Armia indyjska oob 2010

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Armia indyjska AD 2010
Headquarters, Indian Army, New Delhi
o 50th Independent Parachute Brigade headquartered at Agra
o 140 Armoured Brigade in Jaisalmer. Arjun MBT
Central Command,
Eastern Command, headquartered at Kolkata, West Bengal
headquartered at
Lucknow, Uttar
Pradesh
I Corps — Currently
III Corps,
IV Corps,
XXXIII Corps,
assigned to South
headquartered at
headquartered at
headquartered at
Western Command
Dimapur, Nagaland
Tezpur, Assam
Siliguri, West Bengal
Holding Holding
Holding
Holding
 23rd Infantry
 2nd Mountain
 17th Mountain
Division
Division
Division
headquartered at
headquartered at
headquartered at
Ranchi
Dibrugarh
Gangtok
 57th Mountain
 5th Mountain
 20th Mountain
Division
Division
Division
headquartered at
headquartered at
headquartered at
Leimakhong
Bomdila
Binnaguri
 21st Mountain
 27th Mountain
Division
Division
headquartered at
headquartered at
Rangia
Kalimpong
 ?th Artillery
brigade
Southern Command, headquartered at Pune,
Maharashtra
41st Artillery Division, headquartered at Pune,
Maharashtra
South Western Command, headquartered at
Jaipur, Rajasthan
Northern Command, headquartered at Udhampur, Jammu and Kashmir
XIV Corps,
headquartered at Leh,
Jammu and Kashmir
Holding
 3rd Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Leh
 8th Mountain
Division
headquartered at
Dras
 ?th Artillery
brigade
XV Corps,
XVI Corps,
headquartered at
headquartered at
Srinagar, Jammu and
Nagrota, Jammu and
Kashmir Holding
Kashmir Holding
 19th Infantry
 10th Infantry
Division
Division
headquartered at
headquartered at
Baramulla,
Akhnoor
 28th Infantry
 25th Infantry
Division
Division
headquartered at
headquartered at
Gurez
Rajauri
 ?th Artillery brigade  39th Infantry
Division
headquartered at Yol
 ?th Artillery brigade
 2?th Armoured
brigade
 3? th Armoured
brigade
 16? th Armoured
brigade
Western Command, headquartered at Chandimandir
XII Corps,
headquartered at
Jodhpur, Rajasthan
Holding
 4th Armoured
Brigade
 340th Mechanised
Brigade
 11th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Ahmedabad
 12th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Jodhpur
Indian Army Divisions
1 1 Armored Div
2 2 Mountain Div
3 3 Infantry Div
4 4 Infantry Div
5 5 Mountain Div
6 6 Mountain Div
7 7 Infantry Div
8 8 Mountain Div
9 9 Infantry Div
10 10 Infantry Div
11 11 Infantry Div
XXI Corps,
headquartered at Bhopal,
Madhya Pradesh Strike
o
31st
Armoured Division
headquartered at
Jhansi
o
36th
RAPID Sagar
o
54th
Infantry Division
(India)Hyderabad/Se
cunderabad
o
?th
Artillery brigade
o
?th Air
defence brigade
o
475th
Engineer Brigade
Airawat
...
Trishul
Red Eagle
Ball of Fire
...
Golden Arrow
...
Pine
Dah
Golden Katar
I Corps,
headquartered at
Mathura, Uttar
Pradesh Strike
 4th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Allahabad
 6th Mountain
Division
headquartered at
Bareilly
 33rd Armoured
Division
headquartered at
Hisar
 40th Artillery
Division
headquartered at
Ambala
Cantonment[48]
 ?th Engineer
Brigade
Ambala
Dibrugarh
Leh
Allahabad
Bomdila
Bareilly
Ferozepur
Dras
Meerut
Akhnoor
Ahmedabad
II Corps
IV Corps
XIV Corps
I Corps
IV Corps
I Corps
XI Corps
XIV Corps
XI Corps
XVI Corps
XII Corps
X Corps,
headquartered at
Bhatinda, Punjab
Holding
 16th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Sri Ganganagar
 18th RAPID at
Kota
 24th RAPID at
Bikaner
 6th Independent
Armoured Brigade
 615th Independent
Air Defence
Brigade
 471st Engineer
Brigade
Western
Eastern
Northern
SouthWest
Eastern
SouthWest
Western
Northern
Western
Northern
Southern
II Corps,
headquartered at
Ambala, Haryana
Strike
 1st Armoured
Division
headquartered at
Patiala
 14th RAPID at
Dehradun
 22nd Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Meerut
 474th
EngineerBrigade
 612th Mechanised
Independent Air
Defence Brigade
IX Corps,
headquartered at Yol,
Himachal Pradesh
Holding
 26th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Jammu
 29th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Pathankot
 2nd Independent
Armoured Brigade
 3rd Independent
Armoured Brigade
 16th Independent
Armoured Brigade
XI Corps,
headquartered at
Jalandhar, Punjab
Holding
 7th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Firozpur
 9th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Meerut
 15th Infantry
Division
headquartered at
Amritsar
 23rd Armoured
Brigade
 55th Mechanised
Brigade
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
12 Infantry Div
14 RAPID
15 Infantry Div
16 Infantry Div
17 Mountain Div
18 RAPID
19 Infantry Div
20 Mountain Div
21 Mountain Div
22 Infantry Div
23 Infantry Div
Battle Axe
Golden Key
Panther
Sudarshan
Black Cat
...
Dagger
Kirpan
Red Horns
Ram
Seval
Jodhpur
Dehradun
Amritsar
Ganganagar
Gangtok
Kota
Baramulla
Binnaguri
Rangia
Meerut
Ranchi
XII Corps
II Corps
XI Corps
X Corps
XXXIII Corps
X Corps
XV Corps
XXXIII Corps
IV Corps
II Corps
III Corps
Southern
Western
Western
SouthWest
Eastern
SouthWest
Northern
Eastern
Eastern
Western
Eastern
23 24 RAPID
...
Bikaner
X Corps
SouthWest
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Ace of Spades
Tiger
Striking Lion
...
Silver Mace
White Tiger
Dot
Rajauri
Jammu
Kalimpong
Gurez
Pathankot
Jhansi
Hisar
XVI Corps
IX Corps
XXXIII Corps
XV Corps
IX Corps
XXI Corps
I Corps
Northern
Western
Eastern
Northern
Western
Southern
SouthWest
25 Infantry Div
26 Infantry Div
27 Mountain Div
28 Mountain Div
29 Infantry Div
31 Armored Div
33 Armored Div
31 36 RAPID
...
32 39 Infantry Div
33 40 Artillery Div
34 41 Artillery Div
Talwar
...
...
Sagar
XXI Corps
SouthWest
180. Armoured Brigade Bikaner, 25. Infantry Brigade Bhatinda, U/I infantry
brigade Lalgarh Jattan, Division Artillery Brig Bikaner
94. ArmdBrig 83, 12, 13, 15 and 19 Armoured Regiments all T90 Bishma
18.ArmdBrig Gwalior 72.InfBrig Gwalior, 115 InfBrig Dhana: 5 Bn/1st Gorkha
Rifles; 72 InfBrig: 4 Bn/5 Gorkha Rgt, 13 Sikh LI Bn; 41 InfBrig: 5 Rajputana
Rifles; ArtBrig Talbehat
Yol
XVI Corps
Northern
Amballa
...
Western
Pune
...
Southern
Sikandrabad/Hyd
47 InfBrig:; 76 InfBrig:; 91 InfBrig: 1 Maratha Light InfBn, 5 Madras Bn, 8
35 54 Infantry Div
Bison
XXI Corps
Southern
erabad
Mahar Bn
36 57 Mountain Div
Red Shield
Leimakhong
III Corps
Eastern
37 ??? Infantry Div
...
...
The Division is lowest (or the highest, depending on the viewpoint) individual formation. They integrate in themselves all arms and services for sustained independent
operations. Each Division composes of several Brigades. Divisions are designated by function, terrain of operation, or by their equipment mix. The Army has in its Order of
Battle mountain divisions, infantry divisions, armoured divisions (in which tank units predominate). An Infantry Division typically has about 15,500 combat troops, with
8,000 support elements (artillery, engineers, etc). It consists of 3 to 5 Infantry Brigades, an Armoured Regiment and an Artillery Brigade.
The old Indian Army prior to 15 August, 1947, was divided into three Commands Northern, Southern and Eastern. A fourth, Central Command, was raised during the war and
disbanded in September, 1946. Of the Indian divisions which took part in the World War II, the 6th, 8th, 10th, 14th, 17th, 19th, 20th, 23rd, 25th, 26th and 39th were
disbanded, those remaining being the 4th, 5th, 7th Infantry Divisions, 1st Armoured Division and the 2nd Airborne Division.
In 2002 the army had 1,100,000 personnel, by one report in five regional command with 12 corps with 3 armored divisions, 4 RAPID light mechanized divisions, 18 infantry
divisions, 9 mountain divisions, and 15 independent brigades (7 armored) - for a total of 34 divisions. Another report said they were organized into three armored divisions,
one mechanized division, 18 infantry divisions, nine mountain divisions [for a total of 31 divisions, not counting 4 RAPID divisions], five independent armored brigades, five
independent infantry brigades, three independent artillery brigades, four air defense brigades, and three engineer brigades. The divisions are numbered consecutively from 1
through 29, skipping 13, and with no apparent pattern for the remaining divisions, save that the two artillery divisions are numbered 40 and 41.
Accounts differ as to how many Divisions are in the Indian Army as of 2008, with some reports saying as few as 34 divisions and other reports saying the Indian Army has as
many as 37 Divisions. Wikki sources report that the 34 divisions include:
 18 Infantry Divisions
 10 Mountain Divisions
 4 RAPID (Re-organised Army Plains Infantry Divisions) Action Divisions
 3 Armoured Divisions
 2 Artillery Divisions
It will be seen that this amounts to 37 divisions, not 34, though readily available lists enumerate 36 divisions. From this perspective, the discrepancy between 36 identifiable
divisions and 37 total divisions amounts to one Infantry Division, since only 17 can be identified. And the discrepancy between 36 identifiable divisions and 34 reported total
divisions are the two artillery divisions, which are not always counted along with maneuver [armour, infantry, etc] divisions.
