assignment.
Extenuating Circumstances & Due Dates for Assignments
For reasons of extenuating circumstances shared with the professor, a student may request an alternate
due date for an assignment or ask to have an exam rescheduled only one time for this course. Additional
requests will be denied and the student will be advised to drop either or both courses if they are unable to
complete the course assignments as scheduled.
Group Work
Success with group work is essential for attaining learning objectives in this course. Students will have
numerous opportunities and requirements for working together in dyads and small groups to complete
assignments. It is expected that within these groups, students will equally contribute to group efforts to
attain quality context and amicable process. If a student fails to contribute equally to a group assignment
or creates an obstruction to attaining successful outcomes by such means as being argumentative,
unavailable, or lacking in production of their part, etc., the professor may need to dissolve the student
dyad or group and each student will work alone. Student partners who are responsible for this outcome as
assessed by the professor’s observations as well as by peer reviews, will be required to work alone to
complete the assigned work and can earn no greater than 80% on the assignment that was intended to be
shared by group members.
Dress Code OT 402 & OT 503 are courses taught to prepare the OT student for clinical participation.
Therefore, students in this course are instructed to dress in “clinic casual” attire. The professional dress
code is detailed as a separate document.
Attendance Policy
It is essential that students attend all class sessions. The course is experiential by design and most
assignments cannot be duplicated outside of the class milieu. For each unexcused absences, the student
will have one (1) point deducted from their final grade.
Late Attendance Students are expected to be on time for all classes. Arrival 10 minutes after the start of
class is considered an absence for the day and the student will have one (1) point deducted from their final
grade. Likewise, if a student is late for class, meaning they arrive after 8:00 am , meaning they arrive
after 8:00 am and before 8:10 , they will have .5 point deducted from their final grade for each incident
of lateness.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Accessibility Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.

Additional information on the university’s academic integrity policy can be found
at:http://undergrad-catalog.buffalo.edu/policies/course/integrity.shtml
Course Schedule
Date
Wednesday
5/15
Thursday
5/16
Wednesday
5/22
Thursday
5/23
Topics
Book Club Meeting #1 (Introduction – p.56)
Group meetings for FOR assignment
Introduction to Project I & interviewing
DVD lecture: It’s So Much Work to be Your Friend and
discussion
Group meetings for FOR assignment
Continued introduction to Project I
Guest speaker: Kathy Felser, OTR, Wendy Tanti, COTA, &
Shari Percy, program participant (People, Inc.)
(11:00 – 1:00)
Book Club meeting #2
Frame of reference presentations:
Developmental Approaches & Sensorimotor Approaches
Project I: assessments
Thursday
6/6
402: Exam I
Project I: assessments
Book Club meeting #3
Guest speaker: Jeffrey Becker, OT student - PROS Program
at Spectrum Human Services - 9:30
Project I: assessments
Guest speakers: Maureen Kinmartin, OTR, Molly Mott,
OTR & Fred, program participant (SASI) – 8:30
Project I: interventions
OT 503: Exam I
Project I - interventions
Book Club meeting #4
Project I – intervention plan
Guest speaker: Sharon Cavanaugh, OTR with students
from The WAY Program (9:30-11:00)
OT 503: Exam II
Project I – complete assessments & interventions
Work groups from OT 402: Written project
Wednesday
6/12
Complete written project for OT 402 and study groups for
402: Exam II on 6/14/13
Thursday
6/13
Friday
6/14
Preparation for Level I fieldwork & Project II
Preparation for group presentations
Wednesday
5/29
Thursday
5/30
Friday
5/31
Wednesday
6/5
Monday
6/17
Tuesday
6/18
402: Exam II
Level I FW – Group 1
Group Presentations – Group 2
(OT 402)
Level I FW – Group 1
Group Presentations – Group 2
(OT 402)
Due dates
Book Club report due
5/21
Project I: case study
on ‘self’ due
Book Club report due
5/28
Book Club report due
6/4
Book Club report due
6/11
Project I due Friday,
6/7 by 4:00 pm
402: Written group
project due by 4:00
pm
Wednesday
6/19
Thursday
6/20
Friday
6/21
Monday
6/24
Tuesday
6/25
Wednesday
6/26
Thursday
6/27
Friday
6/28
Monday
7/1
Tuesday
7/2
Wednesday
7/3
Level I FW – Group 1
Group Presentations - Group 2
(OT 402)
Level I FW – Group 1
Lecture: clinical documentation
Lab: Standardized assessment tools – Group 2
Level I FW – Group 1
Lecture: clinical documentation
Lab: Standardized assessment tools – Group 2
Level I FW – Group 2
Group Presentations – Group 1
(OT 402)
Level I FW – Group 2
Group Presentations – Group 1
(OT 402)
Level I FW – Group 2
Group Presentations – Group 1
(OT 402)
Level I FW – Group 2
Lecture: clinical documentation
Lab: Standardized assessment tools – Group 1
Level I FW – Group 2
Lecture: clinical documentation
Lab: Standardized assessment tools – Group 1
503: Exam III
Guest speaker: James Lenker, Ph.D., OTR
PIADS and Caregiver Burden assessments
(11:30- 1:00)
Discussion about Level I fieldwork experiences
Project II: intervention plans
Guest speaker: Marvin Henchbarger, Executive Director of
GLYS
503: Exam IV
Project II due Friday,
7/5 by 4:00 pm
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 504
MANAGEMENT FOR REHAB PROFESSIONALS
Semester
Fall 2013
Labs
Hybrid Course:
Lectures on Tuesdays from 5:00 to 7:50 PM on
designated days supplemented by online lectures
and activities
Not Applicable
Location
Diefendorf 5
Lecture
Units 4
Instructor
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Christina S. Kane, Ed. D., MS, OTR
923-4804 (office) or 574-9963 (cell)
[email protected]
By Appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will provide an in-depth, critical review of management and leadership issues
relevant to the occupational therapist. Students will be exposed to the business aspects of
occupational therapy and learn the mechanics of developing and promoting rehabilitation
services. Students will also be exposed to management and financial theories and practices,
professional Codes of Ethics and Practice Acts, health care and rehabilitation service delivery,
design and structure of rehabilitation clinics, supervision issues, ethical issues, and the
development and implementation of outcome measures. Learning experiences provided for
students will include lectures, on-line learning activities and small group discussions. Students
are expected to complete required readings and assignments in preparation for each class.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 560, OT 561 or Admission to the Post-Professional MS Program
COURSE RATIONALE
New graduates of occupational therapy programs are increasingly being placed in positions
where critical review of the literature and advanced management and leadership skills are
required. This may include working independently in the community with limited supervision or
being asked to develop and evaluate new programs. This course will provide the skill required to
allow new therapists to meet the challenges of future practice.
This course in an in-depth analysis course that addresses the curriculum design themes of
Understanding OT in a broader institutional and societal context and Professionalism. The
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
course is designed to build upon the students’ basic knowledge from OT 382: Issues in Service
Delivery and to build upon previous experience from OT 560 and OT 561: Level II Fieldwork.
This course offers the student an opportunity to understand the systems within which
occupational therapists work and to develop and manage programs within those systems.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
Lecture, assigned
readings, learning
activities
Class
participation
B.7.5
2. Demonstrate an understanding of
aspects of human resource planning
including, but not limited to,
recruiting, selecting, interviewing,
evaluating and motivating employees.
Lecture, assigned
readings, in-class
learning activities
Business Plan
project &
Section Quiz
3. Demonstrate an understanding of the
supervisory process for occupational
therapy and non-occupational therapy
personnel.
B.7.7
Lecture, assigned
readings, learning
activities
Class
participation,
Business Plan
project
4. Demonstrate the ability to plan,
develop, organize and market the
delivery of services to include the
determination of programmatic needs
and service delivery options for
effective service provision.
B.7.1
B.7.5
Lecture, assigned
readings, learning
activities
Class
participation,
section quiz,
Business Plan
project
1. Explain the variety of informal and
formal ethical dispute-resolution
systems that have jurisdiction over
occupational therapy practice
B. 9.11
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
5. Demonstrate knowledge of the social,
economic, political, and demographic
factors that influence the delivery and
organization of health care and public
health in the United States and other
countries.
B.6.2
Lecture, assigned
readings
Section
quizzes, class
participation,
on-line
assignments
6. Demonstrate the skills to manage
human and material resources needed
to provide quality, efficient, and costeffective occupational services.
B.7.5;
B.7.7
Lecture, assigned
readings, learning
activities
Business Plan
project, online
assignments,
in-class
participation
7. Demonstrate the knowledge and
ability to comply with the various
reimbursement mechanisms that
affect the practice of occupational
therapy including, but not limited to,
federal and state regulations and
reimbursement practices and thirdparty and private payers.
B.7.4
Lecture, assigned
readings, learning
activities
Business Plan
project, online
assignments,
in-class
participation,
section
quizzes
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.6.2
B.7.1
B.7.4
B.7.5
Analyze the current policy issues and the social, economic, political,
geographic, and demographic factors that influence the various contexts for
practice of occupational therapy.
Describe and discuss the impact of contextual factors on the management and
delivery of occupational therapy services.
Demonstrate knowledge of various reimbursement systems (e.g., federal, state,
third party, private payer), appeals mechanisms, and documentation
Demonstrate the ability to plan, develop, organize, and market the delivery of
services to include the determination of programmatic needs and service
delivery options and formulation and management of staffing for effective
service provision.
University at Buffalo
B.7.7
B.9.11
OT 504 Fall 2013
Develop strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical
supervision of occupational therapy and non–occupational therapy personnel.
Explain the variety of informal and formal systems for resolving ethics disputes
that have jurisdiction over occupational therapy practice.
REQUIRED READINGS
The Occupational Therapy Manager, 5th Edition
Edited by Karen Jacobs, EdD, OTR/L, CPE, FAOTA, and Guy L. McCormack, PhD, OTR/L,
FAOTA
ISBN-13: 978-1-56900-273-5, 669 pages, 2011
Order #1390C. AOTA Members: $79, Nonmembers: $112
ADDITIONAL READINGS
As assigned by instructor throughout the semester.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Business Plan (Due Tuesday, November 5th)
Students will develop and submit a mini Business Plan for an OT-based business including an
“executive summary” and a “pro-forma” (financial analysis) of the business. Lectures and online learning activities during the course will cover topics that will assist in the development of
the plan. The business plan should be for the development of a new rehabilitation
service/program in an existing healthcare organization.
For example:
 Aquatic therapy program for arthritic patients
 Falls prevention program for an outpatient clinic or within a senior facility (SNF,
Assisted living, facility, etc.)
 Wellness/Preventative services to community
 School-based rehab program
 Injury prevention, work site analysis program
 Hand therapy clinic
Section Quizzes
Students will complete three (3) 10 point quizzes following each major section of the course to
demonstrate understanding and learning of material presented on-line and in-person lectures.
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
On-line/Electronic Learning and Blackboard Assignments
Students will be responsible for reviewing various power points, assigned readings and relevant
literature on topics as assigned throughout the semester. Six blackboard assignments must be
completed within set deadlines. See syllabus for due dates.
GRADING
Professionalism:
Class and Electronic Participation/Preparation/
Timeliness/Attendance
Blackboard Assignments (6 total)
Section Quizzes (3 total)
Business Plan Assignment
10 points
30 points (5 points each)
30 points (10 points each)
30 points
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
Letter
Grade
C+
C
D
F
Percentage
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
63-69.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Attendance to all face to face lectures is expected; however should an emergency situation arise the student will be
expected to contact the faculty member at 574-9963 to communicate their absence PRIOR to the start of class. Lack
of prior notification will result in an absence for that class.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
All e-mail communication to the faculty member must be to [email protected] Students
may also communicate with the instructor by cell phone, (716)574-9963.
Incomplete Grades
See University/OT program specific policy noted below.
Late Assignments
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
All assignments are due at the specified time on the designated date. Students will be penalized
5% of the total points for the assignment for each day the assignment is late if prior approval for
late submission is not obtained from the instructor.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for which a student
receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course. Due to the sequential nature of the
OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start of the next semester may result in the student
decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
University at Buffalo





OT 504 Fall 2013
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
University at Buffalo
OT 504 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
BOLD weeks indicate face to face lecture
Readings and Class Preparation (to be completed prior to class date noted) N/A Assignments/ Activities (to be completed prior to date noted) N/A Chpt. 3‐Evolution of Occupational Therapy Delivery Systems Chpt. 25‐
Reimbursement Chpt 9‐Starting a New Program, Business or Practice Chpt 7‐Financial Planning and Budgeting Blackboard Assignment #1‐ Health Care Professional as a Manager Week Date Topic 1 8‐27 2 9‐3 Course Introduction & Syllabus Review
Core Elements of Management Healthcare Regulations and Reimbursement 3 9‐10 Healthcare Finance & Business Planning *Review Business Plan format 4 9‐17 5 9‐24 QUIZ #1 at start of class Human Resources in Healthcare Organizations 6 10‐1 Chpt. 13‐Personnel Management Chpt‐14‐Conflict Resolution Blackboard Assignment #2 Starting Up a New Program, Business, or Practice Quiz # 1‐
Healthcare Finance, Regulation and Reimbursement Blackboard Assignment #3 Human Resource/ Supervision (TBD) University at Buffalo
7 10‐8 Supervision and Leadership 8 10‐15 9 10‐22 ***Instructor available to assist in business plan development. QUIZ # 2 at start of class Healthcare Policy AOTA Advocacy 10 10‐29 ***Instructor available requested to assist in business plan development. 11 11‐5 Legal and Ethical Implications and Standards for the OT 12 11‐12 OT 504 Fall 2013
Chpt. 18‐Leadership Development Chpt. 16‐Mentoring and Professional Development Chpt 28‐Federal Legislative Advocacy Chpt 29‐State Regulation of Occupational Therapists and Assistants Review NYS Education Department OT /OTA practice act on‐line QUIZ #2‐ Human Resources, Leadership and Supervision **Mandatory attendance at UB Career Fair October 25th Chpt 30‐Ethical Dimensions of OT Chpt. 32‐Legal Dimensions of OT AOTA website research: aota.org/Practitioners/
Ethics/Docs/Standards/
38527.aspx BUSINESS PLAN DUE IN CLASS Blackboard Assignment #4 Reflection paper based on Career Fair Attendance Finish business plan Blackboard Assignment #5 OT Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (2010) University at Buffalo
13 11‐19 14 11‐26 15 12‐3 OT 504 Fall 2013
QUIZ # 3 at start of class Outcome Measures and Management Affordable Care Act and Impact on OT Services Chpt 22‐Evidence‐ Based Practice Chpt 23‐Evidence‐
Based Occupational Therapy Management QUIZ # 3‐
Healthcare Policy and Ethical/Legal Implications Alternative Practice Settings for Occupational Therapists Chpt 21‐Managing Programs in Emerging Practice Areas AOTA website review (TBD) Blackboard Assignment #6 Alternative Practice Setting and Impact of Affordable Care Act (TBD) Occupational Therapy Program, Department of Rehabilitation Science
University at Buffalo, State University of New York
OT 505: Applied Geriatrics
Spring 2014
3 Credits
Instructor:
Office:
Telephone:
Email:
Office Hours:
Class Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:30 – 10:50 am
Class Location: Kimball, Room 108
Jo A. Schweitzer, MS, OTR/L
532 Kimball Tower
829-6737
[email protected]
immediately after class, and by appointment
Course Description
This course provides an overview of aging and considers issues related to OT interventions for older
adults who are healthy, or have chronic disabling syndromes. The course focuses on the person in
various facility-based and community-based intervention settings. Topics examine the current and
potential role for occupational therapists with this population. The assigned projects use the AOTA
Practice Framework as the conceptual framework for examining these themes. Also, the course includes
a review of current literature on evidence-based practice in the study of gerontology.
Pre-Requisite Courses
OT 560 – Level II fieldwork; OT 561 – Level II fieldwork
Course Rationale
The study of clinical practice and research in gerontology are relevant topics for the entry-level
occupational therapy practitioner since geriatrics represents a significant niche for the employment of
occupational therapist at facility-based, community-based, and home care practices. This course offers
students a chance to build on their experiences in Level II fieldwork and assists them to gather and
examine themes for them to consider in clinical practice.
Relationship to Curriculum Design
Applied Geriatrics is a seminar option for 5th year BS/MS students and OT advanced MS students to
study and discuss topics specifically related to older adults across practice settings. The course provides
an opportunity for students to develop knowledge and skills needed to be effective practitioners in
settings that involve interventions with older persons.
Program
Competency
B.2.9.
Learning Objectives
Focus on quality of life, well-being,
and occupation of the individual,
group, and setting to promote
physical and mental health and
prevention of injury & disease
considering contexts & environments
Instructional Methods
Assessment
Method(s)
In class discussion
Textbook discussions
Term project
Graded responses to
textbook questions
Graded written and
oral term project
B.5.5.
B.6.5.
B.7.1.
B.9.7.
B.7.5.
B.8.3.
B.9.3.
Promote training in self-care, selfmanagement, health management and
maintenance, home management, and
community integration for older
adults.
Falls prevention home
assessment
Term project
Define the scope of practice settings
that focus on the needs of older
persons including, wellness, aging in
place, and institutional assisted living
services.
Textbook discussions
Literature review for term
project
Falls prevention home
assessment
Demonstrate ability to plan, develop,
organize, and market the delivery of
services to older adults in
community/treatment settings.
Term project including
sharing recommendations
with setting for older
adults
Critique current OT literature
pertaining to evidence-based practice
and geriatrics.
Promote occupational therapy by
educating other professionals, service
providers, consumers and the public.
Literature review
component of term project
Discuss findings in term
project
Proposed OT role in
various settings shared
with personnel and
classmates
Home assessments
Graded home
assessment
Graded written and
oral term project
Graded responses to
textbook questions
Graded written
literature for term
project
Graded & shared
home assessment
Grading written term
project including
shared
recommendations to
setting serving older
adults
Graded literature
review as component
of term project; class
presentation and
written term project
Written term project
that reflects this
sharing component
Home assessments
ACOTE Standards
B.2.9
B.5.5
B.5.6
B.6.5
B.7.5.
B.8.3
B.9.3
B.9.7
Express support for the quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the individual,
group, or population to promote physical and mental health and prevention of injury
and disease considering the context (e.g., cultural, physical, social, personal,
spiritual, temporal, virtual) and environment.
Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management and
maintenance, home management, and community and work integration.
Provide therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions,
and judgments as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group
interaction.
Analyze the trends in models of service delivery, including, but not limited to
medical, educational, community, and social models, and their potential effect on
the practice of occupational therapy.
Demonstrates the ability to plan, develop, organize, and market the delivery of
services to include the determination of programmatic needs and service delivery
options and formulation and management of staffing for effective service provision.
Use scholarly literature to make evidence –based decisions.
Promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers,
consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies and the public.
Discuss and justify the varied roles of the occupational therapist as a practitioner,
educator, researcher, consultant and entrepreneur.
Learning Activities
Textbook discussions, term project, and home safety assessments related to occupational performance by
and with older adults will be used as methods of instruction in this course.
Course Requirements: Assignments
I. Textbook Readings & Discussion
On 2/11, 18, 25 and 3/04, students will meet in small groups to discuss sections of the course
textbook based on questions provided by the instructor. Students will prepare their written
responses to these discussions and will submit them at the end of the class session.
Students will each have a turn leading the discussion within their assigned group.
II. Term Project
This project will be completed in pairs. Students will identify an entity as part of the service
delivery system focused on older adults. They will determine a broad application for
occupational therapy services shared with individuals, programs and society. The final
written project will include a literature review, project proposal, sharing of the plan with an
agency for whom the topic is meaningful, and an in-class oral presentation. Directions for
and details about this project are further described in a separate document. All completed
projects will be posted on UBlearns to share with the class.
III. Home Safety Assessments



This project is done in conjunction with any of the community partners involved in this course.
The resident and the home should be previously unknown to the students.
This assignment represents collaboration between the OT students and the home owner/renter.
1. Students will work in pairs to complete one home assessment for each student group.
2. Student pairs will use the Home Safety Self- Assessment Tool (HSSAT) v.3 developed through the
UB Occupational Therapy Program for this individual home visit.
3. Student pairs should converse with and ask questions of the resident to determine and document their
occupations done within the home. This information will help students to better document the
resident’s functional use of their living space.
3. The student pairs will prepare field notes and a final report from this visit. The report should take into
consideration the resident’s home-based occupations as well as the physical layout of all living areas.
4. All recommendations regarding falls prevent that were shared with the resident should be included in
the report.
Textbook
Cisneros, H., Dyer-Chamberlain, M., & Hickie, J.(Eds.) (2012). Independent for life – homes and
neighborhoods for an aging America. University of Texas Press: Austin.
(ISBN 978-0-292-73792-1)
See supplemental list of suggested readings that pertain to term project topics.
Grading
Evaluation
Due Date
% of Total Grade
Book discussions & written responses to questions.
2/18, 25; 3/4, 11
20
Albany Day or Alternate written assignment
Term project: (60 %)
Literature review & project plan
3/27
05
3/14 (Friday)
As scheduled (by 4/15)
4/17
4/24, 29; 5/1, 6
10
Shared project with setting
Written (final) project
Class presentation of final project
Home Safety Assessments : student pairs; one
household
Peer evaluations: term project
Total
4/08
3/11 and 4/17
15
25
10
15
0
100
Student Grade Determination
95-100
90-94.99
87-89.99
84-86.99
80-83.99
A
AB+
B
B-
77-79.99
74-76.99
70-73.99
65-69.99
0-64.99
C+
C
CD
F
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail
account.

UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom
use.
Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments, Exams and University Policy on Incompletes
in the Course
 Class Attendance and Absences
Students are expected to attend all class sessions and be prepared to present and/or exchange
content information, perceptions and ideas with peers and the instructor.
Note: students must be available to work with their peers on Tuesdays & Thursdays from
9:30 -10:50 am, even if there is no formal class scheduled..

Site Visits - professional attire
Students are expected to attend all scheduled site visits. Students are expected to adhere to a
professional dress code as determined in the student handbook. Students are also expected to
display professional behavior, including timeliness, appropriate discussions, and maintaining
confidentiality of all that is observed.

Late Assignments
All assignments are required on the scheduled due date at the beginning of class or by the time
Designated on dates when class is not scheduled to be in session. No late assignments will be
accepted unless prior arrangements have been made with the course instructor.

Peer Review
Peer reviews of students’ group performance will be factored into the calculation of grades for h
the term project assignment. All students are expected to be prepared and fully participate in all
assigned group work.
REQUIREMENT
Use of UBLearns
All students must access http://ublearns.buffalo.edu for assignments. Students are expected to log onto
ublearns frequently in order to be up to date on course requirements, online readings and changes in
schedule. The instructor will only use the university email when communicating with students; private
email addresses are not recognized.
Use of Technology in Class
The instructor encourages the use of technology to enhance the learning environment. Technology that is
misused in the classroom will be considered a disruption. Misuse of technology includes: using cell
phones, text messaging, tweeting, answering emails, or using the computer/smart phone/I Pad for
activities not immediately related to class work. Students will be warned once during the semester about
using technology inappropriately and after that they will be asked to leave the classroom for that session.
Students are responsible to make up the work they missed if asked to leave class or lab. If a student has a
need to be available for a phone call that is considered very important, and cannot be delayed, they may
leave the room when the phone call is received if they cleared this with the instructor first.
Peer Reviews
Students will be required to critique their group members’ participation twice during the semester. The
instructor will carefully consider students’ ratings from their peers when calculating the final grade.
Note: if a student receives a peer review by their group members that indicates the rated student has been
unavailable and unprepared for meetings, demonstrates lack of interest, and/or poor participation with the
group project assignment, the instructors will examine if the situation can be remediated. If the situation
is beyond remediation, the student may be required to complete their own project independently.
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to the university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the student has
not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a default grade that will
become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by formal notice by the instructor
upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be assigned only
if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade better than the default
grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of at least ‘D’) in the requirements
already completed. The instructor will provide the student specifications, in writing or by electronic mail,
of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade within
twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the ‘I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an earlier date
for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim ‘I’. When a student
graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will default to the
permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree program, e.g. receiving a B.S.
in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in
the course constituting the student’s degree program will be excluded from this provision but will remain
subject to the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any one of:
‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’, or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will
be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT Program: A grade of ‘I’ is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for
which a student receives a grade of ‘I’ do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course. Due to the
sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of ‘I’ prior to the start of the next
semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Course Evaluation
Registered students in OT 505 will automatically be prompted to complete an online evaluation of the
course. Students are encouraged to participate in this voluntary evaluation process at the conclusion of
the course.
Accommodation Policy
A student who has a disability that requires special accommodations must contact one of the instructors
during the first two class sessions in order to arrange for assistance in obtaining instructional support.
The student who needs accommodations is strongly encouraged to register his/her needs with the Office
of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, University at Buffalo, phone: 645-2608.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the
Occupational Therapy Program and University policy.
UNIVERSITY STATEMENT ON THE PRINCIPLE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
The University has a responsibility to promote academic honesty and integrity and to develop procedures
to deal effectively with instances of academic dishonesty. Students are responsible for the honest
completion and representation of their work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for respect for
others’ academic endeavors. By placing their name on academic work, students certify the originality of
all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgments.
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:








Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been previously
submitted -- in whole or in substantial part -- in another course, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one's
own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one's own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another
student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones
and Pads), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms
of computer data; forging an instructor's name or initials; resubmitting an examination or
assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor's authorization; or
submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official
document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or
laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the
University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate assistance in the
preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller knows, or has reason to
believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended
for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Course Schedule
(Necessary changes in the schedule will be announced.)
Date
Topic
Course introduction
Form groups for term project & discuss
1/28
options
Course introduction (continued as needed)
Meeting of term project groups; individual
1/30
assistance as needed
Out of class literature review and site
2/04
contacts; instructor meets with groups 1-5
Out of class literature review and site
2/06
contacts; instructor meets with groups 6-9
Out of class literature review and site
2/11
contacts; instructor meets with groups 1-5
Out of class literature review and site
2/13
contacts; instructor meets with groups 6-9
Book Discussion 1 Part I-II
2/18
Meeting with instructor as needed
2/20
Meeting with instructor as needed
Assignment
Read textbook pp.1-50 and answer
questions – due 2/18
2/25
Book Discussion 2 – Parts III-IV
Meeting with instructor as needed
2/26
‘Albany Day’ (optional)
2/27
Meeting with instructor as needed
Book Discussion 3 – Part V
Instructor meets with groups 7-9
3/04
3/06
3/11
3/13
3/18
3/20
3/25
3/27
4/01
4/03
4/08
4/10
4/15
4/17
4/22
4/24
4/29
5/01
5/06
5/08
Instructor meets with groups 1-6
Book Discussion 4- Part VI & Conclusion
Meet with instructor as needed
Literature review and project plan
Meet with instructor as needed
No scheduled class: spring break
No scheduled class: spring break
Site visits & implementation and/or sharing
of plan
Falls prevention home assessments or Site
visits & implementation (sharing of plan)
Falls prevention home assessment
or Site visits & implementation (sharing of
plan) Meetings with instructor as needed
Falls prevention home assessment
or Site visits & implementation (sharing of
plan) Meetings with instructor as needed
Site visits & implementation (sharing of
plan); Instructor meets with groups 1-4
Site visits & implementation (sharing of
plan); Instructor meets with groups 5-9
Discuss falls prevention home assessment
experiences
Meet with instructor as needed
Independent preparation for in-class
presentations; instructor meets with groups
6-9 as needed
Independent preparation for in-class
presentations; instructor meets with groups
1-5 as needed
Term project presentations for groups 8-9
Term project presentations for groups 6-7
Term project presentations for groups 3-5
Term project presentations for groups 1-2
Debriefing about term projects
Read textbook pp. 51-143 and answer
questions – due 2/25
Read textbook pp. 147-218 and
answer questions – due 3/04
Read textbook pp. 219-262 and answer
questions – 3/11
Literature review & project plan due
3/14 (Friday by 3:00 pm)
Albany Day or alternate written
assignment due 3/27 by 4:00 pm
Falls prevention home assessments due
4/08
Last date to share project with setting
4/15
Written term project due 4/17 by 4:00
pm
OT 506
Clinical Research Skills for OT
Fall 2013
.
2 Units
Class Time: Thursday 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Class Location: 5 DFN/ 113 Computer lab
Instructors:
Office:
Telephone:
Email:
Office Hours:
Machiko R. Tomita, Ph.D.
631 Kimball Tower
829-6740
[email protected]
By appointment only
TA: Sujata Nair
617 Kimball Tower
[email protected]
By appointment only
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides the fundamental information for research methods
in order to complete a student research project and is coordinated with OT 563. This course focuses on
study design, sampling methods, sample size, and statistical analysis to answer the research questions
or hypotheses. Students will learn how to use introductory SPSS package. Students will learn about
the overall statistical concepts in the lecture and apply gained knowledge to a group project. Individual
project guidance is incorporated. Use of proper research and statistical language is emphasized.
Studies will complete the method section of the project in this course together with OT 563.
PREREQUISITE COURSES: OT 560 and OT 561
CO-REQUISITE COURSE: OT 563
COURSE RATIONALE/RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN: This course, which is
designed for occupational therapy students in the 5th year of the BS/MS program, will provide the
analytical framework in order to develop a project that applies the clinical and theoretical concepts of
occupational therapy in OT 563. An individual as well as a team approach will be applied in this
course. Further, the students will develop the project under advisors.
COURSE OBJECTIVES AND ACOTE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS:
Objectives
ACOTE Instructional Assessment
Standard Method
Method
B.1.7.
Lecture
Aural presentation
1 Demonstrate the ability to use statistics to
interpret tests and measurements for the
purpose of delivering evidence-based
practice.
2 Understand and use basic descriptive,
B.8.4
correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics
1
Reading
Lecture
Class Discussion
Exam
analyze, and synthesize qualitative data)
3 Understand and critique the validity of
research studies, including their design and
methodology.
4
5
B.8.5
Discussion
Written proposal
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Class Discussion
Exam
Written proposal
Demonstrate the skills necessary to design a
scholarly proposal that includes the research
question, relevant literature, sample, design,
measurement, and data analysis.
B.8.6
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Presentation
Exam
Written proposal
Demonstrate skills necessary to write a scholarly
report in a format for presentation or publication
B.8.8
Lecture
Discussion
Presentation
Exam
Written proposal
LEARNING ACTIVITIES: A lecture and seminar format, small working groups, student oral
presentations, and individual instruction will be used to accomplish the course objectives. The focus
of the small group activities will be to refine the specific project proposals and to offer assistance as
needed.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.
Prior to class, obtain and study class handout and journal articles in BULearns.
2.
Students must attend and participate fully in all lectures.
3.
Studdnets are required to complete SPSS inclass assignments.
4.
Take 2 quizes
5.
Submit 2 group project proposals
6.
Submit the final proposal
7.
Present of the group project using power point
REQUIRED READINGS (Additional readings may be assigned):
Recommended Texts:
Portney, LG and Watkins, MP (2000) Foundations of Clinical Research, 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River,
NJ: Prentice Hall Health.
Kielhofner, G. (2006). Research in occupational therapy: Methods of inquiry for enhancing practice.
Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis Company.
Publication manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition.
All handouts available on-line or distributed in class.
ASSIGNMENTS:

Assignments and due dates are listed on the course schedule. All written assignments
(group) should be typed using Arial 12 pt font and double-spaced. No credit will be given if an
assignment is turned in late.
2
GRADING:
Due Date
Evaluation
Percent of Grade
Individual Class Attendance
(11 classes) @2
SPSS in-class assignment (X6) @2
Exam (X2) @10
Group paper (x2) @12
Final group paper (Same as OT 563)
Final Oral presentation
Course Evaluation 2
22%
12%
20%
24%
15%
5%
2%
100%
NOTE: For group assignments, each student within your group will receive the same grade. It is
your responsibility that everyone in the group contributes equally to the written project and final oral
presentation.
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION:
Final Grade
A
B+
B
C+
C
D
F
Percentage Earned
90.0-100
85.0-89.9
80.0-84.9
75.0-79.9
70.0-74.9
60-69.9
<60
COMMUNICATION (Email and UB Learns): Students are expected to read their UB e-mail
account and check UB learns regularly and prior to every class for important information and updates.
Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail account.

UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments.
Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for
classroom use.
POLICY REGARDING ABSENCES, ATTENDANCE, ASSIGNMENTS, EXAMS AND
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON INCOMPLETES IN THE COURSE:
Class Attendance and Absences: Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the
case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact the
instructor prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be
3
aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required
assignments. Students are also required to make individual and/or group appointments with their
faculty project advisor on a regular basis.
Being late for class for 15 minutes or more will not earn a point. Repeating 3 tardiness will be
considered as one time absence.
Assignments: Late submission for assignments and group projects will not earn any points.
Exam: There will be no make-up exam. If you cannot take the exam on the scheduled day, it must be
taken prior to the scheduled exam day.
Use of cell phone and Internet
Not allowed. If you must, talk to the Instructor prior to class. Use of such technologies during
class will lose 2 points each time.
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course: Incomplete grades will be given only if there are
extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe documented illness) that preclude the student from completing
the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and successfully passed
the exam (B- or better) and assignments up until the time an incomplete is formally requested. The
student should be aware that an Incomplete in this course may jeopardize graduating in the Spring of
the following semester.
University Policy on Incomplete Grades: According to university policy, an interim grade of
Incomplete (“I”) may be assigned if the student has not completed all requirements for the course.
The “I” will be accompanied by a default grade (U) that will become the permanent course grade of
record if the “I” is not changed by formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the
course.
Assignment of an interim “I” is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of “I” is to be assigned only
if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade better than the default
grade; the student should have a passing average in the requirements already completed. The
instructor will provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to
be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the “I” is not replaced by a permanent grade
within twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I” was assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an earlier date for
completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a student
graduates, an “I” grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will default to the
permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree program, e.g. receiving a
4
BS in a BS/MS program, any course for which the student has an interim grade of “I” that is not
included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program will be excluded from this provision,
but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all graduate courses, the default grade accompanying an interim grade of “I” will be “U”. Neither
“A”, “P” nor “S” will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT Program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore, courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course.
Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start of
the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
DISABILITY POLICY: If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to
enable you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 25
Capen Hall, 645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will
provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with
severely in accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may
include a grade of zero (0) for an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the
following examples:

Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial part in
another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed consent of the
instructor.

Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic
idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.

Cheating: Receiving information from another student or other unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an examination or
individual assignment.

Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms of
computer data, and reports; forging the instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a report, paper,
materials, computer data or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person
other than the student responsible for the assignment.

Procurement: Distribution or acceptance of examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
5
COURSE SCHEDULE – Fall 2013*
(Any course schedule changes, additional readings or assignments will be announced in class
and posted on UB Learns)
* Subject to change.
Week
Date Lecture Topic*
1
8/29
Course Introduction
Structure of research paper proposal
Types of study/Study Design
Types of Statistics
-Descriptive vs. Inferential
Parametric vs. Nonparametric
Measurement scale
2
3
9/05
9/12
Rosh Hashanah (No Class)
Descriptive Statistics
-Dependent vs. Correlated sample
Central tendencies vs. variability
Normal distribution
4
9/19
Statistical power
Sample size/sampling method
5
9/26
6
7
Assignment Due
OT 563 Fisher’s
course Due
9/12 Statement of
Problem
Comparison of two independent
group means
-Independent t-test
-Mann Whitney t-test
Sample size
SPSS 1
10/03 Comparison of two correlated
samples
-Paired t-test
-Wilcoxon signed rank test
Sampling method
-probability vs. nonprobability
Sample size
SPSS 2
SPSS 1 In class assignment
10/10 Midterm Exam
(Covers week 1-6)
Group paper 1 due Title
(tentative)
Problem statement
Purpose statement
Hypothesis/research
questions
9/19 Purpose
statement and
identification of
Independent and
dependent variables
9/26 Research
questions
SPSS 2 In class assignment
6
10/10 CITI
certification
Methods:
Study design
Sample (except for sample
size)
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
10/17 Comparison of three independent
groups
-One-Way ANOVA
-Kruskal Wallis One-Way ANOVA
SPSS 3
10/24 Comparison of three correlated
groups
-Repeated Measures ANOVA
-Friedman test
SPSS 4
10/31 Correlation
-Pearson correlation
-Spearman’s Rho
Sample size for correlation
SPSS 5
11/07 Chi-square
Sample size
How to write method section
SPSS 6
11/14 Final Exam
(Mainly covers Class 8-13)
11/21
11/28
12/5
12/10
SPSS 3 In class assignment
Exam 1?
SPSS 4 In class assignment
10/24 Procedures
and questionnaires
SPSS 5 In class assignment
SPSS 6 In class assignment
Group paper 2 due Group
paper 1+
-Sample/participants
-Instruments/Measures
-Procedures
-Statistical Analysis
-Expected outcome
Limitations/Strength
Oral Presentations – 4 groups
Fall Recess
Oral Presentations- 4 groups
Final Oral presentations
11/21 Exam 2
Final paper due/Same as
563
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 507
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF SENSORY INTEGRATION AND NEURODEVELOPMENTAL THERAPIES
Semester
Lecture
Spring, 2013
Units 3
Labs
Wednesdays, 12:00- 2:50
A Wednesdays 3:00-4:00
B Thursdays 3:00-4:00
Location Lecture: DFN 203
Lab: DFN 7/8
Instructor
Janice Tona, Ph.D., OTR
Office
Kimball 625
Telephone
(716)829-6741
Email
[email protected]
Office Hours Tues. 10:00-11:00; Also available before and after class by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course presents an overview of the theories, assessments, practical applications, and
research associated with the effectiveness of the sensory integration (SI) and
neurodevelopmental therapy (NDT) approaches used in occupational therapy intervention with
children. Emphasis will be placed on service learning as students examine the literature,
analyze approaches, and plan and implement evidence-based evaluation and interventions for
children with sensory and motor difficulties
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 314, OT 371, OT 381, OT 343, OT 345, OT 352, OT 440, and OT 561, or permission of
instructor.
COURSE RATIONALE
Pediatric occupational therapists often evaluate and intervene with children with sensory and /or
motor difficulties. Theory and treatment in this area is continuously evolving as new evidence
emerges. This course seeks to facilitate independent, life-long learning in the students as they
search for and analyze evidence in sensory and motor intervention with children, and then apply
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OT 507 Spring, 2014
the information to treatment planning and implementation.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course builds on introductory information on sensory integration and neurodevelopmental
theories from OT 381 - OT theory and from OT 440 - Applied Pediatrics courses, allowing for
more in-depth application and analysis of SI and NDT evaluation, intervention, and research.
Theoretical constructs will be revisited and expanded upon as students are guided in the
development of treatment plans in preparation for practice. Furthermore, students will extend
theoretical knowledge to practical, clinical application with children.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the
student will be able to:
Distinguish, discuss, and correctly use
terminology that defines the specific
concepts associated with sensory
integration neurodevelopmental, and
motor learning theories.
B.3.1
Readings, Class
discussion
Quizzes
Utilize teaching-learning strategies to
explain the needs of the child and the
neurological foundations that underlie
intervention and to the child, families, and
others.
B. 5.16,
5.17
Readings, Class
discussion,
discussion with
parents
Quizzes
Use sensory integration, and motor
learning theories to analyze components
of occupational behavior in evaluation,
planning and implementation of treatment
in children.
B.3.1 and
3.5
Treatment
Planning
Treatment Plans
Provide safe and effective intervention
using therapeutic use of self to maximize
effectiveness and clinical reasoning to
modify treatment sessions in accordance
with the child’s response.
1.2 and 3.5,
5.2, 5.3,
5.5, 5.6,
Treatment
Implementation
Observation and
group feedback
on Treatment
implementation
Select, use, and analyze sensory
integration and motor screening and
evaluation tools appropriate for
occupational therapy practice and
research.
B. 4.1, 4.3,
4.4, 4.8,
5.1
Class
discussion;
Evaluation
scoring
Evaluation
scoring
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OT 507 Spring, 2014
Discuss the strengths and limitations of
the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests.
B. 4.1
Scoring of SIPT
Class Discussion
Critically analyze the literature that
supports or refutes the use of sensory
integration and neurodevelopmental
therapies and motor learning in
occupational therapy, and discuss this
analysis with others including parents and
professionals.
B.8.2, 8.3
Article analysis
Article analysis
presentation
Discuss current legislative issues related
to pediatric practice including the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,
Response to Intervention, and No Child
Left Behind, and ways in which the
occupational therapist can influence
policy development.
B.6.2,
6.3,6.4,7.3,
Legislative
assignment
Class
presentation
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.2.
Employ logical thinking, critical analysis, problem solving, and creativity.
B.3.1.
Describe theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
B.3.5.
Apply theoretical constructs to evaluation and intervention with various types of clients and practice contexts to
analyze and effect meaningful occupation.
B.4.1.
Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for occupational therapy
intervention. These include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools; assessments; skilled observations;
checklists; histories; consultations with other professionals; and interviews with the client, family, and significant
others.
B.4.3.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats) when administering assessments.
B.4.4.
Evaluate client(s)’ occupational performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living
(IADL), education, work, play, leisure, and social participation. Evaluation of occupational performance using
standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools includes
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and necessary for the client to
carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.
 Client factors, including body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and
body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, roles) and behavior patterns.
 Cultural, physical, social, personal, spiritual, temporal, and virtual contexts and activity demands that affect
performance.
 Performance skills, including motor (e.g., posture, mobility, coordination, strength, energy), process (e.g., energy,
knowledge, temporal organization, organizing space and objects, adaptation), and communication and interaction
skills (e.g., physicality, information exchange, relations).
B.4.6.
Interpret criterion-referenced and norm-referenced standardized test scores based on an understanding of sampling,
normative data, standard and criterion scores, reliability, and validity.
B.4.8.
Interpret the evaluation data in relation to accepted terminology of the profession and relevant theoretical frameworks.
B.5.1.
Use evaluation findings based on appropriate theoretical approaches, models of practice, and frames of reference to
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develop occupation-based intervention plans and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve them) based on
the stated needs of the client as well as data gathered during the evaluation process in collaboration with the client and
others. Intervention plans and strategies must be culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice,
and based on available evidence. Interventions address the following components:
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and necessary for the client to
carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.
 Client factors, including body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and
body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, roles) and behavior patterns.
 Cultural, physical, social, personal, spiritual, temporal, and virtual contexts and activity demands that affect
performance.
 Performance skills, including motor (e.g., posture, mobility, coordination, strength, energy), process (e.g., energy,
knowledge, temporal organization, organizing space and objects, adaptation), and communication and interaction
skills (e.g., physicality, information exchange, relations).
B.5.2.
Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, wellness, and
performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play,
leisure, and social participation.
B.5.3.
Provide therapeutic use of occupation and activities (e.g., occupation-based activity, practice skills, preparatory
methods).
B.5.5.
Provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, cognitive, perceptual, sensory (e.g., vision, tactile,
auditory, gustatory, olfactory, pain, temperature, pressure, vestibular, proprioception), neuromuscular, and behavioral
skills.
B.5.6.
Provide therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments as part of the
therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction.
B.5.16.
Demonstrate the ability to educate the client, caregiver, family, and significant others to facilitate skills in areas of
occupation as well as prevention, health maintenance, and safety.
B.5.17.
Apply the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational methods to design educational experiences to
address the needs of the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other health providers, and the public.
B.6.2.
Discuss the current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic, and demographic factors that
influence the various contexts for practice of occupational therapy.
B.6.3.
Describe the current social, economic, political, geographic, and demographic factors to promote policy development
and the provision of occupational therapy services.
B.6.4.
Articulate the role and responsibility of the practitioner to address changes in service delivery policies to effect
changes in the system, and to identify opportunities in emerging practice areas.
B.7.3.
Describe the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulation and their implications and
effects on practice.
B.8.2.
Effectively locate, understand, and evaluate information, including the quality of research evidence.
B.8.3.
Use research literature to make evidence-based decisions.
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REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Bundy, A., Lane, S., Murray, E. (2002). Sensory Integration: Theory and Practice (2nd ed).
Philadelphia: F.A .Davis co.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Blye, L. (1983) Components of Normal Movement During the First Year of Life and Abnormal
Motor Movement. NDTA Publications
Additional readings will be posted online
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
1. Attendance and active participation in all classes, including contributions to
discussions and completion of all in-class assignments. This also includes participation in
either PT student lab teaching or DFN 7 lab clean up, AND participation in the OT507
course evaluation.
2. Pop Quizzes: Quizzes will open book / open notes and will take place at the start of
class. Therefore, students must bring copies of all readings to class – and students
should highlight/ notate readings to make it easier to find the material during the allotted
quiz time.
3. Completed written evaluation and intervention plan on one child/case: Working in
small groups, students will complete an assessment on one child including parent
interview, standardized tests and non-standardized observations, and write up of
assessment. While this is a group assignment, all students must participate equally in the
evaluation and all students must be able to articulate the child’s strengths, needs, and
goals.
Students will also complete at least one small-group intervention plan, which will be
accompanied by an article providing evidence for the intervention and an analysis of the
article.
Some OT students will work with college-aged clients with sensory and mild motor
difficulties. OT students in this group will work in pairs to evaluate the client, plan
consultative intervention including a sensory diet, and consult with the client.
4. Evidence-based intervention plan: Students will develop at least one treatment plan
individually following class format on their assigned child. Each student will have at least
one week to plan and implement treatment on the child in the group. This intervention
plan will be presented to the student’s peers prior to implementation for peer evaluation
and feedback.
Students working with college aged clients will evaluate a different client each week, plan
consultative intervention including a sensory diet, and consult with the client.
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5. Article analysis: Students will identify innovative intervention activities that meet the
child’s needs and will evaluate the evidence / rationale behind these activities by
analyzing one article that serves as a basis for at least one of their treatment activities,
using an analysis worksheet. This analysis will be presented in the small group, along
with the treatment plan.
Students working with college-aged clients will conduct one article analysis working in
pairs and at least one article analysis individually.
6. Treatment Implementation: Students will lead one session with a child, following their
established treatment plan. Students should demonstrate flexibility in having the session
be child-directed, and in modifying activities as needed to present a “just right challenge”
for the child. In addition, students will reflect on their own implementation after receiving
input from classmates and identify the strengths and limitations of their own session and
what could be done differently in subsequent sessions.
Students working with college-aged clients will use a consultative model and will provide
the client with education including a sensory diet rather than direct intervention. OT
students will follow up with the client one week later to assess efficacy of the program.
7. Feedback to group members: Students will observe, critique, and offer verbal and
written feedback to group members following each treatment session. Written feedback
will be posted on googledocs. Students will also reflect on their own performance after
intervening with a child and will provide written reflection on googledocs.
Students working with college-aged clients will work in pairs, with one OT student taking
the lead each week and the other OT student providing feedback afterwards.
8. Group Class Project: Students complete one group project and presentation to the
class on a topic related to sensory and motor intervention. Topics will be assigned by the
instructor based on student preferences.
9. Legislative Project: Students must research a legislative topic related to pediatric OT
service delivery and present their findings to the class. This may include attending Albany
Day, participating in webinars or other events if they become available, or completing a
literature review (3-5 page paper).
GRADING
1. Attendance and participation
10
2. Pop Quizzes
10
3. Completed written evaluation, intervention plan, presentation, and
evidence on one child/case (group assignment)
10
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
4. Individual intervention plan and presentation
20
5. Individual intervention implementation and self reflection
15
6. Evidence-Based research summary to substantiate treatment choices.
10
7. Feedback to group members (discussed and posted)
10
8. Group project and presentation
10
9. Legislative Project
5
TOTAL
100
Note: All group work includes results of peer participation ratings
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
Percentage
Letter Grade
Percentage
A
93-100
C+
77-79.99
A-
90-92.99
C
73-76.99
B+
87-89.99
C-
70-72.99
B
83-86.99
D
66-69.99
B-
80-82.99
F
<66
Note: A minimum grade of B is required for graduate courses.
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Students are required to attend all classes and be on time. Any failure to attend class will result
in your having an impact on the entire class because of the discussion component. A phone
call the day before to the instructor will be required in the case of illness or a family emergency.
Exams and Final Exam
Unannounced quizzes will be given on a regular basis in this course. Quizzes will be given
during the first 10 – 15 minutes of class and will be open book/open notes. There is no final
exam.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB learns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account
Incomplete Grades
See university policy (below)
Late Assignments
All written, presentation, and performance components of the assignments, and the research
article reviews are due in their entirety on the date listed. Please do not attempt to print out your
assignments in the computer lab just before they are due in class, because this can jeopardize
your having the assignment ready for submission when due. There is no option for late
assignments
Lab Requirements
All students are expected to arrive at lab approximately 20 minutes prior to their scheduled client
visit to set up the lab and ensure that they will not have a conflict with other groups when using
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
equipment. Students are expected to stay after the child leaves to clean up the lab.
Students are expected to treat the lab as they would a clinic. This includes dressing and behaving
in a professional manner for lab day. It also includes maintaining equipment and reporting any
broken, depleted, or missing equipment or supplies to the instructor.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the
student has not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a
default grade that will become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by
formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be
assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade
better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of
a least ‘D’) in the requirements already completed. The instructor will provide the student
specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade
with twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an
earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any
one of: ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim
grade of ‘I’ will be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. Accessibility
Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for
reasonable accommodations.
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial
part in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
c) Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
d) Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
e) Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
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University at Buffalo
OT 507 Spring, 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
Date
Topic
1/29
Introduction to Course
Sensory Assessments
2/5
Structure/Function of the
Nervous System – Tactile
system, Proprioceptive
system, vestibular system
In-Class Activity
Assignment/items Due
Small group
discussion; Scoring
assessments
Ayres clinical
observations
B,L & M Ch. 2
Ayres, A.J. (1989).
For vestibular tracts use:
http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/s2/chapt
er11.html
(Note: Be able to draw the following
tracts: DCML; ALS; Trigeminothalamic;
Ascending MLF, Descending MLF(medial
vestibulospinal), lateral vestibulospinal,
vestiboulo cerebellar connections.
Description of the SIPT. In the Sensory
Integration and Praxis Test Manual
(pp. 1-9). Western Psychological
Services, Los Angeles, CA.
2/12
Ayres Theory – revisited
Child assignments
given to call families
B,L &M ch. 1;
Ch. 3, 4
Modulation / Dunn Theory
Visual – Spatial
Praxis
Presentations:
Alert Program;
Wilbarger protocol
2//19
Structure / Function of the
Nervous System –Vestibular
and Central Auditory
Processing Disorder
Guest Presenter:
Dr. Robert Burkard
CLASS MEETS at 12:00 in
Kimball Vestibular lab
2/26
11
Class Does Not Meet –
Albany Day
Albany Day
B,L,&M Ch. 6;
Online reading
Online reading
Due: Phone interview with families and
identification of assessments to be used
Online Reading:
Schoen, S.A. & Anderson, J. (1999).
Neurodevelopmental treatment frame of
reference. In Kramer, P. & Hinojosa, J.
(Eds.) Frames of reference for pediatric
occupational therapy (pp. 83-118).
University at Buffalo
3/5
OT 507 Spring, 2014
Connecting Motor learning
and Sensory Processing
NDT
LECTURE: Wed. 12-2:50;
LABS Wed. 3:30-4:30;
Thurs. 3:30-4:30
Lecture:
3/12
NDT
Evaluation
Generating a problem list
Presentations:
Therapeutic Listening
DIR floortime
Feeding
LECTURE: Wed. 12-2:50;
LABS Wed. 3:30-4:30;
Thurs. 3:30-4:30
Lecture: Interpreting SI
assessments
Lab: Play with child/
begin to plan treatment
BL&M Ch. 7, 8
Online Reading
DUE: Evaluation on the child
3/19
SPRING BREAK
Small group treatment
planning / Evidencebased intervention
ideas
BL&M Ch. 9, 10, 11, 12
3/26
EACH WEEK: Wednesday
lab meets at 2:00;
Thursday lab meets at
2:00
Guest Presenter:
Dr. Jeanne Langan
Lab: Evaluate child
EACH WEEK:
Powerpoint
Presentation of
treatment plan and
article by students
who will be
implementing
treatment that week
(10-15 minutes per)
4/2
Wednesday lab meets at
1:00; Thursday lab meets at
2:00
Online Reading
BL&M Ch. 3
Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
DUE by 9am Monday 3/24 –Group
assignment: Intervention Plan (online
safeassign)
ONLINE QUIZ
Online reading;
BL&M Ch. 9, 10, 11, 12
ONLINE QUIZ
4/9
Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
Online reading;
BL&M Ch. 9, 10, 11, 12
ONLINE QUIZ
4/16
Flex Week – Kids on
break
No Treatment – spring
break for kids
Online reading;
BL&M Ch. 9, 10, 11, 12
ONLINE QUIZ
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4/23
4/30
OT 507 Spring, 2014
Wednesday lab meets at
1:00; Thursday lab meets at
2:00
Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
Online reading;
Wednesday lab meets at
1:00; Thursday lab meets at
2:00
Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
Online reading;
BL&M Ch. 13
BL&M Ch. 9, 10, 11, 12
ONLINE QUIZ
DUE by 9am Monday 3/16 –Treatment
Plan for OTS treating the child (online
safeassign)
5/7
13
Wednesday lab meets at
1:00; Thursday lab meets at
2:00Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
Individual intervention
plan / Evidence-based
intervention ideas
Online reading;
DUE by 9am Monday 4/23 –Treatment
Plan for OTS treating the child (online
safeassign)
DUE: FINAL SUMMARY ON CHILD TO
GIVE TO PARENTS
University at Buffalo
OT 508 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 508
PHYSICAL DISABILITIES PRACTICE
Fall 2013
3 Units Lecture
2 Units Lab
Lecture
Th 9:00-11:50 Kimball 111
Labs
A: Tu 1-2:50
B: Tu 3-4:50
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Lecture Kimball 111
Lab DFN 7
Kimberley Persons, DHS, OTR/L
534 Kimball
716-829-6734
[email protected]
By appointment
Laura Lederhouse [email protected]
Ashley Dudek [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is one of three courses offered by the Department of Occupational Therapy which
addresses the role of the occupational therapist in restoring function to patients with physical
limitation or dysfunction. The nature of the subject matter distributed within these three courses
is both theoretical and applied, relying heavily on the basic and medical science courses as
prerequisites.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 322, OT 343, OT 361
COURSE RATIONALE
OT 508 includes the evaluation and intervention principles and procedures for physical
disabilities. The range of perceptual and physical dysfunctions accounted for in this course
include Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Spinal Cord Injury
(SCI), Burns, Amputations, Degenerative diseases, and orthopedic injuries. Evaluation and
treatment procedures will be demonstrated and discussed in class; however, the practicum will
provide the student with the main opportunity to develop clinical skills under supervision.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
OT508 is offered to provide the student the evaluation, treatment principles and procedures
necessary to effectively restore function to patients with physical limitation or dysfunction. This
course, with Orthotics and Prosthetics, OT 450, and Neurophysiological Processes, OT 410,
form a triad of courses that provide the basis necessary for entry-level practice in the area of
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OT 508 Fall 2013
physical dysfunction. The pre-requisite courses provide a foundation for students to draw upon
when applying OT treatment with physical dysfunction.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Comprehend various evaluation
procedures that includes, although are not
limited to ROM, MMT, sensation, ADL’s,
transfers, coordination, functional mobility,
perception and cognition. Given a description
of physical condition(s), differentiate
evaluation and treatment procedures for each
of these conditions.
2. Demonstrate appropriate evaluation or
assessment procedures that apply to different
types of physically disabling conditions.
B.4.1.
B.4.2.
B.4.3.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Level I FW
Assessment
Presentations
Exams
B.2.8.
B.3.1.
B.4.3.
B.4.4.
B.4.6.
B.3.4.
B.6.5.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Level I FW
Lab Work
Level I FW
Lecture
Readings
Group
discussion
Intervention
Plans
Exams
4. Describe, from the perspective of a person
with a physical disability, what needs he or
she may have in managing the environment
and in performing ADL or homemaking
activities.
B.4.7.
B.5.1.
Intervention
Plans
Exams
5. Determine the potential problems a person
with a physical disability may have and
provide a functional assessment of the
individual in relation to the individual’s
environment and performance of roles.
B.4.3.
B.4.4.
B.4.8.
B.5.1.
6. Document, as required in class/lab and
Level 1 fieldwork experience, initial
assessments or evaluations, treatment plans,
progress notes, and discharge summaries.
B.4.10
B.5.20.
B.5.32.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Level I FW
3. Demonstrate an understanding of how
trends in service delivery effect treatment
planning and documentation.
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Intervention
Plans
Level I FW
Intervention
Plans
Exams
University at Buffalo
OT 508 Fall 2013
7. Understand the relationship between the
OTR and the COTA in the data
gathering/assessment process.
B.4.5.
B.5.25.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Lab practice
Level I FW
Lab Practice
Exams
8. Develop beginning clinical skills
commensurate with Level I fieldwork
requirements, including assessment,
treatment planning, transfer performance,
and appropriate positioning of patients.
9. Develop an understanding of the
importance of the rehabilitation team in a
physical disabilities setting.
B.5.1.
B.5.2.
B.5.5.
B.5.6.
B.5.7.
B.5.20.
B.5.21.
B.5.22.
Lecture
Readings
Group
discussion
Exams
Lab
Assignments
10. Given a case study of a particular person
with a physical disability, demonstrate the
ability to problem-solve an appropriate
treatment plan. Include therapeutic
equipment, adaptive equipment, and/or aids
to self-care or ADL.
11. Demonstrate the ability to develop
treatment plans and therapeutic interventions
based on evidenced-based outcomes.
B.5.1.
B.5.10.
B.5.12.
B.5.14.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Intervention
Plans
B.3.1.
B.3.3.
B.5.1.
B.5.28.
B.5.29.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Level I FW
Intervention
Plans
12. Begin to apply theories learned in class in
practice setting. Include content from
orthotics and prosthetics and
neurophysiological processes, as well as
physical dysfunction to develop treatment
rationale.
13. Demonstrate comprehension of course
content and application of material learned in
course by completion of a comprehensive
treatment plan.
14. Develop the clinical ability to identify
and prioritize problems that directly
influence treatment decisions and functional
outcomes.
B.5.1.
B.5.2.
B.5.3.
B.5.14.
Lecture
Readings
Level I FW
Intervention
Plans
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Level I
Fieldwork
Lab
assignments
B.5.1.
B.5.8.
B.5.23.
B.5.24.
B.5.2.
B.5.3.
3
Lab
Assignments
Level I FW
Intervention
Plans
Level I FW
University at Buffalo
15. Allow for bridging into professional role,
from classroom setting to clinical
competency. Demonstrate the ability to use
safety precautions, use clinical reasoning,
and refer and collaborate with specialists and
other interdisciplinary team members.
16. Understand the continuum of care offered
in physical disabilities setting including
service delivery at all levels of the continuum
from screening to termination of services.
Anticipate client needs upon discharge and
demonstrate the ability to assist the client reintegrate into the community.
17. Anticipate the client’s need for health
education and identify the family’s and/or
caregiver’s needs. Provide therapeutic
support that will help the client and
family/caregiver achieve their needs and
objectives.
OT 508 Fall 2013
B.5.2.
B.5.3.
B.5.30.
B.5.31.
B.5.18.
B.5.19.
B.5.29.
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Group
discussion
Level I FW
Lecture
Readings
Group
discussion
Clinical
Safety
Practical
In-class
assignments
Level I FW
Intervention
Plans
Exams
Lecture
Readings
Lab practice
Level I FW
Level I FW
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.2.8.
B.3.1.
B.3.3.
B.4.2.
B.4.3.
B.4.4.
Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety
regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the
setting and scope of practice.
Apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
Use theories, models of practice, and frames of reference to guide and inform
evaluation and intervention.
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual
factors, and psychometric properties of tests. These must be culturally
relevant, based on available evidence, and incorporate use of occupation in
the assessment process.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats)
when administering assessments.
Evaluate client(s)’ occupational performance in activities of daily living
(ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), education, work,
play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. Evaluation of occupational
performance using standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools
includes:
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are
meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles in home,
work, and community environments.
 Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions
(e.g., neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive,
mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, nervous,
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University at Buffalo
OT 508 Fall 2013
genitourinary, integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
 Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment
(e.g., physical, social).
 Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–
perceptual skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and
communication and social skills.
B.4.5. Compare and contrast the role of the occupational therapist and occupational
therapy assistant in the screening and evaluation process along with the
importance of and rationale for supervision and collaborative work between
the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in that process.
B.4.6. Interpret criterion-referenced and norm-referenced standardized test scores
on the basis of an understanding of sampling, normative data, standard
and criterion scores, reliability, and validity.
B.4.7. Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture,
disability status, and situational variables related to the individual and
context.
B.4.8. Interpret the evaluation data in relation to accepted terminology of the
profession and relevant theoretical frameworks.
B.4.10. Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service
provision and to meet standards for reimbursement of services, adhering to
the requirements of applicable facility, local, state, federal, and
reimbursement agencies. Documentation must effectively communicate the
need and rationale for occupational therapy services.
B.5.1. Use evaluation findings based on appropriate theoretical approaches, models
of practice, and frames of reference to develop occupation-based
intervention plans and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve
them) on the basis of the stated needs of the client as well as data gathered
during the evaluation process in collaboration with the client and others.
Intervention plans and strategies must be culturally relevant, reflective of
current occupational therapy practice, and based on available evidence.
Interventions address the following components:
 The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are
meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles in home,
work, and community environments.
 Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions
(e.g., neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive,
mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, nervous,
genitourinary, integumentary systems).
 Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
 Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment
(e.g., physical, social).
 Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–
perceptual skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and
communication and social skills.
B.5.2. Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures
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University at Buffalo
B.5.3.
B.5.5.
B.5.6.
B.5.7.
B.5.8.
B.5.10.
B.5.12.
B.5.14.
B.5.18.
B.5.19.
B.5.20.
B.5.21.
B.5.22.
B.5.23.
B.5.24.
OT 508 Fall 2013
to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in ADLs,
IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation.
Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g.,
occupation-based intervention, purposeful activity, preparatory methods).
Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management and
maintenance, home management, and community and work integration.
Provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental,
cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory
functions (e.g., vision, tactile, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, pain,
temperature, pressure, vestibular, proprioception).
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights,
perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both
individual and group interaction.
Develop and implement intervention strategies to remediate and/or
compensate for cognitive deficits that affect occupational performance.
Articulate principles of and be able to design, fabricate, apply, fit, and train
in assistive technologies and devices (e.g., electronic aids to daily living,
seating and positioning systems) used to enhance occupational performance
and foster participation and well-being.
Provide recommendations and training in techniques to enhance functional
mobility, including physical transfers, wheelchair management, and
mobility devices.
Provide management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable
performance (including the process of bringing food or fluids from the plate
or cup to the mouth, the ability to keep and manipulate food or fluid in the
mouth, and swallowing assessment and management) and train others in
precautions and techniques while considering client and contextual factors.
Demonstrate an understanding of health literacy and the ability to educate
and train the client, caregiver, family and significant others, and
communities to facilitate skills in areas of occupation as well as prevention,
health maintenance, health promotion, and safety.
Apply the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational
methods to design experiences to address the needs of the client, family,
significant others, colleagues, other health providers, and the public.
Effectively interact through written, oral, and nonverbal communication
with the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other health providers,
and the public in a professionally acceptable manner.
Effectively communicate and work interprofessionally with those who
provide services to individuals, organizations, and/or populations in order to
clarify each member’s responsibility in executing an intervention plan.
Refer to specialists (both internal and external to the profession) for
consultation and intervention.
Grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and
interventions to reflect the changing needs of the client, the sociocultural
context, and technological advances.
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and
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University at Buffalo
B.5.25.
B.5.28.
B.5.29.
B.5.30.
B.5.31.
B.5.32.
B.6.5.
OT 508 Fall 2013
adaptations to the environment, that support performance, participation, and
well-being.
Identify and demonstrate techniques in skills of supervision and
collaboration with occupational therapy assistants and other professionals on
therapeutic interventions.
Monitor and reassess, in collaboration with the client, caregiver, family, and
significant others, the effect of occupational therapy intervention and the
need for continued or modified intervention.
Plan for discharge, in collaboration with the client, by reviewing the needs
of the client, caregiver, family, and significant others; available resources;
and discharge environment. This process includes, but is not limited to,
identification of client’s current status within the continuum of care;
identification of community, human, and fiscal resources; recommendations
for environmental adaptations; and home programming to facilitate the
client’s progression along the continuum toward outcome goals.
Organize, collect, and analyze data in a systematic manner for evaluation of
practice outcomes. Report evaluation results and modify practice as needed
to improve client outcomes.
Terminate occupational therapy services when stated outcomes have been
achieved or it has been determined that they cannot be achieved. This
process includes developing a summary of occupational therapy outcomes,
appropriate recommendations, and referrals and discussion of post-discharge
needs with the client and with appropriates others.
Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service
provision and to meet standards for reimbursement of services.
Documentation must effectively communicate the need and rationale for
occupational therapy services and must be appropriate to the context in
which the service is delivered.
Analyze the trends in models of service delivery, including, but not limited
to, medical, educational, community, and social models, and their potential
effect on the practice of occupational therapy.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOKS
Gutman, S.A., Schonfeld, A.B. (2009). Screening adult neurologic populations: A step-by-step
instruction manual (2nd ed.). Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press
Radomski, M.V. & Trombly Latham, C.A., (Eds). (2008). Occupational therapy for physical
dysfunction (6th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Additional readings will be posted on UBLearns
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
All assignments are to be in provided format and submitted online through UBLearns unless
otherwise indicated. All assignments should be submitted in Word or compatible format. The file
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OT 508 Fall 2013
name should be formatted with your last name then the assignment name (ex. Smith Intervention
Plan.docx).
Lecture
Intervention Plans- Students will complete 4 intervention plans. Three will be on assigned case
studies from class and one will be on a client from Level I Fieldwork. Intervention plans must be
completed on the provided format.
Midterm and Final Exam- Students will complete a written midterm and final exam that covers
material from lecture and lab.
In-Class Assignments- Students will complete a variety of in-class assignments in groups and
individually. In-class assignments may include case studies, discussions, or quizzes.
Attendance/Class Participation- All students are expected to participate in class discussions.
Participation in lecture includes being prepared for class, attendance, and punctuality.
AOTA Membership: Students are required to be members of the AOTA to access materials and
resources. Students will provide instructor with membership card (or other documentation of
membership if card had not yet arrived) that is valid through the duration of the course. You
must be a member of AOTA to pass this course.
Level I Fieldwork- Students will complete Level I Fieldwork as assigned by the AFWC. This
fieldwork is graded on a pass/fail basis. To pass, students must successfully complete the written
assignment as posted on UBLearns and comply with professional behaviors (including
timeliness, proper dress, and communication) throughout the fieldwork. You must pass Level I
Fieldwork in order to pass this course.
Lab
OT Evaluations- Students will have the opportunity to evaluate 3 clients with physical
disabilities (CVA, TBI, SCI). In groups, students will complete an evaluation with the client on
the provided form. *These evaluations are scheduled at ECMC. Students must have
transportation and dress appropriately. Lab times may be adjusted.
Assessments- Working in groups, students will be assigned a sensory, vision, and cognition
assessment and present to the class. Students will also provide a 1 page handout to the class.
Lab Assignments- Students will complete a variety of assignments in lab. This assignments will
be group and individual. Requirements for each assignment will be explain during lab and/or
posted on UBLearns.
Clinical Safety Practical- All students are expected to follow clinical safety guidelines
throughout the course. This includes, but is not limited to, following precautions and
contraindications, body mechanics when working with clients, safe positioning and transfers,
HIPAA, Universal Precautions, and AOTA Code of Ethics. *Students must pass this practical
prior to beginning Level I Fieldwork.
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OT 508 Fall 2013
GRADING
Lecture
Intervention Plan #1 TBI
Intervention Plan #2 SCI
Intervention Plan #3 Polytrauma
Intervention Plan #4 FW
Midterm Examination
Final Examination
In-class Assignments
Attendance/Class Participation
AOTA Membership
Level I Fieldwork
Total Points
30
30
30
30
100
100
20
10
Complete/Incomplete
Pass/Fail
350
Lab
OT Evaluation CVA
OT Evaluation TBI
OT Evaluation SCI
Assessments (Sensory, Vision, Cognition)
Lab assignments
Attendance
Clinic Safety Practical
Total Points
25
25
25
30
30
15
Pass/Fail
150
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
Letter
Grade
C
CD+
D
F
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
77-79.99%
Percentage
73-76.99%
70-72.99%
67-69.99%
63-66.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from
9
University at Buffalo
OT 508 Fall 2013
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to attend all exams on time. Failure to attend an exam on time will result
in a grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor prior to the start of the exam
if medical emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations, including alternate exams, may be made at the discretion of the instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UBLearns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible
for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 10% of
points per day that the assignment is late. Assignments more than 3 days late will not be
accepted.
Lab Requirements
Students are expected to participate in all lab activities. Students who come to lab wearing
clothing that restricts their movement or clothing that is immodest will receive one warning, after
that they will be required to leave the lab for that session. Inappropriate clothing is considered to
be the following: any clothing that reveals cleavage or underwear or that exposes low back
tattoos and belly buttons.
Students will have several opportunities to observe individuals in the lab and community.
Students are expected to adhere to a professional dress code, as described in the student
handbook and on UBLearns. Students are also expected to display professional behaviors,
including timeliness, appropriate discussions, and maintaining confidentiality of all that is
observed.
Technology in the Classroom
Students may use laptops or tablets in the classroom and in the lab. Cell phones (including smart
phones) may not be used. Students who are observed using a device for anything unrelated to the
course will be asked to leave the classroom or lab for that day, will receive a zero on any related
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OT 508 Fall 2013
assignments, and will lose the privilege of using technology in the classroom for the remainder
of the course.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
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University at Buffalo





