COURSE OUTLINE

advertisement
Curriculum for Bachelor of Engineering in Computer Science (B.E. CSE)
Module
Module Name
Hour Distribution
Code
IS A
L
T
Semester I
099 LA 11 Communication Skills
2
2
3
099 MA 12 Engineering Mathematics I
3
2
4
1
099 PH 13 Engineering Physics
2
2
3
1
099 CE 14 Basic Civil Engineering
2
2
3
1
099 ME 15 Basic Mechanical Engineering
2
2
3
1
099 CS 17 Modern Information System Laboratory
2
1
1
099 ME 18 Engineering Drawing
2
2
1
Total Contact Hours = ( 30 hrs/week * 15week) = 450hrs + 15 13 18
4
420 hrs
Total Credits
Semester II
Module
Module Name
Hour Distribution
Code
IS A
L
T
099 CH 21 Engineering Chemistry
2
2
3
1
099 MA 22 Engineering Mathematics II
3
2
4
1
099 CS 23 Computer Programming
2
2
3
1
099 EE 24 Basic Electrical Engineering
2
2
3
1
099 EC 25 Basic Electronics Engineering
2
2
3
1
099 CS 27 Computer Programming Laboratory
2
2
099 CS 28 Computer Installation and Servicing
2
2
Total Contact Hours = (25 hrs/week*15week) = 375 hrs + 15
14 16
5
435 hrs
Total Credits
Semester III
Module
Module Name
Hour Distribution
Code
IS A
L
T
055 CS 31 Computer Architecture
3
2
4
1
055 MA 32 Engineering Mathematics III
2
2
3
1
055 CS 33 C++ Programming
2
2
3
1
055 CS 34 System Software
2
2
3
1
055 CS 35 Data Structure and Algorithms
2
2
3
1
055 CS 37 C++ Programming Laboratory
2
2
055 CS 38 Data Structure and Algorithms Laboratory
2
2
055 IP 40
Industrial Training I (4 weeks)
5
Total Contact Hours=(25hrs/week*15week)=375hrs+435hrs 15 14 16
Total Credits
1
Credits
P
1
2
2
3
8
12
15
15
12
12
9
12
87
Credits
P
2
2
4
12
15
12
12
12
9
9
81
Credits
P
2
2
4
15
12
12
12
12
9
9
10
91
Semester IV
Module
Module Name
Code
055 IP 40
Industrial Training I (4 weeks)
055 CS 41 Computer Networks
055 MA 42 Probability and Queuing Theory
055 CS 43 Database Management System
055 CS 44 Java Programming
055 CS 45 Operating Systems
055 CS 47 Java Programming Laboratory
055 CS 48 DBMS Laboratory
Total Contact Hours=(25hrs/week*15week)=375hrs+435hrs
Total Credits
Semester V
Module
Module Name
Code
055 CS 51 Object Oriented System Analysis and Design
055 CS 52 Digital Signal Processing
055 CS 53 Microprocessor
and
Microcontroller
Applications
055 CS 54 Visual Programming
055 CS 55 Network Design Security and Management
055 CS 57 Visual Programming Laboratory
055 CS 58 Networking Laboratory
055 IP 60
Industrial Training II (4 weeks)
Total Contact Hours=(24hrs/week*15week)=360hrs+420hrs
Total Credits
Semester VI
Module
Module Name
Code
055 IP 60
Industrial Training II (4 weeks)
055 CS 61 Advanced Computer Architecture
055 CS 62 Interactive Computer Graphics
055 CS 63 Software Engineering
055 CS 64 Analog, Digital & Data Communications
055 CS 65 Web Technology
055 CS 67 Web Technology Laboratory
055 PJ 68
Mini Project
Total Contact Hours=(25hrs/week*15week)=375hrs+405hrs
Total Credits
2
IS
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
15
Hour Distribution
A
L
T
2
4
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
2
14 16
5
Credits
P
2
2
4
10
15
12
12
12
12
9
9
91
Hour Distribution
IS A
L
T
2
2
3
1
2
2
3
1
2
2
3
1
P
-
2
2
2
2
14
2
2
4
2
2
2
2
14
3
3
15
1
1
5
Credits
12
12
12
12
12
9
9
10
88
IS
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
15
Hour Distribution
A
L
T
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
1
12 16
5
Credits
P
2
2
4
10
12
12
12
12
12
9
9
88
Semester VII
Module
Module Name
Hour Distribution
Code
IS A
L
T
P
055 MG 71 Principles of Management
2
2
3
1
055 MG 72 Principles of Environmental Science and
2
2
3
1
Engineering
055 CO 73 Management Accounting
2
2
3
1
055 CS 74 Artificial Intelligence
1
2
3
055 CS 75 Multimedia Systems
1
2
3
055 CS 77 Multimedia Laboratory
2
2
2
055 CS 78 Software Development Laboratory
2
2
2
055 PJ 79 Project Report & Viva –Voce Phase I
3
1
2
3
6
Total Contact Hours=(25hrs/week*15week)=375hrs+405hrs 15 14 16
Total Credits
Semester VIII
Module
Module Name
Hour Distribution
Code
IS A
L
T
P
055 MG 81 Total Quality Management
1
2
3
055 MG 82 Professional Ethics
1
2
3
Elective I
1
2
3
Elective II
1
2
3
Elective III
1
2
3
055 PJ 89
Project Report & Viva –Voce Phase II
10
10
10
Total Contact Hours=(25hrs/week*15week)=375hrs+375hrs 15 10 15
Total Credits
Grand Total Credits = ( 87 + 81 + 91 + 91 + 88 + 88 + 88 + 75)
3
Credits
9
9
12
12
12
9
9
9
88
Credits
9
9
9
9
9
30
75
689
Elective
Module
Code
055 CS 001
055 CS 002
055 CS 003
055 CS 004
055 CS 005
055 CS 006
055 CS 007
055 CS 008
055 CS 009
055 CS 010
055 CS 011
055 CS 012
055 CS 013
055 CS 014
055 CS 015
055 CS 016
055 CS 017
055 CS 018
Elective Name
Advanced Operating System
Image Processing
Distributed Objects
Data Mining and Warehousing
Parallel Processing
Software Testing
Satellite Communication
Parallel Computing
AD HOC Networks
Wireless Application Protocol
Digital Speech and Image Processing
Advanced Java Programming
Medical Informatics
Java Virtual Machine
Resource Management Techniques
ATM Networking
Bio-Informatics
Distributed Computing
4
IS
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Hour Distribution
A
L
T
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
2
3
-
Credits
P
-
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
099 LA 11
L
T
P
Credits
3
-
1
12
COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Business Communication is designed to continue developing both oral and written
communication skills. This again would be achieved through processes of exploration, and
discussion of certain topics (cultural, educational, scientific and others) strengthening,
meanwhile, the independent analytical and critical thinking among students. Teachers
should assist students to internalize the underlying structures of the language through
series of supplementary and supporting tasks and activities. Familiar with different reading
strategies and acquire interpretative and study skills, including library and internet reference
skills. Train the learners in organized academic and professional writing. Achieve proficiency
in the effective use of language in various authentic career related situations.
Pre-requisite:
Fundamental knowledge in English Grammar and Composition.
UNIT I
Grammar, Kinds of sentences, Degree of comparisons, Parts of speech, Tenses and their uses,
Active and passive voices, Sentence pattern, Punctuation. Direct and indirect speechconjunctions and connections, Clause and phrases, analysis of Kinds of clause,
transformation simple, compound and complex sentences, Punctuation, Question tags and
short answers. Error correction in sentences.
Vocabulary and Usage: Word Formations (by adding suffixes and prefixes); Technical
Word Formation; Synonyms, Antonyms, Homophones, and Homonyms; One Word
Substitution; Misappropriations; Redundant Words; Phrasal Verb Idioms.
UNIT II
Reading at various speeds (slow, fast, very fast); reading different kinds of texts for different
purpose (e.g. for relaxation, for information, for discussion at a later stage, etc.) reading
between the lines. Comprehension of unseen Passages. Exercises in note- making, drawing
inferences, evaluating style and close- reading. Short composition of not more than 50 words
each e.g. advertisement and notices, designing or drafting posters, writing formal and
informal invitations and replies. Composing a dialogue based on the given input. Questions
for Oral Discussion, Role Play Exercises.
UNIT III
Writing Skills: Types of writings (Expository, Descriptive, Analytic, Argumentative,
Narrative etc) and their main features. A report or a factual description based on verbal input
provided. . Preparing agenda, writing proposals, a memorandum and minutes of the meeting.
Interpretation and use of charts, graphs and tables in technical writing. Summarizing and
abstracting; Expressing ideas within a restricted word limit; Paragraph Writing (Paragraph
division, introduction and the conclusion, Variety in sentences and paragraphs). Composition
based on a visual stimulus such as a diagram, picture, graph, map, cartoon, or flow chart
(about 150-words).
5
UNIT IV
Writing letters based on given verbal/visual input. Letter types include (a) business or official
letters (for making enquiries, registering complaints; asking for and giving information,
placing orders and sending replies); (b) letters to the editors (giving suggestions, opinions on
an issue of public interest) Application for a job including CV (Curriculum Vitae)/Resume.
UNIT V
Basic Concepts in Communication: Communication as sharing; context of communication;
the speaker/writer and the listener/reader; medium of communication; barriers to
communication; accuracy, brevity, clarity and appropriateness in communication,
conventional etiquette and body language.
Group Discussion: Use of persuasive strategies including some rhetorical devices for
emphasizing (for instance; being polite and firm; handling questions and taking in criticism
of self; turn-taking strategies and effective intervention; use of body language).
Compare and contrast ideas and arrive at conclusions, with a clear account of events. Present
an argument, supporting it with appropriate examples. Exercises such as Mock interviews and
insights into effective participation in seminars.
Text Books and References:
1. Wren & Martin, 2003, “English grammar and composition”.
2. K. K. Sinha, 2003, “Business Communication”, Galgotia Publishers.
3 T.M.Farhathulla ,2004 .Getting Ahead with English,RBApublishers
4 Chellammal, V.,2003, Learning to Communicate: A Resources Book for Scientist
and Technologists, Allied Pub. Pvt. Ltd., Chennai.
5 Sharon J. Gerson, Steven M. Gerson, 2004, Technical Writing-Process and Product,
3rd Edition, Pearson Education (Singapore) Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
6
099 MA 12
L
T
P
Credits
4
1
-
15
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Identifying algebraic Eigen value problems from practical areas and obtain the 7 Eigen
solutions in certain cases and to have acquired the technique of diagonalizing a matrix.
Understanding the three dimensional materials to study the properties of lines and planes in
space along with sphere as an illustrative curved surface element providing an elegant tool.
Understand effectively the geometrical aspects of curvature, involutes and evolutes of plane
curves, essential concepts for an Engineer as elegant applications of differential calculus.
Understand and handle functions of more than one variable from the points of view of their
differentiation, expansions and extreme values along with differentiation under integral sign
which are encountered in Engineering studies. Learn the methods of solving differential
equations that they might encounter in their studies of other subjects in the same or higher
semester.
Pre-requisite:
Basic Form VI Mathematics knowledge.
UNIT I Matrices
Rank of a matrix- Consistency of linear system of equations-Eigen value problems-Eigen
value and eigenvectors of a real matrix- Characteristics equation- Properties of eigen values
and eigenvectors- Cayley- Hamilton theorem (without proof)- Similarity transformation Orthogonal matrices- Orthogonal transformational of a symmetric matrix to diagonal formReduction of quadratic form to form by orthogonal transformation.
UNIT II Three Dimensional Analytical Geometry
Direction cosine and ratios- angle between two lines- Equation of a plane Equations of a
straight line- Coplanar lines-Shortest distance between skew lines- Sphere- Tangent planeplane section of a sphere – Orthogonal spheres.
UNIT III Geometrical Applications of Differential Calculus
Curvature- Cartesian and polar co-ordinates- Centre and radius of curvature-Circles of
curvature- Involutes and evolutes- Envelopes-Properties of Envelopes and evolutes-Evolutes
as envelope of normal.
UNIT IV Functions of Several Variables
Functions of two variables-Partial derivatives-Total differential-Taylor’s expansion- Maxima
and Minima –Constrained maxima and Minima-Lagrange’s Multiplier method- Jacobiansdifferentiation under integral sign.
UNIT V Ordinary Differential Equations
Simultaneous first order linear equations with constant coefficients- Linear equations of
Second order with constant and variables coefficient. Homogeneous equations of Euler typeEquations reducible to homogeneous form-Method of variation of parameters
7
Text Books and References:
1. Veerarajan, T, 2002, “Engineering Mathematics (for First Year)”, Second Edition, Tata
McGraw-Hill Pub. Co.Ltd, New Delhi.
2. Venkataraman, M.K, 2003, “Engineering Mathematics, Volume I”, Fourth Edition, The
National Pub, Co., Chennai.
3. Kreyszig, E. , 2001, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Eighth Edition, John Wiley
and sons (Asia) Ltd., Singapore.
4. Grewal, B.S, 2001, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Thirty Sixth Edition, Khanna
Publishers, Delhi.
5. Kandasamy, P, Thilagavathy, K and Ganavathy K., 2000,“Engineering Mathematics”,
Volume I, Fourth Revised Edition, S.Chand and Co., New Delhi.
6. Widder, D.V, 2000, “Advanced Calculus”, Second Edition, prentice Hall Of India, New
Delhi.
8
099 PH 13
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
2
15
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Understand optics and its applications in engineering field. Exposure to Static and Dynamic
properties and its, day-to-day application in actual life. Analyze the characteristics of
semiconductor materials and Determine the physical properties of Light and the mechanical
properties of solids and liquids. Understand the application of physics in medical field.
Pre-requisite:
Basic Form V & VI Physics knowledge.
UNIT I Properties of Matter
Elasticity-stress-strain diagram-factors affecting elasticity - Twisting couple on a wire-ShaftsTorsion pendulum - Depression of a cantilever - Young's modulus by cantilever - Uniform
and Non Uniform bending - I-shaped girders - Production and measurement of high vacuum Rotary pump - Diffusion pump - Pirani Gauge- Penning gauge – Viscosity - Oswald
Viscometer-Comparison of viscosities.
Semiconducting Materials: Structure and bonding Schrodinger's equation-Partical
in a box Density of states-Intrinsic conductivity- Extrinsic semiconductors - PN
junction theory LED - Materials used in computers and communication system - PIN
photo diodes- Frequency response of silicon photo diodes - High speed and long
wavelength photo diodes.
UNIT II Modern Engineering Materials
Super conducting materials - High Temperature super conductors - Applications - Liquid
crystals-Liquid crystal display systems - Merits and demerits - Metallic glasses and their
applications-Shape memory alloys and applications - IC packaging materials.
Acoustics: Acoustics of buildings - Absorption coefficient – Intensity – Loudness Reverberation time - Sabine's formula - Noise pollution - Noise control in a machine Ultrasonics-production - Magnetostriction and Piezoelectric methods - Applications of
ultrasonics in Engineering and Medicine.
UNIT III Heat and Thermodynamics
Thermal conductivity - Forbe's and Lee's Disc methods-Radial flow of heat-Thermal
conductivity of rubber and glass - Thermal insulation in buildings - Laws of thermodynamics
- Carnot's cycle as heat engine and refrigerator - Carnot's theorem - Ideal Otto and Diesel
engines - Concept of entropy - Entropy Temperature diagram of carnot's cycle.
UNIT IV Optics and Laser
Photometry - Lummer Brodhum photometer - Flicker Photometer - Antireflection coating Air wedge - Testing of flat surfaces - Michelson's Interferometer and its applications Photoelasticity and its applications – Sextant - Metallurgical microscope - Scanning electron
microscope.
Principle and lasers - laser characteristics - Ruby-NdYAG, He-Ne, CO2 and
semiconductor lasers.
9
UNIT V Fibre Optics
Principles of light transmission through fiber - fiber index profiles - Modes of propagation Losses in fibers - Dispersion-Light sources for fiber optics - Fiber optic communication link Modulators and detectors - Fiber amplifiers - Soliton based coherent optical fiber
communication.
Medical Physics: X-rays: production of X-ray images – Radiation to patients – Live x-ray
images – fluoroscopy.
Nuclear medicine: Sources of radioactivity for nuclear medicine – Statistical aspects – Basic
instrumentation and its clinical applications – Nuclear medicine imaging devices.
Physics Practical (minimum of 5, not for end semester examination)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Measure using vernier caliper, screw gauge and physical balance.
Torsional pendulum
Compound Pendulum
Laser – Grating – determination of Wave length
Optical fibres – measurement of attenuation and numerical aperture.
Spectrometer – Prism
Air Wedge
Determination of band gap of a semiconductor
Semiconductor diode characteristics
Note: Mark distribution End semester 60%, CAT 40%.
CAT Theory 20%
CAT Practical 20%
Text Books and References:
1. John Allison, 2000, "Electronic Engineering Materials and Devices", Tata McGraw
Hill, New Delhi.
2. Arumugam.M., 2004, "Engineering Physics," Anuradha Publications, New Delhi.
3. Arumugam M.,2005, "Material Science", Anuradha publishers, New Delhi.
4. Vasudeva A.S., 2001, "Modern Engineering Physics", S. Chand and Co., New Delhi.
5. Gaur,R.K., and Gupta,S.L., 2000, "Engineering Physics," Dhanpat Raj and Sons, New
Delhi.
6. Mathur, D.S,2003, " Elements, of properties of Matter", S.Chand & Co., New Delhi.
7. Gerd Geiser,1998, "Optical Fiber Communications", McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
8. Nelkon.M., and Parker.P., 1998, "Advanced Level Physics", Arnald-Heinemann,.
10
099 CE 14
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Understand Building materials their properties and usages. Analyze and understand Building
structures and their components. Understand Utility and Services of Civil Engineering.
Pre-requisite:
No formal knowledge is needed.
UNIT I Building Materials and their Properties
Construction materials, physical and mechanical properties, stone, brick, cement, concrete,
steel, plywood, plastic and composite materials. General properties of materials – stress,
strain, modulus of elasticity. Centre of gravity, moment of inertia for rectangle, Angle, T
section, I section, channel section.
UNIT II Building and their Components
Buildings – various components and their functions. Soils, soil types, classification and
bearing capacity improvements. Foundations – functions, classification and suitability.
Masonry – stone and brick masonry and their construction details. Flooring – functions.
Types, cement concrete, mosaic, granolithic marble and granite flooring. Beams, columns,
lintels – Floor beams, columns, lintels – steel and RCC. Roofs – Flat, RCC roof – steel
trusses – roof covering Tall structures – basic design features.
Valuation – simple valuation methods, plinth area method depreciation rate method.
UNIT III
Surveying –classification and principles – surveying techniques and instruments. Roads –
types, water bound macadam road, cement concrete road, Bituminous road. Railways –
permanent way, component parts and functions.
UNIT IV
Docks, Harbors and airports. General terminologies, functions, National and International
standards.
UNIT V
Bridges and Dams. Types, T beam, Steel, Arch. Culvert and Causeway. Dams – Purpose
selection of site, gravity and earthen dams, geological effects. Water supply – sources –
surface and ground water – quality and quantity - water treatment.
11
Text Books and References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
C.L.Kocher, 2003, “Text book of Surveying”, Dhanpat Rai Publication, New Delhi.
S.C. Rangwala, 2002, “Engineering Material”, Charatar Publication, New Delhi.
Sushil Kumar, 2001, “Building Construction”, Jain and Jain, Delhi.
M.S. Plainsman, 2000, “Basic Civil Engineering”, Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi.
Ramesh Babu, 2000, “Civil Engineering”, V.R.B. Publisher, Chennai.
Ramesh Babu, 2001, “Basic Civil Engineering”, Anuratha Publication, Chennai.
Seshagiri KK, 2002, “Basic Engineering”, Anuradha Agencies, Kumbakonam.