Mountain units may serve in other terrain when circumstances dictate, and thus all may not be prepared for immediate operations at high altitude. It was announced in
February 2008 that establishment approval was being sought for the raising of two further mountain divisions.
In the 1980s 33 Division was formed as a mechanized division (in which mechanized infantry units predominate), but this type of formation was found not particularly useful
and 33 Division was reformed as an Armored Division.
Krishnaswami Sundarji [died New Delhi 8 February 1999] was India's most brilliant, ambitious and controversial chief of army staff. In 1976 Sundarji became the first
infantry officer to command an armoured division. During his three-year tenure he realised his ambition of raising the desperately needed mechanised infantry regiment.
Sundarji took this forward in the '80s to shape the army's perspective, the Army Plan 2000, which outlined a new mobile strategy based on tanks, firepower and enhanced
communications. Reorganised Army Plains Infantry Division (RAPID) formations, a brainchild of General Sundarji, have three brigades - two mechanised infantry and one
armoured. Four infantry divisions were converted into the Reorganised Army Plains Infantry Division (RAPIDS). Night fighting capabilities have been enhanced through
third generation passive devices and thermal imaging systems. Sophisticated VHF and HF equipment have been developed to produce jam resistant frequency hopping sets
while different kinds of indigenous radar will boost the air defence and artillery capabilities. These RAPID divisions were essentially infantry divisions with one mechanized
brigade which would give the division greater mobility. The divisional structure was reduced by a brigade, on the assumption that the manpower reduction would be offset by
various force multipliers and surveillance. Needless to say, the Army waited in vain, for the financial resources for this technological makeover were simply never allotted.
Brigades
Independent Brigade Groups
Armour
Mech
Artillery Air Def
Engnr Aviation
Strike Corps
I Corps
II Corps
XXI
Corps
1 (14?)
1 (23)
1
1?
south western
1?
1 (612)
1 (474)
1 (sqn) western
1?
1?
1 (475)
1 (sqn) southern
Holding Corps
III Corps
IV Corps
IX Corps ? (3)
X Corps 1 (6)
XI Corps 1 (23)
XII Corps 1 (4)
XIV
Corps
XV Corps
XVI
3 (2,3,16)
Corps
XXXIII
Corps
TOTAL
reported
armored
mechanized
eastern
1
eastern
?
western
1
1?
south western
1 (55)
1
western
1 (340)
1
southern
1
northern
1
northern
1
northern
1
eastern
7+
5
21
6-7
1
2
7
12 +
15
3
3
3
4
Regiments / Battalions
2
2
4-6
A Brigade is commanded by a Brigadier, and an Infantary Brigade consists of three Infantry Battalions. There is great flexibility in their force mix, and in 'grouping for
tasks'. Brigade (regiment in some armies) size combined-arms groups can be shed or added on at will. Standard Tables of Organization and Equipment do exist, but these are
taken lightly for accounting purposes only.
A regiment can be a type of battalion (eg. in the Artillery/Engineers) or a grouping of a number of battalions of the same type (eg. The Rajput Regiment). The regiments of
armor are equipped with three basic types of tanks - 55 T-72M1, 55 modified T-55s or 72 Vijayantas. The Indian army intended to have 65 regiments of armor by the year
2000, each with between 55 and 72 tanks. The T-72M1 is the principal combat tank of the army and has replaced the Vijayanta in local production. The new Arjun Main
Battle Tank is entering service at an extremely slow rate. By 2009 the Pakistan border was where 58 out of the army's 59 tank regiments were deployed.
Independent brigade groups, as the name suggests, are vested with limited capability to carry out an independent mission. Independent brigade groups or independent
brigade-sized formations may be armoured (135 tanks + 45 supporting AFVs), mechanized, air defence (missile or gun), parachute, engineer, field artillery, electronic
warfare or even standard infantry and mountain. These form 'Corps/Army troops', that is, they are held at Corps and Army levels for balancing out missions and task forces.
At these levels, one would find heavy logistic support units in terms of supply, transport, field ordnance depots, and medical facilities. These Independent Brigades operate
directly under the Corps Commander (GOC Corps).
One source reports that the Indian Army had 5 Independent Armoured Brigades [although there are seven such brigades that are identifiable by number], 15 Independent
Artillery Brigades [although the allocation by Corps discloses no more than 12 or 13], 7 Independent Infantry Brigades [only four of which are attested], 1 Independent
Parachute Brigade, 3 Independent Air Defence Brigades, 2 Independent Air Defence Groups and 4 Independent Engineer Brigades [although the whereabouts of a
fourth such brigade is not apparent]. This source did not mention any Independent Mechanised Brigades, though other sources attest at least two Independent Mechanised
Brigades.
FIELD FORMATIONS
4 RAPID Divisions
18 Infantry Divisions
10 Mountain Divisions
3 Armoured Divisions
2 Artillery Divisions
6 Air Defence Brigades + 2 Surface-to-Air Missile Groups
5 Independent Armoured Brigades
15 Independent Artillery Brigades
7 Independent Infantry Brigades
1 Parachute Brigade
4 Engineer Brigades
14 Army Aviation Helicopter Units
SUB-UNITS
63 Tank Regiments
7 Airborne Battalions
200 Artillery Regiments
360 Infantry Battalions + 5 Para (SF) Battalions
40 Mechanised Infantry Battalions
20 Combat Helicopter Units
35+ Air Defence Regiments
Armoured Corps
Armoured Brigades [armd bde]
Independent Brigades indep armd bde
2. Independent Armoured Brigade
3. Independent Armoured Brigade
4. Independent Armoured Brigade
6. Independent Armoured Brigade
14. Independent Armoured Brigade
16. Independent Armoured Brigade
23. Independent Armoured Brigade
1. President,s Body Guarde (recon/parachute)
2. 1 Horse /Skinner’s Horse T-72 od 1979 1ArmdDiv
3. 2 Lancers /Gardner's Horse T-72
4. 3 Cavalry br wojsk pd
5. 4 Horse /Hodson's Horse 1 ArmdBrig 1ArmdDiv
6. 5 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 43ArmdBrig 1ArmdDiv
7. 6 Lancers od 2006 eks 6 Armoured Regiment T-72 od 2002
8. 7 Light Cavalry
9. 8 Light Cavalry
10. 9 Horse /Deccan Horse
11. 10 Armoured Regiment
12. 11 Armoured Regiment
13. 12 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 31ArmdDiv
14. 13 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 31ArmdDiv
15. 14 Horse
16. 15 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 31ArmdDiv
17. 16 Light Cavalry 1 ArmdBrig 1ArmdDiv
18. 17 Horse/Poona Horse 1 ArmdBrig 1ArmdDiv
19. 18 Cavalry
20. 19 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 31ArmdDiv
21. 20 Lancers
Divisional Brigades
1. Armoured Brigade 1 Armored Division 416 17 ppanc
43. Armoured Brigade 1 Armored Division 5 i 16 ppanc T-90
98. Armoured Brigade 1 Armored Division
31 Armored Division
31 Armored Division
94. Armoured Brigade 31 Armored Division
39. Armoured Brigade 33 Armored Division
57. Armoured Brigade 33 Armored Division
88. Armoured Brigade 33 Armored Division 33. ArtBrig i 627. Ind ArmdADBrig
14 RAPID
18 RAPID
180. Armoured Brigade 24 RAPID
18. Armoured Brigade Gwalior 36 RAPID
Armoured Regiments [armd regt]
42. 65 Armoured Regiment
43. 66 Armoured Regiment
22. 21 Central Indian Horse Dtwo Pd XXI KA 31ArmdDiv/36RAPID Div
44. 67 Armoured Regiment
23. 39 Cavalry?
45. 68 Armoured Regiment T-72 1985
24. 40 Armoured Regiment
46. 69 Armoured Regiment
25. 41 Armoured Regiment T-72 1997
47. 70 Armoured Regiment
26. 42 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 2007-9 za T-55
48. 71 Armoured Regiment
27. 43 Armoured Regiment first received 16 Arjun 25.05.09 140ArmdBrig
49. 72 Armoured Regiment
28. 44 Armoured Regiment
50. 73 Armoured Regiment 25.08.09 T-90S Bishma 1st rgt
29. 45 Armoured Regiment eks T-55
51. 74 Armoured Regiment
30. 46 Armoured Regiment
52. 75 Armoured Regiment 140ArmdBrig 2nd Arjun?
31. 47 Armoured Regiment
53. 76 Armoured Regiment
32. 48 Armoured Regiment
54. 80 Armoured Regiment
33. 49 Armoured Regiment
55. 81 Armoured Regiment
34. 50 Armoured Regiment T-72M1 1989
56. 82 Armoured Regiment
35. 51 Armoured Regiment 1989
57. 83 Armoured Regiment T-90 Bishma 31ArmdDiv
36. 52 Armoured Regiment T-72 1994
58. 84 Armoured Regiment
37. 53 Armoured Regiment
59. 85 Armoured Regiment
38. 61 Cavalry reprezentacyjny konny
60. 86 Armoured Regiment 1977 T-55
39. 62 Cavalry
61. 87 Armoured Regiment
40. 63 Cavalry T-90 Bishma? 43ArmdBrig 1ArmdDiv
62. 88 Armoured Regiment
41. 64 Cavalry
63. 89 Armoured Regiment
64. 90 Armoured Regiment 1979 10IDiv
The Indian Army fields 63 Armoured Regiments, including the President's Body Guards. From the 65th Armoured Regiment onwards, the term 'Cavalry' and 'Lancer' was
dispensed with and all subsequent raisings are designated just as Armoured Regiment (AR).
Brigade of the Guards
The regiment currently consists of a
total of 19 battalions.[1] The
majority of these operate as
mechanised infantry, with four
operating
in
the
reconnaissance and support
role, in support of the border
force. Of these, one is
equipped as an anti-tank
missile battalion and three
proudly remain as infantry.