OT 508 Fall 2013
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
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OT 508 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
* Course schedule is a general outline and is subject to change based on the needs of the class
Week
Date
Lab Topic
1
8/20
Introduction
Review
2
8/27
3
9/3
4
9/10
5
9/17
6
9/24
7
10/1
Motor Skills, Motor
Behavior, &
Assessments and
intervention
Assessment of
Occupational
Functioning
Treatment Planning/
Goal writing
Medical Abbreviations
Assignment/
Reading Due
Gutman: section
5 (bring text to
lab);
Trombly: ch.5
Date
Lecture Topic
8/22
Introduction &
Course Outline
8/29
FIM Bookletonline
9/5
Trombly ch 3
Online Readings
9/12
Gutman: section
4 (bring to lab)
Due: Sensory
Assessment
Presentations
Cognition and Cognitive Gutman:
Assessment and
Section 1
Intervention
Online handouts
Due: Cognition
Assessment
Presentations
Vision, Visual
Gutman:
Perception &
sections 2
Assessment and
&3
Intervention
Online handouts
Due: Vision
Assessment
Presentations
9/19
Sensory and Hand
Function Assessments
and Intervention
13
Delivery &
Documentation of
OT Services
ADL Assessments
ADL/I-ADL
Assessments,
Role Assessments
Assignment/
Reading Due
Trombly:
ch.1,2, 3
UB Learns:
Using
Occupation in
the clinic article
Trombly: ch. 5,
6, 21 - 23
FIM Booklet
Documentation,
SOAP note, Goal
writing, Case study
review
No Class
Rosh Hashanah
Sensation/Hand
function
RSD
Peripheral
Neuropathy
Cognition
Trombly: ch. 7,
27, 42
9/26
Vision, Visual
Perception, low
vision
Trombly; ch. 8,
28
10/3
Midterm
Trombly: 9, 29
University at Buffalo
Week
Date
Lab Topic
8
10/8
Burn lecture
Erika Julyan
9
10/15
TBI Site visit @ ECMC
Times TBA
Christine RudroffMcFayden
10
10/22
11
10/29
CVA Site visit @
ECMC
Times TBA
Christine RudroffMcFayden
SCI Site visit @ ECMC
Times TBA
Christine RudroffMcFayden
12
11/5
Orthopedic Conditions
Clinical precautions and
safety,
Clinical performance
OT 508 Fall 2013
Assignment/
Reading Due
Trombly: ch. 45
Online handouts
Date
Lecture Topic
10/10
Traumatic Brain
Injury
10/17
Cerebral Vascular
Accident
Due: TBI
Evaluation
10/24
Spinal Cord Injury
Due: CVA
Evaluation
10/31
Orthopedic
Injuries/Conditions
Arthritis
Amputation
Trombly: ch. 11,
37
Due: SCI
Evaluation
11/7
Degenerative
diseases
Cardiac/Pulmonary
Disease
Due:
Polytrauma
Intervention
Plan
11/14
Level I Fieldwork
13
11/12
Level I Fieldwork
14
11/19
Level I Fieldwork
11/21
Level I Fieldwork
15
11/26
No Class
Thanksgiving
11/28
No Class
Thanksgiving
14
Assignment/
Reading Due
Trombly: ch. 39
Trombly: ch.38,
48;
Gutman:
section 9
Due: TBI
Intervention
Plan
Trombly: ch. 43
Trombly: ch.
37, 41, 44, 46
Due: SCI
Intervention
Plan
Trombly: ch.
40, 47
Due: FW
Intervention
Plan due 11/18
(if Physical
Disabilities
during first
rotation)
Due: FW
Intervention
Plan due 11/25
(if Physical
Disabilities
during second
rotation)
University at Buffalo
Week
Date
Lab Topic
16
12/3
Fieldwork Review
OT 508 Fall 2013
Assignment/
Reading Due
Finals
Week
Date
Lecture Topic
12/5
Interdisciplinary
Teams
Review for Final
Final Exam
8-11am
*subject to change
12/12
15
Assignment/
Reading Due
OT 509
Community - Based Practice
Occupational Therapy Program- Department of Rehabilitation Science
University at Buffalo
Semester: Spring 2014
Credits: 3
Instructors:
Class Time: Tuesday, 12:30-3:20 pm
Class Location: DFN 5
Mary Matteliano, Ph.D., OTR/L
624 Kimball Tower
829-6728
[email protected]
Jo Schweitzer, MS, OTR/L
532 Kimball Tower
829-6737
[email protected]
Office Hours: By appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course focuses on the role of the occupational therapist in emerging areas of practice. A broad range
of health-related services are addressed in this course including: prevention and health promotion, acute
and chronic medical care, habilitation and rehabilitation, direct and indirect service provision, all of which
are provided in a community based setting. The student will understand current trends in community
health care and the role of the occupational therapist in public health and community health. This course
requires the student to identify an agency of interest in the community, develop, implement and evaluate a
program based on occupational therapy theory and practice with the supervision of community agency
staff and the course instructors. This course builds upon the student’s previous experience from both the
clinical and didactic coursework in the occupational therapy curriculum.
PRE-REQUISITES
The student must complete OT 560, OT 561 (Level II fieldwork) as well as the required coursework of
OT 504: Advanced Managements for occupational therapists, OT 506: Research Skills and OTD 551:
Occupational Behavior Theory in the fall semester, 5th year of the curriculum.
COURSE RATIONALE/RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
The ACOTE Accreditation Standards requires that the occupational therapy student must develop and
understand current health care trends, social models, the role of occupational therapists in communitybased settings, and the importance of marketing occupational therapy services to the community. This
course offers the student an opportunity to develop programs that take place in the client’s natural
environment. With the guidance of the course instructors and the cooperation of community agencies, the
student is able to identify new areas of practice to foster consideration of future employment opportunities
and/or collaborations for occupational therapists in non-traditional community-based settings.
1
COURSE OBJECTIVES AND ACOTE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS (2013)
Objectives
Standard
1
A.6.6
2
3
B.1.5
B. 1.6
4
B.2.4
B.5.21
B. 5.26
B. 9.9
Formulate intervention plans based on task analysis of
areas of occupation, performance skills, performance
patterns, activity demands, context(s), and client factors.
Demonstrate how effective therapeutic intervention
supports quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the
individual, group, or population to promote physical and
mental health and prevention of injury and disease
considering the cultural, temporal, personal, and physical
environment.
Develop and promote the use of appropriate home and
community programming to support performance in the
client's natural environment.
Exhibit and demonstrate the ability to promote
occupational therapy by educating, facilitating, and
training client/family/significant others, colleagues, other
health providers, and the public in areas of occupational
performance in emerging practice areas.
Effectively communicate and work interprofessionally
within a variety of systems and service models, including,
but not limited to, health care, education, community, and
social models, understanding the role of OT intervention
and member responsibility. Articulate the role of the OT
as a contractor/consultant and understand professional
responsibilities.
B. 5.30
B. 6.6
Conduct literature reviews that provide evidence for
treatment decisions. Appreciate and utilize international
resources. Modify practice as needed based on evaluation
results.
B 2.7
5
6
B 2.9
B. 5.4
B.7.1
7
B.5.17
8
9
10
11
12
13
Objective # from Syllabus Addressing the Standard
Demonstrate the ability to synthesize the mission and
philosophy of community organizations with OT theory
and practice models.
Demonstrate an understanding of the health and wellness
needs of those who are at risk for social injustice,
occupational deprivation, and disparity. Demonstrate
knowledge of social issues and their impact on disability
and chronic health conditions.
Understand and appreciate the role of occupation in the
promotion of health and the prevention of disease and
disability for the individual, family, and society.
B 5.18
B. 9.3
Assessment Measure
(i.e. assignment, lab test,
objective or essay test,
project, presentation,
demonstration, Other
(specify)
Final project: must link
mission of site with
project implementation
Literature review, final
project, written report and
implementation
Literature review, final
project, written report and
implementation
Community meetings,
observations and
interviews. Final
implementation of project
Literature review, final
project, written report and
community intervention
Final project:
observation, interviews,
implementation
Literature review,
community based project:
development and
implementation
Final project: involves
interviews with providers,
negotiation with key
personal and reporting on
the structure of
community organizations
Written exercises,
literature review for final
project, project summary
and critique
2
Standard
14
15
16
17
18
B.6.1
B. 6.2
B. 6.3
B. 6.4
B 6.5
Objective number
Assessment
Understand the trends in models of service delivery and
their effect on the practice of occupational therapy,
including, but not limited to, medical, educational,
community, and social models. Articulate practitioner
responses to changes in the social, economic, political,
geographic, and demographic factors and identify
emerging practice areas. Discuss the role of advocacy and
policy development to advance the provision of
occupational therapy services.
19
B. 7.6
20
B. 8.9
Demonstrate the ability to analyze outcomes and make
needed changes to ensure quality services.
Demonstrate an understanding of the process of locating
and securing grants and how grants can serve as a fiscal
resource for research and practice
Literature review, final
project & grant
assignment includes
community needs
assessment, project
development, and
promoting policy changes
for OT service provision
Ongoing project
implementation –group
discussions and instructor
feedback, project
summary and review
Assignment on grant
writing and its application
to group projects
Learning Activities
This course is conducted in a seminar format. The first part of the course focuses on guiding the student
through the process of choosing a community setting of interest, making contact with that setting, creating
a needs assessment, reviewing relevant literature, and developing a community based written proposal for
the final project. The student is involved in program planning using occupational therapy skills in a nontraditional community-based environment. The structure for this assignment is discussed in class and in
groups. The student is encouraged to choose a community-based setting that reflects an area of interest
such as: pediatrics, mental health, geriatrics, adult physical disabilities, family health, and services to the
socio-economically disadvantaged and/or culturally diverse populations.
1
Learning Activities
In class discussion of chapters 1 & 5
2
Staff Interview
3
Participant Observer Report
Guest lecturer: Dr. John Stone
Topic: Grant writing logic model assignment
4
5
Assignment
Submit typed responses to discussion questions
This learning activity is arranged by the student
group at their chosen site
These learning activities are arranged by
individual students at their chosen site
Homework assignment paired with class
presentation on grant writing and logic model
Submission of written project proposal and
summary of supporting literature
7
Written project proposal and literature review
Implementation of group sessions: minimum of
three sessions with one being observed by course
instructor
8
Written project summary and critique of
implementation of sessions
Written assignment by project group
9
Interprofessional exchange with PT students
Informal presentation/explanation of projects
10
Oral presentation of project
PowerPoint presentation to class and guests
Implemented by student groups at chosen site
3
Required Readings for Class Discussion
American Occupational Therapy Association. (2008). Occupational therapy practice framework:
Domain and process (2nd ed.). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62 (6), 625683.
Cole, M. B. (2005). Group dynamics in occupational therapy (3rd ed.) Thorofare, NJ: Slack, Inc.
(found on UBlearns, chapter 11).
Scaffa, M.E., Reitz, S.M., & Pizza, M.A. (2010). Occupational therapy in the promotion of
health and wellness. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Co.
Townsend, E. & Whiteford, G. (2005). A participatory occupational justice framework:
population-based processes of practice. In Kronenberg, F., Algao, S.S., & Pollard, N.
(Eds.), Occupational Therapy Without Borders (pp.110-126). Edinburgh: Elsevier
Churchill Livingstone.
Supplemental Readings for Projects
Asagary, R. (2011). Barriers to health care access among refugee asylum seekers. Journal of
Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 22:506-522.
Bass-Haugen, J.D. (2009). Health disparities: Examination of evidence relevant for occupational
therapy. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63 (1), pp. 24-34.
Birks, M.J., Chapman, Y., & Francis, K. (2007). Breaching the wall: Interviewing people from
other cultures. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 18 (2), pp.150-156
Bonder, B.R., Martin, L., & Miracle, A.W., Culture Emergent in Occupation. American Journal
of Occupational Therapy, 2004. 58(2): 159-168.
Braveman, B. & Suarez-Balcazar (2009). Social justice and resource utilization in a communitybased organization: A case illustration of the role of occupational therapy. American
Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63 (1), pp. 13-23.
Griswold, K., Zayas, L.E., Kerman, J.B., & Wagner, C.M. (2007). Cultural awareness through
medical student and refugee patient encounters. Journal of Immigrant Health, 9:55-60.
Koomor, J.A. (2009). Trauma-and attachment-informed sensory integration assessment and
intervention. Special Interest Section Quarterly, Sensory Integration, 32(4).
Taylor, R.R., Braveman, B., & Hammel, J. (2004). Developing and evaluating
community-based services through participatory action research: Two case examples.
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58(1), 73-82.
4
Townsend, E., Stone, S.D., Angelucci, T., Howey, M., Johnston, D., & Lawlor, S. (2009).
Linking occupation and place in community health. Journal of Occupational Science, 16
(1), pp. 50-55.
EVALUATION FOR ASSIGNMENTS
Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD
F
Percent
95-100
90-94
87-89
83-86
80-82
77-79
73-76
70-72
60-69
59 or below
Total Points
190-200
180-188
174-178
166-172
160-164
154-158
146-152
140-144
120-138
< 118
GRADED ASSIGNMENTS
Points
Percent of
Total Grade
10
5%
2/4
Interview with Staff/Provider Report (group
assignment)
20
10%
Friday
2/28
Participant Observer report (individual
assignment)
20
10%
3/7 (Friday)
10
5%
50
30
group
evaluation
10
individual
contribution
25%
3/4
3/14
(Friday)
15%
(group)
5%
(individual)
20
10%
4/22
Interprofessional exchange with PT students
10
5%
4/29
Oral presentation of project
20
10%
Peer review 1-3
Total
0
200
0
100%
5/2
3/11 &
4/29
Assignment
Written response to questions (Scaffa on Ch 1
& 5) (Individual assignment)
Logic model assignment (group assignment)
Project proposal and literature review (group
assignment)
Implementation of group session: minimum of
three sessions with one being observed by
course instructor
Written summary & critique of implementation
of group sessions
Due Date
3/24-4/25
5
REQUIREMENT
Use of UBLearns
All students must access http://ublearns.buffalo.edu for assignments and seminar materials. Students are
expected to log onto ublearns frequently in order to be up to date on course requirements, online readings
and changes in schedule. Instructors will only use the university email when communicating with
students; private email addresses are not recognized.
Use of Technology in Class
The instructors encourage the use of technology to enhance the learning environment. Technology that is
misused in the classroom or lab will be considered a disruption. Misuse of technology includes: using cell
phones, text messaging, tweeting, answering emails, or using the computer/smart phone/I Pad for
activities not immediately related to class work. Students will be warned once during the semester about
using technology inappropriately and after that they will be asked to leave the classroom for that session.
Students are responsible to make up the work they missed if asked to leave class or lab. If a student has a
need to be available for a phone call that is considered very important, and cannot be delayed, they may
leave the room when the phone call is received if they cleared this with the instructors first.
Peer Reviews
Students will be required to critique their group members’ participation three times during the semester.
The instructor will carefully consider students’ ratings from their peers when calculating the final grade.
Note: if a student receives a peer review by their group members that indicates the rated student has been
unavailable and unprepared for meetings, demonstrates lack of interest, and/or poor participation with the
group project assignment, the instructors will examine if the situation can be remediated and will discuss
this with all members of the group. If the situation is beyond remediation, the student may be required to
complete their project independently.
COMMUNITY BASED CONTACTS
Community contacts should include all members within each group including the interview and
session implementation.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
No unexcused absences from class are permitted. It is expected that students attend all scheduled class
sessions as well as keep track of their time spent on site at the selected community-based setting where
they are developing their project. Students are expected to be available during class times even when class
is not in formal session. This time is reserved for instructor student contacts and student to student group
meetings.
LATE/INCOMPLETE ASSIGNMENTS
No late assignments will be accepted by the instructors unless the student has obtained prior approval for
an agreed upon alternate due date. If the student fails to submit an assignment on this approved alternate
due date, the late assignment will not be read by the instructors and the student will earn a zero grade for
it. Assignments may only be submitted once. Additions to the assignment are not accepted either online
or in class. Students are encouraged to review their final assignment prior to submission since the first
submission will be the version that is graded.
COURSE EVALUATION
All students are requested to participate in the online course evaluation at the end of the semester. One
aspect of professionalism is to offer constructive feedback on a course and make this available to the
instructors. Useful student input will assist the instructors in improving the course for future classes.
Please take the time to participate in the online course evaluation as a professional courtesy.
6
ACCOMMODATION POLICY
A student who has a disability that requires special accommodations must contact one of the instructors
during the first two class sessions in order to arrange for assistance in obtaining instructional support.
The student who needs accommodations is strongly encouraged to register his/her needs with the Office
of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, University at Buffalo, phone: 645-2608.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the
Occupational Therapy Program and University policy. This may include receiving a grade of 0 for an
assignment and/or failure in a course.
Statement of Academic Integrity
It is the conviction and a guiding principle of the Occupational Therapy Program, Department of
Rehabilitation Science that education is concerned with the development of personal character as well as
the acquisition of knowledge and skills. It is further the belief of the University that each individual bears
the primary responsibility for his or her own ethical behavior.
Because of these beliefs, it is the intent of the Program to encourage and to do all that is possible to
support a high standard of ethical behavior. It is incumbent upon all faculty, students, and staff of the
Occupational Therapy Program to maintain the fullest commitment to academic integrity.
The following actions constitute major forms and examples of academic dishonesty among students:
1. Submission: to satisfy academic requirements or material previously submitted in
whole or substantial in part in another course, without prior and expressed consent of
the instructor.
2. Plagiarism: copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material
as one's own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic ideas) or otherwise representing the work of another as one's
own.
3. Cheating: receiving information from another student or other unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
4. Falsification of academic materials: fabricating laboratory materials, notes or reports,
forging the instructor's name or initials, or submitting a report, paper, materials, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
5. Procurement, distribution, or acceptance of academic materials: such as examinations,
laboratory results or confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of
the instructor.
7
Course Schedule
Date
1/28 Groups A & B
meet in DFN 5
2/4 Groups A & B
meet in DFN 5
2/11 Group
meetings with
instructors as
assigned
Topic
Course introduction
Group Assignments
Group discussion on Scaffa chapter assignment
Discuss progress in contacting community-based sites
Discuss progress in contacting community-based sites &
interview assignment
2/18 Group
meetings with
instructors as
assigned
Discuss participant observation assignment
Discuss literature review for project proposal
2/25 Groups A & B
meet in DFN 5
Guest Lecturer: Dr. John Stone
Topic: Grants & Funding
Progress report
Discuss ideas for proposal and implementation
3/4 Group meetings
with instructors as
assigned
Progress report
Discuss ideas for proposal and implementation
3/11 Group
meetings with
instructors as
assigned
3/18
4/8
4/11 (Friday)
Glen E. Gresham Visiting Professor in Rehab Science:
Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy: A Family of
Neurorehabilitation that Harness the Plasticity of the
Nervous System
4/1
Review project
Determine groups for
community-based projects
Read OTPF: available on
UBlearns or AOTA website
Written assignment due on
Chap 1 & 5 from Scaffa due
2/4
Email group site selection for
approval (send to both
instructors)
Interview Assignment Due
Friday 2/28
Group progress report for
community sites
Logic model for project due
3/4
Participant Observation
Report Due Friday 3/7 by
4:00 pm
Peer review #1 due 3/11
Proposal & Literature Review
Due Friday 3/14
Spring break: no class
Community-based program implementation: course
instructor attends onsite session (no in class session)
Community-based program implementation: course
instructor attends onsite session (no in class session)
Community-based program implementation: course
instructor attends onsite session (no in class session)
3/25
Assignments
Attendance required
8
Community-based program implementation: course
instructor attends onsite session (no in class session)
4/15
4/22
Community-based program implementation: course
instructor attends onsite session (no in class session)
4/29
Written summary & critique
of implementation of group
sessions due 4/22
Peer review #2 due 4/29
Interprofessional Presentation with PT students
Friday 5/2
1:00-4:30
190 Kapoor
Final project presentations
9
Applied Neurophysiological Processes
OT 510
Fall 2013 – 3 units for Lecture and 1 unit for Lab
Course Instructor: Mary A. Matteliano PhD, OTR/L
Telephone: 829- 6728
Office: Kimball 624
email:
[email protected]
Teaching Assistants: Laura Lederhouse: [email protected]
Ashley Dudek: [email protected]
Lecture: Monday 8:00-9:20 Crosby 301
Thursday 1:00-2:20 DFN 2
Lab: Friday Lab A: 9:00-10:50
Lab B: 11:00-12:50
Office Hours: Thursday: 2:30-3:30
DFN 7
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course introduces students to clinical theories and techniques that utilize neurophysiological
concepts in the treatment of neurophysiological dysfunction. Application to occupational therapy
using selected activities of work, play, and self-care are included. A life-span approach that
emphasizes treatment for neurological conditions affecting pediatric, adult, and aging
populations is incorporated into teaching and practice modules. A lecture and lab format is
followed with additional practicum experiences.
RELATIONSHIP TO THE CURRICULUM DESIGN:
This course follows a two semester sequence in neuroscience and integrates information from
that sequence and applies it to clinical practice. This is one of three courses offered by the
Occupational Therapy program that addresses the role of the occupational therapist in restoring
function to patients with physical limitations or dysfunction. The other courses are Orthotics and
Prosthetics, OT 450, and Occupational Therapy in Physical Dysfunction, OT 508. The nature of
the subject matter distributed within these three courses is both theoretical and applied, relying
on basic and medical science courses as prerequisites.
COURSE OUTLINE:
A. Course Objectives:
Accreditation Standards Addressed by the Course:
Standard
B.2.8
B.4.2
B.4.4 &
B. 5.1
1
Objective # from Syllabus
Addressing the Standard
Practice safe handling of clients
when applying therapeutic
interventions
Chooses appropriate assessments
according to client needs
Evaluates and develops a treatment
plan based on client’s occupational
profile, client factors, performance
patterns, context and performance
Instructional Methods
Assessment Measure
Videos, assigned readings,
lab demonstrations
Lab practical exam and
competencies
Article reviews, assigned
readings, lab demonstration
Observations, lab
demonstrations, lecture
instruction
Exams, quizzes, case studies
Case studies, treatment
plans, exams, literature
review and term paper
skills
Standard
B.5.2
B.5.3
B.5.6
B.5.12
B.5.20
B.8.3
Objective # from Syllabus
Addressing the Standard
Provide interventions that improve
client performance in ADL, IADL,
work, play, leisure and social
participation
Understand the use of activity,
therapeutic procedures, and
application for neurologically based
conditions in adults and children
Provide remediation for
neurological conditions for adults
and children including application
of entry-level skills for basic
competencies in sensorimotor
approaches, application and
assessment utilizing Brunnstrom,
Neurodevelopmental Treatment,
Proprioceptive Neuromuscular
Facilitation, Rood and motor control
theories.
Demonstrate the ability to apply
motor control techniques into
occupation-based activities to
enhance functional mobility.
Demonstrate effective therapeutic
interaction skills and documentation
with clients, client families and
other health professionals
Demonstrate the ability to find the
best evidence for a particular
treatment approach based on current
research literature
Instructional Methods
Assessment Measure
Class discussion, assigned
readings, observations, lab
practice
Case studies, observed
treatment sessions, lab
practical exam
Observations, practice in lab,
video and various forms of
media
Case studies, observed
treatment sessions, lab
practical exam
Practice in lab, video, lecture,
observations
Exams, competencies, lab
practical exam
Practice in lab, video, lecture
Exams, competencies, lab
practical exam
Practice in lab, videos,
lecture, observations
Competencies, lab practical
exam
Literature review activity,
class discussion, term paper
assignment
Term paper, exams
B. Methods of Instruction:
Reading, lecture, video, literature review and discussion, case studies, lab visits from patients,
clinical competencies and hands-on lab activities will be used as methods of learning in this
course.
C. Textbooks
Davies, P.M. (1993). Steps to follow. New York: Springer-Verlag.
Gutman, S.A., Schonfeld, A.B. (2009). Screening Adult Neurologic Populations: A step-bystep instruction manual, (2nd ed.). Bethesda: AOTA Press (shared with OT 508)
Radomski, M.V., Latham Trombly, Catherine, A. (Eds.). (2008). Occupational Therapy for
Physical Dysfunction, (6th ed.). Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
(shared with OT 508)
2
D. Required Student Activities:







Preparation for lab and lecture by completing reading assignments
Submit one evidence-based literature review and lead an online discussion (group effort)
Participate in online class discussions on evidence-based literature review (individual)
Attend class and participate in lab activities
Take two exams
Work on required quizzes/case studies and lab competencies
Write a term paper on selected approach and provide rationale for approach based on
evidence from the literature
E. Evidence-Based Literature Review
Student groups are required to write one article review based the evidence available for their
term paper project approach. The article review papers must be submitted by the due date.
Student groups who share the same topic are expected to post their discussion questions and lead
an online discussion on their article. The article review assignment details are available on
UBlearns.
F. Basis for Grading
STUDENT EVALUATION FOR LECTURE
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
D
F
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
63-69.99%
< 63%
Total Points
274-295
266-273
257-265
245-256
236-244
227-235
207-226
186-206
185 or <
Please be aware that grades are not rounded-up.
COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & EXAMS
Test Date or Due Date
Exam 1
Exam 2
Article Review
Online Discussion
Term Project
Total Points
3
October
December
Assigned
November
Points
10
100
TBA 100
10
5
10
80
295
Percent
34%
34%
3%
2%
27%
100%
EXAMINATIONS
There will be two examinations consisting mostly of multiple-choice questions and some T-F
questions, fill in the blanks, or short answers. There are no make-up exams, except with
excused absences (major illness, or death in family) and at the discretion of the instructor.
Missed exams due to extra-curricular activities must be discussed with the instructor at least
two weeks before the exam.
TERM PROJECT
The term project is an assigned paper that discusses the evidence and rationale for the
treatment of a particular neurophysiological disorder. Students will choose a treatment
approach in class. The major portion of the paper should discuss the relevant research
on the approach, its effectiveness and/or limitations, and support clinical evidence (or
lack of evidence—as applicable). This paper should cite literature to support the
approach. Students are required to be able to access the AOTA evidence based website
for supporting research.
The basis for this paper is to examine a neurophysiological approach. That approach will be
assigned through a lottery selection in class. At least 4 journal article references and one
textbook should be cited and if available, include an evidence based review. Copies of
the journal articles must be submitted to the professor on the due date (PDF online).
Students will prepare for this assignment by writing a group article review based on their
chosen approach and present it for discussion online. Details of the assignment are to be
posted. Students may use their chosen article for their final term paper. The final paper
should be no longer than seven pages (the title page and reference page are in addition to the
seven pages of text). Points will be taken off for papers longer than seven pages.
The assignment is to be typed, and double-spaced and formatted according to the APA
manual guidelines. APA guidelines regarding, paraphrasing, referencing, plagiarism, and
style should be followed. The assignment is due on Sunday, Nov. 10, and should be
submitted on that date on UBlearns by 11:59 pm. PDFs of articles should be attached to the
assignment. Late papers will be deducted 5 points per day. Papers are considered late if
they are received after the due date. Papers that are submitted with gross spelling,
grammatical, and APA format errors will be returned to the student for correction with 10
points deducted. Students are strongly encouraged to read each other’s papers and work in
groups on APA format. The grade for this assignment is final; the instructor will not
allow exceptions including requests for re-submission or negotiation over points. Given
that, the grade is final once submitted, students are encouraged to work on this project over
the course of the semester and meet with the instructor as needed. The instructor will meet
with students and discuss the assignment but will not correct or read drafts of the assignment
prior to submission. See UBlearns for grading rubric
4
STUDENT EVALUATION FOR LAB
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
D
F
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
63-69.99%
< 63%
Total Points
149-160
144-148
139-143
133-138
128-132
123-127
112-122
101-111
100 or <
Please be aware that grades are not rounded-up.
LABORATORY ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS
Test Date or Due Date
Practical
Nov. 4-8
Lab Competencies
Lab Assignments:
Quizzes, Reviews, or Case Studies
Total Points
Points
Percent
80
10
70
50%
6%
44%
160
100%
LAB QUIZZES & ASSIGNMENTS
There are seven lab assignments throughout the semester for a total of 70 points or 44% of
students’ grade. Quizzes and assignments may be online or in class. Before the quiz, the format
will be announced. There are no make-ups for quizzes if they are online. If they are in class and
the student has a legitimate excuse, one make-up will be provided.
LAB COMPETENCIES
Students will be asked two times throughout the semester to demonstrate competency with a
technique or pattern learned in lab. This will occur randomly throughout the semester. Usually
the student will be asked to perform this during lab time before the end of the session. Each
competency is worth a total of 5 points. The competency-scoring sheet can be found on UBlearns
under the assignment section. Students will be asked to show competency on any material that
has been covered in lab up to and including the last lab. Re-takes on competencies are not
permitted.
5
LAB PRACTICAL
Students are expected to prepare for the lab practical throughout the semester. Since the assigned
lab time does not allow students the time needed to perfect their ability to demonstrate
competency with neurophysiological techniques, students are expected to practice and review
material outside of the lab setting. This means and it is recommended that they attend open labs.
Teaching assistants will be available for open lab only if students sign up. Students are expected
to be considerate of the teaching assistants and instructor’s schedules (i.e. students should not
wait until the week of the lab practical to contact the instructor and teaching assistants for help)
and keep in mind that the material is best understood and retained when it is practiced throughout
the semester. A student fails the lab practical if they receive a grade below 70% or 56/80 points.
If a student fails, they will be allowed to remediate once. If they pass the remediation, both
practical scores will be averaged into the final practical grade. Students must pass the lab
practical in order to pass the lab. Students automatically fail the lab practical if they demonstrate
a gross neglect of safety awareness or if they try to help a partner when they are being tested
(cheating). Note: Every effort will be made to schedule the lab practicals during the normal
classroom and lab times (Monday, Thursday and Friday’s scheduled times) however, it
may be necessary to fill in gaps during times when students are not scheduled for regular
classes. The instructor will have students sign up at least 2 weeks prior to the lab practical
in order to accommodate student schedules as best as possible.
G. OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Class Attendance
Class attendance is expected according to the schedule. There are times the class will meet online
and times the class will meet in person. Students will be notified through UBlearns regarding
their class schedule. Please ask questions in class if the material is unclear or you do not
understand. Please feel free to make an appointment to see the instructor if you are having
difficulties with the material or have questions or want to make a comment about the class. If a
student has a legitimate excuse to miss a class or lab, it is expected that they contact the
instructor in advance (e.g. the beginning of the semester or at least 2-3 weeks in advance) and
make arrangements to make up the work. If a student has an emergency or becomes ill and needs
to miss class they should email the instructor and explain their absence.
UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, classroom handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are
responsible for printing out handouts for classroom/lab use before class/lab is in session.
Dress Code for Lab:
Labs are active and students must dress in a manner that allows for palpation, facilitation, and
flexibility. That means that clothing that is too tight or too cumbersome is not conducive to lab
interaction therefore, the dress code requires that students wear:

6
Clothing that they can move in (no jeans or tight pants). Gym shorts that sit at the waist
and are not more than 3-4 in above the knee or,

Sweat pants or scrub pants that sit at the waist and are loose

T shirts that have a crew collar and are long enough to tuck in

If it is cold you can wear a sweatshirt over your t shirt but be prepared to take off the
sweat shirt for lab activities
Students who come to lab wearing clothing that restricts their movement or clothing that is
immodest will receive one warning, after that they will be required to leave the lab for that
session. Inappropriate clothing is considered to be the following: any dress that reveals
cleavage or underwear or that exposes low back tattoos and belly buttons.
Exams and Assignments
Students are responsible for submitting assignments on time. Unless discussed with me prior to
the due date, any assignments turned in late will not be accepted.
No make-up exams will be offered unless a legitimate excuse is provided (i.e. Note from
physician).
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
TECHNOLOGY
The instructor encourages the use of technology to enhance the learning environment.
Technology that is misused in the classroom or lab will be considered a disruption. Misuse of
technology includes: using cell phones, text messaging, tweeting, answering emails, or using the
computer/smart phone/I Pad for activities not immediately related to class work. Students will
be warned once during the semester about using technology inappropriately and after that they
will be asked to leave the classroom for that session. Students are responsible to make up the
work they missed if asked to leave class or lab. If a student has a need to be available for a phone
call that is considered very important, and cannot be delayed, they may leave the room when the
phone call is received if they cleared this with the instructor first.
7
DISABILITY POLICY
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide
you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Academic integrity is a fundamental university value. Through the honest completion of
academic work, students sustain the integrity of the university while facilitating the university’s
imperative for the transmission of knowledge and culture based upon the generation of new and
innovative ideas.
When an instance of suspected or alleged academic dishonesty by a student arises, it shall be
resolved according to the following procedures. These procedures assume that many questions of
academic dishonesty will be resolved through consultative resolution between the student and the
instructor.
It is recommended that the instructor and student each consult with the department chair, school
or college dean, or the Office of the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education if there are any
questions regarding these procedures.
Examples of Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:




8
Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or
individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s
authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or
any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible
for the assignment.