Shanmugam G. and Palanichamy M.S., “Basic Civil & Mechanical Engg”, –TMH,
Delhi.
9. Natarajan K.V, 2000, “Basic Civil Engg”, M/s. Dhandlakshmi, Madras.
10. Mernit, Frederick. S., 2002, “Standard Handbook for Civil Engineering”, McGraw Hill
Book co., INC New York.
11. Kanethkar. T.P. Kulkarnin S.V., 2001, “Surveying and leveling, part I”, Pune vidyarthi
gritha prakashan, Pune.
12
099 ME 15
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
BASIC MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Understand, Identify and explain in details the working principle, construction, merits,
demerits and application of Energy resources, IC engines, refrigeration and air conditioning,
metal forming and metal joining process.
Pre-requisite:
No formal knowledge is needed.
UNIT I Energy Resources
Renewable and non renewable resources – thermal, hydro, solar, wind, tidal, geothermal, and
nuclear – energy scene.
Power Plants: Layout of steam, gas turbine, diesel, nuclear and hydro, power plants-major
components and their functions – combined cycles – importance of energy storage –
cogeneration – environmental constraints of power generation.
Steam generators: Classification – working of Cochran, Babcock Wilcox, Lamont and
Benson boilers – principles and features of modern high pressure boilers – tower type boilers
– construction features (separate study of boiler mountings and accessories are beyond the
scope of this course)
UNIT II IC Engines
Working principles of petrol and diesel engines, two stroke and four stroke cycles – functions
of main components. Single jet carburetor – air fuel mixing – ignition system of petrol engine
– fuel pump and injector of diesel engine – cooling and lubrication systems.
UNIT III Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning
Elementary principles of vapour compression and vapour absorption systems – requirements
of conditioned air – layout of a typical window room air conditioner. Thermo electric cooling
– applications – electronic and computer systems.
UNIT IV Metal Forming And Metal Joining Processes
Principles of forging – mechanical power hammers – hot and cold forging processes –
rolling, drawing and exhaustion – principles of welding – fundamentals of arc welding, gas
welding and gas cutting – brazing and soldering.
UNIT V Power Transmission
Brief introduction to belt and rope drives – simple and compound gear trains Machine Tool
Engineering: Main components and functions of lathe, drilling shaping, planning and milling
machines. Introduction to CAD, CAM, CIM and ROBOT
13
Text Books and References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
K.P. Roy, S.K. Hajra Choudury, A.K. Hajra Choudury, 1998, “Elements of
Mechanical Engineering”, Media Promoters, Bombay.
T.J. Prabhu, V. Jaiganesh, Jeba Raj, 2001, “Basic Mechanical Engineering”, Ramesh,
Chennai.
Palini Kumar, 2000, “Basic Mechanical Engineering”, A.R.S. Chennai.
Venugopal K, 2000, “Basic Mechanical Engg”, Anuradha Agencies, Kumbakonam.
Rajan T.S., 2002, “Basic Mechanical Engg”, New Age International P, Ltd., Delhi.
14
099 CS 17
MODERN INFORMATION SYSTEM
LABORATORY
L
T
P
Credits
1
-
2
9
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
This is a basic paper for students to familiarize with computer and it’s applications in the
relevant fields and exposes them to other related papers of IT. Demonstrate and use Word
Processing applications, Spreadsheet applications and Presentation software.
Pre-requisite:
No formal knowledge is needed.
UNIT I Operating system
MS DOS: Study of boot process – making bootable disk – file commands, directory
related commands, disk related commands, other commands – creation of batch files
and system files.
MS Windows: Windows basics: Using Desk Top (Windows Explorer, working with
programs, managing files and folders) – customizing desk top – (choosing a desk top style
and adding browsing tools) – windows accessories – printing options – shut down windows.
UNIT II MS Office
Introduction to Microsoft Office – Staroffice, open office etc and their products.
MS Word: Creating and working with documents – formatting pre-viewing and printing of
documents – working with tables, fields and outlines, working with styles and templates –
building tables of contents – working with word macros – DTP with word, Mail Merge.
MS Excel: Introduction, Worksheets, Graphs, Charts, Functions.
MS Power Point: Learning about the presentation slides – Objects – shapes enhancing
presentation – working with charts.
NOTE: Mark Distribution Internal 50%, External 50%
External 50% - Experiment 40%, Record Work and Vivavoce 10%
Experiment 40% - one question from Unit I 10%, two questions from unit II
each of 15%.
Text Books and References:
1.
2.
3.
Maureen Sprankle, 1998, “Problem solving and programming Concept”, Merrill
Publications, Columbus.
D.P.Nagpal, 2000,Mastering Microsoft Office , Wheelers Publishing,New Delhi.
Robert H. Blissmer, 1998, “Introducing Computers”, John Wiley & Sons.
15
099 ME 18
L
T
P
Credits
1
-
3
12
ENGINEERING DRAWING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Know the various geometrical constructions, draw front, top, side view classify the visible
and invisible parts. Draw pictorial drawings and development of surfaces, intersections of
surfaces and basic building drawing.
Pre-requisite:
No formal knowledge is needed.
UNIT I Lettering, Numbering and Dimensioning
Importance of legible lettering and numbering-single stroke letters-capital and lower case
letters-general procedure for lettering and numbering –height of letter-guidelines.
Geometrical Constructions: Type of quadrilaterals, polygons-geometrical construction to
bisect straight lines, circular arc-draw perpendicular-divide straight lines-draw arc-tangentpolygon-hexagon- Scales and types.
Conic Sections: Definitions – properties - practical application – circle – ellipse – parabola hyperbola.
UNIT II Orthographic Projection
Projection of simple objects in three views-exercises in drawing-half size and full sizepractice in first angle projection only.
UNIT III Projection of Solids
Projection of simple solids-cube-square and hexagonal prism-cylinder-cone square and
hexagonal pyramid. - Axis perpendicular to one plane and parallel to the other plane. - Axis
parallel to both the principal planes. Axis parallel to one plane and inclined to the other plane.
Section of Solids: Need of sectional view-cutting plane line-representation as per IS code.
Hatching-section line-section of simple solids-cube, square and hexagonal prism, square and
hexagonal pyramid, cylinder, cone-when the cutting plane is parallel to one and perpendicular
to the other. - Perpendicular to one plane and inclined to the other True shape of section.
UNIT IV Development of Surfaces
Need for preparing development drawing with reference to sheet metal work-procedure for
preparing development drawing of cube-cylinder-square and hexagonal prism, square and
hexagonal pyramids-cone-frustum of pyramid and frustum of cone-trays-funnels.
Intersections of Surfaces: Need-application-methods-line-cutting plane-intersection of –
cylinder and cylinder-prism and prism-cylinder and cone –cone and cone.
UNIT V Pictorial Drawings
Isometric drawings-conversion of orthographic views into isometric drawings.
Building Drawing: Plan, elevation and section of single storied residential or office building
with flat R.C.C. roof and brick masonry walls having not more than three rooms.
(Planning/Designing is not expected in this course)
16
Text Books and References:
1. Natarajan K.V., 2003, “Engineering drawing and Graphics”, private publisher, Chennai.
2. Venugopal K., 2002, “Engineering Graphics”, New Age International Pvt Ltd, Chennai.
3. Bertoline and Wiebe, 2002, “Fundamentals of Graphics communication”, 3 Edition,
McGraw-Hill, Delhi.
4. Waren J. Luzadder and Jon M.Duff, Ed 2001, “Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing”,
Prentice Hall of India Pvt., Ltd, 11, Delhi.
5. Gopalakrishna K.R., 1998, “Engineering Drawing (Vol I and II)”, Subha Publications
Chennai.
17
099 CH 21
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Understand the application of chemistry in engineering. Understand about the application and
principles in engineering materials, water technology, polymers, fuels, lubricants, electro
chemistry and pollution.
Pre-requisite:
No formal knowledge is needed.
UNIT I Technology of Water:
Water and its impurities – Hardness – Units of hardness – Estimation of hardness by EDTA
method – Treatment for hardness – Lime – soda process (problems on lime and soda
requirements) –zeolite and demineralization process – Boiler feed water – treatment methods
– treatment of domestic water supply – Desalination of water – Reverse Osmosis and
electrodialysis.
Chemistry of Engineering Materials - Industrial Silicate Refractories, Abrasives.
Cement – manufacture –wet and dry processes – setting and hardening – lime – properties –
manufacture – plaster of paris – special cements.
UNIT II: High Polymers
Homo and hetro chain polymers – Types. Polymerization – addition, polymerization –
condensation polymerization – effect of polymer structure on properties – strength, plastic
deformation – crystallinity – chemical resistance – plastics – thermo plastic and thermo
setting plastics – cellulosics – PVC. Polythylene, bakelite – advantages of plastics –
fabrication and moulding of plastics..
Adhesives – Adhesive action – development of adhesive strength – physical and chemical
factors influencing adhesive action – classification – advantages and limitations – example
Lubricants- Properties of Lubricants – Classification – Additives for Lubricating oils –
Greases – Solid Lubricants.
UNIT III Fuels
Solid fuels – coal analysis – proximate and ultimate – coke manufacture – hydrogenation of
coal – gross and net calorific values.
Liquid Fuels – Petroleum – Refining – Cracking and polymerization methods – Naptha,
Petrol –Diesel – Kerosene, Residual fuel oils – Asphalt – Aviation fuel.
Gaseous fuels –Natural gas – LPG, produces gas – water gas – coal gas, gober gas and
biogas.
Combustion of fuels – spontaneous ignition temperature – explosive range – determination of
flue gas analysis – calculation of minimum theoretical quantity of air for complete
combustion – effect of excess air.
UNIT IV Electrochemistry:
Conductance of electrolyte solutions – Kohlrausch’s law and its applications – Galvanic cells
– reversible and irreversible cells – EMF and its measurements – Single electrode potential –
Reference electrodes – Standard H2 and calomel electrodes – Nernst equation – EMF series –
concentration cells.
18
Corrosion:
Chemical and electro chemical corrosion – Mechanism – Differential aeration – corrosion
control.
Protective Coating:
Inorganic – surface conversation processes – anodizing, vitreous coating – phosphating,
Chromising – treatment of metal surfaces – hot dipping – Electroplating – cladding – Organic
coating – paints – ingredients and their functions – varnishes – lacquers – enamels.
Powder Metallurgy – manufacture of metal powders – advantages and limitations –
applications
UNIT V Pollution :
Water pollution – sources and treatment – determination of BOD and COD, treatment of
domestic sewage – types of industrial wastes – air pollution –green house effect – ozone
depletion – acid rain – International standards for water and air quality – regulations.
Chemical Toxicology:
Bio-chemical effects of lead, mercury, carbon monoxide, Nitrogen oxides, Sulphur dioxide,
Ozone and Cyanide.
Explosives:
Explosives – uses- classification – requirements – Rocket fuels and propellants.
Phase rule – definition – explanation of terms – examples – applications – one component
and two component eutetic systems.
Text Books and References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
M.M. Upal, S.C Bhatia 2002. Engineering Chemistry, Romesh Chander Kanna, Delhi.
Daniel Yesu Dian 2001, Engineering Chemistry, Hi Tech Publication, Chennai.
Mohammed, Abdul Majeed 1999, Applied Chemistry, J.K Publisher, Chennai.
Ravi Krishnan 2001, Engineering Chemistry, Sri Krishna Publication, Chennai.
Ramendra C. Mukerjee 2001, Modern Approach to chemical calculations, Bharathi
Publication, Patna.
6. Jain PC. & Monika Jain, 1998, Engineering Chemistry, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, Delhi .
7. Uppal M.M., 2000, A text Book of Engineering Chemistry, Khanna Publishers,
Delhi .
8. Puri B.R. and Sharma L.R., 2000, Principles of Physical Chemistry – Shopban Lal
Nagin Chand & Co. New Delhii .
19
099 MA 22
L
T
P
Credits
4
1
-
15
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Learn methods of double and triple integration and gained confidence to handle integrals of
higher orders. Understand the basics of vector calculus comprising of gradient, divergence,
curl, line, surface, volume integrals and the classical theorems involving them. Understand
the analytical functions and their interesting properties with a few standard examples that
have direct application. Understand the basics of complex integration and the concept of
contour integration. Acquire sound knowledge in algebra and trigonometry.
Pre-requisite:
Knowledge on Engineering Mathematics I
UNIT I Multiple Integrals
Double Integration in Cartesian and Polar coordinates - Change of Order of Integration - Area
as a double integral - Triple integration in Cartesian coordinates - Change of variables
between Cartesian and polar coordinate and between Cartesian and cylindrical/ spherical
polar coordinates.
UNIT II Vector Calculus
Gradient divergence and curl- lines, surface and volume integrals - Green’s Gauss divergence
and Stroke’s theorem (without proof) - Verification of the above theorems and evaluation of
integrals using them.
UNIT III Analytic Functions
Function of a complex variable-Analytic function - Necessary conditions - Cauchy - Riemann
equations in Cartesian coordinate - Sufficient conditions(Proof not included) - Properties of
analytic function-Determination of harmonic conjugate Milne-Thomson method – Conformal
mapping w= z + a, az,1/z, z2 and bilinear transformation.
UNIT IV Complex Integration
Statement and application of Cauchy’s integral formula - Taylor’s and Laurent’s series
expansions – Singularities – Classification – Residues - Cauchy’s residue theorem - Contour
integration - Unit circle and semi-circular contours (excluding poles on real axis)
UNIT V Algebra, Trigonometry & Gamma Beta Functions
Binomial, exponential and logarithmic series (without proof of theorems), Problems on
Summation, approximations and coefficients. Expansion of Sin nθ and cos nθ in powers of
Sinθ and Cosθ expansions of tanθ in powers of tanθ. Expansion of sinθ and cosθ in powers
of θ . Expressing sinnθ and cosnθ in terms of sines and cosines of multiples of θ. Hyperbolic
functions. Inverse hyperbolic functions. Separation into real and imaginary parts of complex
functions. Gamma, Beta functions – Important results, Relation between Gamma and Beta
functions.
20
Text Books and References:
1. Grewal, B.S.,2001,“Higher Engineering Mathematics”,Thirty Sixth Edition, Khanna
Publishers,
Delhi.
2. Kreyzig, 2001, “Advanced Engineering Mathematics”, Eighth Edition, Jonh Wiley &
Spons
(Asia) Pte, Ltd, Singapore.
3. Narayanan, S., Manickavasagam Pillay, T.K and Ramaniah, G., 2002, “Advanced
Mathematics for Engineering Students”, Volume I and III, S. Viswanathan (Printers and
Publishers) Pvt. Ltd., Chennai.
21
099 CS 23
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Provides the students to understand the basic concepts of C language, to acquire sufficient
knowledge about programming and able to analyze the need of programming concepts in C
language.
Pre-requisite:
Knowledge on Modern Information Systems Laboratory
UNIT I Fundamentals Concepts in C Programming
C fundamentals character set – Identifiers and keywords – data types – constants – Variables
– Declarations – Expressions – Statements – Arithmetic, Unary, Relations and Logical,
Assignments and Conditional Operators – Library functions including string functions.
UNIT II Control Structures
Data input output functions – Simple C programs – Flow of control – if, if-else, while, dowhile, for loop, Nested control structures – Switch, break and continue, go to statements –
Comma operator.
UNIT III Functions and Storage
Functions – Definition – Prototypes – Passing arguments – Recursions. Storage Classes –
Automatic, External, Static, Register Variables – Multi-file programs.
UNIT IV Arrays and Structures
Arrays – Defining and Processing – Passing arrays to functions – Multi-dimension arrays –
Strings-Arrays and Strings. Structures – User defined data types – Passing structures to
functions – Self-referential structures – Unions – Bit wise operations.
UNIT V Pointers and Files
Pointers – Declarations – Passing pointers to Functions – Operation in Pointers – Pointers and
Arrays – Arrays of Pointers – Structures and Pointers – Files: Creating, Processing, Opening
and Closing a data file.
Text Books and References:
1. Rajaraman, 2003 “Computer Programming in C” Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
2. E. Balguruswamy, 2002, “Programming in ANSI C”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication
Company, Second Edition, New Delhi.
3. N. Kamthane, 2002, “Programming with ANSI and Turbo C”, Pearson Education,
New Delhi.
4. Al Kelley, Iya Pohl, 2001, “A Book on C”, Pearson Education, New Delhi.
5. B. S. Gottfried, 1995, “Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Programming in
C”, Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co, New Delhi.
6. B. W. Kerninghan, D. M. Ritchi, 1998, “The C Programming”, Prentice Hall of India.
22
099 EE 24
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
It is concerned with the design and analysis of electrical circuits, systems and machines. It
also explain the generation, distribution and utilization of electrical energy.
Pre-requisite:
Knowledge on Engineering Physics & Basic Mechanical Engineering.
UNIT I DC Circuits and Magnetic Circuits
Electrical quantities – Ohm’s Law – Kirchoff’s Laws – Resistors – Temperature coefficient
of Resistance – Inductors – Capacitors – series and parallel circuits – Simple problems.
Magnetic circuits – Definitions of MMF, flux and Reluctance – Reluctances in series and
parallel – Electromagnetic induction – Fleming’s rule – Lenz’s law – Faraday’s laws –
statically and dynamically induced EMF – Self and mutual inductance – coefficient of
coupling – Hysteresis – Eddy currents – analogy of electric and magnetic circuits – simple
problem.
UNIT II DC Machines
Elementary concepts and parts of D.C. machines – Generator/Motor action – Emf and Torque
equations – Types of D.C. generators/motors – Characteristics and applications –losses –
starting and speed control of motors.
UNIT III Measuring Instruments
Moving coil and moving iron instruments – Dynamometer type - Wattmeter – Induction type
energy meter – Megger – multimeter – tong tester – applications.
UNIT IV AC Circuits
Sinusoidal functions – Phasor representation – RMS Effective values – Form and peak
factors – RLC circuits, power and power factor – simple problems – poly phase circuits
Advantages – Star/Mesh connections – Measurement of power and power factor.
UNIT V AC Machines & Wiring
Transformers – synchronous generators and motors – Three phase/ Single phase induction
motors – Basic principles – Starting of AC motors – applications. Introduction to
transmission and distribution.
Domestic wiring – accessories – types – staircase wiring – fluorescent tube circuit – simple
layout – earthing and types.
23
Text Books and References:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
V.K.Mehta, Rohith Mehta, 1998, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, Ravindra, New
Delhi.
D.P. Kothari, I.J.Nagrath, 2002, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, Tata McGraw – Hill,
New Delhi.
V.N. Mittle, 2002, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, Tata McGraw – Hill, New Delhi.
B.R.Guptha, Vindana Singhal, 2000, “Electrical Science”, Wheeler, Delhi.
Jimmie J.Chuthey, Syed A.Naser, 1998, “Basic Electrical Engineering”, Tata
McGraw – Hill Singapore.
24
099 EC 25
L
T
P
Credits
3
1
-
12
BASIC ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Identify the components and types, describes the characteristics of diode and transistors.
Explain the logic gates, flip flops, design binary and construct flip flops, adder, subtractor,
decoder, registers, etc and its applications. Understand analog and digital communications.
Pre-requisite:
Knowledge on Engineering physics
UNIT I
Components: Passive Circuit components – resistors – metal film and wire would resistors
and their tolerance – potentio meters – capacitors – Dissipation factor –use of various types
of capacitors in circuits. Identification of various electronic components, finding value of
resistance, capacitance, transistor, diode, etc.
UNIT II Transducers
Active and passive transducers – Basic requirements of a transducer – examples –
displacement transducer – LVDT – electrical strain gauge – temperature transducer – review
of passive components.
UNIT III Semi Conductor Devices
Basic concepts of PN junction diodes half wave rectifiers – Full wave rectifiers – Bridge
rectifiers – filters –zener diodes, bipolar Junction transistor, UJT – JFET – MOSFET –
Thyristors – Photo electric devices –display devices.