Today, the regiment is one of
three in the Indian Army that
is made up of men from the
different castes and regions of
India. The regiment currently
consists of a total of 19
battalions.[1] The majority of
these operate as mechanised
infantry, with four operating in
the
reconnaissance
and
support role, in support of the
border force. Of these, one is
equipped as an anti-tank
missile battalion and three
proudly remain as infantry.
Today, the regiment is one of
three in the Indian Army that
is made up of men from the
different castes and regions of
India.
1.
2.
1st Battalion
(Mechanized) (former 2
Punjab)
2nd Battalion
Mechanised Infantry Regiment
z wyj 23bz wszystkie bz od nr 15
powstały po utw. rgtu w 1.04.1979
1.
1st Battalion (former 1st Bn,
Madras Regiment)
2.
2nd Battalion (former 1st Bn,
Jat Light Infantry)
Parachute regiment
Three of the Special Forces battalions were originally trained for
use in certain environments; 1st bn [strategic reserve], 9th Bn
[mountain] and 10th Bn [desert] and the 21st Bn [jungle].
Currently all Special Forces battalions are cross trained for all
environments.
The 8th Battalion became 16th Battalion, Mahar Regiment in 1976
before reconverting to the 12th Battalion, Mechanised Infantry
Regiment. A sizable part of the battalion was retained in the
airborne role for some time, forming the armoured element of the
50th (Independent) Parachute Brigade and equipped with their
BMP2 Infantry Combat Vehicles.
Presently, a platoon strength of each of the three parachute
battalions is trained and equipped for a mechanized role.
The 50th (Independent) Parachute Brigade comprises two
parachute battalions, one special forces battalion, 60 Parachute
Field Hospital, 411 (Independent) Parachute Field Company
(Bombay Sappers), 622 Parachute Composite Company ASC, 50th
(Independent) Parachute Brigade OFP (Ordnance), 50th
(Independent) Parachute Brigade Signal Company, 2 (Independent)
Parachute Field Workshop Company, 1 parachute field regiment
(Artillery) (9 & 17 parachute field regiments), an air defence
battery and a provost section. The President's Body Guard also
forms part of the brigade as the pathfinders company.
The three parachute battalions in rotation form part of the
parachute brigade alternatingly serving their field tenures in
counter-insurgency/high altitude areas. One of the seven SF
battalions too serves in the brigade on rotation. One of the two
field regiments (9 Para Fd Regt and 17 Para Fd Regt) also forms
part of the brigade while the other serves out its field tenure on
rotation.
Two Territorial Army battalions, 106th (Bangalore) and 116th
(Deolali) also form part of the Parachute Regiment. They form the
elite part of the Terriers (as the Territorial Army is popularly
known) and presently involved in COIN operations.
Last, but not the least, 31st Battalion (Commando), Rashtriya
Rifles, is also affiliated to the Parachute Regiment, for special
operations conducted by the counter-insurgency force.
1. 1st Battalion (Special Forces) - ex 1st Battalion, 2nd
Punjab Regiment Raised 1761, conversion to Special
Forces 1978
2. 2nd Battalion (Special Forces) - ex 3rd Battalion,
Punjab Regiment
Apart from the above battalions,
the following were also
affiliated to the Regiment at one
time or the other.
 1st Battalion --------> 1 Para
(Special Forces)
 2nd Battalion --------> 1
Guards (Mechanized)
 4th Battalion -------->
Disbanded in 1938
 7th Battalion --------> 8th
Mechanised Infantry
 8th Battalion -------->
Disbanded after World War
II
 10th Battalion ------->
Regimental Centre
1.
2.
3.
3rd Battalion
9th Battalion
13th Battalion
(former State Forces
Madras regiment
Currently the regiment has a
strength of 19 battalions.
The 1st Battalion was
converted to the
Mechanised Infantry
Regiment.
1.
2.
2nd Battalion (old 75th
Carnatic Infantry)
3rd Battalion (old 79th
Carnatic Infantry)
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
(Mechanized)(former 1
Grenadiers)
3rd Battalion
(Mechanized)(former 1
Rajputana Rifles)
4th Battalion
(Mechanized)(former 1
Rajput)
5th Battalion
(Mechanized)
6th Battalion
(Mechanized)
7th Battalion
(Mechanized)
8th Battalion
(Mechanized)
9th Battalion
(Mechanized)
10th Battalion
Mechanized)
11th Battalion
(Mechanized)
12th Battalion
(Mechanized)
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
(Mechanised)
15th Battalion (Recce &
Sup)
16th Battalion (Recce &
Sup)
17th Battalion (ATGM)
18th Battalion
(Mechanised)
19th Battalion (Recce &
Sup)
3.
3rd Battalion (former 1st Bn, 8
Gorkha Rifles)
4.
4th Battalion (former 1st Bn,
Sikh Regiment)
5.
5th Battalion (former 14th Bn,
Kumaon Regiment)
6.
6th Battalion (former 1st Bn,
Garhwal Rifles)
7.
7th Battalion (former 1st Bn,
Dogra Regiment
8.
8th Battalion (former 7th Bn,
Punjab Regiment)
9.
9th Battalion (former 7th Bn,
The Grenadiers)
10.
10th Battalion (former 20th Bn,
Maratha Light Infantry)
11.
11th Battalion (former 18th Bn,
Rajputana Rifles)
12.
12th Battalion (former 16th Bn,
Mahar Regiment /8 Para Bn)
13.
13th Battalion (former 18th Bn,
Rajput Regiment)
14.
14th Battalion (former 16th Bn,
Jammu & Kashmir Rifles)
15.
15th Battalion
16.
16th Battalion
17.
17th Battalion (Recce & Sup)
18.
18th Battalion
19.
19th Battalion (Recce & Sup)
20.
20th Battalion
21.
21st Battalion
22.
22nd Battalion
23.
23rd Battalion (Recce & Sup)
24.
24th Battalion (former 20th Bn,
Rajput Regiment)
25.
25th Bn
Maratha Light Infantry raised 1797, conversion to
Special Forces 2000
3. 3rd Battalion (Special Forces) - ex 1st Battalion,
Kumaon Regiment raised 1813, conversion to Special
Forces 2004
4. 4th Battalion (Special Forces) raised 1961, conversion
to Special Forces 2001 or 2003. It contributed to the Sri
Lanka Indian Peace Keeping Force in the 1980s. The
Battalion has the distinction of completing the Siachen
Glacier tenure without suffering a single casualty on
account of weather or enemy action. The battle honour
of the battalion is sadiqia earned during the 1971 war.
5. 5th Battalion raised 1963
6. 6th Battalion raised 1963
7. 7th Battalion raised 1964
8. 9th Battalion (Special Forces) raised 1966 as 9th
Parachute Commando Battalion. The batallion formed
an irregular force known as 'Meghdoot Force' during
the 1965 Indo-Pak War (Operation Riddle).
9. 10th Battalion (Special Forces) raised 1967 as 10th
Parachute Commando battalion. The battalion
distinguished itself in the desert sector during the 1971
Operations.
10. 21st Battalion (Special Forces) - ex 21st Battalion,
Maratha Light Infantry raised 1985, conversion to
Special Forces 1996
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
unit)
14th Battalion
(former State Forces
unit)
15th Battalion
(former State Forces
unit)
16th Battalion
(former State Forces
unit)
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
20th Battalion
21st Battalion
22nd Battalion
23rd Battalion
24th Battalion
25th Battalion
26th Battalion
27th Battalion
28th Battalion
29th Battalion
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
1.
2.
3.
106th Battalion (TA) (Bangalore)
116th Battalion (TA)(Deolali)
31st Battalion (Commando), Rashtriya Rifles, is also
affiliated to the Parachute Regiment
1.
102nd Infantry
Battalion (TA) Punjab
2.
150th Infantry
Battalion (TA) Punjab
4th Battalion (old 83rd
Wallajahabad Light
Infantry)
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion (Shandaar
Saat chamkte rahe )
8th Battalion
9th Battalion Madras
Regiment (former State
Forces unit)
10th Battalion
11th Battalion (old
Territorial Battalion)
12th Battalion (old
Territorial Battalion)
16th Battalion (former
State Forces unit)
17th Battalion (former
State Forces unit)
18th Battalion (former
Mysore Infantry)
19th Battalion
25th Battalion (old
garrison battalion)
26th Battalion (old
garrison battalion)
27th Battalion (old
garrison battalion)
28th Battalion (old
coastal defence
battalion)
3.
156th Infantry
Battalion (TA) (H&H) Punjab
4.
7th Battalion
Rashtriya Rifles Punjab
5.
22nd Battalion
Rashtriya Rifles Punjab
6.
37th Battalion
Rashtriya Rifles Punjab
7.
53rd Battalion
Rashtriya Rifles Punjab
Razem88x bp z tego 40 bz (7x rozp i wsp) 10xbpd (7 SF, 3 bpd) (15 Guards, 25 Mech Rgt, 10 Par, 19 Punjab, 19 Madras)
5xbp (TA) (2 Para, 3 Punjab), 5 RR (1 Para, 4 Punjab)
The Grenadier Regiment
1. 2nd Battalion (102nd KEO
Grenadiers)
2. 3rd Battalion (108th Infantry)
3. 4th Battalion (109th Infantry)
4. 5th Battalion (112th Infantry)
5. 6th Battalion
6. 8th Battalion
7. 9th Battalion (former State
Forces unit)
8. 11th Battalion (old Territorial
battalion)
9. 12th Battalion
10. 13th Battalion
11. 14th Battalion
12. 15th Battalion
13. 16th Battalion
14. 17th Battalion
15. 18th Battalion
16. 19th Battalion
17. 20th Battalion
18. 21st Battalion
19. 22nd Battalion
The Maratha Light Infantry
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
1st Battalion (old 103rd Mahratta LI)
2nd Battalion (old 105th Mahratta LI)
4th Battalion (old 116th Mahrattas)
5th Battalion (old 117th Mahrattas)
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
11th Battalion (old Territorial battalion)
12th Battalion (old Territorial battalion)
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion (former State Forces
unit)
17.