9
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
H. Outline of the Content
Date
Lecture Topic
(Monday &
Thursday)
Aug. 19, 22 &
23
Aug. 26, 29 &
30
Sept. 2, 5 & 6
Sept. 9, 12 & 13
Readings and Assignments Instructor
Lab Topic
(Friday)
Matteliano
Normal movement
patterns and
components
Equilibrium/Right
ing Reactions
Matteliano
Brunnstrom
evaluation: Reflex
testing
Matteliano
Brunnstrom
techniques
Davies: chap.1&3, 4&5 (lab &
lecture)
Radomski: chap. 24 (lecture)
Davies: chap. 6, 7, 8 (lab)
Davies: chap. 10, 11, 12, 14,
16 (lab and lecture), Online
handouts
Matteliano
NDT techniques
Matteliano
NDT & Pusher
Syndrome
Internet class on
8/19 & 8/22
Overview of
Neurorehab &
Movement
Lab meets 8/23
Online assignment and review
due 8/24 (10.5 pts) Radomski:
chap.6 (pp. 186-201) (lecture
material)
Discussion on
neuroscience
Motor control
theories
Brunnstrom:
Movement
Patterns in
Hemiplegia
Labor Day (9/2)
& Rosh
Hashanah (9/5):
no class
Quiz 2:
Brunnstrom
NDT lecture
Radomski: chap. 25 (pp. 667689)
Choose topic for term paper
Review Fugl-Meyer, MAS
Davies: chap. 2 (lab)
Sept. 16, 19 &
20
Quiz 3: NDT
NDT lecture
Sept. 23, 26 &
27
Rood
Radomski: chap. 26 (pp.690697)
Online Supplement
Matteliano
Rood Techniques
Sept. 30, Oct. 3
&4
Oct. 7, 10 & 11
Quiz 4: Rood
Pediatric NDT
Review 10/7
Midterm Exam
(10/10) (students
may need extra
time past 2:30)
PNF techniques
Online handouts
Tona
Pediatric
techniques
Hands on Lab:
neuro patient visit
& case study
assignment (10
pts) due 10/18
PNF techniques
Quiz 5: PNF
Motor Control
Radomski: chap. 22 & 23 (pp.
598-618)
Oct. 14, 17 & 18
Oct. 21, 24 & 25
10
Matteliano
Radomski: chap. 26 (pp.697713)
Matteliano
PNF techniques
Date
Lecture Topic
(Monday &
Thursday)
Readings and Assignments Instructor
Lab Topic
(Friday)
Oct. 28, 31 &
Nov. 1
Quiz 6: Motor
Control
Shoulder/Hand
Syndrome and
CRPS: Tx and
Evidence
Lab Practicaldates TBA
Online handouts
Open lab review
Nov 4, 7 & 8
Nov. 11, 14 &
15
Nov.18, 21 & 22
Nov. 25, 28 &
29
Dec. 2, 5 & 6
Dec 9 (exam
week)
11
Lab Practical
Term paper due:
Nov. 10
Level I Fieldwork
Level 1 Fieldwork
No Class
Fall Break
CIMT lecture
Online handouts
Article Review
on CIMT
Final Exam (date TBA)
Matteliano &
Guest
Lecturers
CIMT & Motor
Control
Assessments
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 511
APPLICATION OF THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUES
Fall 2013
2 Credits
Location:
Day/Times:
Diefendorf 7
*Some classes will meet off-site
Lab A: Monday 4:30-8:20
Lab B: Wednesday 4:30-8:20
*Some classes will meet at other times
Instructor
Michael Koch, MS, OTR
Office
Diefendorf 7
Office Hours
By appointment will meet with students following class
E-Mail
[email protected]
Cell Phone
(716) 200-6438 Prefer text if possible or e-mail (if not urgent)
Teaching
Assistants
Sujata Nair (Monday and Wednesday), Majd Jarrar (Monday)
Sutanuka Bhattacharjya (Wednesday, as needed)
COURSE DISCRIPTION
The goal of occupational therapy is to maximize the degree of independence of individuals in their
preferred life roles and their environment. The topics addressed in OT 511 all relate directly to
individual life role categories. Topics covered include: occupation based activity, transfers , bed
mobility, ADLs, wheelchair evaluation for proper positioning, driver evaluations and adaptations,
environmental assessment and adaptation, physical agent modalities, community resources, acute
care, complementary therapies, wellness, patient/family education.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 352 Assistive Technology
OT 342 Neuroscience
OT 344 Neuroanatomy
COURSE RATIONALE
Through this course, students develop competency in a variety of intervention approaches
including physical agent modalities, functional transfers, complementary therapies, and client and
caregiver education needed to function in a physical disability setting.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course serves to develop knowledge of occupational therapy practice skills that integrate with
OT 508 Physical Disabilities Practice and supplement assistive technology content in OT 544:
Applied Treatment in Pediatrics, and OT 361: Functional Anatomy.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION, AND ASSESSMENT
ACOTE
Instructional
Learning Objectives
Standard
Method
After completion of this course the student will be
able to:
1. Analyze performance skills and patterns
B.2.2.
Reading
needed for the client’s engagement in activities of B.2.7.
Lecture
daily living, work and play/leisure and
Discussion
understand how the context(s), activity demands,
Site Visitation,
and client factors affect occupational
Video
performance.
2. Grade and adapt purposeful activity
(occupation) for therapeutic intervention. B.2.7.
3. Teach health and prevention strategies to
B.5.5
clients including the geriatric population and their B.5.12.
families/caregivers. B.5.20. 4. Explain the difference between remedial and
B.2.11.
compensatory strategies and demonstrate clinical
reasoning skills as part of the decision process. Assessment
Method
Quizzes
Assignments
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation
Video Quizzes
Assignments Quizzes
Assignments Quizzes
Assignments 5. Demonstrate safe and effective application of
superficial thermal and mechanical modalities as
preparatory measure to improve occupational
performance, including foundational knowledge,
underlying principles, indications,
contraindications, and precautions.
B.5.15.
Quizzes
Competencies 6. Explain the use of deep thermal and
electrotherapeutic modalities as a preparatory
measure to improve occupational performance,
including indications, contraindications, and
precautions. 7. Demonstrate competency with all of the
following: wheelchair evaluation, bed mobility,
functional transfers, physical agent modalities,
ADLs, ADL aides, and vital signs.
B.5.16.
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation Quizzes
Competencies B.2.8.
B.5.2.
B.5.10.
B.5.13.
B.5.24.
Reading
Lecture
Discussion
Site Visitation Competencies
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.2.2. B.2.7. B.2.8. B.2.11. B.5.2. B.5.5. B.5.10. B.5.12. B.5.13. B.5.15. B.5.16. B.5.20. Explain the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including the
interaction of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns,
activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors. Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills,
performance patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and
client factors to formulate an intervention plan. Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety
regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the
setting and scope of practice. Analyze, synthesize, and apply models of occupational performance. Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and
procedures to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance
in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and
social participation. Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management
and maintenance, home management, and community and work
integration. Articulate principles of and be able to design, fabricate, apply, fit, and
train in assistive technologies and devices (e.g., electronic aids to
daily living, seating and positioning systems) used to enhance
occupational performance and foster participation and well-being. Provide recommendations and training in techniques to enhance
functional mobility, including physical transfers, wheelchair
management, and mobility devices. Provide recommendations and training in techniques to enhance
community mobility, including public
transportation, community access, and issues related to driver
rehabilitation. Demonstrate safe and effective application of superficial thermal and
mechanical modalities as a preparatory measure to manage pain and
improve occupational performance, including foundational
knowledge, underlying principles, indications, contraindications, and
precautions. Explain the use of deep thermal and electrotherapeutic modalities as a
preparatory measure to improve occupational performance, including
indications, contraindications, and precautions. Effectively interact through written, oral, and nonverbal
communication with the client, family, significant others, colleagues,
other health providers, and the public in a professionally acceptable
manner. REQUIRED READINGS/MATERIALS
TEXTBOOK
Radomski, M.V. & Trombly Latham, C.A. (Eds.). (2008). Occupational therapy for physical
dysfunction (6th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams, & Wilkins.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Additional readings will be posted on UBLearns.
REQUIRED MATERIALS
Binder, clipboard, or folders for handouts
Measuring tape for wheelchair labs
Clothing for ADL lab (extra large is preferable)
All students will be required to wear a visable name tag (can put student ID in sleeve and clip to
front of shirt, wear student fieldwork ID tag, or wear a name sticker stating name and OT
Student)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS
Student performance will be graded on a combination of attendance, quizzes, completed
assignments, class participation, lab performance, and completing competency in performance
of practice skills.
GRADING
Quizzes x 3 (taken during class)
Competencies x 8 (completion of practice skills in lab)
Assignments x 11 (completed at home and handed in at
the beginning of lab, unless it is an in-class assignment)*
Oral Exam/Final Presentation
Attendance/Lab Participation
Total
10 points each
5 points each
5 points each
5 points
26 points
156 PointsTotal
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION:
Letter
Grade A A- B+ B B- C+ Percentage Letter Grade Percentage 93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
77-79.99%
C
CD+
D
F
73-76.99% 70-72.99% 67-69.99% 63-66.99% < 63% CLASS POLICIES
CLASS ATTENDANCE AND ABSENCES:
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or text). Please be aware that an absence from class under these
circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all
information covered in class regardless of attendance.
EXAMS AND FINAL EXAM:
Students are expected to attend all exams and quizzes on time. Failure to attend an exam will
result in a grade of 0 for that exam. Students should contact the instructor within 24 hours if a
medical emergency precludes exam attendance. Written documentation will be required and
accommodations, including alternate exams, may be made at the discretion of the instructor.
COMMUNICATION (E-MAIL & UB LEARNS):
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to
every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through
your UB e-mail account and you must clearly identify yourself. All e-mail communication must be
written in letter-format, using proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails
will be accepted. All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts,
and announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for
printing handouts for classroom use.
INCOMPLETE GRADES:
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
LATE ASIGNMENTS:
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit
the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of .25 points per day
that the assignment is late. Assignments more than 3 days late will not be accepted.
LAB REQUIREMENTS:
Students are expected to participate in all lab activities. Students must wear name tags or
appropriate identification with clear name and title (OT Student). Examples include student ID in
sleeve and clip to front of shirt, student fieldwork ID tag, or wear a name sticker stating name and
OT Student. Students who come to lab wearing clothing that restricts their movement or clothing
that is immodest will receive one warning, after that they will be required to leave the lab for that
session. Inappropriate clothing is considered to be the following: any clothing that reveals
cleavage or underwear or that exposes low back tattoos and belly buttons. Students are expected to
adhere to a professional dress code, as described in the student handbook and on UBLearns.
Students are also expected to display professional behaviors, including timeliness, appropriate
discussions, and maintaining confidentiality of all that is observed
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate
(http://undergrad-catalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate
(http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php) catalog for the complete policy on incomplete
grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor may
set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If
an earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for
which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course.
Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start
of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate
in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, 645-2608,
http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first week of
class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with
the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an
assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the websites
listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course Syllabus for
suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to
the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.


Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as
one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s
own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or
individual assignment.





Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any
forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor’s
authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or
any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible
for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations
or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled
at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate assistance in
the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller knows, or has
reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic
program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
COURSE SCHEDULE
Week
1
Lab A
Mon.
8/19
Lab B
Wed.
8/21
Location/
Time
DFN 7
2
8/26
8/28
DFN 7
9/2
9/4
NO
CLASS
3
9/9
9/11
DFN 7
4
9/16
9/18
DFN 7
5
9/23
9/25
DFN 7
Topic
Reading
Assignment Due*
Introduction and
Objectives/Grading
Patient Interaction and the
Therapeutic Environment
and Selecting the
Appropriate Treatment
Wheelchair Environmental
Access and Home
Evaluation, Home Safety
Sylabus on UB
Learns
NA
T 311-316
T 826-828
T: Chapter 36
Handouts on
Ublearns, Video
In-Class
Assignment 1:
Wheelchair/
Environment
Access
LABOR DAY/ROSH
HASHANAH
OBSERVED – NO LABS
W/C: Parts, Types,
Assessment/Evaluation
(Competency 1)
NA
NA
T 427 (f16-8),
(f16-9)
T 428 (f16-10)
T 488-508
Handouts on
UBlearns
T 820-826
Handouts on
Ublearns, Video
Assignment 2:
WC Access/
Environmental
T 828-835
Assignment 3:
*QUIZ 1
Bed Positioning and
Mobility
(Competency 2)
ADL Functional Transfer
NA
6
9/30
10/2
DFN 7
7
10/7
10/9
DFN 7
8
10/14
10/16
DFN 7
9
10/21
10/23
10
10/28
10/30
11
11/4
11/6
Offsite at
ECMC
*meet at
7th floor
acute
therapy
gym 3:30
pm sharp
Offsite at
ECMC
*meet in
lobby at
Tim
Hortons at
4 pm sharp
Kimball
Hall
Rm 124
11/11
11/13
NA
11/18
11/20
NA
11/25
11/27
NA
Techniques
Kate Hahn to demonstrate
transfers and discuss ADL
routine
(Competency 3)
Practice ADL Functional
Transfer Techniques
Steve Spitz to demonstrate
transfers and discuss ADL
routine
(Competency 4)
ADLs (Practice Grooming,
Dressing Skills etc..)
(Competency 5)
Handouts on
Ublearns, Video
Bed Mobility
Handouts on
UBlearns
Assignment 4:
Transfer
Technique Part 1
T 658
(f24-20&21)
T659(f24-22)
T 797-804
Handouts on
UBlearns
T 775-797
Handouts on
UBlearns
Assignment 5:
Transfers Practice
Part 2
T 1302-03
Handouts on
Ublearns, Video
Assignment 7:
ADL Case Study
Driver Evaluation
(Linda Mullen-Colkitt,
OTR)
Outpatient OT including
BTE, Saebo, and Bioness.
T 1033
T 987
T 839-846
Handouts on
UBlearns
Assignment 8:
Acute Care
*QUIZ 3
Physical Agent Modalities
(Superficial Thermal,
Biofeedback, Ultrasound,
E-Stim) Demo/Practice
(Competency 8)
Douglas Frye, MS,PT to
discuss/demonstrate
Ultrasound and E-stim for
1st part of lab
T 542-571
Handouts on
UBlearns
Assignment 9:
Driver Evaluation
(choose 1)
LEVEL I FIELDWORK
(11/11-11/15) NO LABS
LEVEL I FIELDWORK
(11/18-11/22) NO LABS
THANKSGIVING RECESS
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
*QUIZ 2
ADLs: Adaptive Aids/
Assistive Technology
(Competency 6)
Acute Care, ICU
Vital Signs:
Blood Pressure/
Heart Rate/Pulse
Pulse Oximetry (Jennifer
Dombrowski, OTR)
(Competency 7)
Assignment 6:
ADL
NO LABS
12
12/2
12/4
DFN 7
The Selection of
Appropriate Therapeutic
Procedures to Enhance
Occupational
Performance
Handouts on
UB learns
T. 359-381
and Alternative OT
Treatment Ideas
13
12/9
12/11
DFN 7
(Exam Week) – oral
NA
exam/final presentation in
which each students speaks
for just 5 minutes on any
practical advice they have
learned during level I to help
their fellow students
followed by wrap up.
Assignment 10:
PAMs
In-Class
Assignment 11:
Selection of
Appropriate
Treatment
NA
*ECMC (Erie County Medical Center) is located at 462 Grider Street.
*In-Class Assignments are completed in class and due in class the day they are listed. All other assignments
are scheduled to be due approximately 1 week following the lecture material . There will be a folder
available to turn in assignments at beginning of class.
University at Buffalo
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT/RSC 521.ES532
Statistical Analysis: Group Design
Fall
Semester
Lecture
Units: 3
Location
Labs
205 DFN and 113 Computer lab in Kimball Tower
Date and Time
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistant
Email
Office Hours
Wednesday 4:30 -7:20 PM
Machiko R. Tomita, Ph. D.
631 Kimball Tower
829-6740
[email protected]
By appointment
Sujata Nair
[email protected] 618 Kimball Tower,
Monday 12:00 noon – 2.00 PM
Edward Seger
[email protected]
215 Kimball Tower
Tu.& Th. 10:00 – 11:00
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provide the concept of basic statistics, univariate analysis and some multivariate
statistics, that are frequently used in exercise science, nutrition, occupational therapy, physical
therapy, communication disorders, rehabilitation science, rehab medicine, nursing, and other
health related professions. This course focuses on building basic knowledge to conduct research
including plan, conduct, and interpret statistical methods necessary to quantitative study in health
issues. As part of this course, students will experience data entry, analysis, and interpretation
using SPSS 20.0, statistical software, through hands-on type projects.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
None but graduate level standing is necessary.
COURSE RATIONALE
This course will provide basic information of statistical methods with strong emphasis on
practical application in clinical research including forming hypotheses, creating simulated data,
conducting data entry and analysis, and interpreting data. This course fulfills a need for basic
statistical knowledge to critically evaluate research studies in the field of occupational therapy,
exercise and nutrition, and rehabilitation science. To optimize learning effectiveness, both
individual and group approaches are applied.
1
University at Buffalo
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course is designed for advanced Master’s occupational therapy students, Master’s level of
exercise and nutrition students, and Ph.D. students for rehabilitation science who have only
limited statistical background.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
Identify and compare different research
design
ES1
Reading
Lecture
Assignment
Exam
Form hypotheses that can be analyzed using
statistics
N1, N2
Reading
Lecture
Assignment
Exam
Examine different quantitative data
collection and analysis techniques and be
able to choose the most appropriate
analytical method for a given problem
ES1, N2
Reading
Lecture
Assignment
Exam
Determine sample size
ES1
Interpret analyzed data to answer hypothesis
N2
Present the statistical analysis in written and
aural forms
ES2
Reading
Lecture
Reading
Lecture
Reading
Lecture
Demonstrate the ability to use statistics to interpret
tests and measurements for the purpose of delivering
evidence-based practice.
OT B.1.7
Reading
Lecture
Assignment
Exam
Assignment
Exam
Aural and
written
Presentation
Exam
Understand and use basic descriptive, correlational,
and inferential quantitative statistics.
OT B.8.4.
Demonstrate the skills necessary to design a scholarly
proposal that includes the research question, relevant
literature, sample, design, measurement, and data
analysis.
OT B.8.6
Reading
Lecture
Reading
Lecture
Exam
Aural
Presentation
ACOTE STANDARDS
1
Conduct, with some supervision, a clinical research study (Competency).
2
Intelligently interpret and utilize in clinical practice the OT clinical literature
(Competency).
2
University at Buffalo
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
EXERCISE SCIENCE MS COMPETENCE
1
Clinically analyze relevant scientific literature (Competency 11).
2
In oral or written form, communicate ideas and exchange constructive
criticisms. (Competency 12).
NUTRITION MS COMPETENCE
1
Evidence of and for causality, develop hypotheses (Competency 1a.)
2
Acknowledge statistical method (Competency 1b).
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK (Suggested)
Andy Field, Discovering Statics Using SPSS, 3rd edition ($57.24 in Amazon, or lower)
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
1. Check UB Learns and be ready for next statistics and SPSS session
2. Attend lecture (individual) 12 times
If you cannot attend, send me email for the reason of absence. If it is legitimate
such as sickness, accident, family emergency, the point will not be deducted.
3. Take 2 exams (individual)
4. Submit 7 assignments (group of 2)*
5. Submit 9 SPSS in-class assignments (individual)*
6. Conduct 2 group projects and presentation (group of 4)*
7. Active class participation (individual)
* Late submission will not be accepted, unless there is a legitimate reason.
GRADING
Lecture attenance @1x11=11 points (individuel)
SPSS lab (in-class) assignment @ 2 X9=18 points (individual)
Take home assignment @ 3 X 9=27 points (group of 2)
2 group project content & presentation @7 X 2=14 points (group of 4)
2 exams @ 13 X 2=36 points (individual)
Course evaluation2 points
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
A
B+
B
Percentage
90.00 - 100
85.00 – 89.99
80.00 – 84.99
Letter Grade
C
D
F
3
Percentage
70.00 – 74.99
60.00 – 69.99
0 – 59.99
University at Buffalo
C+
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
75.00 – 79.99
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
For legitimate absence (own illness and unavoidable emergency), contact to the instructor via email prior or phone prior to class should be made to earn points. Non-legitimate absence will not
earn a point. Being late for class for 15 minutes or more will not earn a point. Repeating 3
tardiness will be considered as one time absence.
Exams and Final Exam
If an exam cannot be taken at a scheduled time with a legitimate reason, an arrangement to take
it earlier can be done.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
The instructor will make announcement using UB Learns and E-mail. Students are responsible
for check the announcement.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will not be given with the exception of own illness and unavoidable
emergency with the proof.
Late Assignments
Late submission for assignments and group projects will not earn any points.
Lab Requirements
Each lab requires submission of in-class task. If absent, in-class task should be completed with
an TA.
Use of cell phone and Internet
Not allowed. If you must, talk to the Instructor prior to class. Use of such technologies during
class will lose 2 points each time.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
4
University at Buffalo
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
COURSE SCHEDULE
* Subject to change
Topic
Required Readings/Assignments
5
University at Buffalo
OT/RSC 521, ES 532 Fall, 2013
Topic
Required Readings/Assignments
SPSS 1 in class assignment
(descriptive stats)
9/4
9/11
W2
Introduction
Types of statistics
Descriptive Statistics
No class
Hypothesis formation and
Inferential statistics
9/18
w3
9/25
W4
Independent t-test
Mann-Whitney test (Nonpar)
Paired t-test and nonparametric tests
Wilcoxon Singed Ranks test (Nonpar)
10/2
W5
Chi-square,
McNemar test (Nonpar)
10/9
W6
10/16
W7
10/23
W8
Presentation Group project (group of 4)
(Use t-tests, nopar, and/or chi square)
Midterm exam (week1-week5)
10/30
W9
Repeated measures ANOVA and contrast
Firedman Test (Nonpar)
11/6
W10
Mixed Design
11/13
W11
Pearson Correlation
Sparmans’ rho (Nonpar)
Regression
Review
8/28
W1
11/20
W12
11/27
12/4
W12
12/13
(F)
3:30 –
6:30P
M
No SPSS
Submit Assignment 1 (group of 2)
SPSS 2 in class assignment
(graphics)
Submit Assignment 2 (group of 2)
SPSS 3 in class assignment (t-test)
Submit Assignment 3 (group of 2)
SPSS 4 in class assignment (paired
t-tests and nonpar)
Submit Assignment4 (group of 2)
SPSS 5: in class assignment Cross
tab., Chi square, and McNemer test
One-Way ANOVA and post hoc
Karuskal-Wallis test (Nonpar)
No class – Fall recess
Presentation of project 2 (use, ANOVA,
Mixed design, correlation, and/or
regression) (Group of 4)
Final exam ( Dominantly Week 6-10)
6
Submit Assignment 5 (group of 2)
SPSS 6 in class assignment
(ANOVA
Submit Assignment 6 (group 2)
SPSS 7 in class assignment
(ANOVA)
Submit Assignment 7 (group 2)
SPSS 8 in class assignment (Mixed
design)
Submit Assignment8 (group 2)
SPSS 9 in class assignment
(correlation and regression)
Submit Assignment 9 (Group 2)
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 522
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY FOR
CLINICAL PROBLEMS
Semester
Units 4
Lecture: Tuesday 1:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Location: 631 Kimball Tower
Instructor: Machiko R. Tomita, Ph. D
Office: 631 Kimball Tower. Department of Rehabilitation Science
Telephone: (716) 829-6740
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours: By apppointment only
Teaching Assistant: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will present research procedures that have relevance to the practice of
Occupational Therapy. Emphasis will be placed on the application and interpretation of
research procedures in establishing the scientific foundation of rehabilitation and the
application of intermediate statistics. The class will incorporate seminar and practice of
statistical analysis using SPSS. Practical application of research disciplines will be made
through development of students’ research proposal.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 521 (introductory graduate level statistics course) or equivalent and familiarity with
use of SPSS
COURSE RATIONALE AND RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course, which is designed for occupational therapy students in the advanced MS
program, will provide the overall information regarding research design and methods to
develop a thesis that applies the clinical and theoretical concepts of occupational therapy.
An individual approach that requires instruction of a particular topic and development of
research proposal will be used in this course.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
1
ACOTE
Standard
Organize, collect and analyze data in a systemB.5.30
manner for evaluation of
practice outcomes. Report evaluation
results and modify practice as needed to
Instructiona Assessment
Method
Method
Practice
Written proposal
Discussion
1
University at Buffalo
2
3
4
5
6
improve client outcomes.
Use national and international resources in
B.6.6
making assessment and intervention
choices, and appreciate the influence of
international occupational therapy
contributions to education, research, and
practice
Understand the relationship between
B.8.6
measurements and statistics, calculate
appropriate sample size using power
analysis, and operate SPSS for intermediate
statistics
Participate in scholarly activities that evaluate B.8.7
professional practice (e.g., Scholarship of
Integration, Scholarship of Application,
Scholarship of Teaching and Learning).
Understand the components of a research prop B.1.1
and write and present it orally.
B.1.2
B.8.1
B.8.7
B.8.8
Demonstrate an understanding of the process B.8.9
locating and securing grants and how grants
can serve as a fiscal resource for scholarly
activities
OT 522, Spring, 2014
Ridings
Class discussion
Lecture
Written proposal
Discussion
Lecture
Lab
Exam
Written proposal
Lecture
Assignments
Discussion
Lecture
Written proposal
Discussion Aural presentation
Lecture
Class discussion
Discussion
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.1
B.1.2
B.1.9
B.4.6
B.8.1
B.8.2
B.8.6
B.8.7
B.8.8
Demonstrate oral and written communication skills.
Demonstrate logical thinking, critical analysis, problem-solving and creativi
Demonstrate the ability to use statistics, tests and measurements.
Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture, disabilit
status, and situational variables related to the individual and context.
Articulate the importance of research for practice and the continued develop
of the profession.
Be able to use professional literature to make informed practice decisions.
Demonstrate the skills necessary to design a research proposal that
includes the research question, relevant literature, sample, design,
measurement, and data analysis.
Design and implement beginning-level research studies.
Develop basic skills necessary for the publication and presentation of
research projects.
2
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Portney, L. G, and Watkins, M. P. (2008) Foundations of Clinical Research:
Applications to Practice. 3nd ed. Norwalk, CT: Applenton & Lange.
American psychological Association (2009) Publication Manual of The American
psychological Association. 6th ed. Washington DC. APA.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Provided as needed
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
1. Class attendance
2. Review of the chapter
3. Presentations for certain topic
4. Seminar attendance and report
5. Written quizzes and an examinations
6. Human Subject Tutorial completion
7. Submission of sections of a written research proposal
8. Oral presentation of research project
9. Submission of a final written research proposal
In addition to the above, students will be expected to read chapters in the required texts
and any additional readings assigned in class.
GRADING
A
90.0 – 100
B+
85.0 - 89.9
B
80.0 - 84.9
C+
75.0 - 79.9
C
70.0 - 74.9
D
60.0 - 69.9
F
0 - 59.9
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Course grading proportion
Weight
Class Attendance
13%
Absence from class is legitimate if you are sick or injured, or your
families are in an emergency situation that requires your assistance.
For these reasons, you need to sublimit a written statement written by
the witness. (Read more in Class Attendance and Absence below)
3
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
Belated class attendance more than 15 minutes will not earn a point.
Seminar Attendance (@2.5 X 4)
Submit a one-page report in the following week class.
The report should include: Title, name of presenter, date, the main
theme of the presentation. (Form is available)
Mid Term-Exam
Final Exam (Covers after the mid-term exam)
Human Subject Tutorial completion**
You should know which IRB you will submit your application, and
accordingly you choose the type of human subject tutorial.
Regular submission of thesis proposal in progress in sections of
Title, Introduction, Literature review, Hypothesis, Method-Design, Methodparticipants, Method- Instruments, Method- Procedure, Method-Analytical
Scheme, Weakness and Strength** (@6 X 2) Detailed instruction will be
given in class.
Power point presentation of research proposal draft
Final report of research paper –refined paper (end of the semester)**
Total
Active participation
* No extra point will be given to raise a grade.
10%
18%
20%
3%
12 %
6%
20%
100%
3%
CLASS POLICIES
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail account.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements prior to every class for important information and updates. Students should
frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Students are
responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use.
Use of communication device should be refrained. If this is inevitable, use silenced alarm.
Incomplete Grades
No incomplete is given for this class. Therefore, it is very important not be behind the
research proposal schedule.
Late Assignments
Points will not be given for each late submission of progress paper or SPSS projects.
Class Attendance and Absences: Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected.
In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact
the instructor prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message).
Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from
any required assignments. When absence occurs due to an emergency situation, the letter of
explanation with proof must be submitted.
4
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
Tardiness will be tolerated, if it is within 15 minutes up to two times with a legitimate
reason.
Exam: There will be no make-up exam. If you cannot take the exam on the scheduled day, it
must be taken prior to the scheduled exam day.
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course: Incomplete grades will be given only if there are
extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe documented illness) that preclude the student from
completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and
successfully passed the exam (B- or better) and assignments up until the time an incomplete is
formally requested. The student should be aware that an Incomplete in this course may
jeopardize graduating in the Spring 2009.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades: According to university policy, an interim grade of
Incomplete (“I”) may be assigned if the student has not completed all requirements for the
course. The “I” will be accompanied by a default grade (U) that will become the permanent
course grade of record if the “I” is not changed by formal notice by the instructor upon the
student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim “I” is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of “I” is to be
assigned only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade
better than the default grade; the student should have a passing average in the requirements
already completed. The instructor will provide the student specification, in writing or by
electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the “I” is not replaced by a permanent grade
within twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I” was assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an
earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an “I” grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a BS in a BS/MS program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of “I” that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision, but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all graduate courses, the default grade accompanying an interim grade of “I” will be “U”.
Neither “A”, “P” nor “S” will be assigned as a default grade.
5
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
Note from the OT Program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore,
courses for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a prerequisite course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of
“I” prior to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy: If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to
enable you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS),
25 Capen Hall, 645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class.
ODS will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable
accommodations.
Academic Integrity: Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with
severely in accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may
include a grade of zero (0) for an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
(a)
Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial part
in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
(b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
(c)
Cheating: Receiving information from another student or other unauthorized source
or giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing
an examination or individual assignment.
(d)
Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forging the instructor’s name or initials; or submitting
a report, paper, materials, computer data or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
(e)
Procurement: Distribution or acceptance of examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
6
University at Buffalo
OT 522, Spring, 2014
CLASS SCHEDULE (Subject to change)
Subject to change
# Date Lecture Topics and Assignment
1
1/28
Introduction to the course
Ch1: Concept of Clinical Research
Ch 2: The Role of Theory in Clinical
Research
Ch 3: Ethical Issues in Clinical Research
Ch 4: Principles of Measurement
Ch 31: Searching the Literature
2
2/04
Ch 5: Reliability of Measurements
Ch 26: Statistical Measures of Reliability
Statistics Review
Ch7: Asking the Research Question
Ch 8: Sampling
Appendix C
Ch 32: Writing a Research Proposal
APA format and language for scientific
writing 6.0 edition
Language for scientific writing
Consort
3
2/11
4
2/18
Ch 6: Validity of Measurements
Ch 27: Statistical Measures of Validity
5
2/25
Ch 9 Validity in Experimental Design
Ch 10: Experimental Design
Ch 11: Quasi-Experimental Design
Ch 29: Factor Analysis
6
3/04
Ch 14: Descriptive Research
Ch 15: Surveys and Questionnaires
7
3/11
Exam 1 (covers Weeks 1 – 6)
8
3/18
No class
Spring Recess
Assignment Due Dates for Research
Project and others
Decide which human subject tutorial
should be taken (social and behavioral or
biomedical)
https://www.citiprogram.org/default.asp
Decide the major advisor
Decide the topic area for a thesis
Literature review
Due for Human subject tutorial
Literature review
Class starts at 1:00 PM
Class starts at 1:00 PM
Due Proposal 1
Title, Advisor, Introduction (Problem
statement and Purpose statement,
literature review, research hypothesis/
research question
Method section- study design, sampling
7
University at Buffalo
9
3/25
10 4/01
11 4/08
12 4/15
Ch 24: Linear, multiple, nonlinear
Regression
Appendix B
Ch 29: Logistic Regression
ROC
Ch: Multivariate Analysis of Variance
Ch 16: Systematic reviews and MetaAnalysis
13 4/22
Ch 12: Single-Subject Designs
14 4/29
15 5/06
Exam 2 (mainly week 9- 13)
Presentation of Research Proposal
OT 522, Spring, 2014
Due proposal 2
Procedure
Questionnaires/instruments Analytical
scheme, expected outcome, limitation
and strength of the study
Class starts at 1:00 PM
Class starts at 1 :00 PM
8
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT530: Computer Access (#15545)
Semester Spring 2014
Credits 3 Units
Lectures Wednesday 9-11:50 AM
Location Kimball 518 (Possible Online, Off Campus)
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching Assistants
Stephen Bauer, Ph.D.
521 Kimball Tower
829-6760
[email protected]
Drop in or schedule an appointment.
N/A
COURSE DESCRIPTION
OT530 focuses on the provision of computer-based assistive technology devices (ATD) to persons with
disabilities. On completion of this course, students will: a) understand how client needs, identified
through clinical assessment, connect to appropriate computer-based ATD, b) understand the functions and
classification of computer-based ATD so as to facilitate efficient and effective service provision, c) be
introduced to computer “built-in accessibility options” (as exemplified by Microsoft™) and related
standards – and understand when such options may (or may not) benefit persons with disability, d)
observe and assess the clinical provision of computer-based AT (at the Center for Assistive Technology),
e) be introduced to emerging computer-based ATD (at the Center for Socially Relevant Computing) and
consider the impact of emerging technologies on service provision, and f) review computer-based ATD
for low vision & blindness, hearing, mobility, and communication. Course lectures will be supplemented
by standards, journal papers, and online reference materials.
RE-REQUISITE COURSES
N/A
COURSE RATIONALE
Computer based technology is pervasive and -apparently- diverse and complex. Computer-based AT
devices (ATD) have great and growing importance as clinical interventions. The apparent diversity and
complexity of computer based ATD can be substantial impediments to appropriate and effective provision
of AT services. This course shows that a) all computers comprise the same basic elements and
architectures, b) computer based ATDs fall into broad classes sharing common characteristics - thereby
greatly reducing the apparent complexity and diversity of computer based AT service provision. Students
are introduced to two “leading edge” computer based ATD topics (Microsoft Accessibility, Information
and Communication Technology). Finally, the lab and the low vision and blindness, hearing, and
communication lectures place computer based ATDs into service provision contexts. The language and
framework of the World Health Organization (2001) International Classification System on Functioning,
Disability and Health (ICF) is used throughout the course.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
OT530 is part of the AT Certificate Program.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSEMENT
Objective
1. Students will be able to use the International
Classification System on Functioning,
Disability and Health, IMPACT2, and
RESNA Guidelines in provision of AT
services.
2. Students will be able to describe computer
architectural concepts and framework, and
computer-based AT device classification.
3. Students will be able to discuss emerging
topic areas (Microsoft Accessibility,
Information and Communication
Technology). Guest lecturer.
4. Students will be able to demonstrate (in
outline) computer-based AT service
provision (for low vision, blindness, hearing
and communication AT devices. Computer
based AT services lab).
5. Students will be able to discuss primary and
secondary legislation governing different
contexts of computer based AT services.
6. Students will be able to relate human
functioning (and demographics of) to the
characteristics of computer based AT
devices.
7. Students will be able to discuss the evolution
of societal norms, legislation, and supreme
court rulings pertaining to the provision of
AT services.
ACOTE
Instructional
Section
Methods
B.3.3
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
B.5.9
Assessment
Methods
Homework, Class
Participation
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Homework, Class
Participation
B.5.20
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Homework, Class
Participation
B.6.1
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Homework, Class
Participation
Lecture; class
discussion and
activities; readings
Homework, Class
Participation
B.5.19
B.6.2
B.7.3
Homework, Class
Participation
Homework, Class
Participation
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE®) Standards and
Interpretive Guidelines (2009)
B.3.3.
Discuss how theories, models of practice, and frames of reference are used in occupational
therapy evaluation and intervention.
B.5.9.
Articulate principles of and be able to design, fabricate, apply, fit, and train in assistive
technologies and devices (e.g., electronic aids to daily living, seating systems) used to enhance
occupational performance.
B.5.19. Grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and interventions to reflect the
changing needs of the client, the sociocultural context, and technological advances.
B.5.20. Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and adaptations to the
environment that support performance, participation, and well-being.
B.6.1. Differentiate among the contexts of health care, education, community, and social systems as
they relate to the practice of occupational therapy.
B.6.2. Discuss the current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic, and
demographic factors that influence the various contexts for practice of occupational therapy.
B.7.3. Describe the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulation and
their implications and effects on practice.
References
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]
Bauer, S.M., Elsaesser, L-.J., Arthanat, S. (2011). An assistive technology device classification
based upon the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability
and Health (ICF). Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 6(3) 243–259.
Bauer, S.M., Elsaesser, L-.J. (2012). Integrating medical, assistive, and universal design products
and technologies: assistive technology device classification (ATDC). Disability and Rehabilitation:
Assistive Technology, 7(5):350-5.
Elsaesser, L-.J., Bauer, S.M. (2012). Integrating medical, assistive, and universal design products
and technologies: assistive technology services method (ATSM). Disability and Rehabilitation:
Assistive Technology, 7(4) 282-6.
Elsaesser, L-.J., Bauer, S.M., Scherer, M. (2012). Assistive technology service method (ATSM).
Technology & Disability.
Microsoft (2004). The wide range of abilities and its impact on computer technology. Author.
Retrieved from http://www.microsoft.com/enable/research/phase1.aspx.
World Health Organization (WHO) (2000). International Classification of Functioning Disability
and Health. Author.
Note: a variety of online readings will be assigned throughout the semester for the completion of
homework assignments.
Grading: Student grading will be based upon 6 homework assignments and in class participation.
Homework will be assigned about every two weeks, due two weeks after assigned and graded and
returned two weeks after that. Homework assignments will be returned using the OT530 UB Learns
digital drop box.
Activity
10 Homework (5 points each)
Exam 1 (1st half)
Exam 2 (2nd half)
Points
50
20
30
Grades: Grades will be earned based on the percentage of total points that you earn for the semester.
Letter Grade
A
B
B+
B
B-
Percentage
94-100%
90-93.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
Letter Grade
C+
C
D
F
Percentage
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
60-69.99%
<60%
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format,
using proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.

UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and
changes in assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are
responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use.
Policy Regarding Absences, Attendance, Assignments Exams and University Policy on
Incompletes in the course
 Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional
circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from
class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students
are responsible for all information covered in class regardless of attendance.
 Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and
submit a paper version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in
a loss of 1 point per day that the assignment is late.

Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that
preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all
course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an incomplete is requested.
University Policy on Incomplete Grades 2009-10
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the requirements of
a given course. Students may only be given an “I” grade if they have a passing average in coursework that
has been completed and have well-defined parameters to complete the course requirements that could
result in a grade better than the default grade. An “I” grade may not be assigned to a student who did not
attend the course.
Prior to the end of the semester, students must initiate the request for an “I” grade and receive the
instructor’s approval. Assignment of an “I” grade is at the discretion of the instructor.
The instructor must specify a default letter grade at the time the “I” grade is submitted. A default grade is
the letter grade the student will receive if no additional coursework is completed and/or a grade change
form is not filed by the instructor. “I” grades must be completed within 12 months. Individual instructors
may set shorter time limits for removing an incomplete than the 12-month time limit. Upon assigning an
“I” grade, the instructor shall provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic mail, of the
requirements to be fulfilled, and shall file a copy with the appropriate departmental office.
Students must not re-register for courses for which they have received an “I” grade
Applicable dates regarding the 12-month provision:
Courses taken in (semester):
Fall
Spring
Summer
Will default in 12 months on:
December 31
May 31
August 31
The “I” must be changed to a grade before the degree conferral date if the student plans to graduate in that
semester. At any time prior to the default date, students may elect to change the “I” grade to the default
grade using the Grade Retrieval Form.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses for
which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite course. Due to the
sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior to the start of the next
semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in this
course please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 25 Capen Hall, 645-2608, and also the
instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide you with information and review
appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the
Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for an assignment
and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to the
following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial part in another
course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
b)
c)
d)
e)
Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as one’s own
without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic idea), or
otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or giving information
to another student with intention to deceive while completing an examination or individual
assignment.
Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms of computer
data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a report, paper, materials,
computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than
the student responsible for the assignment.
Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or confidential
academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
COURSE SCHEDULE
#
Date
Description
1
1/29
Introduction, Disability, Assistive Technology, Legislation,
ICF…
2
2/5
Basic Computer Model, Elements, Examples…
3
4
5
2/12
2/19
2/26
6
3/5
7
3/12
Computer-Based ATD Framework Part I
Computer-Based ATD Framework Part II
Computer-Based ATD Framework Part III
Emerging Computer-based ATD Lecture & Lab (Buckley,
Center for Socially Relevant Computing)
Service Provision
(Assess, Baseline, Strategy, Select, Outcomes; Cases)
3/19-3/21
8
3/26
9
10
4/2
4/9
11
4/16
12
4/23
13
4/30
14
5/7
Readings
Ref [6]
pp. 1-50,
Annex 1,
Annex 2;
Ref [1]
Ref [6]
pp. 31205
(skim);
Ref [2]
To Do
W1
W2
W3
W4
Online;
Ref [3]
W5
Ref [4]
W6
SPRING RECESS
EXAM 1 (1-7)
Service Provision Lab (Oddo, Center for Assistive Technology)
Computer-based ATD Technologies Part I (Access)
Computer-based ATD Technologies Part II
(Communication, Cognitive, Mobility)
Universal Design, Accessibility, Standards…
(Separating Hype from Fact)
Emerging (Wild) Computer-based ATD
(…And why you should care!)
Online
Online
W7
W8
Online
W9
Ref [5]
W10
Online
EXAM 2 (Cumulative)
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 544
APPLIED PEDIATRICS
Fall 2013
3 Units lecture
1 Unit lab
Labs
Lecture
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Lab A: Monday 10:00-11:50
Lab B: Monday 12:00-1:50
Tues 10:00-12:50
Lab: DFN 7/8
Lecture: Kapoor 125
Janice L. Tona, Ph.D., OTR/L
625 Kimball
829-6741
[email protected]
Tuesdays 1pm-2pm – or by appointment
Sutanuka Bhattacharjya ([email protected])
Katie Saint ([email protected])
Sheng-Hui Lao – Supervised Teaching Intern ([email protected])
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The purpose of this course is to prepare students with the skills needed to work in a pediatric
setting. It is designed to focus on the impact of health limitations on a child’s occupational role
and on the family funcitoning, and to present pediatric practice with a developmental
perspective. The course offers introduction to a wide range of pediatric evaluation tools and
treatment approaches currently used in pediatric practice. Lectures focus on theory, and current
and relevant research in educational and medical based practice. Lab assignments require the
student to actively engage in evaluation, treatment planning and treatment application for various
pediatric populations. Lab activities promote learning through hands on experiences with various
pediatric evaluations and treatment approaches. Videotapes, Treatment Plans, and observations
of treatment within the community are included. Students are required to participate in class
activities, labs, and discussions, and complete assigned readings, reviews of current literature,
and group, and individual written assignments on time.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 314, OT 371, OT 381, OT 343, OT 345, OT 352
COURSE RATIONALE
Pediatric and school based occupational therapy are one of the most frequent areas of practice for
occupational therapists. This course prepares students for a level I fieldwork experience in
pediatrics, a level II fieldwork experience for students who choose, and for advanced pediatric
courses in the graduate year.
1
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course is designed to build upon the knowledge gained in previous introduction and
foundation courses on occupational-centered theoretical approaches, human growth and
development, and medical pediatric knowledge of various disabilities and delays. The emphasis
is on blending this information with specific evaluation and intervention strategies. This course
should prepare the student to apply this knowledge to practice in a variety of treatment
environments including the home, school based educational settings and medical settings. The
efficacy of OT intervention for the various pediatric populations is examined through the
students’ review of the literature.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student will
be able to:
1. Discuss and adhere to federal and state laws
and regulations pertaining to OT practice in
educational settings and documentation
requirements including formulation of
individualized family service plans for
children birth to three, individualized
education plans for preschool and school
aged children, and individualized transition
plans for adolescents transitioning to adult
roles.
2. Identify and discuss the role of the
occupational therapist, the occupational
therapy assistant, and of other team members
in various pediatric environments, the need
for interprofessional communication,
education and collaboration, and referral of
children to other professionals as
appropriate.
3. Select appropriate evidence-based evaluation
methods; administer evaluations safely,
competently, and in an unbiased manner; and
interpret and synthesize evaluation results in
accordance with referral information, the
theoretical approach, and the literature.
2
B.4.10,
5.17,
5.27, 6.2,
Reading,
Lecture, Lab
assignments
(IEP, IFSP)
IEP, IFSP,
Exam
B.2.3,
4.5, 4.9,
5.22,
5.26, 9.8
Behavioral
Intervention
plan, reading,
Lecture,
discussion
Behavioral
Intervention
Plans;
Exam
B.2.7,
2.8, 4.1,
4.2, 4.3,
4.4, 4.6,
4.7, 4.8,
Lab assignmints
Lab
observations;
Weekly lab
evaluation
scoring
submissions;
Exam
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
4. Formulate reasonable occupation- focused
goals and objectives based on the practice
setting, the child’s strengths, presenting
problems and child and family needs.
B.7.2
5. Demonstrate an understanding and apply
various models of practice and frames of
reference used in OT pediatric evaluations
and interventions including sensory
integration, neurodevelopmental therapy,
and behavioral approaches.
6. Examine the literature and develop evidencebased intervention plans that are designed for
the child’s unique strengths and needs and
which work toward the child’s stated goals
and objectives.
B.2.10,
2.11, 3.1,
3.5
7. Safely implement OT intervention using the
intervention plan as a guide while employing
a therapeutic use of self to analyze, re-assess,
adjust, adapt, grade, and modify as
necessary, intervention activities based on
the child’s performance, environment, and
the child’s and family’s needs.
8. Monitor and reassess progress, in
collaboration with the child, family and
caregivers, and discontinue OT services
when children have met their goals or
services are no longer beneficial.
B.2.7,
2.8, 5.2,
5.6, 5.7,
5.8,
B.5.24,
8.1, 8.3
B.5.25,
5.28,
5.29,
5.30,
5.31.
Reading,
Online goalwriting tutorial;
Lab
assignmints
Intervention
plans,
Lab assignmints
Exam,
Intervention
Plans
Observations
of evaluation
administration
in labs,
Intervention
Plans
Intervention
plans
Online
EvidenceBased Practice
lecture;
Intervention
Plans
Intervention
Observation of
Implementation intervention
in lab
implementation
in lab
Lecture, Lab
assign-mints
Exam,
Intervention
Plans
ACOTE STANDARDS
2.3
2.7
2.8
Articulate to consumers, potential employers, colleagues, third-party payers, regulatory boards,
policymakers, other audiences, and the general public both the unique nature of occupation as viewed by
the profession of occupational therapy and the value of occupation to support performance, participation,
health, and well-being.
Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity
demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to formulate an intervention plan.
Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the
occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice.
2.10
Use clinical reasoning to explain the rationale for and use of compensatory strategies when desired life
tasks cannot be performed.
2.11
3.1
3.3
3.4
Analyze, synthesize, and apply models of occupational performance.
Apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
Use theories, models of practice, and frames of reference to guide and inform evaluation and intervention.
Analyze and discuss how occupational therapy history, occupational therapy theory, and the sociopolitical
climate influence practice.
3
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
3.5
Apply theoretical constructs to evaluation and intervention with various types of clients in a variety of
practice contexts and environments to analyze and effect meaningful occupation outcomes.
4.1
Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for
occupational therapy intervention. These tools include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools;
assessments; skilled observations; occupational histories; consultations with other professionals; and
interviews with the client, family, significant others, and community.
4.2
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual factors, and psychometric
properties of tests. These must be culturally relevant, based on available evidence, and incorporate use of
occupation in the assessment process.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats) when administering
assessments.
Evaluate client(s)’ occupational performance in activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of
daily living (IADLs), education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. Evaluation of
occupational performance using standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools includes
The
occupational profile, including participation in
activities that are meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles in home, work, and community
environments.
Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory
and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive,
nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems).
Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social).
Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–perceptual skills, emotional
regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills.
4.3
4.4
4.5
Compare and contrast the role of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in the
screening and evaluation process along with the importance of and rationale for supervision and
collaborative work between the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in that process.
4.6
Interpret criterion-referenced and norm-referenced standardized test scores on the basis of an
understanding of sampling, normative data, standard and criterion scores, reliability, and validity.
4.7
Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture, disability status, and situational
variables related to the individual and context.
4.8
Interpret the evaluation data in relation to accepted terminology of the profession and relevant theoretical
frameworks.
4.9
Evaluate appropriateness and discuss mechanisms for referring clients for additional evaluation to
specialists who are internal and external to the profession.
4.10
Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service provision and to meet
standards for reimbursement of services, adhering to the requirements of applicable facility, local, state,
federal, and reimbursement agencies. Documentation must effectively communicate the need and
rationale for occupational therapy services.
5.2
Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, health and
wellness, and performance in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social
participation.
5.3
Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g., occupation-based intervention,
purposeful activity, preparatory methods).
5.5
Provide training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management,
and community and work integration.
5.6
Provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual,
neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory functions (e.g., vision, tactile, auditory, gustatory, olfactory,
pain, temperature, pressure, vestibular, proprioception).
5.7
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as
part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction.
5.8
Develop and implement intervention strategies to remediate and/or compensate for cognitive deficits that
affect occupational performance.
4
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
5.17
Develop and promote the use of appropriate home and community programming to support performance
in the client’s natural environment and participation in all contexts relevant to the client.
5.22
5.24
Refer to specialists (both internal and external to the profession) for consultation and intervention.
5.26
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and adaptations to the environment,
that support performance, participation, and well-being
Understand when and how to use the consultative process with groups, programs, organizations, or
communities.
5.28
Monitor and reassess, in collaboration with the client, caregiver, family, and significant others, the effect of
occupational therapy intervention and the need for continued or modified intervention.
5.29
Plan for discharge, in collaboration with the client, by reviewing the needs of the client, caregiver, family,
and significant others; available resources; and discharge environment. This process includes, but is not
limited to, identification of client’s current status within the continuum of care; identification of community,
human, and fiscal resources; recommendations for environmental adaptations; and home programming to
facilitate the client’s progression along the continuum toward outcome goals.
5.30
Organize, collect, and analyze data in a systematic manner for evaluation of practice outcomes. Report
evaluation results and modify practice as needed to improve client outcomes.
5.31
Terminate occupational therapy services when stated outcomes have been achieved or it has been
determined that they cannot be achieved. This process includes developing a summary of occupational
therapy outcomes, appropriate recommendations, and referrals and discussion of post-discharge needs
with the client and with appropriate others.
6.2
Document occupational therapy services to ensure accountability of service provision and to meet
standards for reimbursement of services. Documentation must effectively communicate the need and
rationale for occupational therapy services and must be appropriate to the context in which the service is
delivered.
7.1
Explain how the various practice settings (e.g., medical institutions, community
practice, school systems) affect the delivery of occupational therapy services.
8.2
8.3
9.8
Effectively locate, understand, critique, and evaluate information, including the quality of evidence.
Use scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions.
Explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative professional
relationships between the occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Bly, L. (1983). The Components of normal movement during the first year of life and abnormal
motor development. Chicago: Neuro-Developmental Treatment Association. (available from:
http://www.ndta.org/publications.php)
Case-Smith, Jane. (Ed.) (2010). Occupational Therapy for Children, 6th Ed. St. Louis: Mosby
Kranowitz, C. (2006). The Out-Of-Sync Child. New York: Perigree Trade
*Specific chapters to be read are listed in the course schedule and required readings are to
be completed for class on the date assigned.
Reserve Readings will be posted from:
5
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
Crepeau, E. , Cohn, E., and Schell, B. (Eds) (2009). Willard & Spackman’s Occupational
Therapy Eleventh Edition. New York: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Kramer, P. & Hinijosa, J. (1999). Frames of Reference for Pediatric Occupational Therapy. New
York: Lippincott, Williams &Wilkins.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Item
Attendance and Participation (lecture and lab)
Students must attend and participate fully in all lectures, labs, community visits, and Level I
Fieldwork. This is required to prepare to practice as a pediatric OT. Students are expected to
arrive to class on time.
Students are expected to behave professionally in class and lab. Students will be asked to rate
themselves and their partners regarding participation and contribution in all group activities.
Students must complete readings prior to class and be prepared to discuss readings in class.
Students must bring all handouts/ readings posted on UB learns to class. Electronic versions are
acceptable as noted in UB learns.
Intervention Plan I (Sensory-Based) – Including evidence-based research analysis
Intervention Plan II (Motor-Based)- Including evidence-based research analysis
Intervention Plan III (Behavior-Based)- Including evidence-based research analysis
Midterm Exam (MUST be present at exam)
Final Exam (MUST be present at exam)
Level 1 Fieldwork, includes written assignments associated with it. – Note: Students MUST
PASS the level I fieldwork in order to pass the course.
Lab Assignments
Worksheet assignments are given in nearly every lab. Students can submit work on the day of
the lab or they can submit the following week. Assignments completed with partner(s) will be
graded based on both content AND student contribution to the assignment. Students MUST BE
PRESENT in lab to receive credit for lab assignments. If absent, students may submit
assignments for feedback, but will not receive credit.
GRADING
lecture
Item
Attendance and Participation
Written, Intervention Plan I Draft(Sensory-Based)
Written Intervention Plan I Final Draft
Written, Intervention Plan II (Motor-Based)
6
Points
10
5
10
20
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
Written, Intervention Plan III (Behavior-Based)
Midterm Exam (MUST be present at exam)
Final Exam (MUST be present at exam)
Level 1 Fieldwork, and the written assignments associated with it. – Note: Students
MUST PASS the level I fieldwork in order to pass the course.
Total
15
20
20
Pass/
Fail
100
Lab
Item
Attendance and Participation
Lab Assignments
Intervention Plan I Demonstration (Sensory-Based)
Intervention Plan II Demonstration (Motor-Based)
Level 1 Fieldwork, and the written assignments associated with it. – Note: Students
MUST PASS the level I fieldwork in order to pass the course.
Total
Points
30
20
25
25
Pass/
Fail
100
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Letter
Grade
C+
C
D
F
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
Percentage
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
63-69.99%
< 63%
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that
result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by email or by
leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does
not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all information covered in
class regardless of attendance.
Students attending class are expected to participate fully in the lecture and lab experience. Generating
questions, seeking clarification, and participation in class discussion benefits all students in the class.
Therefore, students are expected to silence all electronic devices, refrain from texting, checking email, or
otherwise communicating with individuals outside of class, and refrain from electronically surfing for
information not pertinent to the discussion at hand.
7
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
Students are welcomed and encouraged to use electronic versions of notes for class and labs. Some
handouts will need to be printed in paper format and will be so noted on UB learns when posted.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to be present for all examinations. In the case of exceptional circumstances
that prevent a student for taking a schedule exam, you must contact me prior to the start of class
(either by email or by leaving a telephone message). An alternate exam is at the discretion of the
instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail
account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format, using proper grammar,
punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit a paper
version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 5% per day that
the assignment is late, up to 3 days. Papers will not be accepted if more than 3 days late.
Lab Requirements
Students are expected to participate in all lab activities. Students will observe individuals in the
community. Students are expected to adhere to a professional dress code, as described in the
student handbook and on UBLearns. Students are also expected to display professional
behaviors, including timeliness, appropriate discussions, and maintaining confidentiality of all
that is observed.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university graduate or undergraduate catalog for the
complete policy on incomplete grades. Refer to the university’s graduate
(http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php) catalog for the complete policy on incomplete
grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor
8
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements than outlined in the
catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in
writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and also the instructor of this course during the
first week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review
appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
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University at Buffalo

OT 544 Fall 2013
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
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University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
Date
Lab Topic
8/19
Introduction to
Course
Date
Assignment
Lecture
Topic
8/20
OT
Framework
– Process
Standardized
Testing
- MVPT
-TVPS
Assignment
JCS Ch. 1,
2, 5, 8
W&S Ch.
46, 47
Occupation
al Profile
Interview
Evaluation
Developme
nt / Critique
VMI
IDEA
IEP/IFSP
Goal
Writing
8/26
PDMS
Due: Scoring
for VMI,
MVPT, TVPS
8/27
Goal Writing
worksheet
9/2
Labor Day!
IDEA
IEP/IFSP
Goal
Writing
Working
with
families
MEET IN
COMPUT
ER LAB
KIMB 113
9/3
Out of Sync
Child
discussion
SI / Sensory
processing
Theory
11
W&S ch 50,
58, 59
Due:
Completed
IEP &
IFSP
(bring
printed)
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
Scoring for
PDMS
9/9
SPM / Sensory
Profile /
9/10
Sensory
Equipment
Sensory
Dunn article
Modulation/
Sensory
JCS: ch. 11
Integration
Application
/ treatment
Planning
Discussion
of
intervention
plan I
9/16
Ayres Clinical
Observations
Due: Scoring
for SPM,
Sensory Profile
9/17
Discussion of
Intervention Plan
1
Sensory
Diet/
Sensory
lifestyle
Cognitive
Perceptual
9/16
OPEN LAB in
preparation for
intervention plan
1 demo next
week!
2:00- 4:00
9/17-9/20
Make plans
to meet with
group for
intervention
plan 1 next
week!
9/23
Intervention plan
I demonstration
Due: Scoring
for clinical
observations
Due:
Intervention
Plan I
(Sensory) draft
& demo
9/24
Midterm
Exam (1
hour)
Motor
Control /
Motor
Learning
Kramer &
Hinijosa;
JCS Ch. 12
9/30
NDT/ Ball Lab
10/1
Posture /
positioning
Fine Motor,
Feeding
Kramer &
Hinijosa;
JCS: 21,
10/7
Feeding Lab
10/8
Behavioral
Approach
Coping
MOHO
Due:
Interventio
n Plan I
(Sensory)
Intervention Plan
II assignment
12
University at Buffalo
OT 544 Fall 2013
(written)
JCS: Ch. 9,
15, 10
10/7
OPEN LAB in
preparation for
intervention plan
demo next week!
10/14
Motor Treatment
Plan
Presentations
2:00- 4:00
10/8-10/11
Make plans
to meet with
group for
intervention
plan 2 next
week!!
10/15
Behavior
Kramer &
Managemen Hinijosa
t
JCS: ch. 14,
3;
Discuss
Backpack
Awareness
Day
Work on
PBS
Intervention
plan
10/21
Elmwood
Franklin –
Backpack
Awareness Day
Due:
Intervention
Plan II (Motor)
& demo;
10/22
Application:
Neonatolog
y and Early
Intervention
10/29
Application: JCS: Ch.
Preschool
24, 25,
School
Aged;
Children
with
sensory
impairments
May need to
change lab
times. Let Dr. T
Know ASAP if
this is a
problem
10/28
BOT-2
13
JCS: Ch.
22, 23
DUE:
Interventio
n Plan III
(Behavioral
)
University at Buffalo
11/4
Handwriting
evaluations
Seating
OT 544 Fall 2013
Due:
BOT – 2
scoring;
11/5
Application:
Hospital
JCS ch. 26,
based /
27
rehab
Transition
Handwriting
evaluation
scoring due by
Friday, 11/9 in
Dr. Tona’s
mailbox
11/11
Email
intervention plan
to Dr. T by
11/17 if you did
Peds fieldwork
this week!
11/12
LEVEL I
FIELDWO
RK!
11/18
Email treatment
plan to Dr. Tona
by 11/23 if you
did Peds
fieldwork this
week!
11/19
LEVEL I
FIELDWO
RK!
11/26
THANKSI
VING
Week
12/3
Fieldwork
Debriefing
11/25
12/2
Lab Clean Up
and Restoration!
Final Exam
-
14
TBA
University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 563
PROJECT GUIDANCE 1
Semester: Fall
Credits: 2
Lecture
Thursdays, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Seminar:
Location
Arranged with Project Advisor
Diefendorf 5
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Teaching
Assistants
Dr. Nadine Fisher
30 Kimball Tower
829-6724
[email protected]
By appointment only
None
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides the fundamental information needed to formulate a specific group research project
proposal. It focuses on scientific quantitative methods, including types of OT clinical research, research
questions and hypotheses, concepts of measurement, and psychometrics of instruments, as well as
human subjects’ protection and ethical concerns in research. The two parts of this course incorporate
both lecture and seminar formats. Students will learn about the components of a clinical research
project in the lecture, and work closely within their groups with their project advisor in the seminar to
more specifically describe and design a specific research project and proposal.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 560 and OT 561
Co-Requisite Course: OT 506
COURSE RATIONALE
This course, which is designed for occupational therapy students in the 5th year of the BS/MS program,
will provide the instructional framework for the development of a project that applies the clinical and
theoretical concepts of occupational therapy. Groups of students will draft a research project proposal
under the direction of their project advisor and the course instructor that fulfills a need for the
occupational therapy profession. A team approach (of students and faculty) will be applied to the
project. The students will learn about the general components and requirements for the research project
in the lecture, and will design their group projects with their project advisor during the seminar.
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University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This is a required component of all accredited OT programs in the United States.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student will be
able to:
Identify and articulate a problem or need in the
Field of OT to be addressed by a research project.
B.1.1,
B.1.2,
B.8.1
Lecture, small
group
Understand the importance of and apply the
principles of scientific inquiry to the research
process.
Demonstrate competence in defining a research
question or hypothesis, corresponding independent
and dependent variables, their operational
definitions and observable indicators.
Justify and support the rationale and purpose of the
research project and its contribution to OT.
State clearly the means by which human subjects
will be protected in research and complete the IRB
process including certification through the
Collaborative IRB Training Initiative’s (CITI)
courses in the Protection of Human Research
Subjects.
Identify and compare different research designs.
Evaluate and be able to choose appropriate
assessment or measurement tools/instruments
(standardized and non-standardized) based on the
research question, validity and reliability of the
instrument, psychometric properties of the
instrument, and patient needs and disability status.
Examine different quantitative and qualitative data
collection and analysis techniques and be able to
choose the most appropriate techniques for a given
problem under investigation.
Demonstrate responsibility and accountability in
the preparation of the research project through
completion of weekly assignments.
B.8.1,
B.8.6
Same as above
Exam, written
assignments,
written project
proposals, orally
presented
proposal
Same as above
B.1.1,
B.1.2,
B.8.2
Same as above
Same as above
B.1.2
Same as above
Same as above
B.6.2
Same as above
and online
CITI tutorial
Same as above
B.8.2
B.1.1,
B.1.9,
B.4.2,
B.4.5
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
B.1.1,
B.1.9,
B.4.3
Same as above
Same as above
B.8.7
Same as above
Same as above
2
University at Buffalo
Understand the components of a research proposal
and write and present it orally.
Understand the process of grant writing and
securing grants.
Develop the basic skills necessary for publication,
presentation and defense of the research project.
OT 563 Fall 2013
B.1.1,
B.1.2,
B.8.1,
B.8.7,
B.8.8
B.8.9
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
B.8.8
Same as above
Same as above
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.1.1
Demonstrate oral and written communication skills.
B.1.2
Demonstrate logical thinking, critical analysis, problem-solving and creativity.
B.1.9
Demonstrate the ability to use statistics, tests and measurements.
B.4.2
Select appropriate assessment tools based on client need, contextual factors, and
psychometric properties of tests.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols, including standardized formats, when
administering assessments.
Exhibit the ability to interpret criterion-referenced and norm-referenced
standardized test scores based on an understanding of sampling, normative data,
standard and criterion scores, reliability and validity.
B.4.3
B.4.5
B.4.6
B.5.2
B.6.2
B.8.1
B.8.2
B.8.6
B.8.7
B.8.8
Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture, disability status,
and situational variables related to the individual and context.
Develop occupationally-based intervention plans and strategies, including goals and
methods to achieve them, based on the stated needs of the client as well as data
gathered during the evaluation process.
Understand current policy issues in systems that influence OT practice.
Articulate the importance of research for practice and the continued development
of the profession.
Be able to use professional literature to make informed practice decisions.
Understand the importance of scholarly activities that will contribute to the
development of a body of knowledge relevant to the profession of occupational
therapy.
Design and implement beginning-level research studies.
Develop basic skills necessary for the publication and presentation of research
projects.
3
University at Buffalo
B.8.9
OT 563 Fall 2013
Develop a basic understanding of the process of securing grants.
REQUIRED READINGS

TEXTBOOK : Publication manual of the American Psychological Association, current edition.
- You should have this already.
Recommended Text: Portney LG & MP Watkins. (2009). Foundations of clinical research:
Applications to Practice. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Collaborative IRB Training Initiative’s (CITI) courses in the Protection of Human Research Subjects:
https://www.citiprogram.org/default.asp
Biomedical CITI course for Health Sciences IRB and Children and Youth IRB.
Behavioral CITI course for the Social and Behavioral Sciences IRB
Institutional Review Board materials from the specific IRB required for your project.
All handouts available on-line or distributed in class.
Readings may be assigned during the semester and will be provided on UBLearns.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Requirements:
1.
Students must attend and participate fully in all lectures and seminars, including at least 6
academic seminars (Rehab Science seminar series, other dept. seminars (especially those in
SPHHP), and the Perry lecture.
2.
Develop and complete all project proposal assignments on time for submission to the instructor
and project advisor and actively discuss your group’s project proposal components in class.
3.
Take in-class exam.
4.
Follow a logical and sequential process for the completion of the project proposal in agreement
with your group and project advisor.
5.
Complete the Collaborative IRB Training Initiative’s (CITI) courses in the Protection of Human
Research Subjects and hand in certificate.
6.
Follow and complete the IRB process for the protection of human subjects, including the
consent/assent forms.
4
University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
7.
Develop and complete the entire project proposal and submit acceptable copies to the course
instructor and project advisor.
8.
Complete a successful defense (group) of the proposal by oral presentation to OT faculty and
peers.
9.
Complete individual mid-term and final evaluations of all members of your project group.
Assignments:

Assignments and due dates are listed on the course schedule. All written assignments (group or
individual) should be typed using 12 pt font and double-spaced. No credit will be given if an
assignment is turned in late. This equates to a 2% loss in your overall grade for every assignment
not turned in on the due date.