UNIT IV Linear and Digital Integrating Circuits
Introduction to fabrication of ICs – operational amplifier and applications – Gates – logic
symbols and truth tables of OR, AND, INVERTER, NOR and NAND gates. Flip-flops – RS
flip-flop – JK Flip-flop. D flip-flop, T flip flop – Counters - shift registers. Introduction to
digital computers.
UNIT V Communication Systems
Analog and Digital Signals – telecommunication system – transmission paths – basic
principles of modulation – AM, FM, pulse and digital modulation – data transmissions –
MODEMs – radio, TV, Microwave, Satellite, RADAR, Optical and ISDN applications.
Text Books and References:
1. S.Ramapathran, 1998, “Basic Electronics”, Romesh Chandra Kanna, Delhi.
2. William H. Gothaman, 2000, “Digital Electronics”, Prentice hall of India, Delhi.
3. Rajiv Guptha, Abhijt Biswar, 2003, “Engineering Electronics”, Pragahi, New
Delhi.
4. S.Rama Latha 2001, “Digital Technology”, Lakshmi, Tamilnadu.
5. Bernard Grob, 2001, “Basic Electronics”, Tata Mc Graw- Hill, Delhi.
6. B.L. Theraja, 2002, “Basic Electronics Solid State”, Chand, Delhi.
7. Muraleedharan K.A., Muthu Subramanian R & Salivahanan, S, 2000, “Basic
Electrical & Electronic and Computer Engineering”, Tata McGraw Hill, Delhi.
25
099 CS 27
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
LABORATORY
L
T
P
Credits
-
-
2
9
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Provides the students to understand and perform programming using simple commands C
commands and demonstrate matrix operations and simple programs in using C language.
Pre-requisite:
Knowledge on Modern Information Systems Laboratory
1. Write a program in C to find the Simple Interest and Compound Interest.
2. SI= (p*n*r)/100 and CI=p*(1+r/100)^n
3. Write a program in C for temperature conversions:
a) Fahrenheit to Centigrade.
b) Centigrade to Fahrenheit.
4. Write a program in C using control structures.
5. Write a program in C using Switch Case conditions.
6. Write a program in C to find the sum of the given series:
a) 1+2+3+…..+n
b) 1^2+2^2+3^2+…..+n^2
c) 1^3+2^3+3^3+…..+n^3
7. Write a program in C to find the sum of the odd and even numbers.
8. Write a program in C to find the factorial of the given number using Recursive
function.
9. Write a program in C to perform Matrix Addition.
10. Write a program in C to perform Matrix Multiplication.
11. Write a program in C to find the biggest of ‘n’ numbers using functions and arrays.
12. Write a program in C to illustrate different string methods.
13. Write a program in C to design the “Student Mark Sheets” using Structures.
14. Write a program in C to calculate area of various shapes (triangle, rectangle, square,
circle, cylinder) using functions.
15. Write a program in C to design the “Employee Payroll Processing” using Structures.
16. Write a program to in C to print the value and address of the elements of an array
using array of pointers.
17. Write a program to in C to perform Binary Search.
Text Books and References:
1. Rajaraman, 2003 “Computer Programming in C” Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
2. E. Balguruswamy, 2002, “Programming in ANSI C”, Tata McGraw Hill Publication
Company, Second Edition, New Delhi.
3. N. Kamthane, 2002, “Programming with ANSI and Turbo C”, Pearson Education,
New Delhi.
4. B. S. Gottfried, 1995, “Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Programming in
C”, Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co, New Delhi.
26
099 CS 28
COMPUTER INSTALLATION &
SERVICING LABORATORY
L
T
P
Credits
-
-
2
9
Total
Marks
100
Course Objectives:
Acquire sufficient basic working skills on assembling, servicing and installation.
Pre-requisite:
Basic computer fundamentals
1. Installing and Configuring FDD in system
a. Using BIOS setup program to configure an FDD
b. Floppy drive Diagnostics / Servicing
2. Identification of front panel indicators , switches in a computer system for flip-flop
and tower case computers and identification of rear side connectors.
3. Familiarizing the computer system layout : Marking positions of SMPS ,
Motherboard, FDD, HDD , CD and add on cards in both flip-flop and tower models.
4. Drawing the layout of a Pentium Motherboard marking the following items in it :
CPU used, RAM, Cache, Xtal, Cooling fan, I/O slots, I/O ports available.
5. (a) Studying the important jumper settings for changing the CPU speed, Memory
size, temperature etc., in a motherboard.
(b) Study of CMOS setup program
1.
Changing Standard Settings
2.
Changing advanced settings
6. HDD Installation:
(a) Installing Hard Disk.
(b) Configuring CMOS-Setup
(c) Partitioning using FDISK
(d) Formatting Hard Disk
7. Study of AGP Card (a) To draw the layout (b) Study various connections (c) jumper
settings
8. Familiarizing important dos commands (a) scandisk (b) MSD (c) Virus Detecting and
Rectifying Softwares.
9. Printer Installation and Servicing
(a) Installing a DOT Matrix Printer
(b) Installing a Laser / Inkjet printer
(c) Printer trouble shooting to cable fault
(d) Head Cleaning
10. CD Drive and MODEM Installation
(a) Installing a CD-ROM Drive for Dos / Windows modes
(b) Configuring using device drivers
(c) Installing a MODEM and Configuring it.
27
11. Installing and Configuring a TV Tuner Card
12. Installation of CD-Writer
(a) Installing and Configuring a CD-Writer
(b) Recording a Blank CD.
13. Installation of Scanner and DVD Drive
(a) Installing and Configuring a Scanner
(b) Installing and configuring a DVD Drive
14. Assembling of a Pentium (II / III / IV ) System with add on Cards and check the
working condition of the system.
15. Assembling of a Pentium system without add on cards. ( Built –in ) and check the
working condition of the system.
Text Books and References:
1. B.Govindrajalu, IBM PC and CLONES, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishers
2. D.Balasubramanian, 2005, Computer Installation and Servicing, Tata McGraw Hill.
3. M.Radhakrishnan, 2001, Computer Installation and Troubleshooting, ISTE- Learning
Materials.
4. Minasi, The complete PC upgrade and Maintenance Mark, BPB Publication
5. Peter Norton, Inside the PC, Tech Media
6. Stephen J Bigelow, 2001, Troubleshooting, Maintaining and Repairing PCs, Tata
McGraw Hill Pub.
28
055 CS 31 COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Course Objectives
This course offers a good understanding of the various functional units of a computer system
and prepares the student to be in a position to design a basic computer system. Finally the
student will be exposed to the recent trends in parallel and distributed computing and
multithreaded application.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I Introduction
Evaluation of computers generations of computers – basics of computer architecture -stored
program organization (Von Neuman architecture) – institution formats and types – addressing
modes – stack organization.
UNIT II Processor Design
Processor basics – CPU organization – data representation – institution sets – data path
design – fixed point arithmetic – ALU – floating point arithmetic – control design – basic
concepts – hard wired control – micro programmed control – pipeline control.
UNIT III Memory and I / O Systems
Memory technology – memory systems – virtual memory – high speed memories –
interleaved memories – caches – design methods – associative memories – input / output
system – programmed I /O – DMA and interrupts – I / O processors.
UNIT IV Parallel Processing
Parallelism in uni processor system – parallel computer structures – architectural
classification schemes – pipelining – instruction and arithmetic pipelining – principles of
designing pipeline processors – vector processing requirements.
UNIT V Advanced Computer Architecture
RISC machines – design principles – RISC versus CISC – examples RISC architecture
SPARC – static and dynamic data flow design – fault tolerant computers.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. John p. Hayes, 1998, “Computer Architecture and Organization”, 3rd edition McGraw
– Hill.
2. Carl Hamacher, zvonko Vranesic and Safwat Zaky, 2002, “Computer organization”,
McGraw- Hill.
3. Heuring V.p and Jordan H.F, 2000, “Computer systems design and architecture”,
Addison Wesley.
4. William Stallings, 2001,“Computer Organization and Architecture”, Addison Wesley,
5th edition.
5. John D Carpinelinelli, 2001, “Computer systems Organization and Architecture”,
Addison Wesley.
6. Dezso Simha, Trence Fountain and Peter Kacsuk, 1998, “Advanced Computer
Architecture’, Addison Wesley.
29
055 MA 32 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III
Course Objectives:
This course provides students with a comprehensive study of geometric aspects of curvature,
method of solving differential equations, identifying algebraic eigen value problems and
understanding three dimensional materials to study the properties of lines and planes in space
along with sphere as an illustrative curved surface element.
Pre-requisite:
099 MA 12 Engineering Mathematics I & 099 MA 22 Engineering Mathematics II
UNIT I Partial Differential Equations
Formation, Solutions of Standard types of first order equation and Lagrange’s equation, linear
partial differential equations of second and higher order with constant coefficient coordinates.
UNIT II Fourier Series
Dirichlet’s conditions, general Fourier series, half range sine and Cosine series Parseval’s
identity, Harmonic Analysis.
UNIT III Boundary Value Problem
Classification of second order linear partial differential equations, transverse vibration of a
string, one – dimensional heat equation and two - dimensional heat flow – Fourier series
solutions in Cartesian coordinates.
UNIT IV Laplace Transforms
Transforms of simple functions, Basic operational properties, Transforms of derivatives and
integrals, periodic functions, Initial and final value theorems - Inverse transforms –
Convolution theorem – Applications of Laplace transforms for solving linear ordinary
differential equations.
UNIT V Fourier Transforms
Statement of Fourier integral theorem – Fourier transform pair - Fourier Sine and Cosine
transforms –– Transforms of simple functions, transforms of derivatives, the convolution
integrals of Fourier, application to one dimensional diffusion equations.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Kreyszig, E., 2000 “Advanced Engineering Mathematics” (8th Edition), John Wiley And
Sons,(Asia) Pte Ltd., Singapore,
2. Grewal, B.S., 2000 “Higher Engineering Mathematics” (35th Editions,), Khanna
Publishers, Delhi
3 Kandasamy, P., Thilagavathy, K., and Gunavathy, K., 2000,“Engineering Mathematics”,
Volumes II & III (4th Edition), S. Chand & Co., New Delhi,
4. Narayanan, S., Manicavachago Pillay, T.K., Ramanaiah, G., 1997 “Advanced
Mathematics for Engineering students”, Volumes II & III (2nd Edition), S.Viswanathan
(Printers & Publishers, Pvt, Ltd.), Chennai.
30
055 CS 33 C++ PROGRAMMING
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of Object Oriented
Programming with C++ and its various operations, features in developing standard
applications.
Pre-requisites:
099 CS 23 Computer Programming.
Unit I
Introduction to OOPS : Concepts of Object Oriented Programming- Benefits of OOP –
Applications of OOP – Applications of C++ - Structure of C++ program – Creating the
source file – compiling and linking.
Tokens, Expressions and Control structures :Introduction – Tokens – Keywords –
Identifiers and constants – Basic data types – User defined data types – derived data types Symbolic Constants – Type Compatibility – Declaration of variables – Dynamic initialization
of variables – Reference variables – Operators in C++ - Scope resolution operator – Member
Dereferencing operators – Memory management operators – Manipulators – Type cast
Operator – Expressions and their types – Special assignment expressions – Implicit
conversions – Operator overloading – Operator precedence – Control structures.
Unit II
Functions in C++: Introduction – Main function – Function prototyping – Call by reference
– Return by reference – Inline functions – Default arguments – Const arguments – Function
Overloading – Friend and virtual functions – Math library functions.
Classes and Objects : Introduction – Specifying a class – Defining member functions – C++
programs with Class – Making an outside function inline – Nesting of member functions –
Private member functions – Arrays within a class – Memory allocation for objects – Static
data members – Static member functions – Arrays of objects – Objects as function arguments
– Friendly functions – Returning objects – Const member functions – Pointers to members –
local classes.
Constructors and Destructors : Introduction – Constructors – parameterized constructors –
Multiple constructors in a Class – Constructors with default arguments – Dynamic
initialization of objects – Copy constructor – dynamic constructors – Constructing two
dimensional arrays – Const objects – Destructors.
Unit III
Operator Overloading and Type Conversions : Introduction – Defining Operator
Overloading – Overloading Unary Operators – Overloading Binary Operators – Overloading
Binary Operators using Friends – Manipulation of strings using operators – Rules of
Overloading Operators – Type Conversions.
Inheritance: Extending Classes – Introduction – Defining derived classes – Single
inheritance – Making a private member inheritable – multilevel inheritance – Multiple
inheritance – Hierarchical inheritance – Hybrid inheritance – Virtual base classes – Abstract
classes – Constructors in derived classes – Member classes : Nesting of classes.
Pointers, Virtual Functions and polymorphism : Introduction – Pointers to objects – this
pointer – Pointers to derived classes – Virtual functions – Pure virtual functions
31
Unit IV
Managing console I/O operations : Introduction – C++ streams – C++ stream classes –
Unformatted I/O operations – Formatted Console I/O operations – Managing Output with
Manipulators.
Working with Files : Introduction – Classes for file stream operations – Opening and
Closing a File – Detecting End-of File – More about Open(): File Modes – File pointers and
their Manipulations – Sequential Input and Output Operations – Updating a File : Random
access – Error handling during file operations – Command line arguments.
Templates : Introduction – Class templates – Class templates with multiple parameters –
Function templates – Function templates with multiple parameters – Overloading of template
functions – Member function templates – Non-type template arguments.
Unit V
Exception Handling : Introduction – Basics of exception handling – Exception handling
mechanisms – Throwing mechanisms – Catching mechanisms – Rethrowing an Exception –
Specifying Exceptions.
Standard Template Library: Introduction – Components of STL – Containers –
Algorithms – Iterators – Application of container classes – Function Objects.
Manipulation Strings: Introduction – Creating string objects – Manipulating string objects –
Relational operations – String characteristics – Accessing characters in strings – Comparing
and Swapping.
New Features of Ansi C++ Standard : Introduction – New data types – New operators –
Class implementation – Namespace Scope – Operator Keywords – New keywords.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. E Balagurusamy, 2001 “Object Oriented Programming with C++” – second edition,
Tata McGraw- Hill, New Delhi.
2. Herbert Schildt, 2003 “ C++ The Complete Reference” – 4th Edition, Tata McGrawHill, New Delhi.
3. Bjarne stroustrup, 2000 “ The C++ Programming Language” – 3rd Edition , New
Delhi.
32
055 CS 34 SYSTEM SOFTWARE
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of interaction of the
software with the various components of the machine to perform its operations supported by
the system software tools.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT I Introduction
Basic concepts- Machine structure formats- Addressing modes- Typical Architecture.
UNIT II Assemblers
Functions-Features-Machine independent – Design options – One pass- Multiimplementation- Examples.
Pass -
UNIT III Loaders and Linkers
Functions-Features-Relocation- program linking –Linking loader implantation- Automatic
library search Loader option- Linkages editors – Dynamic linking – Bootstrap loaders –
Examples.
UNIT IV Macro Processors
Functions- Macro parameters – Using labels – Conditional macro expansion – Recursive
macro expansion – general purpose macro processors – Examples.
UNIT V Compilers and Utilities
Introduction to compliers – Different phases of a complier- Simple one pass Compliers –
code optimization techniques – System Software tools- Implementation of editors –
Debuggers.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. L.Beck, 1999, “System Software, An Introduction of System Programming”, Addison
Wesley.
2. D.M. Dhamdhere, 1999, “Systems Programming and Operating Systems”, Tata
McGraw Hill
Company.
3. A.V. Aho, Ravi Sethi and J.D. Ullman, 1998, “Compilers Principles, Techniques and
Tools”, Addison Wesley.
33
055 CS 35 DATA STRUCTURE AND ALGORITHMS
Course Objectives
The course should provide one with a fairly good concept of the fundamentals of data
structures and also of the commonly occurring algorithms. The mathematical model of data is
an abstract concept of data such as set, list or graph. To make it useful for problem solving
the abstraction is made concrete by going into the data structure of the model-its
implementation and associated algorithms. Given a data structure, quite frequently, several
alternative algorithms exist for the same operation. Naturally, the question analyzing an
algorithm to determine its performance in relation to the other alternatives becomes
important.
Pre-requisite
099 CS 23 Computer Programming
UNIT I
Introduction, algorithmic notation, Space and Time analysis of an algorithm, information and
its storage representation, Representation and its manipulation of strings, Pattern Matching,
Grammars.
UNIT II
Linear data structure, array of structures, stacks, application of stacks, queues, simulation,
priority queues, pointers and linked allocation, linked linear lists, associative lists.
UNIT III
Non-Linear data structures, Trees, multi linked structure, graphs and their representation,
PERT and related techniques, spanning trees, dynamic storage management, Buddy system,
compaction.
UNIT IV
Sorting and Searching, Selection sort, Bubble sort, radix sort, Sequential search, binary
search, search trees, hash table methods, hashing functions, Collison resolution techniques,
topological sorting, external sorting, Polyphase sorting.
UNIT V
File structures, external storage devices, sequential files, indexed sequential files, direct files,
external searching, linear and virtual hashing, virtual memory, VSAM files, multiple key
access.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jean Paul Tremblay and Paul G. Sorenson, 2001, “An Introduction to data Structures
with Applications”, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw- Hill.
2. Robert Kruse, C.L. Tondo and Bruce Leung, 2001, “Data structures and program
design in C’, 2nd edition, Pearson Education Asia.
3. Sartaj Sahni, 2000, “Data structures, Algorithms and applications in Java”, McGrawHill, Singapore.
4. Robert Sedgwick, 2001, “Algorithms in C++, Third edition, Addison Wesley, New
Delhi.
5. John R.Hubbard, Schaum’s, 2000, “Outline of theory and problem of data structure
with C++’, McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.
34
055 CS 37 C++ PROGRAMMING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of object oriented
programming with C++ programs done practically in the laboratory.
Pre-requisites:
099 CS 27 Computer Programming Laboratory
C++ PROGRAMS USING THE FOLLOWING CONCEPTS
1. Classes
2. Function overloading
3. Friend function
4. Constructor / Destructor
5. Array of objects
6. Operator overloading
7. Inheritance
8. Virtual function and Dynamic binding
9. File operations.
10. Exception Handling
Reference Books
1. E Balagurusamy, 2001 “Object Oriented Programming with C++” – second edition,
Tata McGrawHill, New Delhi.
2. Herbert Schildt, 2003 “ C++ The Complete Reference” – 4th Edition, Tata McGrawHill, New Delhi.
3. Bjarne stroustrup, 2000 “ The C++ Programming Language” – 3rd Edition , New
Delhi.
35
055 CS 38 DATA STRUCTURE AND ALGORITHM LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of object oriented
programming with C++ programs done practically in the laboratory.
Pre-Requisites:
099 CS 27 – Computer Programming Laboratory
List of Exercises
Implement the following exercises using C:
1. Array implementation of List Abstract Data Type (ADT)
2. Linked list implementation of List ADT
3. Cursor implementation of List ADT
4. Array implementations of Stack ADT
5. Linked list implementations of Stack ADT
The following three exercises are to be done by implementing the following source files
(a) Program for ‘Balanced Paranthesis’
(b) Array implementation of Stack ADT
(c) Linked list implementation of Stack ADT
(d) Program for ‘Evaluating Postfix Expressions’
An appropriate header file for the Stack ADT should be #included in (a) and (d)
6. Implement the application for checking ‘Balanced Paranthesis’ using array
implementation of Stack
ADT (by implementing files (a) and (b) given above)
7. Implement the application for checking ‘Balanced Paranthesis’ using linked list
implementation of
Stack ADT (by using file (a) from experiment 6 and implementing file (c))
8. Implement the application for ‘Evaluating Postfix Expressions’ using array and linked list
implementations of Stack ADT (by implementing file (d) and using file (b), and then by
using files
(d) and (c))
9. Queues ADT
10. Search Tree ADT - Binary Search Tree
11. Heap Sort
12. Quick Sort
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Jean Paul Tremblay and Paul G. Sorenson, 2001, “An Introduction to data Structures
with
Applications”, 2nd edition, Tata McGraw- Hill.