18.
21st Battalion
22nd Battalion (former State Forces
unit)
19.
26th Battalion
The Rajaputna Rifles
1.
2nd Battalion (former 120th
[PWO] Rajputana Infantry)
2.
3rd Battalion (former 122nd
Rajputana Infantry)
3.
4th Battalion (former 123rd
Outram's Rifles)
4.
5th Battalion (former 125th
Napier's Rifles)
5.
6th Battalion
6.
7th Battalion
7.
8th Battalion
8.
9th Battalion
9.
11th Battalion
10.
12th Battalion (former 31st
Rajputana Rifles)
11.
13th Battalion
12.
14th Battalion
13.
15th Battalion
14.
16th Battalion
15.
17th Battalion (former State
Forces unit)
16.
19th Battalion
17.
20th Battalion
18.
21st Battalion
19.
28th Battalion
Rajaput Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
2nd Battalion (old 4th Prince
Albert Victor's Rajputs)
3rd Battalion (old 7th DCO
Rajputs)
4th Battalion (old 8th Rajputs)
5th Battalion (old 11th
Rajputs)
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion (former 11th
Rajput)
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
19th Battalion (former State
Forces unit)
21st Battalion
22nd Battalion
23rd Battalion
24th Battalion
25th Battalion
26th Battalion
27th Battalion
The Jat Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
2nd Battalion (former 15th
Jat)
3rd Battalion (old 10th Jats)
4th Battalion (old 18th Inf.)
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion (former 11th Jat)
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion (former 31st
Jat)
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
20th Battalion
1st Battalion (101st Grenadiers)
> 2 Guards
7th Battalion (former State
Forces unit) ------> 9 Mech. Inf.
Old 3rd Battalion (former 110th Mahrattas) -------> 2 Para (SF)
Old 10th Battalion (former 114th Mahrattas) ->
Maratha LI Regiment Centre
20th Battalion --> 10 Mechanised Infantry
21st Battalion ------> 21 Para (SF)
101 Infantry Battalion (TA) ---> (Maratha LI)
109 Infantry Battalion (TA) -> (Maratha LI)
17 Rashtriya Rifles
26 Rashtriya Rifles
41 Rashtriya Rifles
34 Medium Regiment
36 Medium Regiment
1st Battalion (former 104 Welleseley's
Rifles) ----------> 3rd Guards
10th Battalion (former 13th Rajputs
[Shekhawati]) -> The Regimental Centre
18th Battalion -> 11th Mechanised
Infantry
1st Battalion ---------> 4 Guards
18th Battalion ----> 13 Mech. Inf.
20th Battalion (former State Forces unit)
-------> 24th Mech. Inf.
Razem 84xbp (19 Grenadier, 19 Maratha LI, 19 Rajaputna, 20 Rajaput, 17 Jat)
2xbp (TA, Maratha LI), 3xbp RR (Maratha LI) 2xśrpa (Maratha)
The Sikh Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
20th Battalion
21st Battalion
22nd Battalion
1st Battalion ---> 4th Mech.
Inf.
9th Battalion -> Disbanded
in 1984
The Sikh Light Infantry
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
The Dogra Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
1st Battalion ----> 7th Mech. Inf.
Garhwal Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
1st Battalion ----> 6th Mech. Inf.
Kumaon Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion (ex-31st
Battalion)
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
20th Battalion
21st Battalion
Kumaon Scouts
1 Naga
2 Naga
1st Battalion -------> 3rd Parachute
10th Battalion -----> Kumaon
Regimental Centre
14th Battalion -----> 5th Mech. Inf.
The Assam Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
Razem 107xbp (18 Sikh, 18 Sikh LI, 18 Dogra, 18 Garhwal, 21 Kumaon, 14 Assam)
The Bihar Regiment
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
14th Battalion
16th Battalion
17th Battalion
21st Battalion
The Mahar Regiment
1.
1st Battalion
2.
2nd Battalion
3.
3rd Battalion
4.
4th Battalion
5.
5th Battalion
6.
6th Battalion
7.
7th Battalion
8.
8th Battalion
9.
9th Battalion
10.
10th Battalion
11.
11th Battalion
12.
12th Battalion
13.
13th Battalion
14.
14th Battalion (ex31st Mahar)
15.
15th Battalion (ex32nd Mahar)
16.
17th Battalion
17.
18th Battalion
18.
19th Battalion
The Jammu & Kashmir
Rifles
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
7th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
14th Battalion
15th Battalion
17th Battalion
18th Battalion
19th Battalion
20th Battalion
16th Battalion (former 8th
16th Battalion ------> 14
Para) ------> 12th Mech. Inf. Mech. Inf.
31st Battalion --> 14th Mahar
32nd Battalion -> 15th Mahar
Jammu & Kashmir Light
Infantry
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
6th Battalion
8th Battalion
9th Battalion
10th Battalion
11th Battalion
12th Battalion
13th Battalion
15th Battalion
16th Battalion
Naga Regiment
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
1. 3rd Battalion
*1 and 2 Naga form part
of the Kumaon Regiment.
The Gorkha Regiments
1 Gorkha rifles
1.
1st Battalion
2.
2nd Battalion
3.
3rd Battalion
4.
4th Battalion
5.
5th Battalion
3 Gorkha rifles
6.
1st Battalion
7.
2nd Battalion
8.
3rd Battalion
9.
4th Battalion
10.
5th Battalion
4 Gorkha rifles
11.
1st Battalion
12.
2nd Battalion
13.
3rd Battalion
14.
4th Battalion
15.
5th Battalion
16.
6th Battalion
5 Gorkha rifles (Frontier
Force)
17.
1st Battalion
18.
2nd Battalion
19.
3rd Battalion
20.
4th Battalion
21.
5th Battalion
22.
6th Battalion
7th Battalion ---> 1st Ladakh
Scouts
14th Battalion -> 2nd Ladakh
Scouts
Razem 105xbp (14 Bihar, 18 Mahar, 18 Jammu & Kashmir Rifles, 14 Jammu & Kashmir LI, 1 Naga, 40 Gorkha)
ogółem
8 Gorkha rifles
23.
2nd Battalion
24.
3rd Battalion
25.
4th Battalion
26.
5th Battalion
27.
6th Battalion
28.
7th Battalion
1st Battalion --> 3rd Mech. Inf.
9 Gorkha rifles
29.
1st Battalion
30.
2nd Battalion
31.
3rd Battalion
32.
4th Battalion
33.
5th Battalion
34.
6th Battalion
11 Gorkha rifles
35.
1st Battalion
36.
2nd Battalion
37.
3rd Battalion
38.
5th Battalion
39.
6th Battalion
40.
7th Battalion
4th Battalion Disbanded
384xbp z tego 40 bz (7x rozp i wsp) 10xbpd (7 SF, 3 bpd)6xfrontier force=361xbp w 22x pułk (15 Guards, 25 Mech Rgt, 10 Par, 19 Punjab, 19 Madras, 19
Grenadier, 19 Maratha LI, 19 Rajaputna, 20 Rajaput, 17 Jat, 18 Sikh, 18 Sikh LI, 18 Dogra, 18 Garhwal, 21 Kumaon, 14 Assam, 14 Bihar, 18 Mahar, 18 Jammu &
Kashmir Rifles, 14 Jammu & Kashmir LI, 1 Naga, 40 Gorkha (6x frontier force)
24xbpTA7 znanych (2 Para, 3 Punjab, 2 Maratha LI) 63-66xbp RR(1 Para, 4 Punjab, 3 Maratha LI) 2xśrpa (Maratha)
The Rashtriya Rifles is a counter-insurgency/anti-terrorist force in India. It is a paramilitary force deployed in Jammu and Kashmir.
All units of the Army have an organizational structure called the War Establishment (WE). According to the WE are laid down the number of men, vehicles, weapons etc
which the unit is authorized for carrying out it's assigned role. The infantry battalions (inf bns) in the Indian Army have a standard organization called the Inf Bn
Standard. Other types of inf bns according to their assigned role are called by various modifications to the Inf Bn Standard like Inf Bn CI, Inf Bn Mountains, Parachute
Inf Bn, Para Commando Bn and even (till 1975) Camel Mounted Bn. Till the RR came into the picture, the infantry battalions tasked for CI ops were on the Inf Bn CI.
They had four companies and retained their battalion heavy weapons since they were dual tasked. The RR on the other hand has an organization structure tailor made for
CI ops. They have six infantry companies and do not have the heavy battalion weapons which the Inf Bn CI carry although RR troops do train on them. Thus they
do not incur the costs of a heavier unit. Also unlike regular army units which were rotated out of the valley regularly, the RR concept was to rotate personnel after fixed
periods of deputation. Currently this is for two years. The RR units are permanently located in "sectors", with each sector being the equivalent of a brigade with three
battalions. To create a distinct identity, the RR has its own dress, special insignia and flag logistics. The RR units come under four CI Force HQs. Victor Force looks after
Anantnag and Pulwana districts in the south Kashmir valley, Kilo Force looks after Kupwara and Baramulla districts in the north Kashmir valley. Both these forces come
under the operational control of the 15 Corps. The Delta Force looks after the Doda district and the Romeo Force after Poonch and Rajouri. These two forces come under
the operational control of the 16 Corps. Each force is headed by a GOC-in-C with the rank of a Major General. In terms of their location and use, each of the units and
sectors was seen as being interchangeable with a regular, equivalent army formation. GOC Victor Force in some instances would have 2 sector HQs and a regular
infantry brigade in his charge. On the other hand when 8 Mountain Division moved to Kashmir, it came with 2 brigades which were then augmented by adding a sector
of the RR apart from a couple of independent mountain brigades to it. After the government gave the go-ahead to setup the RR, the army decided to milk its existing
units by 10-20% of their personnel to set up it up quickly. The officers and men came on deputation from all branches of the army including the Infantry, Army Service
Corps, EME, Artillery, Armoured Corps. The infantry provides 50%, services 10% and other arms 40% of the troops. In fact the army mothballed a few armoured
regiments and transferred their manpower to the RR. Each regimental center was given the task of raising 1-2 battalions in one year time. During this period, the units
were raised and sent to the Northern Command where they got another 4 to 6 weeks to consolidate. All of them went through a structured 8 week course in special CI
schools. They were then given another month to stabilize and then sent to the more dormant sectors of Kashmir and to the Punjab. To provide some experience base, 6
RR battalions were exchanged for 6 Assam Rifles units. In raising the Rashtriya Rifles to full strength, the Army also had to dig into its war-wastage reserves, with the
best available vehicles, weapons and radio sets going to the RR. In fact the RR units were even the first to receive bullet-proof jackets and patkas. With manpower drawn
from all its arms and services, the Army has had to deal with serious shortages in many of its conventional units, for Rashtriya Rifles battalions are maintained at full
authorized strength. However once the teething problems were overcome the RR proved it was worth the trouble.