Completion of appropriate Collaborative IRB Training Initiative’s (CITI) course in the Protection of
Human Research Subjects (either the Biomedical or Behavioral CITI course).

Completion of individual mid-term and final evaluations of each member of your group.

The final written proposal must meet all of the criteria and contain all of the elements of the
appropriate IRB (as decided by your group and with your advisor), including abstract, project
narrative, etc., and consent and/or assent forms.
GRADING
Evaluation







Due Date
Weekly Assignments (x 5)
See Schedule
(Group or Individual)
Exam 1
Oct. 17
Exam 2
Nov. 21
Written Final Proposal, including
Same date as oral
Consent Form & Questionnaires
presentation (Dec. 10)
Oral Presentation
Dec. 10
Mid-term & Final Peer Evaluation
Seminars, Individual Class Participation &
Attendance
Percent of Grade
10%
15%
15%
25%
15%
10%
10%
____
100%
NOTE: For group assignments, each student within your group will receive the same grade. It is your
responsibility that everyone in the group contributes equally to the written project and final oral
5
University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
presentation. Mid-term and final evaluations will be conducted by your peers in your group to determine
your contribution to the assignments, overall proposal and presentation.
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
A+
A
B+
B
B-
Percentage
93.0 -100
90.0-92.9
87.0-89.9
83.0-86.9
80.0-82.9
Letter Grade
C+
C
CF
Percentage
77.0-79.9
73.0-76.9
70.0-72.9
Less than 70
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances
that result in you being late or absent, you must contact the instructor prior to the start of class (either
by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these
circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are also required to make
individual and/or group appointments with their faculty project advisor on a regular basis.
Exams and Final Exam
There will be no make-up exam. If you cannot take the exam on the scheduled day, it must be taken
prior to the scheduled exam day.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail account. All students are required to access
UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements. Students should frequently access their
classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web site address:
http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe documented
illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed the exam (B- or better) and assignments up until the
time an incomplete is formally requested. The student should be aware that an Incomplete in this course
may jeopardize graduating in the Spring of the following semester.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit the
assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in the loss of 2% of your grade.
6
University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
Lab Requirements
None
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
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University at Buffalo





OT 563 Fall 2013
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
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University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
Week
Date
Lecture Topic
Assignments
Readings for
next week
(Portney &
Watkins)
Chapters
1, 7, 32
1
8/29
Course Introduction
Responsibilities for Project
Required Components of
Research Project
Overview of research process
Synthesizing your lit review
Statement of Problem
Rationale or Justification for
Study
Meet with group and advisor to
consolidate lit review (by 9/12)
2
9/5
NO CLASS
Rosh Hashanah
Meet with group and advisor.
3
9/12
Statement of Purpose
Research Questions &
Hypotheses
Independent & Dependent
Variables & Their
Relationship
Statement of Problem (group)
(due today)
Meet with group and advisor.
3
4
9/19
Introduction to Quantitative
Research
 Settings
 Subject
Recruitment
 Sampling
 Instruments
 Procedures &
Protocols
Statement of Purpose and
Identification of Independent and
Dependent Variables (group)
(due today)
Meet with group and advisor.
8
5
9/26
Human Subjects Protection
Institutional Review Board
IRBNet
Informed Consent
Guest Speaker: Dr. Chris
Marks, Administrator of the
Social & Behavioral Sciences
IRB
Research Questions (group)
(due today)
Meet with group and advisor.
4
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University at Buffalo
OT 563 Fall 2013
6
10/3
Principles of Measurement
Meet with group and advisor.
15
7
10/10
Surveys & Questionnaires
8
10/17
EXAM 1
(on lectures from 8/29-10/3)
Copy of SBSIRB or HSIRB
Human Subjects Certification form
(individual) (due today)
Meet with group and advisor.
Meet with group and advisor.
5
9
10/24
Reliability
Procedures and Questionnaires
(group) (due today)
Meet with group and advisor.
10
10/31
Validity
Meet with group and advisor.
11
11/7
Qualitative Research
Guest Speaker: Dr. Susan
Nochajski, OT Program
Director
Meet with group and advisor.
12
11/14
Qualitative Research, cont.
Guest Speaker: Dr. Susan
Nochajski, OT Program
Director
Meet with group and advisor.
13
11/21
EXAM 2
(on lectures from 10/1011/14)
14
11/28
NO CLASS
Fall Break/Thanksgiving
Meet with group and advisor.
15
12/5
Grant Writing
Disseminating Research
Results
Meet with group and advisor to
finalize proposal and presentation.
Tues.
Dec.
10
Oral Presentations of Project
Proposals (groups)
Dec. 10: 8:30 am -12:30 pm
Final Written Proposal &
Consent/Assent forms (group)
(due today)
10
6
Readings to
be assigned
University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OT 564
PROJECT GUIDANCE
Semester: Spring 2014
Units: 3
Day and Time: Mondays 3:00 – 5:50 PM
Location: DFN 5 & Computer lab in Kimball Tower (some week)
Instructors: Dr. Machiko R. Tomita
631 Kimball Tower
829-6740
[email protected]
Office Hours:
Dr. Susan M. Nochajski
526 Kimball Tower
829-6942
[email protected]
By appointment
Teaching Assistant: Sujata Nair, 618 Kimball Tower, [email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
In this course students will learn about qualitative and quantitative data analysis. For
qualitative analysis, students will learn data analysis techniques and use them on existing data.
For quantitative analysis, the focus will be on introductory statistical analysis and how to use
SPSS for data management. Applying the learned skills, students will work on analyses of
data collected for their masters project. Students will also make an aural presentation of the
final project. As part of this course, students will be required to participate in the scheduled
Rehabilitation Science seminars or other seminars that are relevant to students’ research
interest.
PREREQUISITE COURSES OT 563 and OT 506
COURSE RATIONALE/RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This course, which is designed for occupational therapy students in the 5th year of the BS/MS
program, will provide further information of statistical methods and practical skills of data
analyses through working on secondary data analyses, simulated data creations and analyses,
and attending scheduled seminars within or outside the Department of Rehabilitation Since.
This course builds on the research project the students developed in OT 563/506 and
completes the project without or with actual data collection. Uniqueness of this course is that
students will conduct qualitative data analyses. Although qualitative research is not
emphasized in the curriculum in the OT program, this course will introduce its concept and
method.
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University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
COURSE OBJECTIVES AND ACOTE ACCREDITATION STANDARDS:
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment Method
B. 8.8
B. 8.6
Lab
Lecture
Assignment
Exam
B. 8.8
Lecture
Lab
Assignment
Conduct univariate and
multivariate analyses.
Read and interpret results.
B.8.8
Lecture
Lab
Lecture
Exam
6.
7.
Present a complete research study
Critique qualitative research
studies
B.8.8
B.8.5
8.
Understand qualitative approaches
used in interpreting and reporting
data
Analyze a qualitative data set
B.8.4
B.8.5
Understand qualitative approaches
used in interpreting and reporting
data
B.8.4
B.8.5
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
9.
10
Objectives
Upon completion of this course,
the student will be able to:
Create a SPSS database.
Identify validity of data in the
database.
Conduct descriptive statistics and
graphical presentation.
B.8.8
B.8.4
Lecture
Readings
Class Activity
Discussion
Lecture
Discussion
Reading
Lecture
Class Activity
Lecture
Discussion
Assginment
Exam
Presentation
Assignment
Assignment
Assignment
Assignment
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.8.4 Understand and use basic descriptive, correlational, and inferential quantitative statistics and
code, analyze, and synthesize qualitative data.
B.8.5 Understand and critique the validity or research studies, including their design (both
quantitative and qualitative) and methodology.
B.8.7. Participate in scholarly activities that evaluate professional practice, service delivery, and/or
professional issues (e.g. Scholarship of Integration, Scholarship of Application, Scholarship of
Teaching and Learning).
B.8.8 Demonstrate skills necessary to write a scholarly report in a format for presentation or
publication.
REQUIRED READINGS
There is no reading text for this course.
Highly Recommended: Portney and Watkins, Foundations of Clinical Research 3rd ed.
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University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
1. Attend lecture (14 weeks)
2. Attend 5 Rehabilitation Science seminars or other relevant research seminars.
3. Complete 5 SPSS tasks
4. Complete a critique of a qualitative article (Homework Assignment)
5. Complete analysis of a qualitative data set (Homework Assignment)
6. Take 1 exam
7. Complete a project paper.
8. Present a complete group project using Power Point.
GRADING
A
B+
B
C+
C
D
F
90.00 - 100
85.00 - 89.99
80.00 - 84.99
75.00 - 79.99
70.00 - 74.99
60.00 -69.99
59% or less
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Attendance (1 points each x 14 )
Individual
SPSS in-class task (1 points x 5) *
Individual
Seminar attendance (1 points x 5)*
Individual
Homework for Qualitative research (10X2) Individual
Exam
Individual
Paper (results and data)
Group
Paper (discussion)
Group
Report of a group final project*
Group
PP presentation of the final product
Group
Course evaluation
Individual
Total:
* Late assignment will not be accepted.
14 points
5 points
5 points
20 points
12 points
8 points
8 points
20 points
6 points
2 points
100 points
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Attendance is very important and required. If you miss a class, you should rely on your friends
for missed material. The instructor and TA are not responsible to teach the missed class
material individually. Prior to the start of class, students are required to inform absence to the
instructor. If the reason is legitimate (illness, accident, etc.), a point will not be subtracted.
In addition, tardiness more than 15 minutes will not be given a point for attendance. If
tardiness occurred three times, then it is considered as one absence.
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University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
Exams and Final Exam
If students cannot take exams on a scheduled date, they can make arrangements with to
instructor to take them prior to the scheduled date.
Communication (Email and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB learns regularly and prior
to every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be
through your UB e-mail account. All students are required to access UB Learns for
assignments, class handouts, and announcements. Students should frequently access their
classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web site address:
http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing out handouts for classroom
use.
Any communication devices should be turned off. If it is necessary to use it, use a silenced
alarm, with the instructor’s permission.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will not given.
Late Assignments
Late assignments will not be accepted.
Site Visits and Lab Visits: None
Lab Requirements
For quantitative analysis, students are required to be present at labs and perform tasks
individually.
Lab Competencies
In each computer lab, a task will be given and in class tasks will be completed for points.
POLICY REGARDING ABSENCES, ATTENDANCE, ASSIGNMENTS, EXAMS AND
UNIVERSITY POLICY ON INCOMPLETES IN THE COURSE:
Class Attendance and Absences: Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In
the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you being late or absent, you must contact the
instructor prior to the start of class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be
aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does not excuse you from any required
assignments. Students are also required to make individual and/or group appointments with their
faculty project advisor on a regular basis. When absence occurs due to an emergency situation, the
letter of explanation with proof must be submitted.
Exam: There will be no make-up exam. If you cannot take the exam on the scheduled day, it must
be taken prior to the scheduled exam day.
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course: Incomplete grades will be given only if there are
extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe documented illness) that preclude the student from
completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all course work and
successfully passed the exam (B- or better) and assignments up until the time an incomplete is
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University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
formally requested. The student should be aware that an Incomplete in this course may
jeopardize graduating in the Spring 2009.
University Policy on Incomplete Grades: According to university policy, an interim grade of
Incomplete (“I”) may be assigned if the student has not completed all requirements for the
course. The “I” will be accompanied by a default grade (U) that will become the permanent
course grade of record if the “I” is not changed by formal notice by the instructor upon the
student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim “I” is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of “I” is to be assigned
only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade better
than the default grade; the student should have a passing average in the requirements already
completed. The instructor will provide the student specification, in writing or by electronic
mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the “I” is not replaced by a permanent grade
within twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I” was assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an earlier date
for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic
mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a student
graduates, an “I” grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will default to
the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree program, e.g.
receiving a BS in a BS/MS program, any course for which the student has an interim grade of
“I” that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program will be
excluded from this provision, but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all graduate courses, the default grade accompanying an interim grade of “I” will be “U”.
Neither “A”, “P” nor “S” will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT Program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore, courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I”
prior to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy: If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable
you to participate in this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources (OAR),
25 Capen Hall, 645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class.
OAR will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable
accommodations.
5
University at Buffalo
OT 564 Spring 2014
Academic Integrity: Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely
in accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may
include a grade of zero (0) for an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to
the following examples:

Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial part in
another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed consent
of the instructor.

Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.

Cheating: Receiving information from another student or other unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.

Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forging the instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.

Procurement: Distribution or acceptance of examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Course Outline and Schedule
Subject to change
Class Date
1
1/27
2
2/03
3
2/10
4
2/17
5
2/24
Lecture and Seminar
SPSS/ Qualitative Analysis Content
and due
Introduction to the Course
(Nochajski)
Critiquing Qualitative
Research (Nochajski)
Qualitative Data Analysis
Part 1 (Nochajski)
Qualitative Data Analysis
Part 2 (Nochajski)
Coding and data entry for
demographics (Tomita)
Readings will be posted on UB Learns
Article Critique Due
Preliminary Data Analysis Due
Data will be provided in class
SPSS data entry and useful functions
6
University at Buffalo
Data entry, analysis, and
interpretation for 2
independent group
compassion
Data entry, analysis and
interpretation for 2 paired
group compassions
OT 564 Spring 2014
SPSS: Independent t-test, Mann
Whitney
6
3/03
7
3/10
8
3/17
No Class-spring recess
3/24
Data entry, analyses and
interpretation for 3
independent groups
SPSS: One-Way ANOVA, Kruskalwallis one-way ANOVA
3/31
Data entry, analyses and
interpretation for 3
dependent groups
SPSS:
Repeated Measures ANOVA with
contrast, Friedman test
Completion of data collection and
data entry
9
10
SPSS: Paired t-test, Wilcoxon Signed
ranks tests
Data entry, analyses and
interpretation for correlation
SPSS: Correlation and chi-square
And chi-square
How to write result section
How to write discussion
Due date for Result section
section
11
4/07
12
4/14
13
4/08
Q and A session
14
4/21
Exam for quantitative data analyses and SPSS
15
4/28
Group project podium presentation
Due for the final paper
16
5/05
Group project poster presentation (For independent study)
Due date for Discussion
7
Principles of Occupational Therapy with the Physically Disabled
OTD 517
State University of New York at Buffalo
Department of Rehabilitation Science
Occupational Therapy Program
Fall 2013
3 Units
Lecture
Tuesday: 9:00-12:00
Room:
Diefendorf 5
Instructor:
Mary A Matteliano PhD,
OTR/L
Office hours:
Tuesday: 12:00- 2:00 or by
appointment
Office:
Kimball 624
Telephone:
(716) 829-6728
Email:
[email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to familiarize students with current theories and practice applied in the area of
occupational therapy for individuals with physical disabilities. The course will present an
understanding and appreciation of contemporary occupational therapy theoretical basis, clinical
practice, and research in the physical dysfunction domain.
With the growth in theoretical development, clinical sophistication in occupational therapy, and the
current health care climate, it is important for advanced practitioners to have an understanding of the
dynamic relationship between theory, research, and clinical practice. Students will develop the ability
to expand their current knowledge base and integrate such knowledge into clinical applications.
Additionally, students will gain an understanding of how to address issues associated with an
individual’s adjustment to a newly acquired physical disability. Each student will be expected to
critically examine OT practices in the area of physical dysfunction in terms of the underlying
theoretical principles, assumptions and beliefs, current evaluation/measurement tools, and research
evidence (evidence-based practice and outcomes) for clinical effectiveness.
Course Objectives
B.3.1, B.3.3 Describe major theoretical principles/models (or conceptual framework) that underlies the
occupational therapy interventions used with patients with physical disabilities.
B. 4.2, B.4.3 Select assessments based on client needs and use appropriate procedures and protocols
when administering assessments.
B.4.4 & 4.6 Evaluate and develop a client’s occupational profile and examine client factors,
performance patterns, context, and performance skills using standardized and non-standardized
assessments. Interpret test scores and understand standard and criterion scores, reliability and validity.
B.5.1 Develop treatment interventions that reflect a thorough understanding of theoectical approaches,
models of practice, evidence based intervention plans based on the client’s occupational profile and
individual factors and contexts.
B.5.6 & 5.8. Develop treatment strategies for individuals with neurological, cognitive, perceptual,
musculoskeletal, and behavioral impairments.
B.5.17 Develop community interventions for clients and families.
B.6.1 Evaluate and address the various contexts of health care as they relate to the practice of
occupational therapy.
B.8.2 Discuss research needs for further development of knowledge in OT intervention for individuals
with physical disabilities.
B.8.3 Discuss the concepts and components of evidence-based practice.
B.8.5 Analyze relevant research findings/studies to theoretical and clinical knowledge of occupational
therapy intervention for individuals with physical disabilities
Program Competency
Describe major OT theoretical
principles/models
Identify beliefs and assumptions
on which the therapeutic process
is based
Demonstrate familiarity with the
assessments and treatment
approaches
Identify research needs for further
development of knowledge OT
intervention
Identify concepts and components
of evidence-based practice
Learning
Objectives
Discuss and analyze
the major
theoretical
principles/models
Discuss and analyze
the beliefs and
assumptions on
which the
therapeutic process
is based
List and analyze
assessments and
treatment
approaches specific
to OT treatment of
physical disabilities
Discuss and analyze
research needs for
further development
of OT assessment
and intervention
Discuss and analyze
specific intervention
Instructional
Method
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Group discussions
Assessment
Method
Written
Assignment
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Group discussions
Written
Assignment
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Group discussions
Oral presentation,
clinical assessment
and treatment
Written
Assignment
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Group discussions
Oral presentation
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Oral presentation
Written
Assignment
Relate relevant research
findings/studies to theoretical and
clinical knowledge
and assessments by
evidence-based
practice
Discuss and analyze
relevant research
findings/studies to
theoretical and
clinical knowledge
Group discussions
Written
Assignment
Lecture, Assigned
readings,
Group discussions
Oral presentation
clinical assessment
and treatment
Written
Assignment
Required Text
Ralston, Aron (2004). 127 Hours: Between a rock and a hard place. New York, NY: Atria Paperback.
Additional Readings
Online resources will be made available to students through UBlearns.
Students are required to be able to access AOTA’s Evidence-Based Practice and Research through
student membership.
Communication (E-mail and Blackboard)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and UB Blackboard regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any communication between students and instructor via
e-mail should be through the UB e-mail account.
UB Learns: Internet Access
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, classroom handouts, discussions, and
announcements. Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in
assignments. Web site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu.
Class Attendance
Attendance is considered mandatory. Students must contact the instructor 24 hours prior in the case of
exceptional circumstances that result in lateness or absence. Absence from class under these
circumstances will not excuse the student from any required assignments.
Technology
The instructor encourages the use of technology to enhance the learning environment. Technology that
is misused in the classroom will be considered a disruption. Misuse of technology includes: using cell
phones, text messaging, answering emails, or using the computer for activities not immediately related
to class work. Students will be warned once during the semester about using technology
inappropriately and after that they will be asked to leave the classroom for that session.
Assignment Grading
Assignments will be graded according to posted rubrics. If a student or group submits an assignment
that falls below the instructor’s expectations (i.e. careless spelling and grammar errors, failure to use
APA format appropriately, missing content on major parts of the assignment) they will receive the
assignment back as ungraded and unacceptable. Students will be provided with five days to remediate
the assignment with 10% taken off their final grade for failure to hand in exemplary work the first
time.
Late Assignments
Students will be expected to submit all assignments to the instructor by the start of class on the day it is
due. Most assignments will be uploaded to UBlearns but the instructor will specify on the assignment
instructions. Failure to complete the assignment on the designated date will result in a reduced grade
for that particular assignment. Unless discussed with the instructor prior to the due date, any
assignments submitted after the end of class will be considered late (5 points deducted per day). Late is
defined as after the end of class on the due date.
Participation
Students will be graded on class participation using a variety of methods. Participation in class
discussions will be graded as observed by the instructor. In particular, students will receive credit for
participation if they are able to discuss assignments and readings with thoughtfulness and insight
demonstrating a clear understanding of content and its applicability to various contexts which enhances
the learning environment for all classroom participants. Students will be asked to submit a peer review
for case study groups and group assignments if a group member is unavailable or fails to contribute to
the group process. If there is more than one member participating in the final clinical project, groups
will divide the assignment equally among members and highlight the contributions of each member
within the assignment. E.g., for the literature review/progress report assignment, group members will
assign duties to each member and detail which parts of the assignment were completed by each
member. The group grade for the assignment may be adjusted for each member of the group according
to their contribution. Group members must be available to meet with their members outside of class
time and participate in each and every meeting and clinical appointment. Group participation
includes using Google docs for assignments and demonstrating ability to work as a group online.
If a student is repeatedly not available to meet with their group, slows the groups’ progress by not
being prepared or following up on duties, they will be removed from the group and required to
complete their project independently.
Students with Disabilities
If you have a disability, (physical or psychological) and require reasonable accommodations to enable
you to participate in this course, such as note takers, readers, or extended time on exams and
assignments, please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), 25 Capen Hall, 645-2608, and
also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. ODS will provide you with information
and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
UNIVERSITY STATEMENT ON THE PRINCIPLE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
The University has a responsibility to promote academic honesty and integrity and to develop
procedures to deal effectively with instances of academic dishonesty. Students are responsible for the
honest completion and representation of their work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for
respect for others’ academic endeavors. By placing their name on academic work, students certify the
originality of all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgments.
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following:
Previously submitted work: Submitting academically required material that has been previously
submitted -- in whole or in substantial part -- in another course, without prior and expressed consent of
the instructor.
Plagiarism: Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one's own,
without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases, basic
ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one's own.
Cheating: Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student
or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and Pads), with
the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of
computer data; forging an instructor's name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for
reevaluation which has been altered without the instructor's authorization; or submitting a report,
paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any
person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document,
record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials: Procurement, distribution or acceptance of examinations or
laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the
University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation,
research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for
submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments: No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for
submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Additional information on the university’s academic integrity policy can be found at:
http://undergrad-catalog.buffalo.edu/policies/course/integrity.shtml
Course Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
Required readings completed for the class on the date assigned
Active participation in class and online discussions and activities
Completion of in-class and out of class assignments
Ability to work in student groups using Google docs
The format of this course is lecture, discussion/seminar and independent study. The success of the
course will depend upon all class members having read the assigned material and participating in class
discussions/presentations. Students are expected to focus on a specific disability of interest, examine
available assessment tools, and explore evidence-based practice for that particular disability.
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION - Total points 165
GRADE
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD
F
PERCENT
93-100
90- 92.99
87- 89.99
84- 86.99
80- 83.99
77-79.99
74-76.99
70-73.99
66-69.99
65 or less
TOTAL POINTS
153-165
149-152
144-148
139-143
132-138
127-131
122-126
116-121
109-115
108 or less
Please be aware that grades are not rounded-up.
Course Assignments
Assignment
Due Date
Points
Percentage
Assignment: Life, Support, 9/4-9/8
Music
Assignment: 127 Hours
9/25-9/29
10
6%
10
6%
Case Studies (group): 6
topics
Clinical Project: Progress
Report & Literature
Review
11/12
15 each
90 total
20
9% each
54% total
12%
Clinical presentations
11/26 & 12/3
30
19%
5 (peer ratings, clinical
supervisor report,
instructor observation,
online discussion)
165
3%
Participation
Total
100% (rounded)
Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness) that
preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily completed all
course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an incomplete is
requested. Please refer to the Occupational Therapy Program Student Handbook for program policy on
incomplete grades and the Undergraduate Catalog (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/policies/grading/explanation.shtmlr) for university policy on incomplete grades.
LECTURE SCHEDULE
Lecture
Date
Tuesday
Aug 27
Lecture Topic
Readings
Assignments
Introduction
Course Overview
WHO Report on Disability &
Rehabilitation
Personal and Social Adaptation
“Life, Support, and Music”
On-Line
Handouts
Dr. John Stone
Class discussion on
WHO report
Sept 10
Rehabilitation Measures & Outcomes: The
Evidence
On-Line
Handouts
Sept 17
Stroke: Measurement, Treatment, Evidence On-Line
Handouts
TBI Case Study (due
9/24)
Sept 24
TBI: Measurement, Treatment, Evidence
On-Line
Handouts
Assignment: Online
Discussion: 127 Hours
(9/25-9/29)
SCI Case Study (due
10/1)
Oct 1
SCI: Measurement, Treatment, Evidence
Oct 8
Pain Management, CRPS, Spasticity:
Measurement, Treatment, Evidence
On-Line
Handouts
On-Line
Handouts
Oct 15
Neurodegenerative Disease: Measurement,
Treatment, Evidence
Cognition/Visual Perception:
On-Line
Handouts
On-Line
Handouts
More on cognition/visual perception:
Measurement, Treatment, Evidence
Community Integration: Measurement,
Treatment
Progress reports: meet with instructorschedule time
On-Line
Handouts
On-Line
Handouts
Sept 3
Oct 22
Oct 29
Nov 5
Nov 12
Assignment: Life,
Support, and Music OnLine Discussion
Questions (9/4-9/8)
*Selection of group
assessment/treatment
Stroke Case Study (due
9/17)
Read assigned readings
prior to class
Neuro Case Study (due
10/15)
Guest: Dr. Michele
Youakim Cognition Case
Study (due 10/29)
Community Case Study
(due 11/5)
Progress report and
literature review due
Nov 19
No class
Nov 26
Clinical presentations
Dec 3
Clinical presentations
Student groups working
on presentations
Note: All assignments except the in class assignments are to be written following APA format
including, but not limited to, cover page, double spacing, one-inch margins, pages numbers and
running head, citations in text, and a reference page; citations and references must also be in the
proper APA format.
Clinical Project contact information:
Maria McLaughlin, OTR/L
ECMC (8th floor): 898-5040 - M, T, and TH
E-mail: [email protected]
Janice Moffett, OTR/L
ECMC (outpatient): 898-3896
Email: [email protected]
Lisa Cazes
DeGraff Hospital
Lisa Cazes [email protected]
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OTD 532/RSC 514
SOCIETAL IMPACT ON PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
Fall 2013
3 Units
Instructor:
Office:
Telephone:
E-Mail Address:
Online Course
Susan M. Nochajski, Ph.D., OTR/L
Kimball 526
829- 6942
[email protected]
“Virtual” Office Hours: Tuesday and Thursday from 2:00 to 3:00 PM
During “virtual” office hours, you can expect an almost immediate response to your
email; at other times, I will respond as soon as possible, but usually within 24 hours,
Monday through Friday, less frequently on weekends.
“Real” Office Hours:
By Appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course examines how various aspects of disability policy facilitate or restrict the
fulfillment of roles associated with full participation in society by persons with
disabilities. An on-line discussion format is used to explore a variety of areas including:
(1) the development of disability policy; (2) the meaning of disability to persons with
disabilities and others in society; (3) the involvement of persons with disabilities shaping
policy; (4) the cultural, political, and economic influences on disability; (5) the impact of
disability the fulfillment of a person’s societal roles; and (6) research issues related to the
impact of society on persons with disabilities.
COURSE RATIONALE
Historically, persons with disabilities have been viewed as being incapable of achieving
roles associated with full participation in their community. Rehabilitation researchers and
professionals need to be aware of the various influences, attitudes, and policies that
facilitate or impede the full inclusion of persons with disabilities. This understanding is
necessary so that rehabilitation professionals and persons with disabilities can work
collaboratively to foster their full participation in society.
1
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTIONAL AND ASSESSMENT METHODS
Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this
course, the student will be
able to:
1. Discuss the
development of
disability policy
2. Discuss the history
of disability in the
context of
changing
rehabilitation
paradigms
ACOTE
Standard*
Instructional
Method
Assessment Method
B.3.4.
Readings
Quality of Online
Discussion
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
B.3.4.
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
3. Conceptualize
research questions
and methodologies
for research at the
societal or
participation level
B.8.1.
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
Quality of Online
Discussion
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
Quality of Online
Discussion
Written Research
Agenda Assignment
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
4. Discus the impact
B.3.4
of societal attitudes B.4.7
related to persons
with disabilities
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
Quality of Online
Discussion
Activity on Attitude
Measurement
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
2
University at Buffalo 5. Discuss the
meaning of
disability from
intrapersonal and
interpersonal
perspectives.
B.2.9
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 Quality of Online
Discussion
Written Assignment
on the Autobiography
of a Person with a
Disability
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
6. Discuss the impact
of legislation,
court decisions,
and other political
factors on activity
and participation
of persons with
disabilities
B.6.2
7. Discuss the impact
of empowerment,
self-advocacy, and
the independent
living movement
on disability
B.3.4
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
Quality of Online
Discussion
Activity on ADA
Court Cases
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
Quality of Online
Discussion
Activity on Quality of
Life Assessment
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
8. Discuss the impact
of disability on
vocation,
education,
relationships, and
health care
B.6.1.
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
3
Quality of Online
Discussion
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
University at Buffalo 9. Discuss the impact B.6.2.
of economic/health
policy on disability
Readings
Participation in
Online Discussion
Board
Online PowerPoint
Presentation
OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 Quality of Online
Discussion
Activity on Ethical
Issues
Discussion Summary
Exam based on
Readings
ACOTE STANDARDS
* ACOTE Standards are relevant for graduate students in the BS/MS and Postprofessional MS Programs in Occupational Therapy
B.2.9
Express support for the quality of life, well-being, and occupation of the individual,
group, or population to promote physical and mental health and the prevention of
injury and disease considering the context (e.g. cultural, physical, social, personal,
spiritual, temporal, virtual) and environment.
B.3.4
Analyze and discuss how occupational therapy history, occupational therapy theory,
and the sociopolitical climate influence practice.
B.4.7
Consider factors that might bias assessment results such as culture, disability status,
and situational variables related to the individual and context.
B.6.1
Evaluate and address the various contexts of health care, education, community,
political, and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational
therapy.
B.6.2
Analyze the current policy issues and the social, economic, political,
geographic, and demographic factors that influence the various contexts for the
practice of occupational therapy.
B.8.1
Articulate the importance of how scholarly activities contribute to the
development of a body of knowledge relevant to the profession of occupational
therapy.
COURSE FORMAT
The content of this course will be divided into eight units. In general, for each unit,
students will:
(1) Complete a “pre-unit” reflection activity (when assigned) which will “set the
stage” for the topic prior to reading any of the materials;
(2) Complete the required readings and review the online PowerPoint “lecture”
and/or video clips;
4
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 (3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Respond to the initial discussion questions posted by the instructor in each unit;
Comment on the responses to discussion questions posted by classmates;
“Facilitate” the online discussion by posting additional questions;
Prepare discussion summaries (as assigned) and review discussion summaries
posted by others;
(7) Complete individual and group activities and assignments.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
This course utilizes an on-line seminar format and students are expected to read the
required articles and review the unit materials so that they can actively participate in the
online discussions. Listed below are the specific course requirements:
1. Required readings completed for each unit in a timely manner;
2. Active participation in on-line discussions;
3. Completion of all assignments;
4. All assignments are to be written using the guidelines found in the Publication
Manual of the American Psychological Association – 6th Edition, generally
referred to as APA format. Students are strongly encouraged to purchase and use
the manual. Online information about APA format can be found at the following
websites:
http://www.apastyle.org/
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
REQUIRED READINGS
There are no required texts for this course. However, students will be required to read an
autobiography of a person with a disability. This book can be selected from a list to be
provided online or be of the student’s own choosing (with approval of course instructor).
Books can be purchased through amazon.com or can be borrowed from the UB Libraries,
Erie County Public Library, or the course instructor.
Required readings will be found in three locations:
1. posted on-line in the Course Documents section of UB Learns
2. in on-line journals available through the UB Libraries
3. various websites
Additional readings may be assigned throughout the semester. Check the
Announcements section on UB Learns for information related to any additional
required readings.
ASSIGNMENTS AND CLASS ACTIVITIES
Assignment 1: Autobiography of Person with a Disability:
In order to gain an understanding of the personal meaning of disability, each student will
read an autobiography of a person with a disability. Each student will post a brief
synopsis of the book on-line by 9:00 PM on September 25, 2013 and submit a written
5
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 report by the same date and time. Guidelines for the written report will be posted in the
Assignments section of UB Learns.
Assignment 2: Research Agenda Paper:
Relatively little research has been conducted addressing issues pertinent to persons with
disabilities at the “societal” level. In this assignment, students will identify an area of
needed research, present a brief overview of a potential research study, and discuss the
rationale and potential impact of the proposed study. The paper is due no later than 9:00
PM on December 1, 2013. Guidelines for the written report will be posted in the
Assignments section of UB Learns.
On-Line Discussion:
Students are expected to be active participants in the on-line discussion including
responding to initial questions, commenting on responses of classmates, and posting new
questions. Additional guidelines will be posted in the Assignments section of UB Learns.
Discussion Summary:
Students will be assigned one or two discussion summaries throughout the course of the
semester. Additional guidelines will be posted in the Assignments section of UB Learns
and the instructor will complete the first summary as an example.
Activities:
Throughout the semester, students will be assigned a variety of activities that will
supplement the material in each of the units. Additional guidelines will be posted in the
Assignments section of UB Learns.
Final Exam:
There will be a final exam, consisting short written responses which will be based on the
required readings. The exam will be made available to students on December 7, 2013
and will be due no later than 9:00 PM on December 16, 2013.
Course Evaluation:
Students are expected to complete the online course evaluation. Information about the
course evaluation will be sent to students by the Office of Academic and Student Affairs,
School of Public Health and Health Professions.
GRADING
Course grades will be determined by the total number of points earned as follows:
A
AB+
B
202-215
194-201
185-193
172-184
BC
D
F
6
166-171
151-165
140-150
<140
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 Points earned in the course will be based as follows:
Evaluation
Activities
Due Date
Ongoing throughout
the semester
Points
30
Online Discussion
Ongoing throughout
the semester
80
Discussion Summary
As Assigned
10
Autobiography of a Person
with a Disability
9/25/13
25
Research Agenda Paper
12/1/13
40
Final Exam
12/16/13
30
__
215 Total Points
COMMUNICATION (E-MAIL AND UB LEARNS)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail and check UB Learns regularly for
important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB
e-mail account.
POLICY REGARDING ASSIGNMENTS AND AN INCOMPLETE IN THE COURSE
 Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the specified time on the designated date. Students will be
penalized 5% of the total points for the assignment for each day the assignment is late if
prior approval for late submission is not obtained from the instructor.
 Policy on Incomplete Grades for the Course
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe
illness) that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have
satisfactorily completed all course work prior to requesting an incomplete.
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s graduate
(http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php) catalog for the complete policy on incomplete
grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. The instructor may
set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If
an earlier date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
7
University at Buffalo OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 DISABILITY POLICY
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the course instructor and the Office Accessibility
Resources (OAR), 25 Capen Hall, 645-2608 during the first week of class. OAR will
provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable
accommodations.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in
accordance with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may
include a grade of 0 for an assignment and/or failure in a course. Students should review
the section of the APA Manual related to plagiarism and the proper format for quoting,
paraphrasing, and citing material. Plagiarism is a serious offense and will be dealt with
accordingly.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not
limited to the following examples:







Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has
been previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course,
without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that
material as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the
source (quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing
the work of another as one’s own.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information
to, another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources
such as cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an
examination or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes,
reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials;
resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered
without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials,
computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any
person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the
instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any
inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment,
which the seller knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in
fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
8
University at Buffalo 
OTD 532/RSC 514 Fall 2013 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic
assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic
program requirement.
9
University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OTD 551
THEORY OF OCCUPATION
Semester
Fall 2012
Units
2
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Lecture
Wednesday, 2:00 – 3:50 PM
Labs
Not Applicable
Location
Diefendorf 202
Susan M. Nochajski, PhD, OTR/L
Mary Matteliano, Ph.D., OTR/L
(Course Coordinator)
(Course Coordinator)
Kimball 526
Kimball 624
829-6942
829-6728
[email protected]
[email protected]
Office hours are by appointment. This course is team taught by several
faculty members. Students should contact a course coordinator for any
general questions pertaining to the course and each specific faculty
member presenting the lecture for questions related to content.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (OTPF) and several occupation-based theories,
models, and frameworks guide occupational therapy practice and research. However, as
occupational therapy practice changes and new practice areas emerge, such as public health,
there is a need for occupational therapists to be knowledgeable about theories from other
disciplines that complement occupational therapy research and practice, particularly those
theories related to health and wellness and health promotion.
In this course, students will gain an understanding of public health and its relationship to
occupational therapy. Various theories related to public health and health behavior will be
presented and their relevance to occupational therapy practice and research will be discussed.
As part of this course, students will also complete a series of 12 online modules that will provide
them with a basic knowledge of public health and an understanding of the ways in which
occupational therapy contributes to public health goals.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 560 and OT 561 or Acceptance into the Post-professional MS program.
1
University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
COURSE RATIONALE
The masters’ level practitioner is expected to influence growth and change in the profession of
occupational therapy. As such, a substantial ability is needed to analyze, synthesize, and
articulate the theoretical foundations of occupational therapy interventions, including those
theories from other disciplines that influence OT practice.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This graduate course builds on the material covered in OT 381: Occupational Therapy Theory,
and builds on the students’ fieldwork experience with a focus on public health to allow for a
more in-depth study of theories and models that are complementary to occupation-based
theories. Students will explore relationship of these theories and models to occupational therapy
practice and research, in particular, the critical analysis of the relationship of human occupation
and occupational function, dysfunction, and adaptation as it relates to promotion of health.
Students will have the opportunity to analyze and discuss numerous conceptual practice models
underlying occupational therapy practice and research. In this way, students will be challenged to
expand their view of occupational therapy intervention to understand how OT, which meets the
unique needs of individuals, also addresses the needs of populations and the general health and
quality of life of the public This experience will help students develop a conceptual framework
for master's level project or thesis, and will assist them in promoting physical and mental health
in individuals and populations.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Discuss and utilize the various
theories that contribute to the
development of occupational science,
occupational therapy, and
occupational therapy practice.
B.3.1
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
2. Discuss the assumptions and concepts B.3.1
of occupation underlying
occupational science and how this
impacts occupational therapy practice
and research.
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
Written
Assignments
3. Discuss the relationship between
theory, models, and the development
of new knowledge related to
occupational therapy practice.
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
Written
Assignments
B.3.6
2
University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
4. Discuss theory development in
occupational therapy and how
historical, sociocultural, and political
events influence how occupational
therapy is practiced nationally and
internationally.
B.3.4
B.3.6
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
5. Discuss the assumptions, concepts
and intervention strategies of
theoretical and conceptual models
used in occupational therapy in
relation to occupational function,
dysfunction, and adaptation.
B.3.2
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
6. Compare and contrast theories,
B.3.2
models of practice, and frames of
B.3.3
reference that are used in
occupational therapy practice,
including evaluation and intervention.
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
7. Develop an understanding of a broad
range of theories that are applicable
to occupational therapy practice and
research.
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
B.3.1
Written
Assignments
8. Articulate the relationship between
B.3.2
various theories and the Occupational
Therapy Practice Framework (OTPF).
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
9. Describe the relationship between the
OTPF and the International
Classification of Functioning,
Disability, and Health (ICF).
B.3.2
Readings
Lecture
Discussion
Class
Discussion
Exam
10. Describe how occupational therapy
intervention theory and models may
be used to impact the health of the
community.
B.2.4
B.5.15
Public Health
on-line
modules
Module text
questions
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.2.4.
B.3.1
Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with the
achievement of health and wellness.
Describe theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
3
University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
B.3.2
Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are
used in occupational therapy.
B.3.3
Discuss how theories, models of practice, and frames of reference are used in
occupational therapy evaluation and treatment.
B.3.4
Analyze and discuss how history, theory, and the sociopolitical climate
influence practice.
B.3.6
Discuss the process of theory development and its importance to occupational
therapy.
B.5.15
Develop and promote the use of appropriate home and community
programming to support performance in the client’s natural environment
and participation in all contexts relevant to the client.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Scaffa, M.E., Reitz, S.M., & Pizzi, M.A.(2010). Occupational therapy in the promotion of health
and wellness. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.
The text is available at the University Bookstore, Harriman Hall, South Campus. This text will
also be used during the Spring 2014 semester for OT 509.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
Readings will be listed in the Course Schedule and posted on UB Learns.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Students are expected to attend all classes and be prepared to actively participate in the class
discussions and activities. All required readings are to be completed before the class for which
they are assigned.
The required readings are listed in the course schedule and, if not in the text, will be posted on
UB Learns.
Assignment I – Assignment focuses on Theories of Aging Details will be posted in the
Assignment section of UB Learns.
Assignment II - Assignment focuses on the Kawa Model of Culture Competency. Details will be
posted in the Assignment section of UB Learns.
All students must complete the Public Health Modules as part of this class in order to
successfully complete the course. Additionally, content from the modules may be included on
the Exams 1 and 2.
Students are also expected to complete the online course evaluations at the end of the semester.
4
University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
GRADING
Course grades will be based as follows:
Due Date
Attendance and Participation
Ongoing
Exam 1
October 16
Exam 2 – Part 1
December 4
Exam 2 – Part 2 (Take Home)
Assignment I
Assignment II
Points
10
30
30
(Total for Part 1 and
Part 2)
December 11
October 2
November 13
15
15
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter
Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Letter
Grade
C+
C
D
F
Percentage
93-100%
90-92.99%
87-89.99%
83-86.99%
80-82.99%
Percentage
77-79.99%
70-76.99%
63-69.99%
< 63%
Please be aware that grades are not rounded-up.
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that result in you
being late or absent, you must contact me and the scheduled lecturer prior to the start of class (either by
email or by leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these
circumstances does not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all
information covered in class regardless of attendance.
Exams and Final Exam
Students are expected to be present for all examinations. In the case of exceptional circumstances
that prevent a student for taking an exam as scheduled, you must contact me prior to the start of
class (either by email or by leaving a telephone message). An alternate exam is at the discretion
of the instructor.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail and check UB Learns regularly for important
information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail account.
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University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (B or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the specified time on the designated date. Students will be penalized
5% of the total points for the assignment for each day the assignment is late if prior approval for
late submission is not obtained from the instructor.
Technology in the Classroom
The instructors encourage the use of technology to enhance the learning environment.
Technology that is misused in the classroom will be considered a disruption. Misuse of
technology includes: using cell phones, text messaging, tweeting, answering emails, or using the
computer/smart phone/I Pad for activities not immediately related to class work. Students will
be warned once during the semester about using technology inappropriately and after that they
will be asked to leave the classroom for that session. Students are responsible to make up the
work they missed if asked to leave class or lab. If a student has a need to be available for a phone
call that is considered very important, and cannot be delayed, they may leave the room when the
phone call is received if they cleared this with the instructor first.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
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University at Buffalo
OTD 551 Fall 2013
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
 Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
 Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
 Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
 Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
 Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
 Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
 Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
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OTD 551 Fall 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
OTD 551 – FALL 2013
Date
Lecture Topic
Instructor
August 28
Introduction to the Course
Matteliano
Readings
Note: Additional
readings will be
assigned
Text: Chapter 4
Nochajski
Text: Chapters 2 and 3
Readings to be assigned.
Overview: OT and Public Health
September 4
(2:00 – 2:50)
OT Conceptual Models for Health
Promotion; Health Behavior
Frameworks
(3:00 – 3:50)
Start Online Public Health Modules
September 11
Applying Theory to Clinical
Practice
Schweitzer
September 18
Theories of Aging
Matteliano/Nochajski Readings to be assigned.
September 25
Social Cognition Theory
Tomita
Readings to be assigned.
October 2
No Class – Complete Public Health
Modules 1-6
October 9
Health Promotion for People with
Disabilities
Nochajski
Text: Chapter 18
Readings to be assigned.
Discussion of Public Health
Modules 1-6
October 16
Exam 1
October 23
AT Models
Lenker
October 30
Cultural Competency/Kawa Model
Matteliano/Nochajski Readings to be assigned.
November 6
Clinical Application of the ICF
Bauer
Readings to be assigned.
November 13
Transtheoretical Model
Fisher
Readings to be assigned.
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University at Buffalo
November 20
Family Systems Theory
November 27
No Class – Fall Recess
December 4
Discussion of Public Health
Modules 7-12
OTD 551 Fall 2013
Tona
.
Nochajski
Exam 2: Part 1
December 11
Readings to be assigned.
Exam 2: Part 2
Submitted through Assignment
Submission in UB Learns by 5:00
PM on 12/11/13
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OTE 514
ADVANCED EVALUATION AND TREATMENT PRINCIPLES I: THE HIGH RISK
INFANT AND TODDLER
Semester
Lecture
Spring, 2014
Units 3
Tuesdays 11:00-12:20
Wednesdays 10:00-11:20
Location Lecture: DFN 203
Lab: DFN 5
Instructor
Janice Tona, Ph.D., OTR
Office
Kimball 625
Telephone
(716)829-6741
Email
[email protected]
Office Hours Tues. 10:00-11:00; Also available before and after class by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to provide the practitioner and researcher with theoretical, clinical, and
evidenced based knowledge as it applies to the neonates, infants, and toddlers with disabilities
and their families. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of current information and
research relating to this population. Models of assessment and intervention commonly used with
this population will be explored and analyzed. Legislative issues as well as efficacy of services to
this population will be examined
PRE-REOUISITE COURSES OT 314, OT 371, OT 381, OT 343, OT 345, OT 352, OT 440, and
OT 561, or permission of instructor.
COURSE RATIONALE
This course focuses on providing the graduate student with the tools to better understand and
critically analyze practice with the early intervention population (birth through three years of
age) and their families. Provided this foundation, the graduate level student will be able to
compare current practice with “best practice“ in regards to evaluation, treatment, and required
documentation. The course objectives are addressed through the provision of information in the
areas of assessment and intervention, as well as the skills to study and analyze current research
issues with this population.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
This course builds on introductory information on early intervention service delivery presented
in OT 382 and on theories and intervention techniques from GT 440 - Applied Pediatrics
courses, allowing for more in-depth application and analysis early intervention principles.
Theoretical constructs will be revisited and expanded upon as students examine the literature and
are mentored through clinical experiences designed to facilitate evidence based practice.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
Describe the underlying goal of
intervention services, models of early
intervention and the legislation mandating
early intervention.
B.3.2, 6.1,
6.2, 6.4, 6.5,
7.3
Readings, Class
discussion;
Albany Day
experience and
discussion
Discussion
Questions
Analyze the influence of contextual
factors such as Socioeconomic Status and
culture on the development of the child
and on the delivery of early intervention
services.
B. 6.2
Readings, Class
discussion;
Discussion
Questions
Select, analyze, administer, and interpret
screening and evaluation tools for infants
and toddlers, that are consistent with the
models and theoretical constructs
B.4.1, 4.2,
and 4.3
In-class
evaluation of
children
Evaluation write
up
Demonstrate the ability to critique,
analyze, and report on current literature
that supports or refutes early intervention
occupational therapy treatment
techniques, practice models, or other early
intervention points.
B.6.6, 8.2,
8.3
Readings, Class
discussion
Discussion write
up
After completion of this course the
student will be able to:
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
ACOTE STANDARDS
B.3.2.
Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are used in occupational
therapy.
B.4.1.
Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for
occupational therapy intervention. These include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools;
assessments; skilled observations; checklists; histories; consultations with other professionals; and
interviews with the client, family, and significant others.
B.4.2.
Select appropriate assessment tools based on client needs, contextual factors, and psychometric
properties of tests. These must be relevant to a variety of populations across the life span, culturally
relevant, based on available evidence, and incorporate use of occupation in the assessment process.
B.4.3.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats) when administering
assessments.
B.6.1.
Differentiate among the contexts of health care, education, community, and social systems as they
relate to the practice of occupational therapy.
B.6.2.
Discuss the current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic, and demographic
factors that influence the various contexts for practice of occupational therapy.
B.6.4.
Articulate the role and responsibility of the practitioner to address changes in service delivery
policies to effect changes in the system, and to identify opportunities in emerging practice areas.
B.6.5.
Articulate the trends in models of service delivery and their potential effect on the practice of
occupational therapy, including, but not limited to, medical, educational, community, and social
models.
B.6.6.
Use national and international resources in making assessment or intervention choices, and
appreciate the influence of international occupational therapy contributions to education, research,
and practice.
B.7.3.
Describe the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulation and their
implications and effects on practice.
B.8.2.
Effectively locate, understand, and evaluate information, including the quality of research evidence.
B.8.3.
Use research literature to make evidence-based decisions.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Clark, G. & Kingsley, K. (2013). Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Early
Childhood: Birth through 5 years. Bethesda, MD: AOTA press.
ADDITIONAL READINGS will be posted online from:
Chandler, B (Ed). (2010). Early Childhood: Occupational Therapy Services for Children Birth to
Five. Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
And from the American Occupational Therapy Association. All students are required to be
members of AOTA.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
This course will be run as a mastery-learning course. For all major assignments, students must
submit initial work on time to receive credit. The instructor will grade all submissions as
“acceptable” or “not acceptable”, and feedback will be given. Work will be considered
“acceptable” if a grade of 85 or above can be assigned to the work. Work that is “not acceptable”
will be returned and students will have one week to make changes and resubmit. Students may
resubmit major assignments up to two times (total of 3 submissions).
Final grades will be determined by the number and type of major assignments completed (as
noted below), with the student’s attendance and participation grade factored in (as noted below)
To receive a grade of 85% students must master (receive a grade of 85 or better) each of
the following:
1. Attend and participate in all classes.
2. Weekly reading, discussion question submission via safeassign and/or other assigned
work to accompany readings.
3. Analyze one standardized assessment used in early intervention and present that
evaluation to class.
4. Preparation and participation in in-class evaluations of children and other hands—on
class activities.
5. Prepare, participate in, and reflect on Early Intervention legislation at Albany Day on
February 26, 2014. Students who are not able to attend Albany Day will receive an
alternate assignment.
To receive a grade of 88%, students must master each of the above PLUS complete and
master (receive a grade of 85 or better) the following major assignment, with the first
submission due October 1.
Major Assignment:
Choose one of the following topics (or request approval for another topic) and identify an
electronic video or podcast that is available to the public that can be shared with families
of school-aged children. The resource should be of high quality (such as an interview
with a well-respected researcher or a video sponsored by a reputable organization). The
analysis should follow the format posted on UBlearns.
Early Intervention Regulations Parenting the young child
High-Quality Day Care
Reciprocity between young children and parents Sensory development of young children
Feeding/eating of young children Breastfeeding children with disabilities Promoting
spousal / partner roles among parents of young children with disabilities Managing
young children with behavioral needs 0. A particular diagnosis in children under the age
of 3 (ex: managing Prader Willi in a young child)
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
OR
Attend one live presentation or workshop related to Early Intervention and write a paper
describing the presentation.
To receive a grade of 91% students must master each of the above PLUS complete and
master (receive a grade of 85 or better) the following:
Attend an orientation session at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, observe and interact with
the occupational therapist, and write a reflective paper on the experience.
To receive a grade of 93% students must master each of the above PLUS complete and
master (receive a grade of 85 or better) the following:
Interview an occupational therapist working in early intervention (birth to 3) and observe
the occupational therapist in one session. Write a paper discussing the benefits and
limitations of working as an OT in early intervention. (Interview format Will be posted)
Attendance and Participation Factors:
Students will receive up to 3 points for attendance and participation in class and up to 3
points for discussion question submissions and feedback to classmates on their
presentations. Final grades will be determined by the number of assignments mastered
(as listed above) multiplied by the attendance and participation factor, as noted below.
Attendance and Participation Factor
85-100% 1.0
80-85% .95
75-80% .90
70-75% .85
For example:
A student who submits the acceptable work to receive a grade of B+ (88), has attended
all classes and submitted required discussion questions and feedback With less than a
perfect grade and a final grade of 86% on attendance and participation, would receive a
final grade of B+ (88).
A student Who submits the acceptable work to receive a grade of B+ (88), has attended
all classes and submitted required discussion questions and feedback With less than a
perfect grade and a final grade of 80% on attendance and, would receive a final grade of
B (88 x .95: 836).
Note: All group work includes results of peer participation ratings
GRADING
See Above
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
See Above
Note: A minimum grade of B is required for graduate courses.
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Students are required to attend all classes and be on time. Any failure to attend class will result
in your having an impact on the entire class because of the discussion component. A phone call
the day before to the instructor will be required in the case of illness or a family emergency.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB learns regularly and prior to
every class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through
your UB e-mail account
Incomplete Grades
See university policy (below)
Late Assignments
All written, presentation, and performance components of the assignments, and the research
article reviews are due in their entirety on the date listed. Please do not attempt to print out your
assignments in the computer lab just before they are due in class, because this can jeopardize
your having the assignment ready for submission when due. There is no option for late
assignments
Lab Requirements
All students are expected to arrive at lab approximately 20 minutes prior to their scheduled client
visit to set up the lab and ensure that they will not have a conflict with other groups when using
equipment. Students are expected to stay after the child leaves to clean up the lab.
Students are expected to treat the lab as they would a clinic. This includes dressing and behaving
in a professional manner for lab day. It also includes maintaining equipment and reporting any
broken, depleted, or missing equipment or supplies to the instructor.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
University Policy on Incomplete Grades
According to university policy, an interim grade of incomplete (‘I’) may be assigned if the
student has not completed all requirements for the course. The ‘I’ will be accompanied by a
default grade that will become the permanent course grade of record if the ‘I’ is not changed by
formal notice by the instructor upon the student’s completion of the course.
Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the discretion of the instructor. A grade of ‘I’ is to be assigned
only if successful completion of unfulfilled course requirements can result in a grade better than
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
the default grade; the student should have a passing average (equivalent to a grade of a least ‘D’)
in the requirements already completed. The instructor will provide the student specification, in
writing or by electronic mail, of the requirements to be fulfilled.
The default grade will become the grade of record if the ‘I’ is not replaced by a permanent grade
with twelve (12) months after the close of the semester for which the “I’ is assigned:
Fall: the following 31st of December
Spring: the following 31st of May
Summer: the following 31st of August
The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of course requirements. If an earlier
date for completion is set, the instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by
electronic mail.
A student may not re-register for any course in which the student has an interim “I”. When a
student graduates, an ‘I’ grade in any course included in the student’s degree program will
default to the permanent grade. If a student is continuing in a combined or multi-degree
program, e.g. receiving a B.S. in a B.S./M.S. program, any course for which the student has an
interim grade of ‘I’ that is not included in the courses constituting the student’s degree program
will be excluded from this provision but will remain subject to the maximum time limits.
For all undergraduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim grade of ‘I’ will be any
one of: ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘D’ or ‘F’. For all graduate courses the default grade accompanying an interim
grade of ‘I’ will be ‘U’. Neither ‘A’, ‘P’, nor ‘S’ will be assigned as a default grade.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, and also the instructor of this course during the first week of class. Accessibility
Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for
reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
a) Submission: The use of material previously submitted in whole or in substantial
part in another course, to satisfy academic requirements, without prior and expressed
consent of the instructor.
b) Plagiarism: Copying material from a source or sources and submitting this material as
one’s own without acknowledging the particular debts to the source (quotations,
paraphrases, basic idea), or otherwise representing the work of another as one’s own.
c) Cheating: Receiving information from another student or unauthorized source or
giving information to another student with intention to deceive while completing an
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University at Buffalo
OT 514 Spring, 2014
examination or individual assignment.
d) Falsification of academic materials: Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, all forms
of computer data, and reports; forcing an instructor’s name or initials; or submitting a
report, paper, materials, computer data, or examination (or any considerable part
thereof) prepared by any person other than the student responsible for the assignment.
e) Procurement: Distribution, or acceptance of, examinations, laboratory results, or
confidential academic materials without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
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OT 514 Spring, 2014
COURSE SCHEDULE
Topic
Date
Assignment/items Due
1/28& 29
Introduction to Course;
Chapter 3 – Family – centered practice (online)
2/4&5
Family-Centered Practice
Chapter 4: Infant, Toddler and Young Child
Development
Sociocultural factors and EI
Chapter 6: A day in the life of a young child:
Routines and Natural Environments
2/11& 12
Service Delivery in EI;
Efficacy of evidence-based EI
Chapter 1 Structure and Interaction of service
Provision
2/18& 19
Legislation; Prepare for Albany
Day
Chapter 2: Models and Process of Service
Provision
Due: Appointments, Schedule, etc. for Albany
2/25& 26
Albany Day
3/4& 5
EvaluationPresentations on TSFI, Bayley
Scales of Infant Development,
Peabody or other evaluation.
3/11& 12
Evaluate Child in Class
3/18& 19
SPRING BREAK
3/25&26
Neonatology
Due: Evaluation write-up on child (all students)
4/1&2
Physical delays in early
intervention
Online reading;
4/8&9
Psychosocial delays in early
intervention(note: Class meets
later on Wednesday)
Online reading
Due: write up of webcast/podcast or live
presentation if selected
4/15&16
Class does not meet
Papi Model - Online
Due: Papi model online tutorial (all students)
4/23
Play!
Due: Neonatology visit for mastery learning
project if selected
4/29& 30
Assistive Technology
Due: Interview with EI therapist if selected
5/6& 7
Discussion of Mastery Learning
Assignments
9
Due: Evaluation critique and presentation
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO
OTE 515
ADVANCED EVALUATION AND TREATMENT PRINCIPLES: II THE PRESCHOOL
CHILD
Fall 2013
3 Units
Lecture
Location
Instructor
Office
Telephone
Email
Office Hours
Wednesdays, 10:00-12:50
DFN 5
Janice Tona, Ph.D., OTR
625 Kimball Tower
716-829-6741
[email protected]
Tuesdays 1:00-2:00 or by appointment
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course expands upon the therapist’s theoretical and clinical knowledge of human growth
and development, within the context of pediatric OT practice for preschoolers from 3 to 5 years
of age. The class incorporates seminar, critical reading, community observation, and
faculty/student presentation formats to meet the stated objectives. Models of practice applicable
to the various types of preschool environments will be assessed with respect to their applicability
to evaluation and treatment procedures. Recent research concerning preschool children who
have a disability is also examined in relationship to OT evaluation and treatment. Understanding
and analyzing the Committee on Preschool Education Process and the process of formulating an
Individualized Education Plan is also a component of this course. Working within various
preschool environments and with various types of families is discussed for their unique
challenges.
PRE-REQUISITE COURSES
OT 314, OT 371, OT 381, OT 343, OT 345, OT 352, OT 440, and OT 561.
COURSE RATIONALE
Pediatric occupational therapists need to be prepared to address the unique needs of the
preschool aged child and his or her family. These children and families present with a wide
array of strengths and weaknesses, requiring an in depth knowledge of their particular needs. As
a result, the therapist must demonstrate competence in assessment and intervention with
preschoolers while considering the environment and the associated research. Furthermore, in
order to become an integral part of the process, the therapist working with preschool aged
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University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
children and their families must understand the legislation pertinent to this age group, and how
this legislation has been implemented according to federal and state laws and within the more
immediate community. This course addresses these issues.
RELATIONSHIP TO CURRICULUM DESIGN
This advanced course is presented in the fifth year of study for BS/MS students and as a graduate
course for post-professional masters students as it builds on the solid foundation of human
growth and development and pediatric intervention delivered prior to level II fieldwork. The
course invites students to explore and apply evidence surrounding preschool intervention and
encourages students to become leaders in the field.
COURSE OBJECTIVES, INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT
Learning Objectives
ACOTE
Standard
Instructional
Method
Assessment
Method
After completion of this course the student
will be able to:
1. Using information from current literature
and practice guidelines, describe and analyze
specific biophysical, cognitive, sensory,
gross motor, fine motor, and psychosocial
milestones and processes relating to
preschoolers’ occupational roles including
play.
2. Analyze selected preschool assessments
and interpret results.
8.2, 83,
Readings, class Discussion
discussion
questions and
comments
3.3, 3.5, 4.2,
4.3, 4.6, 4.7,
3. Plan and implement educationallyrelevant tier 1 Response to Intervention
plans, in collaboration with the preschool
teacher.
2.3, 2.8,
2.11, 3.1,
5.3, 5.7, 5.8,
5.17, 5.24,
5.26,
4. Discuss and analyze the requirements of
IDEA as applied to preschoolers including
the Committee on Preschool Special
Education (CPSE) process and the
requirements of the Individualized Education
Plan (IEP), and how occupational therapists
can impact future development of this
legislation.
7.2
Readings, class Assessment
discussion
critique
assignment
Readings, class Service
discussion,
learning
service
journals,
learning
observations,
and teacher
comments
Readings, class Discussion
discussion
questions and
comments
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OTE 515 Fall, 2013
5. Recognize the role of the family in
preschool intervention the impact of cultural
variations may on intervention, and
effectively collaborate with parents.
4.7, 5.7
13. Discuss the role of the COTA in pre
school and school-based intervention and
collaborative methods to be used when
working with an OTA.
4.5, 9.8,
Readings, class
discussion,
service
learning
assignment
Class
discussion,
Service
learning
journals,
observations,
and teacher
comments
Readings, class Discussion
discussion
questions and
comments
ACOTE STANDARDS
2.8
Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the
occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice.
2.10
Use clinical reasoning to explain the rationale for and use of compensatory strategies when desired life
tasks cannot be performed.
2.11
3.1
3.3
3.5
Analyze, synthesize, and apply models of occupational performance.
4.1
Use standardized and nonstandardized screening and assessment tools to determine the need for
occupational therapy intervention. These tools include, but are not limited to, specified screening tools;
assessments; skilled observations; occupational histories; consultations with other professionals; and
interviews with the client, family, significant others, and community.
4.2
Select appropriate assessment tools on the basis of client needs, contextual factors, and psychometric
properties of tests. These must be culturally relevant, based on available evidence, and incorporate use of
occupation in the assessment process.
Use appropriate procedures and protocols (including standardized formats) when administering
assessments.
Compare and contrast the role of the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in the
screening and evaluation process along with the importance of and rationale for supervision and
collaborative work between the occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant in that process.
4.3
4.5
Apply theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
Use theories, models of practice, and frames of reference to guide and inform evaluation and intervention.
Apply theoretical constructs to evaluation and intervention with various types of clients in a variety of
practice contexts and environments to analyze and effect meaningful occupation outcomes.
4.6
Interpret criterion-referenced and norm-referenced standardized test scores on the basis of an
understanding of sampling, normative data, standard and criterion scores, reliability, and validity.
4.7
Consider factors that might bias assessment results, such as culture, disability status, and situational
variables related to the individual and context.
5.3
Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g., occupation-based intervention,
purposeful activity, preparatory methods).
5.7
Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as
part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction.
5.8
Develop and implement intervention strategies to remediate and/or compensate for cognitive deficits that
affect occupational performance.
5.17
Develop and promote the use of appropriate home and community programming to support performance
in the client’s natural environment and participation in all contexts relevant to the client.
3
University at Buffalo
5.24
5.26
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as use of technology and adaptations to the environment,
that support performance, participation, and well-being
Understand when and how to use the consultative process with groups, programs, organizations, or
communities.
7.2
Demonstrate knowledge of applicable national requirements for credentialing and requirements for
licensure, certification, or registration under state laws.
8.2
8.3
9.8
Effectively locate, understand, critique, and evaluate information, including the quality of evidence.
Use scholarly literature to make evidence-based decisions.
Explain and justify the importance of supervisory roles, responsibilities, and collaborative professional
relationships between the occupational therapist and the occupational therapy assistant.
REQUIRED READINGS
TEXTBOOK
Clark, G. & Kingsley, K. (2013). Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Early
Childhood: Birth through 5 years. Bethesda, MD: AOTA press.
We will also be using several readings from AOTA publications. Therefore, AOTA membership
is required.
ADDITIONAL READINGS
References and readings will be posted weekly on UB learns. The student MUST BRING the
readings assigned to class each day – either in paper or electronic format.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & ASSIGNMENTS
Attendance and active participation in all classes, including contributions to
discussions.
Assigned readings as they appear on the Course Outline, and as provided
on UB Learns. Each student must bring the articles to class on the day they are
being discussed.
Reflective written discussion questions or comments on each research article assigned for
class. The questions or comments must not be statements such as: “Did anyone
ever have a child like this?” They must be directly related to the content of the
research article. These comments/questions must be sent to the professor in writing
by 10 pm each Tuesday prior to class and shared verbally in class to contribute to
discussion of the topic. These contributions will be a part of the student’s grade.
Attendance, professional behaviors, and active participation in all service
learning preschool site visits.
Reflective journal entries for each service learning visit following journal template
(a separate handout will be provided for this). Journal entries will be submitted to the
instructor via googledocs.
4
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
Preschool evaluation critique and class presentation, which will be about 15 minutes in
length
Development, implementation, and class presentation on one evidence-based project for the
preschoolers or the teachers in your service-learning environment. This should include
research references and should demonstrate an understanding of the unique characteristics and
needs of this preschool environment. You are expected to produce and share a power point
presentation with your classmates.
OR
Attendance, Participation, Journaling, and class presentation from Tourette Syndrome
Association annual Camp weekend.
GRADING
Attendance and active participation
15
Assigned readings and Reflective written discussion questions or comments
15
Attendance, professional behaviors, and active participation in all service
learning preschool site visits.
15
Reflective journal entries for each service learning visit following journal template
(a separate handout will be provided for this). Journal entries will be submitted to
the
instructor via googledocs.
30
Preschool evaluation critique and class presentation, which will be be about 15
minutes in length
10
Evidence-Based project or TSA Camp participation
15
Total
100
STUDENT GRADE DETERMINATION
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Percentage
93-100
90-92.99
87-89.99
83-86.99
80-82.99
Letter Grade
C+
C
CD
F
5
Percentage
77-79.99
73-76.99
70-72.99
66-69.99
<66
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
CLASS POLICIES
Class Attendance and Absences
Class attendance is mandatory and promptness is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances that
result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class (either by email or by
leaving a telephone message). Please be aware that an absence from class under these circumstances does
not excuse you from any required assignments. Students are responsible for all information covered in
class regardless of attendance.
Students attending class are expected to participate fully in the lecture and lab experience. Generating
questions, seeking clarification, and participation in class discussion benefits all students in the class.
Therefore, students are expected to silence all electronic devices, refrain from texting, checking email, or
otherwise communicating with individuals outside of class, and refrain from electronically surfing for
information not pertinent to the discussion at hand.
Students are welcomed and encouraged to use electronic versions of notes for class and labs. Some
handouts will need to be printed in paper format and will be so noted on UB learns when posted.
Exams and Final Exam
There are no exams in this class. Class may meet during final exam week for presentations as
scheduled.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
Students are expected to read their UB e-mail account and check UB Learns regularly and prior to every
class for important information and updates. Any e-mail communication must be through your UB e-mail
account. All e-mail communication must be written in letter-format, using proper grammar,
punctuation, and spelling. No “IM” type emails will be accepted.
All students are required to access UB Learns for assignments, class handouts, and announcements.
Students should frequently access their classroom website for updates and changes in assignments. Web
site address: http//ublearns.buffalo.edu. Students are responsible for printing handouts for classroom use.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. severe illness)
that preclude the student from completing the course. The student must have satisfactorily
completed all course work and successfully passed all exams (C or better) up until the time an
incomplete is requested.
Late Assignments
All assignments are due at the start of class on the designated date. Failure to complete and submit a paper
version of the assignment at the start of class on the designated date will result in a loss of 5% per day that
the assignment is late, up to 3 days. Papers will not be accepted if more than 3 days late.
Lab Requirements
Students are expected to participate in all lab activities. Students will observe individuals in the
community. Students are expected to adhere to a professional dress code, as described in the
student handbook and on UBLearns. Students are also expected to display professional
6
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
behaviors, including timeliness, appropriate discussions, and maintaining confidentiality of all
that is observed.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Incomplete Grades
A grade of incomplete (“I”) indicates that additional course work is required to fulfill the
requirements of a given course. Refer to the university’s undergraduate (http://undergradcatalog.buffalo.edu/index.shtml) or graduate (http://www.grad.buffalo.edu/policies/index.php)
catalog for the complete policy on incomplete grades. Assignment of an interim ‘I’ is at the
discretion of the instructor. The instructor may set an earlier deadline for completion of
course requirements than outlined in the catalog. If an earlier date for completion is set, the
instructor will inform the student thereof in writing or by electronic mail.
Note from the OT program: A grade of “I” is not considered a passing grade. Therefore courses
for which a student receives a grade of “I” do not fulfill the requirements of a pre-requisite
course. Due to the sequential nature of the OT curriculum, failure to rectify a grade of “I” prior
to the start of the next semester may result in the student decelerating in the program.
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to
participate in this course please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall,
645-2608, http://www.ub-disability.buffalo.edu/, and the instructor of this course during the first
week of class. Accessibility Resources will provide you with information and review appropriate
arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance
with the Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of 0 for
an assignment and/or failure in a course. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Please review the
websites listed in the Course Information section of UB Learns and at the end of the Course
Syllabus for suggestions related to citing and paraphrasing.
Academic Dishonesty: Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited
to the following examples:
1.
Previously submitted work. Submitting academically required material that has been
previously submitted—in whole or in substantial part—in another course, without prior
and expressed consent of the instructor.
1.
Plagiarism. Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material
as one’s own, without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source
(quotations, paraphrases, basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of
another as one’s own.
2.
Cheating. Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to,
another student or any other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as
cellular phones and PDAs), with the intent to deceive while completing an examination
or individual assignment.
7
University at Buffalo
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
Falsification of academic materials. Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or
any forms of computer data; forging an instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an
examination or assignment for reevaluation which has been altered without the
instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials, computer data, or
examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other than the
student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or
Official document, record, or instrument of identification.
Confidential academic materials. Procurement, distribution or acceptance of
examinations or laboratory results without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments. No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person
enrolled at the University at Buffalo any academic assignment, or any inappropriate
assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of any assignment, which the seller
knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or
academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments. No person shall purchase an academic assignment
intended for submission in fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
8
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
COURSE SCHEDULE
Date
Topic
Assignments
August 29