2. Robert Kruse, C.L. Tondo and Bruce Leung, 2001, “Data structures and program
design in C’, 2nd edition, Pearson Education Asia.
3. Sartaj Sahni, 2000, “Data structures, Algorithms and applications in Java”, McGrawHill,
Singapore.
4. Robert Sedgwick, 2001, “Algorithms in C++, Third edition, Addison Wesley, New
Delhi.
36
055 CS 41 COMPUTER NETWORKS
Course Objectives:
To understand the concepts of data communications. To study the functions of different
layers. To introduce IEEE standards employed in computer networking. To make the students
to get familiarized with different protocols and network components.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT I
Data Communication Concepts: Transmission media – Data encoding – Interface and
modems – multiplexing – Error detection and correction – Digital subscriber line – Circuit
switching – Packet switching – Message switching.
UNIT II
Wide Area Networks: ISO – OSI layered architecture – Function of the layers – Data link
protocols – HDLC, LAPD, Internetworking devices – Repeaters, Bridges, Routers, Routing
algorithms – Distance vector routing, link state routing, X.25 protocol, congestion control.
UNIT III
Frame relay and ATM networks: Frame relay operation – layers and traffic control; ATM
networks – architecture switching, layers service classes.
UNIT IV
local area Network: LAN topology – Ethernet – Token bus – Token ring – FDDI – wireless
LAN, ATM LAN – IEEE 802 medium access control layer standard – Random access
protocols – ALOHA – Slotted ALOHA.
UNIT V
OSI Layers: Transport layer issues – Session layer – Synchronization – Presentation layer –
Encryption, decryption, Application layer – Message handling system, file transfer, virtual
terminal – E-mail.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. William Stallings, 2000, “Data and Computer Communication:, 6th edition, Pearson
education Asia.
2. Behrouz A, Forouzan, 2000, “Data Communication and Networking”, 2nd edition,
Tata McGraw – Hill.
3. Fred Halsall, 1998, “Data Communication, Computer networks and Open Systems”,
4th edition, Addison Wesley.
37
055 MA 42 PROBABILITY AND QUEUING THEORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of random variables
in random processes of various systems using the theorems.
Pre-requisites:
099 MA 12 Engineering Mathematics I, 099 MA 22 Engineering Mathematics II & 055 MA
32 Engineering Mathematics III.
UNIT I PROBABILITY AND RANDOM VARIABLES
Probability concepts, random variables, moments, Moment Generating function, Binominal
Poisson Geometric, Negative Binominal, Exponential, Gamma, Weibull distributions,
Functions of random variable, Chebychev inequality.
UNIT II TWO-DIMENSIONAL RANDOM VARIABLES
Marginal and conditional distributions, Covariance, Correlation
Transformation of random variables, Central limit theorem.
and
regression,
UNIT III RANDOM PROCESSES
Classification, Stationary process, Markov Process, Binominal Process, Poisson process,
Birth and death process, renewal process.
UNIT IV MARKOV CHAIN AND RELIABILITY
Markov chain, Transition probabilities, Limiting Distributions, Concepts of reliability, hazard
functions, Series and parallel systems, Reliability and Availability of Markovian systems,
maintainability, Preventive maintenance.
UNIT V QUEUINGTHEORY
Markovian queueing models, Little’s formula, Multi- server queues, M/G/I Queues,
Pollaczek- Khintchineformula.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Trivedi K.S., 2000, “Probability and Statistics with reliability, Queuing and Computer
Science applications”, Prentice – hall of India, New Delhi.
2. Milton J. Susan, 2003, “Introduction to probability and Statistics”.
3. Balagurusamy.E., 1998, “Reliability Engineering”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishers,
New Delhi.
4. Gross D, and Harris C.M, 1998, “Fundamentals of Queuing Theory”, John Wiley &
Sons.
38
055 CS 43 DATA BASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
Course Objectives:
To learn the fundamentals of data models and to conceptualize and depict a database system
using ER diagram. To make a study of SQL and relational database design. To understand the
internal storage structures using different file and indexing techniques which will help in
physical DB design. To know the fundamental concepts of transaction processingconcurrency control techniques and recovery procedure. To have an introductory knowledge
about the emerging trends in the area of distributed DB- OO DB- Data mining and Data
Warehousing and XML
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 35 Data Structures and Algorithms.
UNIT I INTRODUCTION
Introduction to file and database Systems – database system structure – data Models – E-R
Model.
UNIT II RELATIONAL MODEL
Relational model – relational algebra and calculus-commercial query languages-security and
integrity-functional dependency - normalization – relational database design.
UNIT III ADVANCED CONCEPTS
Query processing – crash recovery – concurrency control – distributed databases – file and
system structures – indexing and hashing.
UNIT IV OTHER DATABASES
Hierarchical model – network model active and deductive databases – temporal databases –
parallel databases – multimedia databases.
UNIT V CURRENT TRENDS
object oriented databases – design of object oriented databases- data warehousing – data
mining – association rules – application of data mining – classification and prediction – XML
– case studies.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Ramez Elmasri, Shamkant B. Navathe, 2000, ‘Fundamentals of database systems”, 3rd
Edition, Addison Wesley, McGraw-Hill..
Abraham sillerschatz, Henry.F.Korth and S.Sundharshan, 2002, “Database system
concepts”, 4th edition.
C.J.data, 2001, “Introduction to database systems”, Addison Wesley, 7th Edition.
Hector Garcia-Molina, J.D.Ullman and J.Widom, 2001, “Database systems
Implementation”, Addison Wesley.
J.D.Ullman and J.Widom, 2001,“A first Course in Database systems”, Addison
Wesley.
Raghu Ramakrishnan, 2001, “Database Management Systems”, McGraw-hill,
Publishing company.
Jan l.harrington, 2000, “object oriented database design”, Harcourt India private Ltd.
39
055 CS 44 JAVA PROGRAMMING
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of Object Oriented
Programming with Java and its various operations, features in developing standard
applications.
Pre-requisites:
099 CS 23 Computer Programming & 055 CS 33 C++ Programming
UNIT I
Introduction : OOP concepts – principles – Classes and Objects – Java keywords - Using
blocks of code – Lexical issues – java class libraries.
Data Types, Variables and Arrays : Integers – Floating point types – Characters – Booleans –
Literals – Variables – Type conversion and casting – Automatic Type promotion in
Expressions – Arrays – Strings.
Operators : Arithmetic Operators – Bitwise Operators – Relational Operators – Boolean
Logical Operators – Assignment Operators – The ? operators – Operator Precedence – Using
parenthesis.
Control Statements : Java’s selection statements – Iteration statements – Jump Statements.
UNIT II
Classes and Methods : Introduction – Class Fundamentals – Declaring Objects – Assigning
Object Reference Variables – Introducing methods – Constructors – ‘this’ keyword –
Garbage Collection – The Finalize() Method – Stack Class – Overloading Methods – Using
Objects as Parameters – Argument Passing – Recursion – Access Control – Nested and Inner
Classes – Exploring the String Class – Using Command-Line Arguments.
Inheritance : Introduction – Basics – Using Super – Method Overriding – Dynamic Method
Dispatch – Using Abstract Classes – Using Final with Inheritance – Object Class.
Packages and Interfaces : Introduction to Packages – Access Protection – Importing Packages
– Interfaces.
UNIT III
Exception Handling : Fundamentals – Exception types – Uncaught Exceptions – Using Try
and Catch – Multiple catch clauses – Nested Try Statements – throw – throws – java’s Builtin Exceptions – Creating your Own Exception Subclasses – Chained Exceptions – Using
Exceptions.
Multi-threaded Programming : The Java Thread Model – Main Thread – Creating a Thread –
Multiple threads – Using isAlive() and join() – Thread Priorities – Synchronization –
Interthread Communication – Suspending, Resuming and Stopping threads- Using
Multithreading.
40
UNIT IV
String Handling : String Constructors – String Length – Special String Operations –
Character Extraction – String Comparison – Searching Strings – Modifying a String – Data
Conversion using valueOf() – Changing the Case Of Characters within a String – String
Methods – String Buffer.
I/O Applets : I/O Basics – Reading Console Input – Writing Console Output – The Print
Writer Class – Reading and Writing Files – Applet Fundamentals – Transient and Volatile
Modifiers – Using instanceof – strictfp – Native Methods – Using assert.
The Applet Class : Applet Basics – Applet Architecture – Applet Skeleton – Simple Applet
Display Methods – Requesting Repainting – Using the Status Window – HTML Applet tag –
Passing Parameters to Applets – getDocumentBase() and getCodeBase() – AppletContext and
Show Document() – Audio Clip Interface – Applet Stub Interface – Outputting to the
Console.
UNIT V
Event Handling : Introduction – Mechanisms – The Delegation Event Model – Event Classes
– Sources of Events – Event Listener Interfaces – Using the Delegation Event Model –
Adapter Classes – Inner Classes.
Introducing the AWT : AWT Classes – Working with Windows – Using AWT Controls –
Layout Managers and Menus.
Java.util – The Collection Frame work – More Utility Classes.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Herbert Schildt, 2002 “Java 2 : The Complete Reference”, Fifth Edition , Tata
McGraw Hill.
2. Ken Arnold, James Gosling, David Holmes, 2000 “The Java Programming
Language”, Third Edition, Pearson Education Pvt Limited.
3. C.Thomas Wu, 2001 “An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with
Java”, Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill.
41
055 CS 45 OPERATING SYSTEM
Course Objectives:
To have an overview of different types of operating systems, To know the components of an
operating system. To have a thorough knowledge of process management. To have a
thorough knowledge of storage management. To know the concepts of I/O and file systems.
Pre-requisites:
055 CS 34 System Software & 055 CS 31 Computer Architecture.
UNIT I
Introduction: Mainframe systems –Desktop systems – Multiprocessor systems Distributed
systems – Clustered systems – time systems – Hardware Protection Systems Components –
Handheld systems – Operating System services – System Calls – system Programs – System
Structure –Visual Machines – System Design and Implementation.
UNIT II
Process Management: Process Concept – Process Scheduling –Operation on Process –Cooperating Processes – Inter process Communication –Threads –Overview –Multithreading
Models –Process Synchronization – The Critical Section Problem- Synchronization
Hardware – Semaphores – Classical Problems of Synchronization – Deadlocks- System
Model – Deadlock Characterization – Methods for handling Deadlocks – Deadlock
Prevention – Deadlock Detection – Recovery from Deadlock.
UNIT III
CPU Scheduling and Memory Management: CPU scheduling Algorithms – Multiple –
Processors Scheduling – Real Time Scheduling – Algorithm Evaluation – Memory
Management – Background Swapping – Contiguous Memory Allocation- Paging –
Segmentation – Segmentation with paging.
UNIT IV
Virtual Memory – Demand Paging –Page replacement –Thrashing Allocation of Frames –
Other Considerations – File Systems – File Concepts –Access Methods – Directory Structure
– file system Mounting – file Sharing – Protection – File System Structure – File System
Implementation – recovery.
UNIT V
Files and secondary Storage Management: Allocation Methods – Free-Space Management –
Directory Implementation – Recovery –Disk Structure –Disk Scheduling –Disk
Management- Swap Space management – Process Management – Process Scheduling –
Security.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Silberschatz, Galvin, GAGNE, 2002, “Operating System Concepts”, Sixth Edition,
John wile & Sons, INC.
2. D.M. Dhamdhere, 2002, “Operating Systems”, Tata McGraw Hall.
3. Charles Crowley, 1999, “Operating Systems: A Design Oriented Approach”, Tata
McGraw Hill.
4. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, 1998, “Modern Operating System”, Prentice Hall of India.
42
055 CS 47 JAVA PROGRAMMING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of OOP with java
programs to be done practically in the laboratory.
Pre-requisites:
099 CS 27 Computer Programming Laboratory & 055 CS 37 C++ Programming Laboratory.
Students are required to write a code snippet that covers the following Concepts.
1. Creation of Classes and object.
2. Usage of import statement and package declaration in java programs.
3. Declaring variables of various data types and their effect by changing the access
modifiers like Private, public, protected, default.
4. Usage of Java keywords final, static, transient, volatile, synchronized at appropriate
places in java programs.
5. Writing programs which make use of Arithmetic Operators, Comparison Operators,
Logical Operators, Bit wise Operators.
6. Writing programs which make use of && operators.
7. Write Java programs, which make use of control Statement like if, while, do while.
Try, catch, finally, throw throws.
8. Write code snippets which make usage of Method Overloading, method Overriding,
recursion,
9. Using super, this, super (), this () in Java Programs.
10. Write Java Programs, which make usage of Exception handling
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Herbert Schildt, 2002 “Java 2 : The Complete Reference”, Fifth Edition , Tata
McGraw Hill.
2. Ken Arnold, James Gosling, David Holmes, 2000 “The Java Programming
Language”, Third Edition, Pearson Education Pvt Limited.
3. C.Thomas Wu, 2001 “An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with Java”,
Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill.
43
055 CS 48 DBMS LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of creating and
managing the database to be done practically in the laboratory.
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 38 Data Structures and Algorithms Laboratory
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Data Definition Language (DDL) commands in RDBMS.
2. Data Manipulation Language (DML) and Data Control Language (DCL)
commands in RDBMS.
3. High-level language extension with Cursors.
4. High level language extension with Triggers.
5. Procedures and Functions.
6. Embedded SQL.
7. Database design using E-R model and Normalization.
8. Design and implementation of Payroll Processing System.
9. Design and implementation of Banking System.
10. Design and implementation of Library Information System.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ramez Elmasri, Shamkant B. Navathe, 2000, ‘Fundamentals of database systems”, 3rd
Edition, Addison Wesley, McGraw-Hill..
Abraham sillerschatz, Henry.F.Korth and S.Sundharshan, 2002, “Database system
concepts”, 4th edition.
C.J.data, 2001, “Introduction to database systems”, Addison Wesley, 7th Edition.
Hector Garcia-Molina, J.D.Ullman and J.Widom, 2001, “Database systems
Implementation”, Addison Wesley.
44
055 CS 51 OBJECT ORIENTED SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of analyzing the
objects in a system and design the objects based on its activities.
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 33 C++ Programming
UNIT I
Object Orientation- System development – review of objects- inheritances- object
relationship dynamic binding-OOSD life style
UNIT II
Process- Analysis – Design-prototyping –implementation- Testing – Overview of
Methodologies
UNIT III
OMT- Booch methodology, Jacobson methodology- patterns – Unified approach - UML –
Class diagram – Dynamic modeling.
UNIT IV
Use case model- Creation of classes – Noun phrase approach- responsibilities- CollaboratorsObject relationship – Super – Sub class- Aggregation.
UNIT V
Quality assurance- class visibility- refining attributes- Methods- Access layer- OODBMSTable- class mapping view layer.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ali Bahrami, 1999, “Object Orients System Development”, McGraw- Hill
International
Edition.
2. Booch G., 2000, “Object Oriented analysis and Design”, Addison- Wesley Publishing
Company.
3. Rambaugh J, Blaha.M. Premeriani, W., Eddy F and Loreson W., 1998, “Object
Oriented
Modeling and Design”, PHL.
45
055 EC 52 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
Course Objectives:
To have an overview of signals and systems. To study DFT & FFT, To study the design of
IIR filters. To study the design of FIR filters. To study the effect of finite word lengths &
applications of DSP.
Pre-requisite:
099 EC 25 Basic Electronics Engineering
UNIT I
Discrete Time Signals and systems: Analysis of discrete time linear shift invariant systems –
Convolution sum – Discrete – time systems described by difference equations –
Implementation of discrete time system – Z – transform and system analysis.
UNIT II
Discrete time Fourier transform (DTFT): DFT and properties – computation of DFT and
IDFT using fast Fourier Transform (FFT), radix-2 DIT and DIF algorithms.
UNIT III
Structures for FIR systems: direct, cascade, frequency sampling and lattice structures –
Structures for IIR systems: direct, cascade, parallel and lattice structures – Representation of
numbers – Quantization of filter coefficients – Round – off effects in digital filters.
UNIT IV
Digital Filters: Design of linear phase FIR filters using window methods, frequency sampling
method – Design of IIR filters from analog filters, Frequency transformation.
UNIT V
Application: Multirate Digital Signal Processing, Sampling rate conversion – Sub-Band
coding of Speech signals – Musical sound processing.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
John G.Proakis and Dimitris, G.Manolakis, 2002, “Digital Signal Processing
Principles Algorithms and Applications”, 3rd edition, prentice hall of India Pvt. Ltd.
Sanjit K. Mitra, 2002, “Digital Signal Processing – A Computer based Approach”,
Tata McGraw – Hill Edition.
Alan Oppenheim V., Ronald Schafer W., 2002, “Discrete Time Signal Processing “,
Pearson education India Pvt Ltd., New Delhi.
46
055 EC 53 MICROPROCESSOR AND MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATIONS
Course Objectives:
To study the architecture and Instruction set of 8085 and 8086. To develop assembly
language programs in 8085 and 8086. To design and understand multiprocessor
configurations, To study different peripheral devices and their interfacing to 8085/8086. To
study the architecture and programming of 8051 microcontroller.
Pre-requisites:
099 EC 25 Basic Electronics Engineering & 055 CS 31 Computer Architecture
UNIT I 8-BIT MICROPROCESSOR
8085 architecture – pin configuration – Timing diagrams – Basic memory and I/O interfacing
concepts – instruction set – Assembly.
UNIT II MICRO CONTROLLER
Intel 8051 / 8031 architecture – 8051 micro controller hardware – I /O pins – ports and
circuits – External memory – Counter and Timers – serial data I / O – interrupts – Basic
assembly language programming – Introduction to 16 bit micro controller.
UNIT III 80 X 86 PROCESSORS
8086 architecture – Pin configuration – 8086 in min / max. Mode – Assembly language
programming – Intel 32 – bit / 64 – bit processors.
UNIT IV PERIPHERALS AND INTERFACING
Serial and parallel I/O (8251 and 82055) – Programmable DMA controller (8257) –
Programmable interrupt controller (8259) – Keyboard and display controller (8279) – ADC /
DAC interfacing.
UNIT V MICROPROCESSOR BASED SYSTEMS DESIGN AND DIGITAL
INTERFACING
Interfacing to Alpha Numeric displays – High power devices and optical motor shaft
encoders – Analog interfacing and industrial control microcomputer based scale – Industrial
process control system – Prototype microcomputer based instrument – Robotics and
embedded control – DSP and Digital filters.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
A.K Ray and K.M. bhurchandi, 2000, “advanced microprocessors and peripherals”,
1st edition, Tata McGraw-hill.
2.
Goankar, 1998, “Microprocessor Architecture programming and aplicationa with
8085”, Wiley eastern.
3.
Myke Predko, 1999, “Programming and customizing the 8051 Microcontroller”, Tata
McGraw-Hill, edition.
4.
Muhammad Ali Mazidi Janice Gilispie Mazidi, 2000, “The 8051 Microcontroller and
Embedded Systems”, Prentice Hall of India, Pvt, Ltd.
5.
Douglas V.Hall, 1999, “Microprocessors and Interfacing Programming and
Hardware”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
47
055 CS 54 VISUAL PROGRAMMING
Course Objectives
Familiar with the concepts of windows programming. Understand the concepts of Visual
basic programming. Acquainted with Visual C++ programming, Familiar with the advance
concepts of Visual basic programming, Understand the application of windows programming.