The Rashtriya Rifles comprises 63 battalions.
The efficacy of an RR battalion arises from the fact that unlike conventional Army battalions, it has six rifle companies instead of four they possess and has kept its heavy
weapons -- useless in their sphere of activities -- back at their bases.
Originally comprising a total of four Counterinsurgency Forces, each responsible for an area of the Kashmir Valley and Jammu, the RR raised a fifth force 'Uniform' in
2003-04.:
 Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) R / Romeo Force - Rajouri and Poonch
 Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) D / Delta Force - Doda
 Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) V / Victor Force - Anantnag, Pulwama and Badgam
 Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) K / Kilo Force - Kupwara, Baramulla and Srinagar
 Counter Insurgency Force (CIF) U / Uniform Force - Udhampur and Banihal
Rashtriya Rifles
To reduce the commitment of Army on internal security duties, the Rashtriya Rifles (RR) has been at the forefront in counter-insurgency (CI) operations.
Indian strategists believed that in the event of a war, the 40,000-strong Rashtriya Rifles would protect the lines of communication and supplies from terrorist attacks in Jammu
and Kashmir. Made up of troops posted on deputation from the Army, the Rashtriya Rifles was meant to ensure that India's LoC divisions could do their job, engaging
Pakistan, unhindered by guerilla action.
The Regiment has a distinct dress code, akin to a rifle regiment. Its badge depicts two crossed AK-47 rifles with fixed bayonets atop which is the coveted Ashoka Chakra.
Beneath, in a banner, is emblazoned the motto of this force - dridhta aur virta. Incidentally, the AK-47 is the main personal weapon of this force.
Rashtriya Rifles was raised as a para-military force as it was envisaged that personnel posted to RR would comprise regular Army volunteers on deputation, ex-servicemen
and lateral inductees from various para-military forces and central police organisations. However, ever since its inception this force has comprised hundred per cent regular
Army deputationists.
This is the only regiment where troops from the Infantry and other arms and services operate together to combat terrorism under a common RR banner. Each battalion
comprises six rifle companies. The infantry component comprises sixty per cent troops while that of other arms forms twentyfive per cent. The remaining fifteen per cent
troops comprises task oriented troops from various services to provide the logistic back-up to the RR battalion.
All individuals, prior to joining their respective units, have to undergo a four-week rigorous pre-induction training at a Corps Battle School. This is followed by two weeks of
'on-the-job' training and a periodic refresher training cadre under sector arrangements.
The reputation of Rashtriya Rifles as a specialised anti-terrorist force has a tremendous impact on the militant's psyche who avoid any kind of direct confrontation with RR
troops. Secondly, due to the proactive nature of operations conducted by well-trained and well-equipped troops, militants lost a number of their cadres, arms and equipment
which was a grave setback to them. Such pressures against the militants have been continuously maintained by RR troops in a relentless manner. The motivation of all ranks
to perform better has it roots in various factors such as a sense of pride to get selected in a special force with a separate identity, dress and organisation. Each individual is
given here the opportunity to prove his mettle in operational field.
The achievements of RR have been laudable indeed. Amongst its plethora of honours and awards won are one Ashoka Chakra, 10 Kirti Chakra, 53 Shaurya Chakra and 300
Sena Medals. Among the awardees on Republic Day this year were Lt Gen Avtar Singh, the former Director General and Colonel of the Rashtriya Rifles who was bestowed
with the coveted Param Vishisht Seva Medal for distinguished service of an exceptionally high order. This award has also been conferred to Lt Gen RS Kadyan who was the
Director General and Colonel of the Rashtriya Rifles. Sixteen units of the Rashtriya Rifles have been conferred with the coveted Chief of Army Staff's Unit Citation as well.
As there is more permanence in the deployment of RR formations and units, they have a better rapport with the locals to gain more authentic flow of intelligence. As a result
of all these factors, the junior leaders of RR battalions are able to take greater risks, often at the cost of their own lives to attain their operational goals. They always lead from
the front, thereby setting an example for others to emulate. The fact that they have neutralised more than 7000 terrorists, captured more than 6000 weapons of all types and
won more than 2000 honours and awards speaks volumes of this organisation.
Faced with internal security challenges in Kashmir and elsewhere, the Indian army is interested in reducing its overall strength and using available revenue for force
modernization. Some Indian spokesmen have suggested that increasing the use of light army forces, such as the Rashtriya Rifles, to fulfill missions in Kashmir and elsewhere
could reduce the need for regular army forces in an internal-security role and help realize cuts. Such a move, it is argued, would better correspond to the real security issues
with which India must deal. Others have suggested that the Rashtriya Rifles battalions be re-examined in light of their predominant internal-security duties and gendarme-like
character. This is likely to remain a topic of close consideration and debate within the army and the government, as India re-evaluates its national-security requirements, its
force-modernization priorities, and its approaches to internal security.
Rashtriya Rifles (RR) Chronology
In 1990, the Rashtriya Rifles (RR) was established with six battalions and two sector headquarters. The Rashtriya Rifles was raised by former chief of Army staff General
B C Joshi in 1990 for the exclusive role of fighting insurgency in Kashmir.
In 1993, the Indian army expanded its role in the Kashmir Valley when it deployed the Rashtriya Rifles. The 36-battalion formation, a light elite counterinsurgency force,
was formed specifically to compensate for weak and untrustworthy local police and increasingly well-armed insurgents in Kashmir.
The force was further expanded in 1994-95.
By 1996, as guerrilla problems grew, tens of thousands of regular army units joined the Rashtriya Rifles in the valley, further supplemented by a police counterinsurgency
special task force composed principally of non-Muslim personnel not from the local area.
For the creation of this legendary force, many sacrifices have been made by various organisations and individuals. To begin with, Headquarters Counter Insurgency Force, a
formation headquarter equivalent to a corps headquarters, was sanctioned by the Government in 1994 for the overall command and control of Rashtriya Rifles. This
headquarter was trifurcated later to form two operative force headquarters in J&K and a Rashtriya Rifles Directorate at Army HQ, Delhi.
The nature of tasks makes it imperative on the part of RR personnel to sacrifice basic comforts of life. The Army, as a whole, has made many sacrifices. The manpower for
raising of the RR force was drawn from the units of the regular Army. These units operated with reduced manpower till deficiency was made up. The reserves of the Army
was used for equipping newly raised RR battalions. The regimental centers of all arms and services had also undertaken the additional task of training persons posted to RR. A
substantial amount of Army's budget was used for raising and maintaining RR till 1998. The budget of RR has been separated from defence budget since the financial year
1998-99.
The relationship of the RR with the local people, civil administration and law-inforcing agencies has been of an exceptionally high order. This has been possible due to regular
interaction with the locals by RR formations, units and even companies. Various core group meetings are held periodically wherein the problems of the people are looked into
and acted upon with compassion. Numerous civic action programmes like construction of water points, community centres and improvement of schools, mosques, roads and
tracks have been undertaken. Hundreds of school children have been taken on various RR sponsored educational-cum-cultural tours to various historical places in India. Other
successes of this force include successful conduct of parliamentary and state assembly elections in 1997 and 1998 respectively, management of entire counter-insurgency and
rear area security operations in J&K during operation Vijay, elimination of over 2700 militants since its raising, capture of large quantities of arms, ammunition and warlike
stores, causing confusion and disarray amidst various militant cadres and improving the quality of life of the local public in their respective areas of responsibility.
In 1998, Surankot, a militant dominated tehsil of Poonch district was reeling under insurgency and drew attention of everyone in India in general and Jammu & Kashmir in
particular. The common man was in a state of fear, markets were deserted and there was virtual breakdown of civil life. The civil administration too was subdued by a number
of sabotage activities and made nonfunctional. The militants had even created their own capital called 'Faisalabad'. The battalions of Rashtriya Rifles (RR) were tasked to
bring back normalcy in this area. In a short span, they eliminated more than 200 militants, including foreign mercenaries. Today you see smiles on people's faces as normalcy
is restored. National days, religious functions, sports events and marriage functions are being celebrated with impunity and greater fervour. Democratic political activity has
witnessed a momentum with the emergence of sarpanchs and Panchs in the Panchayat polls.
Operation Vijay ended in a decisive victory and the need was felt to focus all attention on combating insurgency. It was at this juncture that it was decided to raise Kay Force
under the stewardship of Maj Gen Nirbhay Sharma. The orders for its raising were issued on September 1, 1999 and the formation was fully operational within 20 days, with
the motto "Tougher the Better." On getting operational, the formation was increasingly entrusted with a huge area of responsibility comprising most parts of North and Central
Kashmir. The terrain varied from chilling snow covered heights to riverine marshland waterbodies, from dense forests to paddy fields and crowded villages, covering a total
covering area of over 6,500 sq km. Coupled to all this was a hostile population who were apprehensive of the security forces while at the same time being exploited by the
terrorists.
By 2001 all the four force HQs, which include 12 sector HQs and 36 battalions, were deployed in J&K. While CI Force `R' is responsible for combating terrorism in the
districts of Rajouri and Poonch, CI Force `D' has been taking care of Doda district. Likewise, CI Force `V' is responsible for the districts of Anantnag, Pulwama and Badgam
and CI Force `K' has been deployed in the districts of Kupwara, Baramulla and Srinagar.