Introduction to course


Discuss of Course Outline and
Requirements
Student choices for
Evaluation Presentations
Schedule for Service Learning
IDEA Regulations in
preschoolers
Caseload to workload
http://www.aota.org/Consumers
/Professionals/WhatIsOT/CY
/FactSheets/38519.aspx?FT=.pdf
OT in school settings
http://otpt13.wikispaces.com/fil
e/view/OT_Services.in.Schoo
lBased.Settings_AOTA_ECP
TOTE_2011.pdf
September 4
September 11
September 18

Review of normal sensory,
gross, fine motor and play
development of the
preschooler.

Understanding play

How a sensory integration
problem affects the Play
and learning of the
preschooler.
Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Assessing the preschool child
with a disability
Select assessments for critique
or presentation
Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments


Sept 20-22

TOURETTE CAMP
9
Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Service Learning and journal
entry
Service Learning and journal
entry
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
Sept 25
CLASS DOES NOT MEET –
EXCHANGE FOR TOURETTE
CAMP OR WORK ON
EVIDENCE-BASED PROJECT
Service Learning and journal
entry
Oct. 2

Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Oct. 9

The impact of fine motor and
visual motor dysfunction on the
play and learning of the
preschool child
How a physical disability
problem affects the Play and
learning of the preschooler.
Service Learning and journal
entry
Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Service Learning and journal
entry
Obtain parental permission for
evaluation
Service Learning and journal
entry
Oct. 16
Presentations of Evaluations
Oct. 23
Presentation of Evaluations
Service Learning and journal
entry
Oct. 30

Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Nov. 6
Nov. 13



The influence of culture in
working with children and
families with special needs
Preschool legislation
Managing preschool workload
Working with occupational
therapy assistants
Service Learning and journal
entry
Assigned readings
Service Learning and journal
entry
Assigned readings and
discussion questions/comments
Service Learning and journal
entry
Nov. 20
Nov. 27
Dec. 4
Final Exam Week
Presentation of projects or TS camp Due: Presentation
presentation
Thanksgiving week
Presentation of projects or TS camp Due: presentation
presentation
Class may meet for presentations 10
University at Buffalo
OTE 515 Fall, 2013
TBA
11
RSC 570 Culture and Disability
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
This course provides an overview of the relationships among culture-based views
of disability, views about appropriate interventions and the roles of rehabilitation
professionals, persons with disabilities and family members. The course
examines the impact of these variables on health disparities, barriers to
rehabilitation services and the effectiveness of such services. The course will
review research on these relationships, as well as educational approaches to
teaching cultural competence in-service and pre-service.
COURSE OUTLINE
A. Definition of Course Objectives
At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Identify the role of culture in shaping beliefs and behaviours related
to health and disability.
2. Describe the culture of the health and rehabilitation systems in the U.S.,
including their goals and values.
3. Employ culturally appropriate methods to study, diagnose and treat disabling
conditions.
4. Identify appropriate strategies and methods for teaching cultural competency in
higher education.
B. Methods of Instruction: Lecture, discussion, case studies, student projects and
presentations.
C. Textbooks
Stone, J. (Ed.) (2005). Culture and disability: providing culturally competent
services. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
There will be reading assignments from chapters of other books and journal
articles.
D. Required student activities




Prepare for class by completing reading assignments
Attend classes and participate in discussions
Write a term paper and present an overview of the topic to the class
Engage in local fieldwork
E. Basis for grading
Participation in class discussions
Written Term Paper/Project
Presentation of Term Paper
10%
50%
15%
1
Class assignments
Fieldwork
15%
10%
A letter grade from A-C and F will be assigned.
A: 90-100
A- 85-89
B+: 80-84
B: 75-79
B-: 70-74
C+: 65-69
C: 60 – 64
F: Less than 60
2
F. Outline of the Content
Date
January
30, 2014
February
6
February
13
February
20
February
27
March 6
March 13
March 27
April 3
April 10
April 17
April 24
May 1
May 8
Topic
Overview of the
course.
Immigration patterns
and demographics.
Ethnic composition of
the rehabilitation
professions.
Health disparities
among foreign born
and minority groups
Special needs of
immigrants and
refugees with
disabilities
Fieldwork: participant
observation,
conducting interviews,
ethnography
The Culture Brokering
model and other
models of cultural
competence.
Culturally competent
services to children
and families.
Student presentations
Culturally competent
services in mental
health
Human rights vs
culture relativism
Religion and
spirituality
Teaching cultural
competence in the
rehabilitation
professions
Measuring cultural
competence
Student presentations
Student presentations
Readings
U.S. Census Bureau (2003), (2011) and (2012).
Stone (2005). Introduction and Overview.
Video:
http://www.empirestatephtc.org/videos/vid/culturedisability.cfm
Institute of Medicine (2002)
National Health Care Disparities Report (2003)
Giger, et. al. (2007)
Stone (2005) Chap. 1 & 2
Video:
http://www.empirestatephtc.org/videos/vid/vidsrc/refugees/index.cfm
Klienman, Eisenberg and Good (1978).
Campinha-Bacote (2002).
Jezewski and Sotnik (2005), Chap 3.
Lynch and Hanson, Chap.1. (Hanson)
Kalyanpur and Harry, Chap. 5 (Harry)
Arroyo
Fazel and Stein (2002)
Bickenbach (2009) and video (DVD)
Miles, M. (1999), Miles, M. (2009)
Matteliano & Stone, 2010.
CIRRIE Curriculum Guides
http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/culture/curriculum/guides/
Griswald, et al. 2007.
Lie, Boker & Cleveland (2006)
3
G. Course bibliography
Bickenbach, J. (2009). Disability, culture and the UN convention. Disability and
Rehabilitation, 31 (14): 1111-1124.
Campinha-Bacote, J. (2002). The process of cultural competence in the delivery of
healthcare services: a model of care. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, 13(3), 181184.
Fazel, M. and Stein, A. (2002) The mental health of refugee children. Archives of
Disabled Children 87 (366-370)
Giger, J., Davidhizar, R.E., Purnell, L., Taylor Harden, J., Phillips, J. & Strickland, O.
(2007). American academy of nursing expert panel report: developing cultural
competence to eliminate health disparities in ethnic minorities and other
vulnerable populations. Journal of Transcultural Nursing, (18), 2: 95-102.
Griswold, K., Zayas, L., Kernan, J.B., & Wagner, C.M. (2007). Cultural awareness
through medical student and refugee patient encounters. Journal of Immigrant
Health (9): 55-60.
Groce, N. E., & Zola, I. K. (1993). Multiculturalism, chronic illness, and disability
Pedicatrics, 91(5), 1048-1055.
Groce, N.E. (2005) Immigrants, disability and rehabilitation. In Stone, J. (Ed.) Culture
and disability: providing culturally competent services. Thousand Oaks, CA:
SAGE Publications.
Institute of Medicine. (2002). Unequal treatment: what healthcare providers need to know
about racial and ethnic disparities in health-care. Washington, D.C.: National
Academy Press.
Jezewski, M.A. and Sotnik, P. (2005). Culture and the disability services. In Stone, J.
(Ed.) Culture and disability: providing culturally competent services. Thousand
Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
Kalyanpur, M. (1999). Special education epistemology as a product of western culture:
implications for non-western families of children with disabilities. International
Journal of Rehabilitation Research. 22 (2):111-8.
Kleinman, A., Eisenberg, L., Good, B.. (1978). Culture, illness, and care: clinical lessons
from anthropologic and cross-cultural research. Annals of Internal Medicine. 88:
251-258, Feb.
http://content.ebscohost.com.gate.lib.buffalo.edu/pdf18_21/pdf/1978/AIM/01Feb78/7079
458.pdf?T=P&P=AN&K=7079458&S=R&D=a9h&EbscoContent=dGJyMMTo5
0SeprE4yNfsOLCmr0yep7NSr6u4SK%2BWxWXS&ContentCustomer=dGJyMP
Gusk6vqrVKuePfgeyx44Dt6fIA
4
Lattanzi, J.B. (2006). Physical therapy cultural encounters in geriatrics. In J.B. Lattanzi
& L.D. Purnell (Eds.) Developing cultural competency in physical therapy
practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis.
Lie, D., Boker, J. & Cleveland, E. 2006. Using the tool for assessing cultural competence
training (TACCT) to measure faculty and medical student perceptions of cultural
competence instruction in the first three years of the curriculum. Academic
Medicine, 81, 557-564.
Lynch, E. and Hanson, M. (Eds.) (2011). Developing cross-cultural competence: a guide
for working with children and their families. Baltimore: Paul Brooks Publishing.
Matteliano, M. and Stone J. (2010). Cultural competence education in rehabilitation. In
Balcazar, et. al. (Eds), Race, culture and disability. Sudbury, MA: Jones and
Bartlett.
McElroy, A. & Jezewski, M.A. (2000). Cultural variation in the experience of health and
illness. In G. L. Albrecht, R. Fitzpatrick, and S.C. Scrimshaw (Eds). The
Handbook of Social Sciences in Health & Medicine (pp. 191-209). Thousand
Oaks: Sage Publications
Miles, M. (1999). Some influences of religions on attitudes towards disabilities and
people with disabilities. In R.L. Leavitt (Ed.) Cross-cultural rehabilitation: An
international perspective. London: W.B. Saunders.
Miles, M. (2009). Religion and Spirituality. In: JH Stone, M Blouin, editors. International
Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation. Available online:
http://cirrie.buffalo.edu/encyclopedia/en/article/1/
Mpofu, E., & Conyers, L. M. (2004). A representational theory perspective of minority
status and people with disabilities: implications for rehabilitation science and
practice. Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, 47(3), 142-151.
National Healthcare Disparities Report, Washington, D.C: Agency for Healthcare
Research and Quality (AHRQ). Department of Health and Human Services, 2005.
Retrieved on January 8. 2014
http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/nhdr05/nhdr05.htm
National Center for Cultural Competence (2004). Bridging the cultural divide in
healthcare settings: the essential role of culture broker programs. Washington,
DC.: Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence.
Pernell-Arnold, A. (1998). Multiculturalism: myths and miracles. Psychiatric
Rehabilitation Journal, 21 (3), 224-230.
Royeen, M. and Crabtree, J. (Eds.) (2006). Culture in rehabilitation: from competency to
proficiency. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.
5
Sotnik, P. and Jezewski, M.A. (2005). Disability services providers as culture brokers.
In Stone, J. (Ed.) Culture and disability: providing culturally competent services.
Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.
Stone, J. (Ed.) (2001-2003). The rehabilitation service provider’s guide to the cultures of
the foreign born (monograph series). Buffalo, NY: CIRRIE
Stone, J. (2005). Introduction and overview. In Stone, J. (Ed.) Culture and disability:
providing culturally competent services. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE
Publications.
Stone, J. (2005) Understanding immigrants with disabilities. In Stone, J. (Ed.) Culture
and disability: providing culturally competent services. Thousand Oaks, CA:
SAGE Publications.
U.S. Census Bureau (2003). The foreign-born population: 2000. Washington, DC: U.S.
Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2005 from
http://www.census.gov/prod/2003pubs/c2kbr-34.pdf
U.S. Census Bureau (2011). How do we know? America’s foreign born in the last 50
years. Washington, DC: US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 3, 2014 from
http://www.census.gov/how/infographics/foreign_born.html
U.S. Census Bureau (2012) The foreign born population in the United States: 2010.
American Community Survey Reports. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau.
Retrieved January 3, 2014 from
http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/acs-19.pdf
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2004). Setting the agenda for research
on cultural competence in healthcare. AHRQ, Washington, D.C. Retrieved March
11, 2007 from http://www.ahrq.gov/research/cultural2.htm
Whiteford, G. E. (2005). Understanding the occupational deprivation of refugees: a case
study. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. 72 (2): 78-88.
Whyte, S.R.& Ingstad, B. (1998). Help for people with disabilities: do cultural
differences matter? World Health Forum, 19, 42-46.
Wilson, K., Whittaker, T., and Black, V. (2007) Case management and vocational
rehabilitation counseling. In Leung, P., Flowers, C., Talley, W., and Sanderson,
P. (Editors), Multicultural issues in rehabilitation and allied health. Linn Creek,
MO: Aspen Professional Services.
6
RSC 610: Rehabilitation Environments
University at Buffalo, Department of Rehabilitation Science
Instructor: Laura L. Lien, Ph.D.
Contact Information: 504 Kimball, (716) 829-2589, [email protected] (*email is preferred!)
Office Hours: Tuesdays 3:30-5pm or by appointment
Course Description
This course will examine environmental factors that support or inhibit the rehabilitation process and an
individual’s ability to maintain his/her functional status and participation in the community. This will be
explored in a variety of settings including acute and long-term health care facilities, independent
housing, alternative residential environments, educational environments, and public/community spaces.
Aspects of the physical and psychosocial environment of these settings, including accessibility
standards, usability, assistive technologies, placemaking, and universal design will be explored. Both
barriers in and possible modifications to these settings will be considered. Policy and research issues
pertaining to the physical environment will also be discussed. Concepts from architecture, urban and
regional planning, environmental psychology, human factors, person-environment fit theories, as well
as occupational therapy practice will be used as a theoretical foundation for this course.
Prerequisite Courses
Graduate standing.
Course Rationale
Many people have one or more disabilities that may interfere with daily activities and require
adaptations to the environment to support function and independence. The importance and impact of
physical, social, and psychological factors on performance, as well as the need for environmental
modifications, is often overlooked in rehabilitation programs. The concept of full participation in society
for persons with mental, developmental, cognitive, and physical disabilities, along with an increase in
the aging population, has resulted in a need for more professionals with appropriate training to act as
researchers, educators, and consultants in the areas of assistive technology, environmental
modifications, and person-environment fit.
Relationship to Curriculum Design
This course provides in-depth analysis related to content included in several themes of the occupational
therapy (OT) program curriculum design, including:
 The impact of biological, psychological, and social systems on occupational role performance
 Occupation-centered philosophical and theoretical basis for OT practice
 Understanding OT in a broader institutional and societal context
 Assessment, treatment planning, and therapeutic interventions
 Research and evidence-based practice
1
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
ACOTE
Standard
B.5.5
Instructional
Method
Class Discussion &
Activities; Readings
Assessment
Method
In-class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 4-6
Discuss the impact of legislation, regulations, and
judicial decisions in relation to the physical environment
and persons with disabilities
B.7.3
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 3-6
Discuss concepts and theories from environmental
psychology and other professional literature that
influence the rehabilitation process and a person’s
ability to function
B.3.1
B.3.2
B.3.3
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Discuss concepts from human factors literature that
influence the rehabilitation process and a person’s
ability to function
B.3.1
B.3.2
B.3.3
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Discuss the role of assistive technology in the
rehabilitation process and its effect on a person’s
functional performance and participation in society
B.5.9
B.5.20
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Discuss factors in residential, rehabilitation, and
community environments that facilitate or impede the
rehabilitation process and a person’s functional
performance and community participation
B.5.15
B.7.1
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Discuss appropriate methods and tools for assessing
various aspects of the physical environment
B.4.2
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignment 2
Develop solutions to problems encountered by persons
with disabilities which provide a person-environment
“fit”
B.5.8
B.5.15
B.5.19
B.8.3
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Develop an awareness of research issues related to
the role of the physical environment in the rehabilitation
process and maintenance and/or improvement of a
person’s functional performance and community
participation
B.8.3
Lecture; Class
Discussion &
Activities; Readings
In-Class Work;
Homework;
Assignments 1-6
Learning Objectives
Discuss the effects of various disabilities on sensory,
cognitive, and physical abilities in relationship to daily
activities and the environments for those activities
ACOTE Standards
B.3.1
B.3.2
B.3.3
B.4.2
B.5.5
B.5.9
B.5.8
B.5.15
B.5.19
B.5.20
2 Describe theories that underlie the practice of occupational therapy.
Compare and contrast models of practice and frames of reference that are used in OT.
Discuss how theories, models of practice, and frames of reference are used in OT evaluation and
intervention.
Select appropriate assessment tools based on client needs, contextual factors, and psychometric
properties of tests.
Provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, cognitive, perceptual, sensory (e.g.
vision, tactile, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, pain, temperature, pressure, vestibular, proprioception),
neuromuscular, and behavioral skills.
Articulate principles of and be able to design, fabricate, apply, fit, and train in assistive technologies and
devices (e.g. electronic aids to daily living, seating systems) used to enhance occupational
performance.
Modify environments (e.g. home, work, school, community) and adapt processes, including the
application of ergonomic principles.
Develop and promote the use of appropriate home and community programming to support
performance in the client’s natural environment and participation in all contexts relevant to the client.
Grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and interventions to reflect the
changing needs of the client and the sociocultural context.
Select and teach compensatory strategies, such as the use of technology, adaptions to the
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
environment, and involvement of humans and nonhumans in the completion of tasks.
Explain how the various practice settings (e.g. medical institutions, community practice, school systems)
affect the delivery of OT services.
Describe the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulation and their
implications and effects on practice.
Use research literature to make evidence-based decisions.
B.7.1
B.7.3
B.8.3
Required Readings & Weekly Discussion Questions
There is not a required textbook for this course. However, if you do not already have the APA manual
(6th Edition), it is strongly recommended that you obtain a copy of this reference:
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological
Association (6th Ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
Readings will be assigned from a variety of sources found in the Readings & Activities section on UB
Learns. All readings are to be read before the class date to which they are assigned.
Additional readings will be posted as needed. Please check the Announcements section on UB Learns
for information as to when and where any additional required readings will be available.
As you complete each reading, make note of at least two related discussion questions. Bring your list of
questions from each reading to class every week for group discussion. On occasion, and unannounced,
discussion questions will be collected at the start of class for in-class participation/activity points.
Questions do not need to be word processed, but need to be legible, organized by reading, and written
on a separate piece of paper (in the event they are turned in).
Course Requirements
Students are required to – be punctual and attend all classes
read the assigned weekly readings prior to the start of class
prepare and write a minimum of two discussion questions based on each
required weekly reading prior to the start of class
actively participate in discussions both in the classroom and on UB Learns
complete in-class and out-of-class activities and assignments
Course Assignments
Details for all out-of-class course assignments are posted under Assignments in UB Learns.
Late Policy: Assignments will lose 10% per day late (starting on the due date at the end of
class). Absence from class on the day an in-class graded activity was performed will result in
zero points unless approved in advance.
Grading
Date Due
February 3rd by 7am
Points
10
Assignment 2 – Environmental Assessment & Measurement
Tools Presentation
February 17th by 7am
20
Assignment 3 – Assistive Technology & Home Modifications
Information Search
February 24th
10
Assignment 4 – Research Article Discussion & Written Report
March 3rd (article sent via
email) & as assigned
30
Assignment 5 – Navigating the Built Environment Project
April 21st by 7am
40
Assignment 1 – Environmental Evaluation Photos & Discussion
th
Assignment 6 – Space & Place Design Project
May 5 by 7am
65
Discussion Questions, Class Participation, & In-Class Activities
Ongoing
25
TOTAL POINTS 200
3
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
Final Grade
A
AB+
B
B-
Total Points Earned
94 – 100
90 – 93.99
87 – 89.99
84 – 86.99
80 – 83.99
Final Grade
C+
C
CD
F
Total Points Earned
77 – 79.99
74 – 76.66
70 – 73.99
60 – 69.99
< 60
Class Attendance
Since many in-class activities and discussions will be completed throughout the semester (ultimately
contributing to your final grade), class attendance is expected. In the case of exceptional circumstances
that result in you being late or absent, you must contact me prior to the start of class. Please be aware
that an absence from class under exceptional circumstances does not excuse you from any required
assignments or deadlines.
Exams and Final Exam
There are no exams in this class.
Communication (E-mail and UB Learns)
UB Learns will be used in this course. You can access the online course material and information
through MyUB. You will need to have a valid UB account to use this system. All students are required
to use UB Learns for access to assignments, readings, and announcements. Students are responsible
for printing out handouts, readings, and assignments for classroom use.
Students are expected to check their UB e-mail and UB Learns regularly and prior to every class for
important information and updates. E-mail communication must be through your official UB e-mail
account. All e-mails must be written professionally, using proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling. I
reserve the right to return or deny e-mails that are not respectful and/or professional in nature.
Please plan ahead for questions, comments, or feedback you may need from me. I regularly check email during the work day (Monday – Friday), but rarely past 5pm and only sporadically on weekends.
Similarly, I am not always in my office to receive phone calls, so please use e-mail when possible. I will
do my best to get back to you promptly, but pressing issues should be planned for in a timely fashion.
Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades will be given only if there are extenuating circumstances (e.g., severe illness) that
preclude the student from completing the course. Based on Graduate School standards, the student
must have satisfactorily completed all coursework (B or better) up until the time an incomplete is
requested. Assignments of “I” will follow UB policies on incomplete grades (available upon request).
Technology
The use of technology to enhance the learning environment is encouraged. Technology that is misused
in the classroom will be considered a disruption. Misuse of technology includes: using cell phones, text
messaging, Tweeting, Facebooking, surfing the web, answering emails, or using the computer/smart
phone/iPad/other electronics for activities not immediately related to classwork. Students may use
laptops or other electronic devices to reference readings, etc., but only when permission is granted.
Course Evaluations
All students are requested to participate in the online course evaluation at the end of the semester. One
aspect of professionalism is to offer constructive feedback on a course and make this available to the
instructor. Useful student input will assist in improving the course for future classes. Please take the
time to participate in the online course evaluation as a professional courtesy.
4
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
Disability Policy
If you have any disability which requires reasonable accommodations to enable you to participate in
this course, please contact the Office of Accessibility Resources, 25 Capen Hall, (716) 645-2608. You
must also inform me of any accommodations during the first week of class. Accessibility Resources will
provide you with information and review appropriate arrangements for reasonable accommodations.
Academic Integrity
Students who are suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with severely in accordance with the
Occupational Therapy Program and University Policy. This may include a grade of zero for an
assignment and/or course failure. Plagiarism will not be tolerated. This includes turning in similar and/or
identical work to another student unless group work is explicitly stated in assignment directions or
otherwise approved by the instructor.
Academic Dishonesty
Actions that compromise academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the following examples:
Previously submitted work.
Submitting academically required material that has been previously submitted—in whole or
substantial part—in another course, without prior and expressed consent of the instructor.
Plagiarism.
Copying or receiving material from any source and submitting that material as one’s own,
without acknowledging and citing the particular debts to the source (quotations, paraphrases,
basic ideas), or in any other manner representing the work of another as one’s own.
Cheating.
Soliciting and/or receiving information from, or providing information to, another student or any
other unauthorized source (including electronic sources such as cellular phones and PDAs),
with the intent to deceive while completing an examination or individual assignment.
Falsification of academic materials.
Fabricating laboratory materials, notes, reports, or any forms of computer data; forging an
instructor’s name or initials; resubmitting an examination or assignment for reevaluation which
has been altered without the instructor’s authorization; or submitting a report, paper, materials,
computer data, or examination (or any considerable part thereof) prepared by any person other
than the student responsible for the assignment.
Misrepresentation of documents.
Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University or Official document, record, or instrument of
identification.
Confidential academic materials.
Procurement, distribution, or acceptance of examinations or laboratory results without prior and
expressed consent of the instructor.
Selling academic assignments.
No person shall sell or offer for sale to any person enrolled at the University at Buffalo any
academic assignment, or any inappropriate assistance in the preparation, research, or writing of
any assignment, which the seller knows, or has reason to believe, is intended for submission in
fulfillment of any course or academic program requirement.
Purchasing academic assignments.
No person shall purchase an academic assignment intended for submission in fulfillment of any
course or academic program requirement.
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University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
Course Schedule
Any course schedule changes will be announced in class and posted in Announcements on UB Learns.
All readings will be posted in UB Learns under Readings & Activities. They are organized by week. Any
additional required readings will be assigned and posted at least one week prior to the class for which
they are assigned. Please check weekly readings (and announcements) regularly for any new postings.
Date
Course Topic
Homework Due
1/27
Introduction to Course
Readings
What is the “environment”?
Environmental Evaluation Photo Discussion
(Assignment 1)
Aging & Disability:
Legislation, Regulations, & Judicial Decisions
2/3
Readings
Environmental Psychology
Human Factors
Person-Environment Interaction
2/10
Readings
Accessibility, Usability, & Universal Design
Environment Assessment/Measurement Tools
Presentation (Assignment 2)
2/17
Readings
Environmental Assessments &
Measurement Tools
Assistive Technologies/Home Modification
Information Search (Assignment 3)
2/24
Readings
Assistive Technology & Home Modifications
Electronic copy of research article (for
Assignment 4) emailed to Laura by 9am on 3/3
3/3
Home Environments:
Independent (Community Dwelling) Housing
Readings
3/10
Home Environments:
Senior-Specific Retirement Communities
Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs)
Smart House Technologies
Enjoy Spring Break!
Spring Break:
No class!
Readings
3/17
6
Remember your readings for 3/24…
and work on your Space & Place Project
if you get bored (?)
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
3/24
Healthcare/Alternative Residential Environments:
Hospitals & Acute Care
Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs)
Readings
3/31
Community Environments:
School Settings
Environments for Children
Work Settings
Readings
4/7
Community Environments:
Leisure & IADLs
Visitability
Readings
4/14
Navigating the Built Environment:
In-Class Activity
Readings
Navigating the Built Environment Project
(Assignment 5)
4/21
Continue progress on Space & Place Design
Project (Assignment 6)
Community Environments:
Health Promotion
Disability & Age-Friendly Design
Prepare for project meeting with Laura
4/28
Assignment 6 Work & Meetings:
No formal class!
Space & Place Design Project (Assignment 6)
5/5
Group Presentations:
Space & Place Design Project
Enjoy the summer!!
7
University at Buffalo
RSC 610 Spring 2014
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