Pre-requisite
055 CS 33 C++ Programming
UNIT I
Introduction to Windows Programming: GUI Concepts – Overview of Windows
programming – Creating the window – Displaying the window – message Loop – windows
procedure – WM_PAINT message – WM_ DESTROY message – An Introduction to GDI –
Scroll Bars – Keyboard – keyboard – Mouse – menus.
UNIT II
Visual basic Programming: IDE – First Visual Basic Program – Introduction to Forms –
Intrinsic Controls – working with Files – Accessing databases with data control – Classes and
Object – ADO Object Model.
UNIT III
Visual C++ Programming: Windows programming Model – Visual C++ components –
Microsoft foundation classes Library Application Framework – Getting Started with
Appwizard – Basic Event handling, Mapping modes, and a Scrolling View – Graphics
Device Interface, colors and fonts – model Dialog and Windows Common Dialogs –
Modeless Dialog and windows Common dialogs – using Active-x controls – windows
message processing and Multithreading.
UNIT IV
Advanced concepts: Menus – keyboard Accelerators – Rich Edit Control – Tool bars – Status
bars – A reusable frame Window base class – Reading and writing documents – SDI and
MDI environments – splitter windows and multiple views.
UNIT V
Applications of windows programming: Dynamic link library – Component Object linking
and embedding – Data base management With Microsoft ODBC.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Francesco Balena, 2001, “Programming Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0”, Microsoft press,
Indian Reprint.
David Kruglirski. J, 1998, “Programming Microsoft Visual C++”, 5th Edition,
Microsoft press.
G.Cornell, 1998, “Visual Basic 6 “, Tata McGraw Hill, 1998.
Deitel & Deitel, T. R. neito, 1999,“ Vitusl Basic 6, How to program”, Prentice Hall
Of India.
48
055 CS 055 NETWORK DESIGN SECURITY & MANAGEMENT
Course Objectives:
Understand the principles of network and design, Familiar with the designing of WAN
topology, Familiar with security services and cryptography, Acquire sufficient knowledge in
network security, Obtain adequate information in network management.
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 45 Operating System
UNIT I PRINCIPLES OF NETWORK AND DESIGN
Design objectives – Understanding the networking environment – Achieving the design goals
– Importance of being predictable and fundamental design principles. Designing the campus
LAN – campus network design goals – understanding the campus network – Designing the
LAN topology – Campus hierarchical design.
UNIT II DESIGNING THE WAN
designing the WAN topology – flat versus hierarchical, flat WAN topology – Limitations of
a flat design – hierarchical WAN topology – PVC and leased line Aggregation – Issues with
hierarchical design – hierarchical layers – WAN design parameters – choosing the WAN
technology – design considerations for serial links – designing IP over frame relay, and ISDN
design issues with IP – fundamental IP routing design – designing an IP addressing plan –
categorizing IP routing protocol and RIP.
UNIT III SECURITY PROBLEM AND CRYPTOGRAPHY
Security attacks – services – and mechanism – Conventional encryption model –
Steganography – Classical encryption techniques – simplified DES – block Cipher principles
– The DES standards – Principles of Public key cryptosystems – RSA algorithm – key
management – Diffie – Hellman key exchange – Authentication requirements and functions –
Authentication codes Hash functions Kerberos.
UNIT IV NETWORK SECURITY
E-mail security – pretty good privacy – S / MIME – IP security – overview and architecture –
authentication header – encapsulating security payload – combing security associations – web
security requirements SSL – TLS – secure electronic transactions – intruders – higher wall
design principles – trusted systems.
UNIT V NETWORK MANAGEMENT
Network management – requirements and systems – network monitoring architecture
Performance monitoring – Fault monitoring – Account monitoring – Configuration control –
Security control – SNMP background and concepts – structure of management information –
SNMP protocol – basic concepts – specifications – Transport level support – Groups.
49
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Cormac Long, 2001, “IP network design”, Tata McGraw Hill.
William Stallings, 2000, “Cryptography and network security – Principles and
practice”, Pearson education Asia, prentice Hall
William Stallings, 2001, “SNMP, SNMPv2, SNMPv3 and RMONI and 2”, Pearson
education Asia, 3rdedition.
Bruce Schneier, 2001, “Applied Cryptography”, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2nd edition.
ED Taylor, 2000, “Networking Handbook”, TMH, 2000.
Mani Subramanian, 2000, “Network management – Principle and practice”, Pearson
education Asia.
50
055 CS 57 VISUAL PROGRAMMING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concepts of visual basic and
Visual C++ programming to be done practically in the lab.
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 37 C++ Programming Laboratory
1.
VISUAL BASIC
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
Simple programs with control structures
Adding menus to forms
Creating dialog boxes with various options
MDI applications
Writing code for various keyboard and mouse events
OLE container control
Simple programs with classes and objects
Data access through Data control and DAO.
2.
VISUAL C++
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
Creating applications with App wizard
Drawing in documents
Working with MFC
Creating simple SDI and MDI applications
Exception handling
Loading – Editing and – Adding resources – Linking resources to applications
Drawing bitmaps
Threads
OLE
Active x
DLL’s
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Francesco Balena, 2001, “Programming Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0”, Microsoft press,
Indian Reprint.
David Kruglirski. J, 1998, “Programming Microsoft Visual C++”, 5th Edition,
Microsoft press.
G.Cornell, 1998, “Visual Basic 6 “, Tata McGraw Hill, 1998.
Deitel & Deitel, T. R. neito, 1999,“ Vitusl Basic 6, How to program”, Prentice Hall
Of India.
51
055 CS 58 NETWORKING LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of establishing a
network to transfer data and control a remote computer located in a network supported by the
UNIX and Windows socket programming to be done practically in the laboratory
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 45 Operating System
USING THE FOLLOWING CONCEPTS OF NETWORKING.
1.
File transfer using RS232C interface.
2.
File Transfer – suing TCP / IP.
3.
Remote command execution
4.
UNIX socket programming.
5.
Windows socket programming
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Cormac Long, 2001, “IP network design”, Tata McGraw Hill.
William Stallings, 2000, “Cryptography and network security – Principles and
practice”, Pearson education Asia, prentice Hall
William Stallings, 2001, “SNMP, SNMPv2, SNMPv3 and RMONI and 2”, Pearson
education Asia, 3rdedition.
Bruce Schneier, 2001, “Applied Cryptography”, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2nd edition.
ED Taylor, 2000, “Networking Handbook”, TMH, 2000.
Mani Subramanian, 2000, “Network management – Principle and practice”, Pearson
education Asia.
52
055 CS 61 ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
Course Objectives:
This course offers a good understanding of the various functional units of a computer system
and prepares the student to be in a position to design a basic computer system. Finally the
student will be exposed to the present trends and technology followed by the processors,
memory and I/O interface of a computer system.
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 31 Computer Architecture
UNIT I
Fundamentals of computer Design – RISC Vs CISC –Performance related issues
performance parameters –Measuring Performance- Instruction Set Architecture Designcompiler related issues.
UNIT II
Instruction Pipelining –Pipeline hazards –Overcoming hazards- Instruction set design and
pipelining- Parallelism Concepts- Dynamic Scheduling –Dynamic hardware branch
prediction.
UNIT III
Super scalar, VLIW and vector processors –compiler support for ILP – extracting
parallelism- speculation – performance.
UNIT IV
Centralized shared memory architectures, Distributed shared memory architecturessynchronization – memory organization and cache coherence issues.
UNIT V
IO issues and Bus Standards –SCSI – Typical processor stack processors- data flow systems.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Hennessey & Pateterson, 1999, “Computer Architecture A Quantitative
Approach”, Harcourt Asia, Morgan Kaufman.
2. Patterson and Hennessey, 1999, “Computer Organization and Design, The
Hardware/Software Interface”, Harcourt Asia Morgan Kaufman.
3. Richard Y.Kain, 1999, “Advanced Computer Architecture: A System Design
Approach”, PHI.
53
055 CS 62 INTERACTIVE COMPUTER GRAPHICS
Course Objectives:
The Objective of this course is to make the student understand the fundamental graphical
operations and its implementation on Computers to get a glimpse of recent advances in
computer graphics, Understanding user interface issues that make the computer easy for the
novice to use.
Pre-requisites:
055 EC 51 Digital Signal Processing & 055 MA 32 Engineering Mathematics III
UNIT I INTRODUCTION
Input and output devices- graphics adaptors- input methods – classification- Raster and
random scan- Line and circle drawing algorithms- Polygon filling.
UNIT II CURVES, SURFACES AND SOLIDS
Clipping – Color table- Animation using Colour table- Anti- aliasing methods- Representing
curves, surfaces and solids –B- splines – Bezier curves- Quadtree and octree- Geometric
model- Fractals- Hierarchical model.
UNIT III TRANSFORMATIONS
2D transformations- 3D transformations- perspective viewing – Animation of wire frame
models.
UNIT IV HIDDEN SURFACE ELIMINATION
Hidden line elimination – Hidden surface elimination –Painter’s algorithm – Scan the
algorithm- Octree method- Z- buffer- Ray tracing.
UNIT V COLOR MODELS
Chromaticity diagram – RGB, CMY, HSV, HLS, CIE models- Realism in rendering, halvingIllumination and shading- Gouraud and Phong shading.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
Newman, W.M. and Sproull R.F., 1999, “Principles of interactive Computer
Graphics”, Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company Limited,
New Delhi.
Foley J.D., Van Dam A, Fiener S.K. and Hughes J.F., 1998, “Computer Graphics”, 2
nd Edition, Addison Wesley.
54
055 CS 63 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
Course Objectives:
To be aware of Different life cycle models, Requirement dictation process, Analysis
modeling and specification & Architectural and detailed design methods, Implementation and
testing strategies, Verification and validation techniques, Project planning and management,
Use of CASE tools
Pre-requisite:
055 CS 41 Object Oriented System Analysis and Design
UNIT I SOFTWARE PROCESS
Introduction - ETVXM architecture – S/W – verification – validation – life cycle process –
development process – life cycle models (water fall, incremental, spiral, WINWIN spiral,
evolutionary, prototyping, object oriented, embedded system process, and synchronized and
stabilized) – system engineering hierarchy – business process engineering overview – product
engineering overview.
UNIT II SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS
Functional and non-functional – user – system – S/W document – requirement engineering
process – feasibility studies – requirements – elicitation – validation and management –
software prototyping – prototyping in the software process – rapid prototyping techniques –
user interface prototyping. Analysis and modeling – data functional – behavioral – structured
analysis and data dictionary.
UNIT III DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES
Design process and concepts – modular design – design heuristic – design model and
document. Architectural design – software architecture – data design – architectural design –
transform and transaction mapping – user interface design – user interface design principle –
user interaction – information presentation – user support and interface evaluation. Real time
software design system design – real time executives – monitoring and control system – data
acquisition system.
UNIT IV TESTING
Taxonomy of software testing – levels – test activities – types of S/W test – black box
testing- testing boundary conditions – structural testing – test coverage criteria based on data
flow mechanisms – regression testing – testing in the large. S/W testing strategies – strategic
approach and issues – unit testing – integration testing – validation testing – system testing
and debugging.
UNIT V SOFTWARE MEASUREMENTS
measures and measurements – S/W complexity and science measure – size measure – ZIPF’s
law – data and logic structure measure – entropy based S/W measure – information flow
measure. Software cost estimation – function point models – COCOMO model – Delphi
method. Software changes – program evolution dynamics – software maintenance –
Architectural evolution. Computer Aided software engineering – building blocks for CASE –
Taxonomy of CASE tools – integrated case environment – integration architecture – CASE
repository.
55
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Roger S. Pressman, 2001, “Software Engineering – A practitioner’s Approach”,
McGraw-Hill, International Edition, 5th eddison.
2. James R.Peters, Witold Pedrycz, 2000, “Software Engineering – an Engineering
Approach”, John Wiley and sons, Inc, 1st edition.
3. Ian Summerville, 2000, “Software engineering”, Pearson education Asia, 6th edition.
4. Stephan R.Schach, 1998, “Software engineering with JAVA, Tata McGraw-Hill.
5. Kathy Schwalbe, 2001, “Information technology project management”, Thomson
Learning,.
6. William E.Perry, 2001, ‘Effective methods for software testing”, John Wiley & sons,
Inc, 2nd edition.
7. Edward Kit, 2000, “Software testing in the real world’, Addition Wesley.
56
055 EC 64 ANALOG, DIGITAL & DATA COMMUNICATIONS
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of Analog and
Digital signals along with its data transmission features and methods.
Pre-requisites:
99 EE 24 Basic Electrical Engineering, 99 EC 25 Basic Electronics Engineering &
055 EC 51 Digital Signal Processing.
UNIT I COMMUNICATION
Basics of AM, FM and PM-Block diagram, Concepts of AM, FM Modulator and AM, FM
Demodulators – Pulse Modulation system- Pulse amplitude modulation- Sampling,
Quantization error.
UNIT II INFORMATION THEORY AND CODING
Discrete Message-Concepts of entropy and information rae- Shannon’s theorem – channel
capacity –Orthogonal signals and their use- Introduction to coding- Coding and decodingAlgebraic codes, burst error correction codes- Convolution and decoding.
UNIT III DATA TRANSMISSION
Concepts –Analog and Digital transmission, transmission impairments- Transmission mediaSynchronous/ Asynchronous transmission – Line Configurations – interfacing.
UNIT IV DATA ENCODING
Digital Data Digital signals- Variations of NRZ and biphase- Digital data Analog signals–
ASK, FSK, PSK, QPSK- Analog data digital signals –PCM, DM.
UNIT V DATA CONTROL
Flow control, error control –HDLE, multiplexing.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Taub and Schilling, 2001, “Principles of communication Systems”, McGraw –Hill,
2. William Stallings, 2000, “Data and Computer Communication”, Prentice –Hall of
India.
3. Behrouz Forouzan, 1999, “Introduction to Data Communication and Networking”,
Tata McGraw Hill.
57
055 CS 65 WEB TECHNOLOGY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of web forms and
the programming languages used in creation of web forms to access the server along with the
internet technologies.
Pre-requisites:
055 CS 43 Database Management System & 055 CS 53 Computer Networks.
UNIT I
Introduction: Internet Principles – basic Web concepts – Client / Server model – Retrieving
data from Internet – HTML and Scripting Languages standard Generalized Mark-up
Language – Next Generation Internet – Protocols and applications
UNIT II
Common Gateway Interface Programming: HTML forms – CGI Concepts – HTML tags
Emulation – Server-Browser communication – E-Mail generation – CGI Client side Applets
– CGI Server Side Applets – Authorization and security.
UNIT III
Socket Programming: Streaming – Networking principles – sockets – protocol handlers –
content handlers – multicasting – Remote Method Invocation – activation – serialization –
Marshal streams.
UNIT IV
Server side Programming: Dynamic web content – cascading style sheets – DHTML – XML
– Server side includes – communication –Active and Java Server Pages – Firewalls – proxy
servers.
UNIT V
Online applications: Simple applications – On-line databases – monitoring user events –
Plug-ins – database connectivity – Internet information Systems – EDI application in
business – internet commerce – Customization of Internet commerce.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ravi Kalakota and Andrew B Whinston, 1998, “Frontiers of Electronic commerce”,
Addison Wesley.
Eric Ladd, Jim O’ Donnel, 1999, “Using HTML 4, XML and Java”, Prentice hall f
India, QUE.
Jeffy Dwight, Michael Erwin and Robert Niles, 1999, “Using CGI”, Prentice Hall of
India, QUE.
Scot Johnson, Keith Ballinger, Davis Chaman, 1999, “Using Active server Pages”,
Prentice Hall of India.
58
055 CS 67 WEB TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of developing web
pages in client side using the required components to have the interface between other
devices using the socket programming along with the database connectivity to be done
practically in the laboratory.
Pre-Requisites:
055 CS 47 Java Programming Laboratory & 055 CS 48 DBMS Laboratory
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Client Side Scripting Programs
Use of Components
Creating Dynamic Web Pages.
Experiments with ACTIVEX/ JAVA Server Pages.
Sockets Programming and Applications.
Java Servlets.
On- line Transaction- database Connectivity.
SOFTWARE REQUIRED: JDK 1.3, JSDK, ANY WEB BROWSER.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:
1. Write a java program to demonstrate the use of following layouts
a) Flow layout
b) Border Layout
c) Grid Layout
d) Grid Bag Layout e) Card Layout
2. Write a program in java to demonstrate the following AWT controls
1. Scrollbar
2. Choice
3. List
4. Check box
3. Write a program in java to create an applet with the following
i. Create a color palette with matrix of buttons.
ii. Set foreground and back ground of the control text Area by selecting a color
from Color palette.
iii. In order to select Foreground or background use Checkbox control as radio
buttons.
4. Write a program in java to do the following.
I) Set the URL of another Server.
II) Down load the homepage of the server
III) Display the contents of the home page with date, content type, Expiration date,
Last modified and length of the page.
5. Write a program in Java fro creating simple chat application with Data gram sockets
And Data gram pockets.
6. Write a program in Java to create Servlets for displaying student mark list. Assume
that student information is available in a database which has been stored in a Server.
59
7. Write a program in Java to create servlets for conducting on line examination.
8. Create a web page with the following using HTML
a. Set the background with yellow color.
b. Use our college information for the document.
c. Use different fonts with different sizes.
d. Differentiate fonts with different sizes.
e. Use various Text formatting tags.
9. Create a web page with the following using HTML
a. Set the background with tilted image using style sheet.
b. Set some hyperlinks in your document with images.
c. Set some inter hyperlinks for viewing all the pages of your homepage.
10. Create a web page with the following using HTML.
i) Using MS Paint, Draw INDIA map and store it in a file.
ii) Using image map fix the hot spots for the metropolitan
Cities with approximate positions
a) MOSHI b) ARUSHA
c)MWANZA d) DODOMA
iii) Show information for all the cities when the hot spots are clicked.
11. Create a Web page with the following.
i) Cascading style sheets.
ii) Embedded style sheets.
iii) Inline style sheets.
iv) Use our College information for the Web Pages.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ravi Kalakota and Andrew B Whinston, 1998, “Frontiers of Electronic commerce”,
Addison Wesley.
Eric Ladd, Jim O’ Donnel, 1999, “Using HTML 4, XML and Java”, Prentice hall f
India, QUE.
Jeffy Dwight, Michael Erwin and Robert Niles, 1999, “Using CGI”, Prentice Hall of
India, QUE.
Scot Johnson, Keith Ballinger, Davis Chaman, 1999, “Using Active server Pages”,
Prentice Hall of India.
60
055 EE 68 MINI PROJECT
Course Objectives:
The objective of this course is to impart and improve the design capability of the student.
This course conceives purely a design problem in any one of the disciplines of Electrical
Engineering; e.g., The design problem can be allotted to either an individual student or a
group of students comprising of not more than four. At the end of the course the group should
submit a complete report on the design problem consisting of the data given, the design
calculations, specifications if any and complete set of drawings which follow the design
Pre-requisite:
All modules studied in the previous semesters.
The Objective of Mini project work is to enable the students to work in convenient groups of
not more than four members in a group on a project involving theoretical and experimental
studies related to Electrical and Electronics Engineering. Every Project Work shall have a
Guide who is a member of the faculty of the College. Time shall be allotted in the Time
Table for this important activity and this time shall be utilized by the students to receive
directions from the Guide, on library reading, laboratory work, computer analysis or field
work as assigned by the Guide and also to present in periodical seminars the progress made in
the project.
Each student shall finally produce a comprehensive report covering background information,
literature Survey, problem statement, Project work details and conclusions. This final report
shall be typewritten form as specified in the guidelines.
The continuous assessment and semester evaluation may be carried out as specified in the
guidelines to be issued from time to time.
61
055 MG 71 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
Course Objectives:
The course is designed to provide students an overview of the management function and its
role in organizations and society. It also provides fundamental knowledge and exposure to the
concepts, theories and practices in the field of management.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT I
Management – Importance – Definition – Nature and scope of Management process – Role
and functions of a Manager – Levels of Management - functions and roles – Management Art
or Science – management as a profession – Management approaches - Development of
management thought – classical, neo-classical, behavioural, systems and contingency
approaches.