In April 2001 the Center exclusively earmarked more than Rs 600 crore in order to raise 30 battalions of the Rashtriya Rifles (RR) for combating militancy in
Kashmir. These new battalions, comprising men and officers from within the Army, will help the present 30 Rashtriya Rifles battalions perform internal security and antiinsurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir and some other parts of the country. Each battalion having 1,150 men and officers will be controlled by the Army. These
battalions will help the Army to withdraw its regular troops from J&K and re-train them to guard borders and fight. The objective is to gradually withdraw regular Army
formations from internal security (IS) duties in J&K.
Six Army battalions raised especially for Jammu and Kashmir (J-K) counter insurgency operations underwent special training, and started deployment in the state by
01 September 2001. With the entire state barring Ladakh under the Armed Forces Special Powers Act, the Army began deploying additional forces to tighten the security net,
with 7,200 soldiers of six newly-raised battalions. The battalions are assigned to the Rashtriya Rifles (RR), but parent Regiments raised them at their respective regimental
centres. One of the six battalions was raised in New Delhi (Rajputana Rifles). The Maratha Light Infantry (MLI) RR battalion was raised at Belgaum, the Madras Regiment at
Tiruchi, the Assam Regiment RR battalion at Shillong, the Punjab RR at Ramgarh, Grenadiers at Jabalpur and the Dogra Regiment RR battalion at Faizabad. The newlyraised battalions underwent special training at the Army's counter insurgency warfare school near Jammu. The Army had six months to raise and train the soldiers for the
highly specialised operations. After that there was a four-week-long capsule course in laying ambushes in hills and mountains, detecting and disarming IEDs, carrying out
cordon and search operations and carrying out operations to neutralise terrorists in heavily populated neighbourhoods.
The 59th Rashtriya Rifles Battalion (Assam) was formally raised at Assam Regimental Centre, Shillong in May 2004. This is the third RR battalion of Assam Regiment. Brig
WJB Sturgeon, Commandant, 58 Gorkha Training Centre, unfurled the RR flag at a glittering ceremony held at Happy Valley, Shillong. Lt Col Suchindra Kumar has been
deputed as the Commanding Officer of the battalion. The newly raised battalion comprises 24 officers, 38 JCOs and 1,141 other ranks posted from various battalions of
the Assam Regiment.
The security environment in the state of J&K is dynamic and is reviewed constantly based on threat perceptions.
To reduce the commitment of Army on internal security duties, the Government had given in principle approval in 2000, to raise 30 more Rashtriya Rifles battalions, to bring
up the total strength of Rashtriya Rifles troops to five Force Headquarters, 17 Sector Headquarters and 66 Rashtriya Rifles Battalions by the year 2005.
By 2004 Rashtriya Rifles battalions (1 to 57) had been raised and inducted in the Northern Sector. Rashtriya Rifles Battalions (58 to 63) were under raising.
Table 1: RR Sector locations
Sector 1 Victor CIF 3,7 , 36 RR
Sector 2 Victor CIF 1, 9, 20 RR
Sector 3 Victor CIF 2, 5 RR
Sector 4 Delta CIF 4 RR
Sector 5 Kilo CIF 13, 14 15, 22 RR
Sector 6 Romeo CIF 16, 17, 25, 27 RR
Sector 7 Kilo CIF 23, 24 32 RR
Sector 8 Kilo CIF 6,18, 19, 21 RR
Sector 9 Delta CIF 11, 26, 31 RR
Sector 10 Kilo CIF 28, 29, 30 33 RR
Sector 11 Delta CIF 8, 10, 12
Sector 12 Victor CIF 34,35 RR
Anantnag
Kulgam
Kangan
Doda
Baramulla
Poonch
Kupwara
Kupwara
Kistwar
Baramulla
Banihal
Badgam
Table 2: Some known RR battalion affiliations
Battalion
4 RR
7 RR
10 RR
11 RR
Affiliation
Bihar
Punjab
Rajput
Dogra
12 RR
13 RR
15 RR
17 RR
21 RR
22 RR
26 RR
31 RR
32 RR
36 RR
37 RR
41 RR
53 RR
58 RR
59 RR
Grenadiers
Kumaon
1 GR
Maratha
Guards
Punjab
Maratha
Commando Paras
3 GR
Garhwal Rifles
Punjab
Maratha
Punjab
Gorkha
Assam 3rd of that rgt
Table 4: RR Battalion wise current approximate known area of operations. The focus seems to be on the Kilo Force.
Battalion
1 RR
2 RR
3 RR
4 RR
5 RR
6 RR
7 RR
8 RR
9 RR
10 RR
11 RR
12 RR
13 RR
14 RR
15 RR
16 RR
Approx Area of Operations
Pulwana
Srinagar
Anantnag
Doda
Ganderbal
Kupwara
Anantnag
Doda
Anantnag
Doda
Doda
Doda
Pattan
Bandipore
Bandipore
Poonch
Battalion
19 RR
20 RR
21 RR
22 RR
23 RR
24 RR
25 RR
26 RR
27 RR
28 RR
29 RR
30 RR
31 RR
32 RR
33 RR
34 RR
Approx Area of Operations
Kupwara
Banihal
Kupwara
Sopore
Kupwara
Kupwara
Surankote
Kishthwar
Poonch
Baramulla
Baramulla
Sopore
Kistwar
Kupwara
Bandipore
Badgam
17 RR
18 RR
Poonch
Kupwara
35 RR
36 RR
Badgam
Anantnag
TA Group Headquarters





TA GP HQ, Southern Command - Pune
TA GP HQ, Eastern Command - Calcutta
TA GP HQ, Western Command - Chandigarh
TA GP HQ, Central Command - Lucknow
Dir DSC, Northern Command - c/o 56 APO
Departmental Units
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
968 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Ludhiana
969 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Jamalpur
970 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Jhansi
971 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Delhi
972 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Muzaffarpur
1031 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Kota
1032 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Adra
1034 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Banglore
1101 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Chandigarh
1103 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Kota
1105 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Secunderabad
1051 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Ludhiana
1052 Railway Engineer Regiment (TA) - Adra
General Hospital (TA) (500 Beds) - Kolkata
General Hospital (TA) (400 Beds) - Allahabad
General Hospital (TA) (300 Beds) - Jaipur
General Hospital (TA) (300 Beds) - Patiala
General Hospital (TA) (300 Beds) - Gauhati
General Hospital (TA) (300 Beds) - Ahmadabad
General Hospital (TA) (400 Beds) - Rothak
414 ASC Battalion Mktg (TA) - Kamptee
777 Signal Regiment Telecom (TA) - Mhow
801 Engineer Regiment R&P (TA) - Agra
811 Engineer Regiment ONGC (TA) - Baroda
Ecological Battalions
127 Infantry Battalion (TA) Garhwal Rifles Eco Dehradun
128 Infantry Battalion (TA) Rajputana Rifles Eco - Bikaner
129 Infantry Battalion (TA) JAK LI Eco - Samba
130 Infantry Battalion (TA) Kumaon Eco - Pithoragarh
131 Infantry Battalion (TA) Rajput Eco
132 Infantry Battalion (TA) Eco - Bhatti Mines, Delhi
Non-Departmental Units
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
101 Infantry Battalion (TA) Maratha LI - Pune
102 Infantry Battalion (TA) Punjab - Kalka
103 Infantry Battalion (TA) Sikh LI - Ludhiana
105 Infantry Battalion (TA) Rajputana Rifles - Delhi
Cantonment
106 Infantry Battalion (TA) Para - Banglore
107 Infantry Battalion (TA) 11 Gorkha Rifles - Darjeeling
108 Infantry Battalion (TA) Mahar - Saugor
109 Infantry Battalion (TA) Maratha LI - Kolhapur
110 Infantry Battalion (TA) Madras - Coimbatore
111 Infantry Battalion (TA) Kumaon - Allahabad
112 Infantry Battalion (TA) Dogra - Jalandhar
113 Infantry Battalion (TA) Rajput - Calcutta
114 Infantry Battalion (TA) Jat - Fatehgarh
115 Infantry Battalion (TA) Mahar - Belgaum
116 Infantry Battalion (TA) Para - Deolali
117 Infantry Battalion (TA) Guards - Tiruchi
118 Infantry Battalion (TA) Grenadiers - Nagpur
119 Infantry Battalion (TA) Assam - Shillong
120 Infantry Battalion (TA) Bihar - Bhubaneswar
121 Infantry Battalion (TA) Garhwal Rifles - Calcutta
122 Infantry Battalion (TA) Madras Cannanore
123 Infantry Battalion (TA) Grenadiers Jaipur
124 Infantry Battalion (TA) Sikh - New Delhi
125 Infantry Battalion (TA) Guards - Secunderabad
126 Infantry Battalion (TA) JAK Rifles - c/o 56 APO
150 Infantry Battalion (TA) Punjab - Delhi
151 Infantry Battalion (TA) Jat - Muzaffarpur
152 Infantry Battalion (TA) Sikh - Ludhiana
153 Infantry Battalion (TA) Dogra - Meerut
154 Infantry Battalion (TA) Bihar - Brichgunj (Port Balair)
155 Infantry Battalion (TA) JAK Rifles - Sujanpur
156 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) Punjab - Rajouri
157 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) Sikh - BD Bari
158 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) Sikh LI - Janlot
159 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) Dogra - Thalela
160 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) JAK Rifles - Kupwara
161 Infantry Battalion (TA) (H&H) JAK LI - Baramula Gwalior
Vehicles
Utility and miscellaneous vehicles
.