UNIT II
Planning – Nature – Importance – Forms – Types – Steps in planning – Objectives – Policies
– Procedures – and Methods – Nature and types policies – Decision making – Process of
decision making – Types of decision – Problems of involved in decision making.
UNIT III
Organising – Types of Organisation – Organisational structure – Span of Control –
Committees – Departmentalisation – Informal Organisation.
Authority – Delegation – Decentralisation – Difference between authority and power – Uses
of authority – Distinction between Centralization and Decentralisation – Responsibility –
Line and Staff relationship.
UNIT IV
Staffing – Sources of recruitment – Selection process – Training – Direction – Nature and
Purpose of Directing – Motivation. Nature and Importance of motivation; Types of
motivation; Theories of motivation-Maslow, Hertzberg, X, Y and Z; Leadership – meaning
and importance; Traits of a leader; Leadership Styles – Likert’s Systems of Management,
Tannenbaum & Schmidt Model and Managerial Grid.
UNIT V
Co-Ordination – Need for co-ordination – Types – Techniques – Distinction between CoOrdination and Co Operation – Requisites for excellent Co-Ordination – Systems Approaches
and Co-ordination – Controlling – Meaning and importance of Controls – Control Process.
Nature and Scope of control; Types of Control; Control process; Control techniques –
traditional and modern; Effective Control System.
62
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Stoner, Freeman, Jr. Gilbert, 2003, “Management”, Prentice Hall of India, New
Delhi.
2. C. B. Gupta, 2003, “Management Concepts and Practices”, Sultan Chand and Sons,
New
Delhi.
3. Scott, Thomas, 2003, “Management: Competing in the New Era”,Tata McGraw Hill,
New
Delhi.
4. P. C. Tripathy, P. N. Reddy, 2001, “Principles of Management”, Himalaya Publishers,
New Delhi.
5. B. S. Moshal, 2001, “Management: Theory and Practice”, Galgotia Publishing Co.,
New Delhi.
6. Stephen, P. Robbins, Mary Coulter, 2001, “Management”, Pearson Education, New
Delhi.
63
055 MG 72 PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
Course Objectives:
Understand environmental studies and natural resources, Understand ecosystems and
biodiversity, Understand and discuss environmental pollution, Expose social issues and the
environment, Understand human population and its impact on the environment.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND NATURAL
RESOURCES
Definition, scope and importance-Need for public awareness- Forest resources: Use and overexploitation, deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction, mining, dams and their effects on
forest and tribal people-Water resources: Use and Over-utilization of surface and ground
water, floods, drought, conflicts over water, dams-benefits and problems-Mineral resources:
Use and exploitation, environmental effects of extracting and using mineral resources, case
studies-Food resources: World food problems, Changes caused by agriculture and
overgrazing, effects of modern agriculture, fertilizer-pesticide problems, water logging,
salinity, case studies-Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable and non renewable
energy sources, use of alternate energy sources case studies-Land resources: Land as a
resources, land degradation, man induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification-Role of
an individual in conservation of natural resources-Equitable use of resources for sustainable
lifestyles. Field study of local area to document environmental assetsriver/forest/grassland/hill/mountain.
UNIT II
ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY
Concept of an ecosystem-Structure and function of an ecosystem-Producers, consumers and
decomposers-Energy flow in the ecosystem-Ecological succession-Food chains, food webs
and ecological pyramids-Introduction, types, characteristic feature, structure and function of
the (a) Forest ecosystem (b) Grassland ecosystem (c) Desert ecosystem (d) Aquatic
ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans, estuaries)-Introduction to Biodiversitydefinition: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity-Biogeographically classification of
Malawi-Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social, ethical, aesthetic and
option value-Biodiversity at global, National and local levels-Malawi as a mega-diversity
nation-Hot-spots of biodiversity-Threats to biodiversity: habit loss, poaching of wildlife,
man-wildlife conflicts-Endangered and endemic species of Malawi-Conservation of
biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversity.
UNIT III
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
Definition-Causes, effects and control measures of (a) Air pollution (b) Water pollution (c)
Soil pollution (d) Marine Pollution (e) Noise pollution (f) Thermal pollution (g) Nuclear
hazards-Soil waste Management: Cause, Effects and control measures of urban and industrial
wastes-Role of an individual in prevention of pollution-Pollution case studies-Disaster
management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides. Field Study of local Polluted siteUrban / Rural/ Industrial/ Agricultural.
64
UNIT IV
SOCIAL ISSUES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
From Unsustainable to Sustainable development-Urban problems related to energy- Water
conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management-Resettlement and rehabilitation
of people; its problems and concerns, case studies-Environmental ethics: Issues and possible
solutions-Climate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents
and holocaust, case studies-Wasteland reclamation-Consumerism and waste productsEnvironment production Act-Air (Prevention and Control Of Pollution) Act-Water
(Prevention and Control Of Pollution) Act-Wildlife Protection Act-Forest Conservation ActIssues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation-Public awareness.
UNIT V
HUMAN POPULATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT.
Population growth, variation among nations-Population explosion-Family Welfare
Programme-Environment and human health- Human Rights-Value Education-HIV/AIDSWomen and Child Welfare-Role of Information Technology In Environment and human
health-Case studies.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Gilbert M.Masters, 2004, Introduction to Environmental Engineering and
Science,Pearson Education Pvt., Ltd., Second Edition, New Delhi.
2. Miller T.G. Jr.,2000, Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co.Townsend C.,
Harper J and Michael Begon, Essentials of Ecology, Blackwell Science.
3. Trived R.K. and P.K. Goel, 2001, Introduction to Air Pollution, Techno-Science
Publications, New Delhi.
4. Trivedi R.K., 1998, Handbook of Environmental Laws, rules, Guidelines, Compliances
and Standards, Vol.,I and II, Enviro Media.
5. Cunningham, W.P.Cooper, T.H Gorhani, 2001, Environmental Encyclopedia, Jaico
Publ. House, Mumbai.
6. Wager K.D., 1998, Environmental management, W.B Saunders Co., Philadelphia,
USA.
65
055 CO 74 MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING
Objective:
The objective of the course is to familiarize the students with the basic management
accounting concepts and their applications in managerial decision making. Understand the
accounting cycle, the key valuation and allocation methods used in accrual basis financial
reporting and an ability to interpret financial statements using basic financial statement ratios.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT - I
Management Accounting: Nature and Scope, Financial Accounting, Cost Accounting and
Management Accounting, Advantages and Limitations of Management Accounting, Role of
Management Accountant.
UNIT - II
Financial Analysis: Financial Statements and their Limitations, Concepts of Financial
Analysis, Tools of Financial Analysis: Comparative Financial Statements, Common Size
Financial Statements, Trend Percentages, Ratio Analysis, Fund Flow and Cash Flow
Analysis.
Ratio Analysis: Nature and Interpretation, Classification of Ratios, Profitability Ratios,
Turnover Ratios, Financial Ratios, Utility and Limitations of Ratios, DUPONT Control
Chart.
Funds & Cash Flow Analysis: Concept of Funds Flow Statement, Sources and Uses of
Funds, Managerial Uses of Funds Flow Analysis, Construction of Funds Flow Statement,
Distribution of Cash from Funds, Utility of Cash Flow Statement, Accounting Standard 3
(AS 3), Construction of Cash Flow Statement.
UNIT - III
Budgets and Budgetary Control: Concept of Budgets and Budgetary Control, Advantages
and Limitations of Budgetary Control, Establishing a System of Budgetary Control,
Preparation of Different Budgets, Fixed and Flexile Budgeting, Performance Budgeting and
Zero Base Budgeting, Concept of Responsibility Accounting – Types of Responsibility
Centres.
UNIT - IV
Standard Costing and Variance Analysis: Meaning of Standard Cost, Relevance of
Standard Cost for Variance Analysis, significance of Variance Analysis, Computation of
Material, Labour Variances.
UNIT - V
Marginal Costing and Profit Planning: Marginal Costing Differentiated from Absorption
Costing, Direct Costing, Differential Costing, Key Factor-Break-ever Analysis, Margin of
Safety, Cost Volume Profit Relationship, Advantages, Limitations and Applications of
Marginal Costing.
Decisions Involving Alternative Choices: Concept of Relevant Costs, Steps in Decision
Making, Decisions regarding Determination of Sales Mix, Exploring new Markets,
Discontinuance of a Product Line, Make or Buy, Equipment Replacement, Change Versus
Status Quo, Expand or Contract and Shut-down or continue.
66
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. S. N. Maheshwari, 2003, “Principles of Management Accounting”, Sultan Chand & Sons,
Fourteenth Edition, New Delhi.
2. S. K. Bhattacharya, Dearden, 2003, “Accounting for Management - Text and Cases”,
Vikas Publishing House, Third Edition New Delhi.
3. A.G.Mwangamila, 2000, “ Co-operative Principles and Accounting”, NBAA.
4. “International Financial Reporting Standards(IFRS)”, 2007, International Accounting
Standards Board(IASB).
5. Arora, “ Book Keeping, Principles of Accounting and Auditing”, 2000, NBAA.
6. A.G.Mwangamila, “ Co-operative Principles and Accounting”, 2000, NBAA.
7. T.Ramachandran, 2003, Accounting for Management, Scitech Publications, Chennai.
8. R.S.N.Pillai, Bagavathi, 2003, Management Accounting, Sultan Chand & Sons, New
Delhi.
9. C.L.Tyagi, Madhu Tyagi, 1998, Introduction to Management Accounting, Galgotia
Publisher, New Delhi
10. I. M. Pandey, 2003, “Management Accounting”, Vikas Publishing House, Third Edition,
New Delhi.
11. S. N. Maheshwari, 2003, “Advanced Cost Accounting and Cost Systems”, Shree
Mahavir, Book Depot, Second Edition, New Delhi.
12. Horngren, Charles, 1999, “Introduction to Management Accounting”, Prentice Hall of
India,
Eleventh Edition, New Delhi.
13. Khan, Jain, 2002, “Management Accounting”, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing House,
Third Edition, New Delhi.
14. M.Bendrey, R.Hussey, C.Wet, “ Essentials of Management Accounting in Business”,
2003, Continuum-London.
67
055 CS 74 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of artificial
intelligence in developing a structured and detailed unified science of human and
computational intelligence. Supported by specific theory and research will be of special
interest to creative scholars in the disciplines of the sciences of cognition.
Pre-requisites:
099 MA12 Engineering Mathematics I, 099 MA 22 Engineering Mathematics II, 055 MA 32
Engineering Mathematics III & 055 MA 42 Probability and Queuing Theory
UNIT I INTRODUCTION
Definition of AI- Foundations- History- Intelligence Agents – Perception and Language
Processing – Problem Solving Searching- Heuristic Search- game Playing.
UNIT II LOGIC AND REASONING
Agents that reason logically- First order logic- Inference in first order logic- Logical
reasoning.
UNIT III KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION
Semantic Nets and Description matching- Frames- Inheritance and common sense RulesRule Chaining.
UNIT IV REASONING WITH INCOMPLETE AND UNCERTAIN KNOWLEDGE
Uncertainty- Probabilistic Reasoning Systems- Making simple and complex Decisions- No
monotonic reasoning and Truth Maintenance.
UNIT V PLANNING AND LEARNING
Planning- Representation for planning- partial order planning- Conditional planningpreplanning agent- Learning- Analyzing differences- Explaining Experience- Correcting
mistakes- Recording cases- Version space method Identification tress- Neural nets and
Genetic algorithms.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Stewart Russell and Peter Norvig, 2002, “Artificial Intelligence – A Modern
Approach”, Prentice Hall International.
2. Patrick Henry Winston, 1999, “Artificial Intelligence”, Third Editions, ISE reprint,
Addison Wesley.
3. Eugence Charniak and Drew Mc Dermott, Addison Wesley, 1998, “Introduction to
Artificial Intelligence”, ISE Reprint
4. Nils J.Niisson, 1998, “Artificial Intelligence – A New Syntheses”, Harcourt Asia PTE
Ltd, Morgan
68
055 CS 75 MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS
Course Objectives
Understand the elements of multimedia systems, Acquainted with multimedia hardware
components, Familiar with the tools, object and architecture of multimedia, Familiar with the
concepts of multimedia networking, Understanding the concepts of OS database and
information retrieval.
Pre-requisite
56 CS 53 Visual Programming
UNIT I
Introduction to Multimedia: Elements of multimedia system – need – benefits – converging
technologies-multimedia – applications development, multimedia building blocks – TextSound-images-animation-Video.
UNIT II
Multimedia Hardware: PC Platform-SCSI, MCI (Media Control Interface) – Storage for
multimedia-DVD, CD-Technologies-input devices-output hardware-communication –
devices, multimedia workstation.
UNIT III
Multimedia Authoring: Hypertext – Hypermedia – Document architecture – MPEG, Basic
tools – image editing tool-painting and drawing tools – sound editing programs, Video
formats – quick time. Linking multimedia objects-OLE and DDE – office suites- presentation
tools – authoring – tools-User Interface design.
UNIT IV
Multimedia Networks: Application subsystem, Transport Subsystem, QOS, Synchronization,
presentation techniques – Multimedia synchronization – single user – multimedia on
networks.
UNIT V
Multimedia OS, Database and Information Retrieval: Multimedia OS-Process management –
File systems – Multimedia DBMS – Data Structures for storage – Indexing techniques –
Information retrieval, multimedia search engine – Case Study.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
Tay Vaughan, 2001, “Multimedia: Making it work”, 5th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing company Ltd.
Fred Halsall, 2001, “Multimedia Communication – Application Networks, protocols
and standard”, Addison-Wesley.
Mark Elsom Cook, 2001, “Principles of Interactive Multimedia”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
69
56 CS 77 MULTIMEDIA LABORATORY
Course Objectives
Understand the elements of multimedia systems, Acquainted with multimedia hardware
components, Familiar with the concepts of multimedia networking, perform presentation
using multimedia software. Use various multimedia software.
Pre-requisite
56 CS 54 Visual Programming
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Study of CD ROM Drive, Video Card, Sound Blaster card in Multimedia kit.
Basic Software programs for the components in the kit
Program for Compression algorithm of Text
Programming for Video effects like Zoom, Video etc.
Study and Use for the Basic tools in Multimedia Software
Study and Use of Presentation and Authoring Tools
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
Tay Vaughan, 2001, “Multimedia: Making it work”, 5th Edition, Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing company Ltd.
Fred Halsall, 2001, “Multimedia Communication – Application Networks, protocols
and standard”, Addison-Wesley.
Mark Elsom Cook, 2001, “Principles of Interactive Multimedia”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
70
055 CS 78 SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY
Course Objectives:
The Objective of the course is to acquaint the students about the concept of implementing a
project by analyzing, designing and testing along with access to a database following the
methodology of the software engineering.
Pre-requisites:
055 CS 41 Object Oriented System Analysis and Design & 055 CS 055 Software
Engineering.
Implementation of project using Software Engineering techniques:
PROJECT PLANNING
1. SOFTWARE REQUIREMENT ANALYSIS
2. DATA MODELING & IMPLEMENTATION
3. SOFTWARE TESTING
4. SOFTWARE DEBUGGING
SOFTWARES REQUIRED:
Languages: C/C++JDK 1.3, JSDK, WEB BROWSER & UML
Any front End Tools (Like VB, VC++, and Developer 2000)
Any back End Tools (Like Oracle, MS- Access, and SQL)
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:
Develop the following software using software Engineering methodology:
1. Online Railways reservation system
2. Simulator software for parallel processing operation
3. Payroll processing application
4. Inventory system
5. Simulator software for compiler operation
6. Automating the Banking process
7. Software for game
8. Library management system
9. Text editor
10. Create a dictionary
11. Telephone directory
12. Create an E- Book of your choice.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Roger S. Pressman, 2001, “Software Engineering – A practitioner’s Approach”,
McGraw- ill, International Edition, 5th eddison.
2. James R.Peters, Witold Pedrycz, 2000, “Software Engineering – an Engineering
Approach”, John Wiley and sons, Inc, 1st edition.
3. Ian Summerville, 2000, “Software engineering”, Pearson education Asia, 6th edition.
4. Ali Bahrami, 1999, “Object Oriented System Development”, McGraw- Hill
International Edition.
71
055 MG 81 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT
Course Objectives:
Understand quality control, Understand statistics and its applications in quality control,
Understand quality control in general engineering, Understand methods of inspection and
quality appraisal, Understand human resource development and environment management
system in quality circles.
Pre-requisites:
055 MG 71 Principles of Management
UNIT I INTRODUCTION TO QUALITY CONTROL
Definition – History -Need and Dissemination of Quality Information - Quality control and
inspection –Responsibility – standardization- Organization and Cost Analysis.
UNIT II STATISTICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN QUALITY CONTROL
Statistical quality control by charts - characteristics - steps - Attributes- Defects and
Control limits for variables. Statistical Process Control(SPC) – process capability Indices,
Acceptance and Group control charts. Probability - Binomial, Poisson and Normal
Distributions.
UNIT III QUALITY CONTROL IN GENERAL ENGINEERING
Recent Techniques For Quality Improvement-- Just in Time Manufacture- kanban systemQueue Control- Optimized Production Technology- Zero Defect (ZD) concept-Bench
Marking – Design of Experiments, CAD/CAM in Quality Control and Sampling Inspection
in Engineering.
UNIT IV METHODS OF INSPECTION AND QUALITY APPRAISAL
Inspection Criteria - Requirements , Techniques, Accuracy Evaluation, Instruments
Equipments and Statistical Inference. Selection of an ISO model and implementation of
ISO 9000 -Important Clauses- Steps in Implementing Quality system for ISO : 9000 and
Certification.
UNIT V
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENT
MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN QUALITY CIRCLES
International Standard – Philosophy of Quality Circle -Organization - Stage of Adoption
and Areas of Interest. Essential Requirements for success of Circles - Training- AuditGains- Techniques for Problem solving and Quality of work life.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. P L Jain, 2000 “Quality Control and Total Quality Management “Tata McGrawHill,
New Delhi
2. Feigenbaum, A.V., 2000 “Total Quality control” McGraw Hill. New Delhi
3. Dennis Green, 1997, ISO 9000 Quality Systems Auditing, Gower, England 1999, The
QualityYear Book, McGraw-Hill, New Delhi
4. Dale H. Besterfiled, et at., 1999, “Total Quality Management”, Pearson Education
asia, (Indian Reprint 2002).
5. James R. Evans, William M. Lindsay, 2001, ”Management and the Control of
Quality“,
South-Western College Pub.
72
055 MG 82 PROFESSIONAL ETHICS
Course Objectives:
To create an awareness on Engineering Ethics and Human Values in the place of work. To
instill Moral and Social Values and Loyalty. To appreciate the rights of others.
Pre-requisite:
None
UNIT I
ENGINEERING ETHICS
Senses of Engineering Ethics- variety of moral issues- Types of inquiry – Moral dilemmas.
Moral Autonomy- Kohlberg’s theory – Gilligan’s theory – Consensus and ControversyProfessions and Professionalism – Professional ideals and virtues- theories – Theories about
right action- Self- interest- Customs and religion- Use of Ethical Theories.
UNIT II
ENGINEERING AS SOCIAL EXPERIMENTATION
Engineering as experimentation- Engineers as responsible experiments – Codes of Ethics- A
Balanced Outlook on Law- The Challenger Case Study.
UNIT III
ENGINEER’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR AUTHORITY
Safety and risk – Assessment of safety and risk –Risk Benefit Analysis- Reducing risk- The
Three Mile Island and Chernobyl case Studies.
UNIT IV
RESPONSIBILITIES AND RIGHTS
Collegiality and loyalty - Respect for Authority – Collective bargaining- Confidentiality –
Conflicts of Interest – Occupational Crime – professional rights – Employee Rights –
Discrimination.
UNIT V
GLOBAL ISSUES
Multinational Corporations – Environmental Ethics – Computer Ethics- Weapons
Development – Engineers as Managers- Consulting Engineers- Engineers as Expert
Witnesses and Advisors – Moral Leadership- Sample code of conduct.
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Mike Martin and Roland Schinzinger, 2000, Ethics in Engineering, McGraw Hill,
New York,
2. Charles D Fledderman, 1999 Engineering Ethics, Prentice hall, New Mexico,
3. Diana Winstanley, Jean Woodall, 2000, “Ethical Issues in Contemporary Human
Resource Management”, Palgrave Macmillan.
4. Justin Oakley, Dean Cocking , 2001, “Virtue Ethics and Professional Roles”,
Cambridge University Press.
5. Josep M. Lozano, 2000, “Ethics and Organizations”, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
73
055 PJ 89 PROJECT WORK
The objective of project work is to enable the students, to work in convenient groups of not
more than four members in a group, on a project involving some design and fabrication work
or theoretical and experimental studies related to the respective engineering discipline.
Every project work shall have a Guide who is a member of the faculty of the University.
Twelve periods per weeks shall be allotted in the Time table for this important activity and
this time shall be utilized by the student receive directions from the Guide, on library reading,
laboratory work, computer analysis, or field work as assigned by the Guide and also to
present periodical seminars of viva to review the progress made in the project.
Each student shall finally produce a comprehensive report covering background information,
literature survey, problem statement, project work details, estimation of cost and conclusion.
This final report shall be in typewritten form as specified in the guidelines.
The continuous assessment and semester evolutions may be carried out as specified in the
guidelines to be issued time to time.
74
055 CS 001 ADVANCED OPERATING SYSTEMS
Course Objectives
The course describes the architecture of real-time operating systems and their interface, it
introduces the models, algorithms and techniques being used for real-time scheduling and
scheduling analysis, and shows how the priority-inversion problem can be dealt with. A
description of real-time operating system implementation techniques, focused on context
switch, scheduling and device interface concludes the course. Advanced topics include lock
and wait-free synchronization techniques, microkernel-based operating systems and the
effects of the execution environment on the real-time capabilities of a system.
UNIT I
MULTIPROCESSOR OPERATING SYSTEMS
Threads – Process synchronization – Processor scheduling – Memory management –
Reliability – Fault tolerance.
UNIT II
NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEMS (NOS)
Types of NOS – NOS to LANs – Choosing and NOS – Multiple NOS on a single Network –
NOS and Network management – Future Trends.
UNIT III
DISTRIBUTED OPERATING SYSTEMS
Issues - Communication Primitives – Remote procedure call – Logical clocks – Vector
clocks – Distributed mutual exclusion – Non token based algorithms – Token based
algorithms – Issues in deadlock detection and resolution – Centralized and distributed
deadlock detection algorithms – Election algorithms, Classification of agreement problems –
Solutions to the Byzantine agreement problem – Impossibility result. Issues in load
distributing – Load distributing algorithms – Performance comparison. Distributed File
System design issues – Mechanisms for building DFS – Case studies.
UNIT IV
DATABASE OPERATING SYSTEMS
Requirements - Concurrency control model – Serializability theory – Distributed database
systems – Synchronisation primitives – Lock based and timestamp based algorithms – Fully
replicated database systems.
UNIT V
REAL TIME OPERATING SYSTEMS
Architecture of Real Time Systems – Operating Systems Issues – Performance Measures –
Estimating Program runtimes – Uniprocessor Scheduling – IRIS Tasks – Task Assignment
Mode changes – Fault – tolerant scheduling.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mukesh Singhal, Niranjan G.Shivaratri, 1994, “Advanced Concepts in Operating
Systems”, McGraw-Hill, New York.
2. C.M.Krishna, Kang G.Shin, 1997, “Real Time Systems”, McGraw-Hill.
3. Philip Hunter,1995, “Network Operating Systems – Making Right Choices”, Addison
Wesley.
4. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, 2000, “Modern Operating Systems”, Prentice Hall, NJ
(Section 9 – 13 only).
75
055 CS 002 IMAGE PROCESSING
Course Objectives
To study the image fundamentals and mathematical transforms necessary for image
processing. To study the image enhancement techniques, To study image restoration
procedures. To study the image compression procedures. To study the image segmentation
and representation techniques.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
DIGITAL IMAGE FUNDAMENTALS
Digital image – applications of digital image processing – elements of digital image systems
– vidicon camera – line scan CCD sensor – area sensor – flash A/D converter – display –
elements of visual perception – structure of the human eye – luminance – brightness –
contrast – mach band effect – image fidelity criteria – colour models – RGB, CMY, HIS
mathematical preliminaries of 2D systems – convolution – Fourier transform – ZS transform
– toeplitz and circulant matrices – orthogonal and unitary matrices.
UNIT II
IMAGE TRANSFORM
Properties of unitary transform – 2D DFT – DCT – DST – Discrete wavelet transform –
Discrete Hadmard – Walsh – Hotelling transform – SVD transform – Slant, Haar transforms.
UNIT III
IMAGE ENHANCEMENT AND RESTORATION
Contrast stretching – intensity level slicing – Histogram equalization – spatial averaging –
directional smoothing – Median filtering – non linear filters – maximum, minimum,
geometric mean, Harmonic mean contra – harmonic mean, Lp mean filters – edge detection –
Roberts, Sobel, Isotropic, Kinsch, Campass gradient, Laplacian operators – inverse filtering –
removal of blur caused by uniform linear motion – wiener filtering – geometric
transformations for image restoration.
UNIT IV
IMAGE COMPRESSION
Huffan coding – truncated Huffman coding – B2, binary codes, arithmetic coding – bit plane
coding – contrast area coding – Run length encoding – transform coding JPEG and MPEG
coding schemes.
UNIT V
IMAGE SEGMENTATION
Pixel based approach – feature threshold – choice of feature – optimum threshold – threshold
selection methods – region based approach – region growing – region splitting – region
merging, split and merge.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
Gonzalez,R.C and Woods, 2000, “ Digital image processing”, Addition Wesley.
Anil.K.Jain, 1998, “Fundamentals of digital image processing”, PHI.
Umbaugh, S.E, 1998, “Computer vision and image processing”, Prentice Hall
International, Inc.
76
055 CS 003
DISTRIBUTED OBJECTS
Course Objectives
Students who take this module should learn Threads and Processes and Synchronization,
Blocking and Non-blocking calls, Remote Method Invocation, Serialization and XML.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Objects – Distributed objects – Historical perspective Distributed objects and computing
methodologies.
UNIT II
CORBA
Architecture – Interface Definition Language – Static and dynamic method invocation Interface Repository – Basic Object Adaptor – Services.
UNIT III
DEVELOPMENT OF A CORBA APPLICATION
Client applet – Server – IDL contract – Database interface.
UNIT IV
DCOM
Model and Services – Objects and Object hierarchies – Location transparency -Configuration
information – Interface Definition Language (MIDL) – Applications.
UNIT V
CURRENT ISSUES
Internet Inter Orb Protocol – CORBA-DCOM interoperability issues – CORBA facilities –
CORBA domains – CORBA migration process – Other distributed object paradigms.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. T.J.Mowbary and W.A. Ruh, 1997, ”Inside CORBA”, Addison Wesley.
2. R.Orfali and D.Harkey, 1999, “Client / Server Programming with Java and CORBA”, 2nd
ed., John Wiley and Sons.
3. M.Henning and S.Vnonski, 1999, “Advanced CORBA Programming with C++”, Addison
Wesley.
4. Stama, Garbis, Russel, 1999, “Enterprise CORBA”, Addison Wesley.
5. F.E.Redmond, 1997, “DCOM: Microsoft Distributed Component Object Model”, IDG
Books Worldwide Inc..
6. R.Sessions, 1998, “COM and DCOM”, John Wiley and Sons.
7. T.I.Thai, 1999, “Learning DCOM”, O’Reilly.
77
055 CS 004 DATA MINING AND WAREHOUSING
Course Objectives
This course has been designed with the following objectives, to introduce the concept of data
mining with in detail coverage of basic tasks, metrics, issues, and implication. Core topics
like classification, clustering and association rules are exhaustively dealt with. To introduce
the concept of data warehousing with special emphasis on architecture and design.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION AND DATA WAREHOUSING
Introduction, Data Warehouse, Multidimensional Data Model, Data Warehouse Architecture,
Implementation, Further Development, Data Warehousing to Data Mining
UNIT II
DATA
PREPROCESSING,
LANGUAGE,
ARCHITECTURES,
CONCEPT DESCRIPTION
Why Preprocessing, Cleaning, Integration, Transformation, Reduction, Discretization,
Concept Hierarchy Generation, Data Mining Primitives, Query Language, Graphical User
Interfaces, Architectures, Concept Description, Data Generalization, Characterizations, Class
Comparisons, Descriptive Statistical Measures.
UNIT III
ASSOCIATION RULES Association Rule Mining, Single-Dimensional
Boolean Association Rules from Transactional Databases, Multi-Level Association Rules
from Transaction Databases
UNIT IV
CLASSIFICATION AND CLUSTERING
Classification and Prediction, Issues, Decision Tree Induction, Bayesian Classification,
Association Rule Based, Other Classification Methods, Prediction, Classifier Accuracy,
Cluster Analysis, Types of data, Categorization of methods, Partitioning methods, Outlier
Analysis.
UNIT V
RECENT TRENDS
Multidimensional Analysis and Descriptive Mining of Complex Data Objects, Spatial
Databases, Multimedia Databases, Time Series and Sequence Data, Text Databases, World
Wide Web, Applications and Trends in Data Mining
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. J. Han, M. Kamber, 2001, “Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques”, Harcourt India /
Morgan
Kauffman.
2. Margaret H.Dunham, 2004, “Data Mining: Introductory and Advanced Topics”, Pearson
Education.
3. Sam Anahory, Dennis Murry, 2003, “Data Warehousing in the real world”, Pearson
Education.
4. David Hand, Heikki Manila, Padhraic Symth, 2004, “Principles of Data Mining”, PHI.
5. W.H.Inmon, 2003, “Building the Data Warehouse”, 3rd Edition, Wiley.
6. Alex Bezon, Stephen J.Smith, 2001,“Data Warehousing, Data Mining & OLAP”,
McGraw-Hill Edition.
7. Paulraj Ponniah, 2003, “Data Warehousing Fundamentals”, Wiley-Interscience
Publication.
78
055 CS 005 PARALLEL PROCESSING
Course Objectives
Provide students with a thorough grounding in the computing architectures and algorithms
associated with parallel processing. Understand of how parallelism is limited by architectural
features and by computational algorithms and compiled codes. Mapping algorithms on to
parallel machines receives a good deal of attention. Provides the student a background in the
design and application of pipelines for high throughput digital hardware, such as high speed
pipelined memory, floating point arithmetic, recursive filters or graphics processing.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
Parallel Computer Models: Multiprocessors and Multi computers – Multi vector and SIMD
Computers – PRAM and VLSI models – Program and Network properties: program flow
Mechanism – System Interconnection Architectures – Parallel processing Applications –
speeding performance.
UNIT II
Hardware Technologies: Processor and Memory Hierarchy: advanced processor Technology
– Super scalar and vector processors – Memory Hierarchy Technology – Virtual Memory
Technology – Bus, Cache and Shared memory organizations.
UNIT III
Processor Development Techniques: Linear Pipeline Processors – non-Linear pipeline
processors – Instruction pipeline Design: Instruction Execution Phases, Mechanism for
Instruction pipelining, dynamic instruction scheduling – Arithmetic pipeline design:
Computer Arithmetic principles, Multifunctional Arithmetic pipelines – Super scalar and
super pipeline design.
UNIT IV
Parallel and Scalable Architectures: Multiprocessor system interconnects – Cache coherence
and synchronization mechanisms: The Cache Coherence Problem, Snoopy Bus Protocols,
Directory – based protocols – Message – passing mechanisms – multi vector multiprocessors:
compound vector processing – SIMD computer organizations – Principles of multithreading
– Fine-grain multi computers – Scalable and multithreaded Architectures.
UNIT V
Parallel Programming Software: Parallel programming models – parallel languages and
compliers – dependence analysis of data arrays – code optimization and scheduling – parallel
programming environments – multiprocessor UNIX design goals – master-slave and
multithreaded UNIX – multi computer UNIX extensions.
79
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
Kai Hwang, 1998, “Advanced Computer Architecture – Parallelism, Scalability,
Programmability”, McGraw Hill.
Ananth Grama, Vipin Kumar, Anshul Gupta, George Karypis , 2003, “An
Introduction to Parallel Computing”, Pearson Addison Wesley, Second Edition
Seyed H. Roosta, 2000, “ Parallel Processing and Parallel Algorithms”, Springer
Verlag.
80
055 CS 006 SOFTWARE TESTING
Course Objectives
To explain the basics of software testing, To highlight the strategies for software testing,
stress the need and conduct of testing levels, identify the issues in testing management, bring
out the ways and means of controlling and monitoring testing activity.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Testing as an Engineering Activity, Role of Process in Software Quality, Testing as a
Process, Basic Definitions, Software Testing Principles, The Tester’s Role in a Software
Development Organization, Origins of Defects, Defect Classes, The Defect Repository and
Test Design, Defect Examples, Developer/Tester Support for Developing a Defect Repository
UNIT II
TEST CASE DESIGN
Introduction to Testing Design Strategies, The Smarter Tester, Test Case Design Strategies,
Using Black Box Approach to Test Case Design, Random Testing, Equivalence Class
Partitioning, Boundary Value Analysis, Other Black-box Test Design Approaches, Black-box
testing and COTS, Using White-Box Approach to Test design, Test Adequacy Criteria,
Coverage and Control Flow Graphs, Covering Code Logic, Paths: Their Role in White-box
Based Test Design, Additional White Box Test Design Approaches, Evaluating Test
Adequacy Criteria
UNIT III
LEVELS OF TESTING
The Need for Levels of Testing, Unit Test, Unit Test Planning, Designing the Unit Tests. The
Class as a Testable Unit, The Test Harness, Running the Unit tests and Recording results,
Integration tests, Designing Integration Tests, Integration Test Planning, System Test – The
Different Types, Regression Testing, Alpha, Beta and Acceptance Tests
UNIT IV
TEST MANAGEMENT
Introductory Concepts, Testing and Debugging Goals and Policies, Test Planning, Test Plan
Components, Test Plan Attachments, Locating Test Items, Reporting Test Results, The role
of three groups in Test Planning and Policy Development, Process and the Engineering
Disciplines, Introducing the test specialist, Skills needed by a test specialist, Building a
Testing Group
UNIT V
CONTROLLING AND MONITORING
Defining Terms, Measurements and Milestones for Controlling and Monitoring, Status
Meetings, Reports and Control Issues, Criteria for Test Completion, SCM, Types of reviews,
Developing a review program, Components of Review Plans, Reporting review results
81
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Ilene Burnstein, 2003, “Practical Software Testing”, Springer International Edition,
Chennai.
2. Edward Kit, 1995, “Software Testing in the Real World – Improving the Process”,
Pearson Education,
3. New Delhi.
4. Elfriede Dustin, 2003, “Effective Software Testing”, Pearson Education, New Delhi.
5. Renu Rajani and Pradeep Oak, 2003, “Software Testing – Effective Methods, Tools and
Techniques”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.
82
055 CS 007 SATELLITE COMMUNICATION
Course Objectives
Overview of satellite systems in relation to other terrestrial systems. Study of satellite orbits
and launching. Study of earth segment and space segment components, Study of satellite
access by various users. Study of DTH and compression standards.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
OVERVIEW OF SATELLITE SYSTEMS, ORBITS AND LAUNCHING
METHODS
Introduction – Frequency Allocations for Satellite Services – Intelsat – U.S.Domsats – Polar
Orbiting
Satellites – Problems – Kepler’s First Law – Kepler’s Second Law – Kepler’s Third Law –
Definitions of Terms for Earth-orbiting Satellites – Orbital Elements – Apogee and Perigee
Heights – Orbital Perturbations – Effects of a Nonspherical Earth – Atmospheric Drag –
Inclined Orbits – Calendars – Universal Time – Julian Dates – Sidereal Time – The Orbital
Plane – The Geocentric-Equatorial Coordinate System – Earth Station Referred to the IJK
Frame – The Topcentric-Horizon Co-ordinate System – The Sub-satellite Point – Predicting
Satellite Position.
UNIT II
GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT & SPACE SEGMENT
Introduction – Antenna Look Angels – The Polar Mount Antenna – Limits of Visibility –
Near Geostationary Orbits – Earth Eclipse of Satellite – Sun Transit Outage – Launching
Orbits – Problems – Power Supply – Attitude Control – Spinning Satellite Stabilization –
Momentum Wheel Stabilization – Station Keeping – Thermal Control – TT&C Subsystem –
Transponders – Wideband Receiver – Input Demultiplexer – Power Amplifier – Antenna
Subsystem – Morelos – Anik-E – Advanced Tiros-N Spacecraft
UNIT III
EARTH SEGMENT & SPACE LINK
Introduction – Receive-Only Home TV Systems – Outdoor Unit – Indoor Unit for Analog
(FM) TV – Master Antenna TV System – Community Antenna TV System – TransmitReceive Earth Stations – Problems – Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power – Transmission
Losses – Free-Space Transmission – Feeder Losses – Antenna Misalignment Losses – Fixed
Atmospheric and Ionospheric Losses – Link Power Budget Equation – System Noise –
Antenna Noise – Amplifier Noise Temperature – Amplifiers in Cascade – Noise Factor –
Noise Temperature of Absorptive Networks – Overall System Noise Temperature – Carrierto-Noise Ratio – Uplink – Saturation Flux Density – Input Back Off – The Earth Station HPA
– Downlink – Output Back off – Satellite TWTA Output – Effects of Rain – Uplink rain-fade
margin – Downlink rain-fade margin – Combined Uplink and Downlink C/N Ratio – Inter
modulation Noise.
83
UNIT IV
SATELLITE ACCESS
Single Access – Preassigned FDMA, Demand-Assigned FDMA, SPADE System.
Bandwidth-limited a
Power-limited TWT amplifier operation, FDMA downlink analysis. TDMA : Reference
Burst; Preamble and Postamble, Carrier recovery, Network synchronization, unique word
detection, Traffic Date, Frame Efficiency and Channel capacity, preassigned TDMA,
Demand assigned TDMA, Speech Interpolation and Prediction, Downlink analysis for Digital
transmission. Companion of uplink Power requirements for FDMA & TDMA. On-board
signal Processing for TDMA / FDMA operation, Satellite switched TDMA. Code-Division
Multiple Access – Direct-Sequence spread spectrum – code signal c(t) – autocorrelation
function for c(t) – Acquisition and trackling – Spectrum spreading and dispreading – CDMA
throughput – Problems – Network Layers – TCP Link – Satellite Links and TCP – Enhancing
TCP Over Satellite Channels Using Standard Mechanisms (RFC-2488) – Requests for
comments – Split TCP connections – Asymmetric Channels – Proposed Systems.
UNIT V
DIRECT BROADCAST SATELLITE SERVICES
Introduction – Orbital Spacings – Power Rating and Number of Transponders – Frequencies
and Polarization – Transponder Capacity – Bit Rates for Digital Television – MPEG
Compression Standards – Forward Error Correction – Home Receiver Outdoor Unit (ODU) –
Home Receiver Indoor Unit (IDU) – Downlink Analysis – Uplink -Problems - Satellite
Mobile Services – VSATs – Radarsat – Global Positioning Satellite System – Orbcomm.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Dennis Roddy, 2001, “Satellite Communications”, Third edition ,McGraw-Hill
Publication
2. Timothy Pratt – Charles Bostian & Jeremy Allmuti, 2004, ”Satellite
Communications”, John Willy & Sons (Asia) Pvt. Ltd.