Name
Type
Jonga
Light Utility Vehicle
Maruti Gypsy
Light Utility Vehicle
Mahindra 550 xdb
Light Utility Vehicle
Windy
Fast attack vehicle
Tata 407
Light 4x4 truck
Tata LPTA 713 TC
Medium 4X4 truck
Super Azad
Medium 4x4 truck
Ashok Leyland Topchi
Medium 4x4 truck
Shaktiman
Medium 4x4 truck
Rampar
Medium Amphibious
truck
Tata Model 1210SD
Medium truck
Stallion Mk.III
Medium 4x4 truck
Tata LPTA 1621
Medium 4x4 truck
BEML Tatra
Heavy truck
Quantit
y
Origin
India
Notes
Being phased out.
India
India
700
India
India
India
India
India
India
India
India
India
India
India
In service from 2005.
1 Ton truck
2.5 Ton truck
3 Ton truck
3 Ton truck
3 Ton truck
Amphibious conversion of the Shaktiman truck.
4 Ton truck.
5 Ton truck. fire truck, and water bowser vehicles are also based on the Stallion
chassis.
5 Ton truck
License produced Tatra heavy truck. Various models. Used for carrying sensitive
equipment like Radars as well as vehicle for Pinaka and Smerch MBRL systems.
Engineering and support vehicles
Name
Type
Quantit
y
Armoured vehiclelaunched bridge
Armoured vehicleT-72 ABL
launched bridge
Sarvatra
Vehicle launched bridge
Amphibious Engineer
BMP-2 AERV
Reconnaissance Vehicle
Amphibious Armoured
BMP-2 AAD
Bulldozer
Armoured recovery
Vijayanta ARV
200
vehicle
Armoured recovery
WZT-3
352
vehicle
Armoured recovery
VT-72B ARV
200+
vehicle
Mine protected and mine clearing vehicles
Quantit
Name
Type
y
Armoured personnel
Casspir[6]
>200
carrier
Hydremma
Mine clearing vehicle
Aditya
Mine protected Vehicle 300+
DRDO Daksh
Bomb disposal robot
2
Armoured fighting vehicles
Quantit
Name
Type
y
Kartik ABL
Origin
Notes
India
Based on a Vijayanta chassis
India
T-72 based Multi-Hop or Extended Span Assault bridge
India
8x8 truck-mounted bridging system
India
BMP-2 based engineering and reconnaissance vehicle
India
BMP-2 with turret removed and bulldozer blade and other engineering equipment
added.
India
Being replaced by VT-72B.
Poland
Slovenia/ India
Origin
Armoured recovery vehicle replacing the Vijayanta ARV
Notes
South Africa
India
India
India
Manufactured by OFB India
OFB India. 1400 to be produced. 20/month manufactured at HVF, Medak
The Army has placed orders for 20 Dakshs."[7]
Origin
Arjun MBT Mk1
Main battle tank
124[8]
India
T-90S "Bhishma"/T90M
Main battle tank
620
Russia/ India
Notes
With a total of 248 to be built.[9] This to be followed by the Arjun MK-II and the
FMBT.[10]
Initially contract for 310 "T-90S" signed in 2001.A contract, worth $800 million, was
signed on October 26, 2006, for another 330 T-90M MBTs that were to be built with
locally-sourced raw materials.A third contract, worth $1.23 billion, was signed in
December 2007 for 347 upgraded T-90Ms, the bulk of which will be licence-assembled
by HVF.The Indian Army would begin receiving its first T-90M main battle tank (MBT)
in completely knocked-down condition from Russia’s Nizhny Tagil-based
Uralvagonzavod JSC by the end of 2009.[11][12] In all, India plans to have 310 T-90S
700
43
198
Soviet Union
India
India
and 1,330 T-90M tanks in service by 2020(totally 1657 tanks by 2020 in 21
regiments).[13]
968 T72M1 have been upgraded by the Heavy vehicles factory (HVF), While requests for
proposal for upgrading approximately 1000 other T-72's have been sent to various firms
in Israel, Russia, Poland and France.[citation needed]
Up to 200 additional T-55s are kept in storage. T-55s were to be phased out in favour of
T-90.[15] Some T-55s may be converted into Tarmour AFV's [16]
Additional Being modernized with TISAS (thermal imaging stand alone sights), better
fire control, and more modern ATGM armament (Konkurs M). BMP-1 has been phased
out and the upgraded BMP-2 is BMP-2 M with two thermobaric missiles and two tandem
warhead Konkurs missiles. Its also has an integrated TI sight, an LRF, and has an AGL
mounted on the turret which is also stabilised in the horizontal plane. 100 gets added each
year. To enhance the rate to 125 a year.[18] Currently more than 900 are in active
service.[19]
700 are in active service
BMP-2 based Nag missile carrier.
BMP-2 based mortar carrier. Produced by CVRDE.
80
United Kingdom
Purchased from British Army surplus
157
Czechoslovakia/ Poland
255
100
~80
Soviet Union
United Kingdom
United Kingdom
T-72M1 "Ajeya"
Main battle tank
1950[14
Soviet Union/ India
]
T-55
Main battle tank
550[15] Soviet Union
Infantry fighting vehicle
1000+[1
Soviet Union/ India
7]
BMP-2 "Sarath"
BMP-1
NAMICA
CMT
BRDM-2
Ferret
FV433 Abbot SPG
Infantry fighting vehicle
Tank destroyer
Mortar Carrier
Armoured personnel
carrier
Armoured Personnel
Carrier
Reconnaissance vehicle
Reconnaissance vehicle
Self-propelled artillery
M-46 Catapult
Self-propelled artillery ~20
India
Tunguska M1[20]
Self-propelled antiaircraft weapon
108
Soviet Union
ZSU-23-4M 'Shilka'
Self-propelled antiaircraft gun
100[citat
ion
Soviet Union
needed]
FV432[citation needed]
OT-64 SKOT
Relegated to internal security roles.
105 mm howitzer. To be replaced following selection of new system.
130 mm howitzer mounted on a Vijayanta hull. ~80 in storage. To be replaced following
selection of new system.
To be upgraded.
Battlefield surveillance
1RL126 "Small Fred" Battlefield Surveillance Radar based on BMP. NATO designation
Soviet Union
system
was BMP M1975
As of December 2006, the 310 T-90S tanks imported from Russia under a February 2001 Rs 3,625 crore (about $795 million) contract are divided between the first lot of 124 T-90S tanks bought
off-the-shelf, and 186 imported in knocked-down condition for assembly at the Heavy Vehicles Factory at Avadi.
The goal was to begin progressive manufacture of the follow-on batch of 1,000 from 2007-2008 onward, working under the license production agreement associated with India’s 2001 order. The
idea was to build upon and broaden India’s indigenous capabilities as the process moved forward.
PRP-3
The purchase of 330 more ready-for-assembly T-90 kits later in October 2006 would appear to be a deviation from this strategy, but as of August 2008, production of the fully localized Indian
tanks has not even begun yet at the Avadi Heavy Vehicles Factory. Jane’s believed that the order for the 330 sets of T-90S components was driven by chronic delays in the production schedule
of the domestic Arjun MBT, and multi-year delays in T-72 modernization due to bureaucratic vacillation. This turned out to be partly correct; as DID has reported before, those are chronic
problems in India’s defense market. It seems that there was also a problem with full Russian technology transfer, however, which held up production at Avadi.
The Times of India Reports: The Army gameplan is to have 21 regiments of T-90S ‘Bhishma’ tanks and 40 regiments of upgraded T-72 M1 ‘Ajeya’ tanks by 2020 since the “speed and
shock effect” of mechanised forces will continue to play a decisive role in future wars, say sources.
An armoured regiment typically has 45 tanks, along with another 17 for training purposes, war reserves and replacements. So, the 1.13-million Army intends to face future armoured battles with
a mix of around 3,800 T-90S and T-72 tanks.”
Artillery
Haubits FH77/B
Howitzer
Quantit
Origin
y
410
Sweden
M-46
Howitzer
180
D-30
Howitzer
M-46
Field gun
Indian Field Gun
Light Field Gun
Field gun
Field gun
India
India
Smerch 9K58 MBRL
Multiple rocket launcher 38
Soviet Union
Pinaka MBRL
Multiple rocket launcher 80
India
BM-21
Multiple rocket launcher 150
Soviet Union
Name
Type
Soviet Union
450
Bofors L/70
Anti-aircraft artillery
ZSU-23-2
Anti-aircraft artillery
Missile systems
Anti-tank guided missiles
Name
Soviet Union/ Israel
Type
800
Soviet Union
Sweden
Soviet Union
Quantit
y
Origin
Nag
Anti-tank guided missile
India
MILAN
9M113 Konkurs (AT-5
Spandrel)
Anti-tank guided missile
France/ India
Anti-tank guided missile
Soviet Union
Notes
155 mm gun made by Bofors. 100 are not in good repair, and therefore not in service.
M-46 field guns to be upgraded to 155mm howitzers by Soltam. 220 more upgrade kits
to be ordered.
Being replaced by the M-46.
130 mm field gun. 550 purchased. 100 used with the Catapult self-propelled gun. Some
to be upgraded to M-46 howitzers.
105mm gun. Being replaced by the M-46122 mm
105mm gun. Being phased out.
300 mm multiple rocket launch system. Further order for 24 units will be completed by
2010.[21]
214 mm multiple rocket launch system. Replacing the 122 mm BM-21.[22]
Modernized rockets with range of 40 km was purchased from Russia. To be replaced by
Pinaka.
40mm gun. Upgraded L/60.
Twin 23 mm AA guns
Notes
Third Generation fire and forget IIR Guided ATGM developed Indigenously. Its has
been ordered by army. Nag was cleared for production on 1st week of July 2009 .443
missiles were ordered.
MILAN 1 produced under license in India. MILAN 2Ts purchased from France[23]
9M111 Fagot (AT-4
Spigot)
9M119 Svir (AT-11
Sniper)
9M133 Kornet (AT-14
Spriggan)
Lahat
FGM-148 Javelin
Air defence missiles
Name
Prithvi Air Defense
(PAD)
Advanced Air Defence
(AAD)
Anti-tank guided missile
Soviet Union
In process of being phased out
Anti-tank guided missile
Soviet Union
For use with the T-90S.
Anti-tank guided missile
Russia
Anti-tank guided missile
Anti-tank guided missile
Israel
United States
Type
Quantit
y
Origin
Notes
Anti-ballistic missile
India
Exoatmospheric (outside the atmosphere) interceptor system
Anti-ballistic missile
India
Endo atmospheric (within the atmosphere) interceptor system
Soviet Union
Still not officially acknowledged.
India
Indigenously developed surface to air missile to replace SA6.
The Indian Army has sought to upgrade its SA-6 Kvadrat and SA-8 Missile systems
whilst the Akash enters service. The Indian magazine "Strategic Affairs " (No. 0011/
Issue: December 16) noted: "Poland has won an order worth $200 m from India to
upgrade 100 Kvadrat (SA6) and 50 OSA-AKM (SA8) mobile surface to air missiles.
The contract made public in August, is to be completed by 2002. The upgrades include
integration of new radars, communications and control systems, improvements to the
launch vehicle including new power packs. The Kvadrat upgrade includes new
electronics for better electronic counter measures, passive infra-red search and track
sensors."
It is designed to defend large areas from bomber attack or other strategic aircraft. Still
not officially acknowledged.
Akash
Strategic Surface-to-air
missile
Surface-to-air missile
SA-6 Gainful
Surface-to-air missile
Soviet Union
SA-5 Gammon[25]
Strategic SAM system
Soviet Union
SA-8 Gecko
SA-13 Gopher
Surface-to-air missile
Surface-to-air missile
Soviet Union
Soviet Union
S-300PMU-2[24]
For use with the Arjun.
On order.
2016.02
NSG withdraws 600 commandos from VVIP duties for counter-terror operations
According to the new blueprint being worked upon by the elite force, two teams out of the total three of the 11th Special Rangers Group (SRG),
stand withdrawn from VVIP security duties and have been tasked to undertake counter-terror operations along with and in assistance of the
primary strike units-- the Special Action Group (SAG).
Taking the first step towards gradually reverting to its original role of undertaking counter-terror operations, the NSG has pulled out over 600
commandos from its VVIP security unit and used them for the first time during the recent Pathankot attack.
The plan has been in the making since the last over two years and the terrorist attack on the forward IAF base in Pathankot became the first
operation where these black cat commandos made their assault.
According to the new blueprint being worked upon by the elite force, two teams out of the total three of the 11th Special Rangers Group (SRG),
stand withdrawn from VVIP security duties and have been tasked to undertake counter-terror operations along with and in assistance of the
primary strike units-- the Special Action Group (SAG).
National Security Guard (NSG) commando teams are raised under five primary units, two SAGs manned by officers and jawans from the Army
and three SRGs comprising personnel from paramilitary forces.
While each of the two SAGs (51 and 52) are tasked with counter-terror, counter-hijack and hostage rescue operations, the SRGs (11, 12 and 13)
were used to render logistical support to the SAGs during such operations and have been primarily deployed for guarding high-risk VVIPs for
many years now.
Each SRG has three teams, with over 300 commandos each, and the estimated strength of an entire unit is about 1,000 personnel.
Officials said the Pathankot operation was the first time that the unit was inducted into a full-scale anti-terror operation and select commandos
were deployed to undertake door-to-door sanitisation of numerous buildings at the Indian Air Force station that was attacked in the wee hours of
January 2.
NSG commanders said the force, which was raised in 1984 for exclusive counter-terror operations but later entrusted with VVIP security duties,
has the least number of 15 such protectees under its cover and, after its request to not burden it further in this regard, the government has not
given it any additional responsibility in this domain for over two years now.
While one team of the 11th SRG and two units (12 and 13) are still tasked with the security of high-risk dignitaries, commanders of the special
federal contingency force foresee a time when even these units will be gradually pulled out of VVIP protection duties.
"Not in the very near future but NSG is on it way to go back to its original charter of being a specialist counter-terror and an exclusive
commando force. The last team of the said SRG will also be pulled out sooner than later and prepared for terrorist combat roles," they said.
They said the results of the first experiment at Pathankot have been satisfactory even as these units have been subjected to rigours undertaken by
the strike units comprising personnel drawn from the army, with each of its commandos undertaking precision firing, unarmed combat and
special tactics course every day of the year.
The plan was mooted in 2012 when NSG commanders, keeping in mind the evolving terrorist attacks scenario across the globe, visualised an
event where simultaneous assaults could be launched by them at multiple centres in the country and hence a good number of combat-ready
commandos will have to be rushed in different directions.
While the 2008 Mumbai terror attack involved about 400 commandos over a period of three days, over 300 NSG men were deployed for the
Pathankot operation that was officially called off in five days.
In what has come as a help, the government has also not given any additional duty in the VVIP security domain and assigned that task to central
paramilitary forces like CRPF, CISF and ITBP.
The force's charter states that the primary role of NSG is "to combat terrorism in whatever form it may assume in areas where activity of
terrorists assumes serious proportions and the state police and other central police forces cannot cope up with the situation.
"The NSG is a force specially equipped and trained to deal with specific situations and is therefore to be used only in exceptional situations. The
force is not designed to undertake the functions of state police forces or other paramilitary forces of the Union of India," it says.
The force is modelled on the pattern of foreign special forces like SAS of the UK and GSG-9 of Germany but has now included the best practises
of a few other such elite forces over the years.
Source: http://defence.pk/threads/indian-special-forces.43257/page-440#ixzz417mOawlD
 Introduction
Formed on 02 November 1987, the Army Aviation Corps (AAC) currently consists of 38 helicopter flights operated by 12 squadrons. The AAC
currently flies 180 helicopters consisting of 60 HAL Chetaks (Alouette II) and 120 HAL Cheetahs (Alouette III). The 80 newest Cheetah
airframes are currently in the process of being upgraded/overhauled to the HAL Lancer configuration at the rate of four per month. The HAL
Chetaks are organized into six squadrons, which are assigned to Corps HQs. The HAL Cheetahs and HAL Lancers are organized into six
squadron establishments, which support independent flights of five helicopters each and are attached to Divisional HQs. The AAC currently has
460 pilot officers on strength and an annual intake of 40-45 officers per year and the AAC Centre is at Nasik, Maharashtra. Army aviation
training which was previously carried out at the School of Artillery at Deolali, is now carried out in an independent Combat Air Training School
also at Deolali.
The first three HAL Dhruv helicopters were formally delivered to the Indian Army on 20 March 2002 and the AAC is in the process of raising
two squadrons of these helicopters. The first of these squadrons is now operational in a testing and tactics development role. The HAL Dhruv
will initially replace the Chetak fleet, which was originally obtained second hand from the Indian Air Force. The AAC has recently finished its
evaluation of the Mi-17 and Super Puma helicopters for the medium lift role. While the Army prefers the French Super Puma, they are likely to
end up with a purchase of Russian Mi-17s to ensure commonality with the extant IAF fleet. In the next plan, the Army will order seven Do-228s
for the purposes of liaison. AAC officers have also recently taken over flying of Mi-35 and Mi-25 helicopters, even though the units themselves
are owned and administered by the Indian Air Force.
The Cheetah Helicopter Simulator has been set up at the Combat Army Aviation Training School (CATS) at Nashik. It is likely to be introduced
at the initial ground training stage of the pilot training, and is expected to substantially reduce costs and risks of pilot training. The trainee pilots
of the AAC will be exposed to different weather conditions like rain, snow, storms and of different terrains in addition to night flying, training in
handling emergencies, tactical handling of the flying machine, its different maneuvers and more. The project to install a simulator was proposed
in December 2000 and approved in April 2002, with CATS Nashik chosen as the centre for installation. Macmet Technologies Ltd, who won the
bid over Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), completed the project by 2005 at a cost of Rs 1.87 crore. After stringent checks, the facility was
accepted by the Army in December 2005.
 Organisation
This a partial list of the Corps' Army Aviation Squadrons. Each squadron generally consists of two Recce & Observation Flights, which can be
interchanged depending on operational requirements. The flights do not lose their identity even when they form part of a squadron. However the
term Air Observation Post (AOP) is no longer used in the Corps and has been replaced with the term Recce & Observation (R&O). This list was
derived mainly from "Indian Army - A Reference Manual" by Lieutenant Colonel Gautam Sharma.
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No.201 Army Aviation Squadron - (HAL Dhruv) 2001.09.15 powstal
 No.663 Army Aviation Squadron
No.659 Army Aviation Squadron
 No.664 Army Aviation Squadron
No.660 Army Aviation Squadron
 No.665 Army Aviation Squadron
No.661 Army Aviation Squadron
 No.666 Army Aviation Squadron
No.662 Army Aviation Squadron
 No.667 Army Aviation Squadron
This is a list of the R&O Flights which come under the Army Aviation Squadrons. Some R&O Flights operate independently and do not have a
parent squadron. They are designated by an (I) in their name to reflect the fact that they are independent. There are also two independent Utility
Helo (UH) flights and they adopt the same numbering system as the R&O flights.
 No.1 (I) R&O Flight
 No.10 R&O Flight
 No.19 R&O Flight
 No.28 R&O Flight
 No.1 (I) UH Flight
 No.2 R&O Flight
 No.11 R&O Flight
 No.20 R&O Flight
 No.29 R&O Flight
 No.2 (I) UH Flight
 No.3 R&O Flight
 No.12 (I) R&O Flight
 No.21 R&O Flight
 No.30 (I) R&O Flight
 No.4 R&O Flight
 No.13 R&O Flight
 No.22 (I) R&O Flight
 No.31 R&O Flight
 No.5 R&O Flight
 No.14 R&O Flight
 No.23 (I) R&O Flight
 No.32 R&O Flight
 No.6 R&O Flight
 No.15 R&O Flight
 No.24 R&O Flight
 No.33 R&O Flight
 No.7 R&O Flight
 No.16 R&O Flight
 No.25 R&O Flight
 No.34 R&O Flight
 No.8 R&O Flight
 No.17 R&O Flight
 No.26 R&O Flight
 No.35 R&O Flight
 No.9 R&O Flight
 No.18 R&O Flight
 No.27 (I) R&O Flight
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