3. Wilbur L. Pritchars Henri G.Suyder Hond Robert A.Nelson, 2003, ”Satellite
Communication Systems Engineering” Second edition , Pearson Education Ltd.,.
4. M.Richharia, 2003, “Satellite Communication Systems Design Principles” Second
Edition, Macmillan Press Ltd.
84
055 CS 008 PARALLEL COMPUTING
Course Objectives
The objective of this course is to study the theory and practice of applied parallel/distributed
computing.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Computational demands of parallel applications – Taxonomy – Performance metrics and
measures – Speed up laws – Scaling and speed up – Evaluating a real machine.
UNIT II
PARALLEL COMPUTING PARADIGMS
Pipelining and superscalar processors, Vector processors, Array Processors, SIMD
processors, Systolic architecture, Data flow.
UNIT III
MULTIPROCESSORS
Shared memory and message passing Architectures – Interconnection network – Topologies
– Routing – Switch design – Issues in multiprocessors.
UNIT IV
CACHE COHERENCE IN SHARED MEMORY SYSTEMS
Snooping protocols – Synchronization – Memory consistency models – Hardware / Software
support for implementation.
UNIT V
CACHE COHERENCE IN SCALABLE MULTIPROCESSORS
Directory based cache coherence protocols – Synchronization issues – Implementation issues
and Latency tolerance in multiprocessors – Current trends.
REFERENCES
1. Culler D.E., J.P.Singh, A.Gupta , 1999, “Parallel Computer Architecture – A Hardware /
Software Approach”, Harcourt Asia, Morgan Kaufmann.
2. K.Hwang, 1994, “Advanced Computer Architecture – Scalability”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
3. M.J.Quinn, 1994, “Parallel Computing – Theory & Practice”, McGraw-Hill.
4. Rajkumar Buyya, 1999, “High Performance Cluster Computing”, Vol.1, PTRPH.
85
055 CS 009 AD HOC NETWORKS
Course Objectives
Explore fundamental issues in routing in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs) and Sensor
Networks.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT 1
Introduction: Model of operation . Symmetric Links. Layer-2 Ad Hoc Solution. Proactive
versus reactive Protocols. Multicast. Commercial Applications of Ad Hoc Networking.
Conferencing. Home Networking. Emergency Services. Personal Area Networks and
Bluetooth. Embedded Computing Applications. Technical and Market Factors Affecting Ad
Hoc Networks. Scalability. Power Budget versus Latency. Protocol Development and
Incompatible Standards.
UNIT II
Channel Allocation: Channel allocation methods – MACA- 802. 11 WLAN – MACAWCSMA – TSMA – MACABI.
UNIT III
DSDV: Destination Sequenced Distance Vector Protocol:
Introduction. Overview of Routing Methods. Link- State. Distance vector. DestinationSequenced Distance vector Protocol. Protocol Overview. Route Advertisements. Route Table
Entry Structure. Responding to Topology Changes. Route selection Criteria. Operating
DSDV at Layer 2. Extending Base station Coverage. Performance Evaluation using
simulators.
UNIT IV
DSR: Dynamic Source Routing Protocol for Multi hop Wireless Ad Hoc Networks
Assumptions. DSR Protocol Description – Overview and Important properties. DSR Route
Discovery. DSR Route maintenance. Additional Route Maintenance features. Support for
Heterogeneous Networks and Mobile IP. Multicast Routing with DSR. Location of DSR
Functions in the ISO Network References Model. Performance Evaluation using simulators.
UNIT V
AODV: Ad Hoc on – Demand Distance – Vector Protocol
AODV Properties. Unicast Route Establishment. Route Discovery. Expanding Ring Search.
Forward Path Setup. Route Maintenance Local Connectivity Management. Multicast Route
Establishment. Route Discovery. Forward path set up. Multicast route activation/
Deactivation. Multicast tree Maintenance. Performance. Performance Evaluation using
simulators
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1
Charles E. Perkins, 2000, “Ad Hoc Networking”, Addison Wesley.
2.
IEEE journal on Selected Areas in Communications, 1999, “Special issues on Ad hoc
Networks”.
3.
Elizabeth. M. Royer and C.K.Toh, 1999, “A Review of Current Routing Protocols for
Mobile Ad hoc Networks”, IEEE personal Protocols for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks”,
Personal Communications.
86
055 CS 010 WIRELESS APPLICATION PROTOCOL
Course Objectives
At the conclusion of this course, participants will be able to Describe the basic components of
a wireless network from the mobile unit through to the backbone infrastructure, Describe the
fundamental concepts of data communications and computer networking, Explain the various
access methods and associated networking systems, Define various terms associated with
wireless data networking and third generation systems. Identify the key players in the
wireless data networking arena and their strategic directions, Explain WAP and its
components, Differentiate and identify wireless Internet components.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
Mobile Internet: Introduction, Mobile Data – Connectivity – Key Services for Mobile internet
– Mobile Internet access and application service provides: content provides and Developer.
UNIT II
Mobile Internet Standard : Current web technologies for wireless applications: origin and
overview of WAP components of Mwap standard: Network Infrastructure services supporting
Wap clients Design principles tools and software editors and emulators.
UNIT III
Implementation WAP services: WML Basics and document model; content generation;
Binary WML; enhanced WML: WML script: rules of script standard libraries, analysis: user
interface design guidelines.
UNIT IV
Advanced WAP: Tailoring concept to client: Techniques using HTTP 1.1; WAP Push: Push
Access Protocol: Push Technology: MIME media types for push messages: Proxy gateway;
Data base driven WAP: ASP and WAP, Object model: Activex data objects (ADO): End-toend WAP services: Security domains: linking WAP and internet.
UNIT V
Wireless Technology Applications: WAY architecture: client Framework: Server and
security: Design considerations Application creation Toolbox; WTA enhancements;
Technology; Bluetooth and Voice XML, Telematics inter connectivity.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
Sandeep Signal et al, 2001, ”WAP: Writing Applications For mobile internet”,
Pearson Education.
BulBrook, 2001, “WAP: A beginner’s Guide: Data”, Tata McGraw Hill PCL.
87
055 CS 011
DIGITAL SPEECH AND IMAGE PROCESSING
Course Objectives
Review of multi-dimensional sampling theory, aliasing, and quantization, fundamentals of
color, human visual system, 2-D Block transforms, DFT, DCT and wavelets, image filtering,
edge detection, enhancement, and restoration. Basic video file formats, resolutions, and bit
rates for various digital video applications. Motion analysis and estimation using 2D and 3D
models. Motion-compensated filtering methods for noise removal, de-interlacing, and
resolution enhancement. Digital image and video compression methods and standards,
including JPEG/JPEG2000 and MPEG-1/2 and 4. Contentbased image and video indexing and MPEG-7.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
Speech processing model – Speech analysis – Estimation frequency – Spectrum of speech
using DFT – Linear predictive Analysis.
UNIT II
Speech synthesizer – Linear predictive synthesizer – Different methods of speech recognition
and speech encoding.
UNIT III
Image Transforms – image enhancement – Restoration.
UNIT IV
Compression Models – Lossy compression – Image Segmentation – Boundary detection –
Detection of Discontinuities – Thresholding Boundary representation – Description –
Introduction to Classifiers – Introduction to Colour image processing.
UNIT V
Morphology – Automated Image Analysis – Semantic Networks – Production (expert
system)
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Gonzalez r. and woods B.E, 1993, “Digital Image Processing”, Addison Wesley.
Maner Sid-Ahmed A., “Image Processing”, McGraw Hill International Edition, 1995.
Rabiner, 1993 “Speech Recognition”, Prentice Hall.
Rabiner and Schaeffeer, 1995 “ Digital Processing of Speech Signals”, Prentice hall.
Anil Jain K, 1999 “Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing”, PHI.
Gonzales, Rafael and Windzp, “Digital Image Processing”, Addison-Wesley.
88
055 CS 012 ADVANCED JAVA PROGRAMMING
Course Objectives
To learn advanced Java programming concepts like reflection, native code interface, threads,
etc., To develop network programs in Java, To understand Concepts needed for distributed
and multi-tier applications, To understand issues in enterprise applications development.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
JAVA FUNDAMENTALS
Java I/O streaming – filter and pipe streams – Byte Code interpretation - reflection –
Dynamic Reflexive Classes – Threading – Java Native Interfaces- Swing.
UNIT II
NETWORK PROGRAMMING IN JAVA
Sockets – secure sockets – custom sockets – UDP datagrams – multicast sockets – URL
classes – Reading Data from the server – writing data – configuring the connection – Reading
the header – telnet application – Java Messaging services
UNIT III
APPLICATIONS IN DISTRIBUTED ENVIRONMENT
Remote method Invocation – activation models – RMI custom sockets – Object Serialization
– RMI – IIOP implementation – CORBA – IDL technology – Naming Services – CORBA
programming Models - JAR file creation
UNIT IV
MULTI-TIER APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
Server side programming – servlets – Java Server Pages - Applet to Applet communication –
applet to Servlet communication - JDBC – Using BLOB and CLOB objects – storing
Multimedia data into databases – Multimedia streaming applications – Java Media
Framework.
UNIT V
ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS
Server Side Component Architecture – Introduction to J2EE – Session Beans – Entity Beans
– Persistent Entity Beans – Transactions.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Elliotte Rusty Harold, 2000, “ Java Network Programming”, O’Reilly publishers. (UNIT
II)
2. Ed Roman, 1999, “Mastering Enterprise Java Beans”, John Wiley & Sons Inc.
(UNIT III and UNIT V)
3. Hortsmann & Cornell, 2002 , “CORE JAVA 2 ADVANCED FEATURES, VOL II”,
Pearson
Education. (UNIT I and UNIT IV)
5. Patrick Naughton, 2003, “COMPLETE REFERENCE: JAVA2”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
89
055 CS 013 MEDICAL INFORMATICS
Course Objectives
To study the methods utilized for data storage, data retrieval and analysis, To study the
concept of visual programming and to develop VB based medical information systems. To
expose to various applications of computer in medical field like neural network, fuzzy system
and virtual reality, Based on the above knowledge to develop packages for transmission of
medical information and for training.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
MEDICAL DATABASE IMPLEMENTATION
Medical data acquisition and database systems: PC based multi channel data acquisition
system; storage, analysis and retrieval techniques.
UNIT II
VISUAL BASIC
Visual programming concepts; visual Basic environment, tools and controls; Dynamic data
exchange; VB based Medical information System.
UNIT III
COMPUTERS IN SYSTEM DESIGN
Hospital Information System its design and functional characteristics; Principles and
application of Artificial Intelligence, Pattern Recognition, Neural Network and Fuzzy Logic
in Medicine.
UNIT IV
MULTIMEDIA AND VIRTUAL REALITY APPLIED TO MEDICINE
9
Basic concepts of Multimedia; Design of Multimedia information systems; Components of
virtual reality; Virtual reality applications in medicine.
UNIT V
COMPUTERS IN MEDICAL RESEARCH 9
Medical Informatics and its levels; Design and development of educational packages on
medical sciences; Integrated design concepts; Interactive multimedia, Virtual and digital
libraries, Internet and its applications.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. R.D.Lele, 1997, “Computer in Medicine”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.
2. Tay Vaughan, 1997, “Multimedia making it work’, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.
3. Davis Chapman, 1997, “Teach Yourself Visual Basic 6 in 21 days”, New Delhi.
4. Harold Sackman, 1997, “Biomedical Information Technology’, Academic Press, New
York.
5. Mary Brth Fecko, 1997, “Electronics Resources: Access and Issues”, Bowker and Saur,
London.
90
055 CS 014
JAVA VIRTUAL MACHINE
Course Objectives
Learn how to write multi-thread Java applications via our advanced Java training.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
JAVA PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE
Types, value, variables, conversions – Names and packages, classes, fields, method, static
initializes, constructors, interfaces, nesting – Arrays – Exception – Execution – Threads.
UNIT II
JAVA VIRTUAL MACHINE (JVM) STRUCTURE
Data types – Runtime data base areas and frames – Objects – Floating point arithmetic –
Exceptions – Instruction set summary – Class libraries.
UNIT III
CLASS FILE FORMAT
Class and interfaces names, descriptors – Constant pool – Fields, methods, attributes –
Constraints – Verification.
UNIT IV
RUNTIME ISSUES
Runtime constant pool – Virtual machine start up – Creation, loading, linking, initialization –
Binding - Instruction set – Threads and locks.
UNIT V
COMPILING FOR JVM
Constants, local variables, control constructs – Arithmetic – Runtime constant pool –
Arguments, method, class instances – Arrays - Compiling switches – Exceptions –
Synchronization.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Tim Lindholm and Frank Yellin, 1999, “The Java Virtual Machine Specification”,
Second Edition,
Addison Wesley.
2. Ken Arnold and James Gosling, 1998 ,”The Java Programming Language”, Addison
Wesley.
3. Alferd V.Aho, Ravi Sethi, Jeffery D. Ullman, 1998, “Compilers – Principles,
Techniques and Tools”, Addison Wesley.
4. Joshua Engel, 1999, “Programming for the Java Virtual Machine”, Addison Wesley.
91
055 CS 015 RESOURCE MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES
Course Objectives
Explore fundamental issues of resource management techniques.
Prerequisite
None
UNIT I
LINEAR PROGRAMMING:
Principal components of decision problem – Modeling phases – LP Formulation and graphic
solution –Resource allocation problems – Simplex method – Sensitivity analysis.
UNIT II
DUALITY AND NETWORKS:
Definition of dual problem – Primal – Dual relation ships – Dual simplex methods – Post
optimality
analysis – Transportation and assignment model shortest route problem.
UNIT III
INTEGER PROGRAMMING:
Cutting plan algorithm – Branch and bound methods, Multistage (Dynamic) programming.
UNIT IV
CLASSICAL OPTIMISATION THEORY:
Unconstrained external problems, Newton – Ralphson method – Equality constraints –
Jacobean methods – Lagrangian method – Kuhn – Tucker conditions – Simple problems.
UNIT V
OBJECT SCHEDULING
Network diagram representation – Critical path method – Time charts and resource leveling –
PERT.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Anderson, 2002, “Quantitative Methods for Business”, 8th Edition, Thomson Learning.
2. Winston, 2003, “Operation Research”, Thomson Learning.
3. H.A.Taha, 2002 , “Operation Research” , Prentice Hall of India.
4. Vohra, 2002, “Quantitative Techniques in Management”, Tata McGraw Hill.
5. Anand Sarma, 2003, “Operation Research”, Himalaya Publishing House.
92
055 CS 016 ATM NETWORKS
Course Objectives
The basic functions of the Network Layer are explained in sense of design issues, routing
algorithms, congestion control algorithms, Internetworking, the network layer in the Internet,
the network layer in ATM Networks. The Transport Layer includes the transport service,
elements of transport protocols, a simple transport protocol, the Internet transport protocols
(TCP and UDP). The ATM AAL layer protocols. The Application Layer issues cover the
network security, DNS (Domain Name System), SNMP (Simple Network Management
Protocol), Electronic Mail, and the World Wide Web.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
ATM – Historical perspective – Protocol Architecture – Logical connections – Cells –
Transmission of ATM cells – SDH – SONET – Switches.
UNIT II
ATM PROTOCOL
Connection setup – Routing Switching, Signaling, ATM Service categories – QOS
parameters –Adaptation Layer.
UNIT III
ROUTING ISSUES
Routing for high speed networks – RSVP, Traffic and Congestion control – Achieving QOS
– Traffic shaping – Generic cell rate algorithms – Rate based congestion control –
Connection admission control.
UNIT IV
HIGH SPEED LANS
Fast Ethernet – ATM LAN’s – LANE
UNIT V
PROTOCOLS OVER ATM
Multiple protocols over ATM, IP over ATM, TCP over ATM – Real time transport protocol
– Wireless ATM – Current trends.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Rainer Handel, Manfred N. Huber, Stefan Schroder, 1999, “ATM Networks”, Addison
Wesley.
2. William Stallings, 1998 “High Speed Networks TCP/IP and ATM Design Principles”,
Prentice Hall International.
3. Uyless Black, 1999 , “ATM Vol.1 and 2”, PHPTR.
4. William Stalling, 1999 , “ISDN with Broad Lane ISDN with frame relay and ATM”, PH,
4th edition.
93
055 CS 017 BIO INFORMATICS
.
Course Objectives
Discuss the basic aspects of the biological patterns, Biological pattern matching. Use the
archives and information retrieval strategies, Understand the approaches to sequence
alignments, Understand the issues in proteins and drug discovery.
Pre-requisite
None
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
Life in Space and Time, Dogmas, Data Archives, WWW, Computers, Biological
Classification, Use of
Sequences, Protein Structure, Clinical Implications
UNIT II
GENOME ORGANIZATION
Genomics and Proteomics, Eavesdropping on transmission of genetic information, Genomes
of prokaryotes, Genomes of Eukaryotes, Human Genome, SNPs, Genetic Diversity,
Evolution of Genomes
UNIT III
ARCHIVES AND INFORMATION RETRIEVAL
Introduction, The archives, Gateways to Archives
UNIT IV
ALIGNMENTS AND PHYLOGENETIC TREES
Introduction to Sequence Alignment, The dotplot, Dotplots and Sequence Alignments,
Measures of Sequence similarity, Computing the Al;ignment, The dynamic programming
algorithm, Significance of alignments, Multiple sequence alignment, Applications,
Phylogeny, Phylogenetic trees
UNIT V
PROTEIN STRUCTURE AND DRUG DISCOVERY
Protein Stability and Folding, Applications of Hydrophobicity, Superposition of structures,
DALI, Evolution of Protein Structures, Classification of Protein Structures, Protein Structure
prediction and modeling, Assignment of protein structures to genomes, Prediction of protein
function, Drug discovery and development
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Arthur M Lesk, 2004, “Introduction to Bioinformatics”, Oxford University Press, India.
2. Attwood T K and Parry-Smith D J, 2001, “Introduction to Bioinformatics”, Pearson
Education Asis,
New Delhi
94
055 CS 018 DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING
Course Objectives
Upon completion, a graduate of the program should have substantial expertise in key areas of
Internet programming and distributed computing, Able to apply acquired techniques and
knowledge to contribute to the development and implementation of enterprise software
systems in organizations. Able to analyse and design ICT projects and future ICT needs, and
able to apply Internet-based distributed computing systems and algorithms to e-Science and
e-Business applications.
Prerequisite
None
UNIT I
Introduction – Goals – hardware concepts – bus based multiprocessor – switched
multiprocessor – bus based multicomputer – switched multicomputer – software concepts –
network operating systems – True distributed system – Multiprocessor time sharing system –
design issues – transparency – Flexibility – reliability – Performance and Scalability.
UNIT II
Communication – Layered Protocols – ATM networks – Client server model – remote
procedure call – group communication.
UNIT III
Synchronization-Clock Synchronization – Mutual Exclusion – Election Algorithms – Atomic
transactions – Deadlock – Threads – System models – Processor Allocation – Scheduling –
fault tolerance – Real time system.
UNIT IV
Distributed file systems Distributed file system design – implementation – file models – fault
tolerance – file replication – multimedia.
UNIT V
Distributed shared memory – consistency models – page based distributed shared memory –
shared variable distributed shared memory – Distributed programming languages – case
studies.
REFERENCE BOOKS:
1.
2.
3.
Andrew S.Tanenbaum, 2001, “Distributed Operating System”, Pearson Education
Asia.
Mukesh singhal and Niranjan G. Shivaratri, 2000, “Advanced concepts in Operating
system, Tata McGraw Hill.
Pradeep . K and Sinha, 2001 “Distributed operating systems, PHI, New Delhi.
95
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards