Executive District Officer Agriculture Rawalpindi

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E.D.O. AGRICULTURE
DR. HAMEED ULLAH SHAH
BRIEF NOTE OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE DISTRICT OFFICER AGRICULTURE
RAWALPINDI.
Executive District Officer Agriculture
is
newly created post after devolution and
responsible to coordinate the activates of U;q groups of Officers under his business.
Following District Officers are attached with Executive District Officer Agriculture
Rawalpindi.
Agriculture (Ext) Rawalpindi.
Livestock & Dairy Development Rawalpindi.
Soil Conservation Rawalpindi.
Water Management Rawalpindi.
Forest Rawalpindi.
Fisheries Rawalpindi.
Functions:
1. To assist the D.C.O. in formulation of policy and bring to the notice of the D.C.O. cases
which are required to be submitted to the Zila Nazim under the rules.
2. To execute the sanctioned policy of District Government
3. Being the official head of the group of District Officers and is responsible for its
efficient administration and discipline and for the proper conduct of business
assigned to the group of officers.
4. To submit all proposals for taxation and the bye laws to the Zila Council through
Zila Nazim and D.C.O.
5. To be responsible to the D.C.O. for the proper conduct of the business and keep
him informed about the working of the District Officers.
6. To monitor developmental and functional discipline of the Office and sub-offices.
7. To keep close contact and coordinate with elected members, NGOs and
provisional Government.
STAFF POSITION OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE DISTRICT OFFICER
AGRICULTURE RAWALPINDI.
S.No
Name of Post
1.
BPS
Field in
Vacant
Executive District Officer 18
Agriculture Rawalpindi.
01
-
2.
Superintendent
16
-
01
3.
Stenographer
12
-
01
4.
Assistant
11
-
01
5.
Senior clerk
07
01
01
6.
Junior clerk
05
02
-
7.
Driver
04
01
-
8.
Naib Qasid
01
01
-
9.
Chowkidar
01
01
-
10.
Sweeper
01
01
-
Total
-
08
04
PREPARATION OF DISTRICT WEBSITE
1. AGRICULTURE EXTENSION DEPARTMENT DISTRICT RAWALPINDI
Phone No. 9290331 Fax 9290875
District Officer Agriculture,
(Extension) Murree Road,
Rawalpindi.
2. SERVICE OFFICERED BY THE DEPARTMENT
AGRICULTURE EXTENSION SERVICE
Agriculture Extension Department is responsible for education and motivation of the
farmers to adopt the latest agricultural technology. The agriculture extension services
have been continuously struggling and making hard and hectic efforts for transmitting the
modern agriculture technology to the farmer and to persuade them to increase the
production of food and fiber crops, oil seeds, fruits and vegetables.
DUTIES OF AGRICULTURE EXTENSION WING
•
Transmission of modern crop production technology to the growers.
•
Monitoring of supply of inputs.
•
Quality control of pesticides by taking samples and submission to laboratory for
analysis.
•
Quality control of fertilizer by taking samples and submission to laboratory for
analysis.
•
Grading of seed (Wheat) through seed graders.
•
Provision of literature (free of cost). to farmers.
•
Achievement of targets of sowing/yield.
•
Farmer's days for method/result demonstration.
•
Organizing fruit and vegetable shows, exhibitions and meals.
•
Multiplying pre-basics seed from the basis seed for further distribution to
progressive growers through the Punjab Seed Corporation.
•
Propagation of pedigree nursery plants of fruits at Government nurseries and their
distribution to farmers at subsidized rates
•
Wheat farmer training programme
•
Groundnut training programme
MAJOR FUNCTION
AGRICULTURE ACTIVITIES
TRANSFER OF TECHNOLOGY
Adoption of recommended package of agricultural technology is highly important for
increasing crops, fruit and vegetable production. The site-specific technology is being
disseminated through efficient communication and by different modes such as:
1. DEMONSTRATION PLOTS.
The demonstration plots are sown throughout the District to display improved and proven
technology, at the farmer’s field, which build up confidence of the farmers on the
technology and play an important role to increase awareness about innovations.
Therefore, each Field Assistant layout one or two plots in his area, in each season, on the
farmer's field.
2. REFRESHER COURSE.
It is the need of the time to keep the field staff, up to date regarding the latest technology,
being developed by the scientists, in view of the changing socio economic and agroecological conditions. Accordingly, Extension Wing of Agriculture Department arranges
refresher courses at the District and Tehsil level, once in a season.
3. FIELD DAYS.
Farmers gathering play an important role in bridging the gap between findings of
research and performance of the farmer field; therefore, field days are arranged at the
demonstration plots, which play a vital role increasing awareness regarding impact of
innovation/technology production.
4. AGRICULTURAL FAIRS
Agricultural fairs provide to the fanners not only an atmosphere of leisure, joy ness and
competitions with his fellow farmers but also play an important role in learning form the
experience of other farmer's show in the exhibition. Therefore, the Extension Wing in
Rawalpindi arranges fairs at different occasions to achieve the objectives.
5. WRITING OF MOTTO, SLOGANS AND ERECTION OF BURJIES
Writing of Mottos is also an important method for transfer of technology. Therefore wall
chalking, erection Burjies, Writing of mottos and slogans are being done throughout, the
District.
6. FARMER'S TRAINING PROGRAMME AT VILLAGE LEVEL
!
Agriculture graduates or Senior and 'experience field staff before the start of the
season of crops carries out Farmer. Training programme. All the crops growing
villages are covered and latest, technology is transferred to the farming community by
group meeting, farm visit and individual contract. Wide publicity is made through
loud speakers and held staff about the schedules of meeting. with 'the farmers. The
main focus is sowing time, speed rate, balance use of fertilizer and recommended
varieties. Literature is distributed among the farmers and at the end of meeting a
discussion is held and the entire question raised by the fanners is addressed and their
problems are noted for appropriate remedial measures.
4. ONE WINDOW OPERATION
• Provision of guide lines for increasing per acre yield of major crops.
• Training of farmers about new technologies in Agriculture.
• Provision of fruit plants at subsidized rates.
5. APPLICATION FORM,
The District Officer Agriculture (Ext) Rawalpindi has fully authorized to issue the
pesticide dealer/vendor ship license totanYIapplic4nt at district level after completing
all codal formalities.
District Livestock Officer Rawalpindi.
DR. MUHMMAD YAQOOB SAJID
INTRODUCTION.
Livestock is an integral component of rain fed and plays crucial role in the rural
economy. Estimates rural that livestock contributes 40% of the total house hold income.
It also provides social security when crops fail due to uncertain weather conditions. Livestock
production in the certain areas has tremendous potential for development but due to
infections & non-infections diseases are the constraints which if circumvented can double
the out put of Livestock Production.
TOPOGRAPHY:
Rawalpindi District is situated in the North Punjab about 9 Km away from
the capital Islamabad. Its urban population is about 17,84000 and rural population is
1568000 brings total up to of 33,52000. The whole district is Barani and Livestock of the
people mostly belongs to military / Civil Services & nurtures the livestock. It has 6 Tehsil
newly:
1. Rawalpindi.
2. Kahuta.
3. Murree.
4. Kotli Sattian.
5. Taxila.
Being a thickly inhabited the people are facing many troubles as for the
fundamental needs are concerned. Auspiciously city, area has been De-cattle by the
District Government. In order to carry out the outmost results of this De-cattling, cattle
colonies in the adjacent area should be set up duly equipped with veterinary facilities like
hospital diagnostic laboratories. It activities for the up lift / development of livestock in
District are mentioned below:
LIVESTOCK POPULATON
URBAN
RURAL
BUFFALOES
CATTLE
SHEEP
GOAT
HORSES
155319
206534
. 12097
190296
1359
19498
4247
395
5801
248
TOTAL
174817
210681
12492
196097
1607
ASSES
CAMELS
POULTRY
23695
1373
1242825
NO. OF VETERINARY INSTITUTION.
HOSPITALS
VETERINARY DISPENSARIES
VETERINARY CENTERS
A. 1. CENTERS
04
A. 1. SUB-CENTERS
11
463
80069
42158
1373
1322894
13
24
74
Under District Government plan the field services i.e. Animal Health, A. I.
and poultry. Extension has been merged for the provision health care A. I and poultry at
the door steps of the farmers. There activities are performing through the District network
of existing veterinary institution in the District.
ORGANOGRAM DISTRICT RAWALPINDI.
DISTRICT LIVESTOCK OFFICER BS-18+ SPECIAL P A Y=1
Deputy District Livestock
Deputy District Livestock
Deputy District Livestock
Officer
Officer
Officer
(Breed Improvement) Bs-18=1
(Poultry) Bs-18=1
Establishment
Technical Staff for District.
(Animal Health)
Bs-18=1
"
Senior Veterinary Officer
Admn Officer, Bs-16+100
1
Veterinary Officer Bs-17
29
(Distt. Vety. Hosp.) Bs-18=1
Superintendent, Bs-16
Stenographer, Bs-12
Assistant Bs-ll
3
Senior Clerk, Bs-07 3
Junior Clerk, Bs-05 4
Driver, Bs-04
2
Naib Qasid, Bs-Ol 4
Chowkidar, Bs-Ol 2
1
1
Veterinary Assistant, Bs-06
A.I. Supervisor, Bs-I0
A.I. Technician, Bs-06
Chowkidar, Bs-Ol
Cattle Attendant, Bs-Ol
Water Carrier, Bs-Ol
Sweeper
125
1
16
18
1
37
38
Sanitary Worker, Bs-Ol
2
VETERINARY
HOSPITALS
13
VETERINARY
DISPENSARIES
24
VETERINARY
CENTRES
74
A.I. ENTRES/SUBCENTRES.
15
BRIEF NOTE ON LIVESTOCK ACTIVITIES IN DISTRICT RAWALPINDI.
FUNCTIONS
i. To Provide, Vety: Cover, Disease control, Vaccination & A.I. Services through
existing Vety: institutions both at Hospital & door step of the breeder.
ii. To provide, extension services through Farmer days, Livestock shows & individual
contract with the farmers.
iii. To train livestock breeders in the field of livestock management, husbandry measure1
and first aid at hospital level.
iv. To provide mass vaccination/prophylactive measures both as routine and during
natural calamities.
v. To formulate and implement the development schemes of both district and provincial
governments.
vi. To co-ordinate aid giving agencies such as ABAD.
vii. To extend liaison for district and provincial government. viii. To supervise affairs of slaughterhouse.
LIVESTOCK POPULATION DISTRICT RAWALPINDI.
S.NO.
BREED
1
Buffalo
2
RURAL
URBAN
TOTAL.
155319
19498
174817
Cattle
206534
4247
210681
3
Sheep
12097
395
12492
4
Goat
190296
5801
196097
5
Horses
1359
248
1607
6
Asses
23695
436
24158
7
Camel
1373
0
1373
8
Poultry
1242825 80069
i
1322984
VETERINARY INSTITUTIONS DISTRICT RAWALPINDI.
S.NO.
NAME OF
HOSPITALS
NAME OF
DISPENSARIES
A.I.CENTRES
A.I. SUBCENTRES
1
Rawalpindi
Dhok Gujran
Rawa1pindi
Taxi1a
2
Chountra
Chak Bali Khan
Bassali
Kallar Syeddan
3
Sihal
Punkar
Gujar Khan
Dhoke Gujran
4
Bassali
Nar
Daultala
Choa Khalsa
5
Gujar Khan
Balakhar
Shamsabad
6
Mandra
Bewal
Kahuta
7
Daultala
Kounterial
Mandra
8
Murree
Mator
Kountrila
9
Taxila
Devi
Smoote
10
Koutli Sattian
Krum Alyas
Qazian
11
Kabuta
Narali
Devi
12
Kallar Syeddan
Bun
Chack Bali Khan
13
Jattal
Gohra
14
Dhanda
15
Derya Gali
16
Kmal Abad
17
Pind Nosheri
18
Lub Thuthu
19
Lehtrar
20
Karor
21
Malote Sattian
22
Dhuma
23
Qazian
24
Sihal Khingher
25
Nara
Total 13
25
4
12
STAFF POSITION
S.NO.
NAME OF POST
BPS
SANCTION
IN
VACANT
STRENGTH POSITION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
D.L.O.
18
1
D.D.L.O.
18
3
S.V.O.
18
1
V.O.
17+18
29
ADMIN OFFICER
16
1
SUPERINTENDENT 16
1
STENOGRAPHER
12
1
ASSISTANT
11
2
A.I. SUPERVISIOR
10
1
SENIOR CLERK
7
3
A.I.T.
6+9
16
VETY. ASSISTANT 6+9
86
JUNIOR CLERK
5
4
DRIVER
4
2
DAFTRI
2
1
NAIB QASID
1
5
CHOWKIDAR
1
9
WATER CARRIER
1
2
SANITARY
1
5
WORKER
20
CATTLE
1
1
ATTENDENT
STAFF POSITION OF DEFUNCT (Z.C) STAFF
1
ASSISTANT
11
1
2
VETY. ASSISTANT 6+9
39
3
JUNIOR CLERK
5
1
4
CHOWKIDAR
1
18
5
NAIB QASID
1
1
6
KHALSI
1
1
7
WATER CARRIER
1
35
8
SANITARY
1
38
WORKER
1
0
19
1
1
1
15
74
3
1
3
8
2
4
3
1
10
1
2
1
2
1
12
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
31
15
1
31
29
8
1
3
1
4
9
DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES.
I. Provision of Community bulls 7.3 5Million.
II. Reconstruction of Veterinary Hospital & residences 6.7 Million.
III. A pilot project for livestock production enhancement through door steps provision of
veterinary services in drought effected areas 0 f Rawalpindi, District worth Rs.19.997
PROGRESS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES FROM 2001-06
OFFICE OF THE, DISTRICT LIVESTOCK OFFICER, RAWALPINDI.
ACTIVITIES
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Treatment
119650
162342
108597
201974
174520
Vaccination
284714
4765:?6
630000
520815
801300
Income
220120
288955
426627
594233
245359
3083
38888
40383
40710
63363
7930
10033
10038
10348
4666
( natural)
10450
9894
10490
10958'
5377
G.D. (Cases)
563
590
812
706
413
Income.
927805
1169590
1215550
1225130
2107604
A.I. WORK.
A.I (TOTAL)
Preg Test
(A. I)
FIELD DAY AND FARMER DAY
The field day and farmer day are the extension tools used to provide the improved husbandry
techniques at the farmer's door step. The main characteristics of both techniques are as follow:
FIELD DAY.
1. The field day is conducted to teach on the specific topics
2. The topic selected is mainly seasonal and need of farmers at that time.
3. The group of farmers is about 5 to 10.
4. The field day is conducted at the farmer's door step keeping the availability of farmers
without considering the time schedule.
5. The field day is entirely a two way communication.
6. Usually conducted by the concerned officer.
FARMER DAY
1. This is multi activities programme conducted practically at the common place.
2. Farmer training programme by the different subject specialist is conducted.
3. The exhibition stall is also placed at the farmer day.
4. The farmer problems, suggestion and departmental policies and activities are openly
discussed and delivered.
5. It is usually conducted at village level.
FIELD DAY
CATTLE FAIRS
FIELD DAYS
UNDER
DEAR
PROGRAMME FOR THE YEAR 20042005
ACHIEVEMENT
2003-2004
16
2
-
2004-2005
72
6
188
Anjrna1 Dewormed
83742
DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES.
I. Provision of Community bulls 7.3 5Million.
II. Reconstruction of Veterinary Hospital & residences 6.7 Million.
III. A pilot project for livestock production enhancement through door steps provision of veterinary services in drought
'
effected areas 0 f Rawalpindi, District worth Rs.19.997 million under DERA-II.
PHYSICAL ACHIVEMENTS IN THSIL GUJAR KHANIUNDER BARANI VILLAGER DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMME DURING THE YEAR 2003-2006.
ACHIEVEMENT
SR.
NO.
1
NAME OF ACTIVITIES i
2
3
4
2003-04
26
2004-05
40
2005-06
12
DISTRIBUTION OF UMMB
2600
3820
-
MCLA, TRAINING
/REFERESHER COURSE
FEMALE LEW INDUCATION
56
25
-
225
221
104
DISTRIBUTION OF BREEDING
BULLS/CALVES
TRAINING COURSE
5
FIELD DAYS CONDUCTED
132
34
14
6
NO. OF LARGE ANIMALS
DEWORMED
NO. OF SMALL ANIMALS
DEWORMED
4965
1925
880
2673
2250
696
7
I
DEVELOPMENT SCHEMES
DISTRICT RAWALPINDI.
NAME OF SCHEME
SR.
1.
B.V.D.P.
REMARKS
This scheme is functioning in Tehsil Gujar Khan under ABAD agency all the
active/~chievements up to 30.6.2004, have been reflected in Brief Note. About
1071, CO, members benefited under this scheme. This scheme is effectively
operated with the active participation of community members.
2.
Strengthening of A.I. The District Government has provides Rs.l, OOO/=Million for the
Services
through
purchase of A.I Kits. The purchase is under process, on the receipt of the
providing A.I. Kits.
store 18; A.I. Sub-Centers will be established in District Rawalpindi. This
project is framed to improve the genetic potential of local breed by
exploiting superior germsplasam. About 5000 people will be benefited
under this scheme.
3.
Establishment of Vety. District Government Rawalpindi has provided Rs.0.879/= Million funds for the
Dispensary/ Hospital
at Sarwar Shaheed construction of vety Dispencary clinic during the current financial year. The
Sangori,
District
construction work has been taken in hand by the Building Department. On its
Rawalpindi.
completion staff will be posted there and the people of area surrounding 10 KM.
Sarwar Shaheed Sanghori will get benefit from this. Hospital for the treatment of
their sick animals.
ACTION PLAN:
1. Opening of new Vety: Institutions.
2. Up gradation of Existing institutions.
3. Enhancement of Vaccination cover to the animals by fixing per worker target.
4. To boost up the existing Vety: Cover through effective control over the institutions with the help of
local Govt.
5. To train village Veterinary Workt:;rs to deliver Vety: aid at the door step of the farmer.
6. To Co-ordinate with the Directorates ofL&DD department & P D (BVDP) to achieve
100% targets of different activities such as distribution of breeding bulls improvement of Nutrients of
the animals by distributing UMMB and health improvement of animals by deworming them.
7. To enhance breeding activities in the district through distribution of breeding bulls.
PROBLEMS:
1. Shortage of technical staff.
2. Difficult Access to livestock owner due to lack of transport facility.
3. Shortage of furniture/equipment in the field area.
4. Deteriorated conditions of existing 'Slaughterhouses.
5. Non-availability of residences of field staff.
ANTICIPATED SOLUTIONS:
1. New recruitment of technical staff against vacant posts.
2. Provision of mobility transport to the field staff.
3. Provision of sufficient budget.
4. Construction of new buildings of Veterinary Hospitals.
5. Constructions of two or three Cattle's Colonies out side the city limits.
6. Constructions of latest equipped meat complex / Slaughterhouse at suitable place within twin city approach.
WEB SITE OF DISTRICT OFFICER FIHERIES
RAWALPINDI 2006
INTRODUCTION:
The Fisheries Department was established in 1949.The services of Fisheries Department was conservation.
There were two Directorates at East Pakistan and West Pakistan. Due to less technology; the rivers have plenty of areas in their
connivance, annual rain fall were normal and rivers overflow water in their tributaries. Resultantly fish not only bred at these
tributaries, but also these areas provide healthy fish seed to the rivers and these rivers provide plenty of fish which not only
marketed but many fisherman community were totally dependant on the catching of fish.
By the, passage of time, rivers were squeezed, due to present technology, fish productive areas has been
converted into cultivated lands by the construction of bunds around the rivers to save the human community assets. In this way not
only fish productive areas has been decreased but also fish production suffers.
Keeping in view the above situations; fisheries department introduce new induced spawning
technology, By constructing new Hatcheries, provide technical guideline to the private sector ,ponds comprises from l Kanal to 50
acres were constructed.
The present fish in the market is mostly the production of private fish farms, man made small dams, mini
darns which are being stocked through Hatcheries of fisheries department.
TOPOGRAPHY.
Rawalpindi District comprises Six Tehsils (Rawalpindi, Taxila, Murree, Gujar Khan, Kotli Sattian and
Kahuta) with total area 12, 90,013 acres with cultivated area 6, 65,560 acres and uncultivated area 6,24,453
acres.
Rawalpindi District constitutes the eastern half of the Potohar uplands and lies between latitudes 32° 30' and 34° 30' N, and
longitudes 72° 30' and 73° 30' E. In the North's and East the area is bounded by the Himalayan foothills, in the South by the Salt
range and in the West by Attock District and the Gandhara range.
The High Potwar Plateau represents a synclinal through between the salt range and the
Rawalpindi foothills, filled with Tertiary and quaternary deposits. The District has a comp lese
geological history of mountain building, alluvial and loessic depositions and erosion cycles. Inter
bedded conformer rates sand stones halls and siltstones mainly underlie the area of whole district. The
Harro and Sowan Rivers comprise the main drainage of the potwar uplands unlike the rivers of the
plug as Plains; the Potwar Uplands Rivers are eroding material, not depositing it. The riverbeds lie far
below the general level of the, consequently erosion has been very active in the plains and has resulted
in a network of deep gullies.
CLIMATE.
The average rainfall in the district various from about 45 inches in the North's to less then no inches in
the South east. The climate of the area is characterized by rainfall from both monsoon and Western
disturbances giving a twin peak type distribution with the maximum precipitation with the precipitation
occurring in July to September. The summers are pleasantly cool (90M 1 00 FO) while winters are severe
with considerable frost and snow in month of January.
OBJECTIVES
1) To Increase the fish Production.
2) To increase the income of fisheries community.
3) To utilized uncultivated land.
4) To utilize the water logged areas.
5) To utilized the uneven lands.
6) Leasing of dams.
7) Compensation fee through Challans.
8) Stocking of fish seed.
9) Survey of sites.
10) Provision of technical advisory Services about fisheries.
11) Provision ofPhysibilities reports for loan from ADBP & Small Industries. 12) Visiting of Private fish farms and Small dams.
13) Conducting of seminars and training for Fish farmers.
14) Provision of information through Melas.
15) Provision ofInformation through Web Site.
16) Provision ofInformation through Information Technology. 17) Provision of Information for prompt growth of fish.
18) Provision of Information for marketing.
19) Provision of Information for export of fish as the fresh water fish is the most demanding fish not only in UK. But also in USA,
KSA and even in Japan.
DETAIL OF KIND OF FISH SEED, RATE OF STOCKING PER ACRE
AND PRODUCTION PER YEAR
%Of
S.No.
1.
Kinds
Stocking
Growth
Food Required
Per
Acre
Annually
1.5kgs
to
2.5kgs
200% of the body
10%
Grass
Carp
%
Average
weight
Remarks
If green fooder is in abundant
2.
Silver
Carp
15%
1.5
to
2.0kgs
3% of the body
weight
Rice brawn,rice polish.oil
cakes.maiz gluten etc
3.
Thailla
15%
3% of the body
weight
Rice brawn,rice polish. oil
cakes.maiz gluten etc
4.
Rohu
40%
1.0
to
1.5kgs
1.0Kgs
to
1.25kgs
3% of the body
weight
Rice brawn,rice polish.oil
cakes.maiz gluten etc
5.
Mori
20%
.75kgs
to
1.0kgs
3% of the body
weight
Rice brawn,rice polish.oil
cakes.maiz gluten etc
1.5
to
2.2kgs
3% of the body
weight
Rice brawn, rice polish.oil
cakes.maiz gluten etc
6.
Big Head
10%
DETAIL OF MACHINERY/VEHICLES
1. No vehicle was provided from the District pool in spite of request again & again, this is only office which is earning and earn
annually.
2. EDO (Agri) provide vehicle to perform the field duty on off and off time.
3. One peter engine 15H/P for shifting of fish seed from nurseries to main fish farm in Govt./ Private sector.
4. Fisheries Equipments.
5. Nets.
6. Fish Holding Containers (Small Plastic Drums)
ACHIEVEMENT FOR THE YEAR, 2002-2003
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5
6
Activity
Targets achieved
Fish seed stocking
6.0 Lac
Income through lease Money
RS.9.3Lac
Income through license fee
The power has not been delegated
Compensation fee
--n-do----Sale of fish seed
No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was transferred.
Sale of ornamental fish
No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was transferred.
Fish production in private sector
400 M.Tons
Fish production in other organization
600 M.Tons
ACHIEVEMENT FOR THE YEAR, 2003-04
Activity
Income through Leases
Stocking of Fish Seed in Small Dams and Private Fish Farm
Fish Production From Natural Resources, Small dams And Private Fish Farms.
Construction Of New Fish Farm & Mini Dams During 2003-2004
Advisory services provided to the people who visited the office
Visit Of Private Fish Farm For Checking the water Quality and Growth of Fish.
Targets achieved
Rs.2.05Lac
11.00Lac
1436M.Tons
25Nos
75Nos
250Nos
ACHIEVEMENT FOR THE YEAR, 2004-05
S.NO
1
3
4
5
6
7
Activity
Fish seed stocking
Income through license fee
Compensation fee
Sale of fish seed
Sale of ornamental fish
Fish production in private sector
Targets achieved
6.28 Lac
The power has not been delegated
-----don--No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was transferred.
No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was transferred.
1500 M.Tons
ACHIEVEMENT FOR THE YEAR, 2005-06
S.NO
1
2
3
4
5
6
Activity
Income through Leases
Stocking of Fish Seed in Small Dams and Private Fish Farm
Fish Production From Natural Resources, Small dams And Private Fish Farms.
Construction Of New Fish Farm & Mini Dams During 2003-2004
Advisory services provided to the people who visited the office
Visit Of Private Fish Farm For Checking the water Quality and Growth of Fish.
Targets achieved
Rs. 2.05Lac
11.00Lac
1436M.Tons
25Nos
75Nos
250Nos
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2001-02
S.N o.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
486000
20000
506000
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2002-03
S.N o.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
1011000
331000
1392000
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2003-04
S.N o.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
1001000
571000
1632000
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2004-05
S.N o.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
1035000
527000
1562000
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2005-06
S.No.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
915000
684000
1599000
BUDGET ALLOCATION FOR 2006-07
S.N o.
Salary
Non Salary
Total
1
1218000
941000
2159000
PROCEDURE OF AUCTION OF FISHING RIGHTS
There are (7) Nos of small Dams in District Rawalpindi. The fishing rights ofthese small are auction
out for three years. District Coordination Officer is fully competent to auction the fishing rights
1. When the tenure of fishing right completed; District Officer Fisheries intimate to the DCa (R WP) though EDO (Agri)
Rawalpindi and get permission for auction of fishing rights of dams and fixation
of date & time and to advertise in National News Papers and vide publicity through staff.
2. District Coordination Officer & EDO (Agri) purposed auction committee.
3. Open auction is conducted in the presence of purposed auction committee.
4. Committee announce the Govt rate of fishing rights ;which is at least 10% more than ftom the
previous auction.
5. The highest bidders become the successor; and the fishing rights of small dam is provisionally
accepted until the sanctioned ftom the DCa (RWP).
6. The contractor has to stock the fish seed in the dams annually through his own expenses under
intimation to this office.
7. The contractor started ftom the date of sanction to 30th May of that relevant years when the auction
of fishing right completed after 3 years.
8. The contractors are not allowed to fishing ftom 15t June to 30th August due to spawning season.
9. The Detail of Dams.
INCOME THROUGH LEASE OF SMALL DAMS
FOR 2002-03
S.NO.
Name Of Dam
Auction
Period
Amount
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Total
Misriot Dam
Khasala Dam
Nirali Dam
Dongi Dam
Dhok Sunday Mar
2002-05
2002-05
2002-05
2002-05
2002-05
3 years
3 years
3 years
3years
3years
220000
240000
100000
245000
125000
930000
INCOME THROUGH LEASE OF SMALL DAMS
FOR 2003-06
S.NO.
6.
I Auction
I 2003-06
I Name Of Dam
I Jawa Dam
I Period
I 3years
I Amount
I 205000
INCOME THROUGH LEASE OF SMALL DAMS
FOR 2005-08
S.NO.
Name Of Dam
Auction
Period
Amount
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Total
Misriot Dam
2005-08
2005-08
2005-08
2005-08
3vears
3 years
3years
3years
3vears
410000
400000
221000
295000
370000
1696000
Khasala Dam
Nirali Dam
Dongi Dam
Dhok Sunday Mar
2005-08
INCOME THROUGH LEASE OF SMALL DAMS
FOR 2006-09
S.NO.
12.
13.
Total
Name Of Dam
Jawa Dam
Jamal Dam
Auction
2006-09
2006-09
Period
3vears
3 Years
Amount
310000
200000
510000
DEVELOPMENT SCHEME
A scheme for the provision of Extension Services to all Private and Govt Fish Farms for Rs. (6) lac for the years (2004-05)
District Rawalpindi was provided under ADP scheme, through which this office enables to provide extension services to the private
along with Govt small dams.
ANNUAL BUDGETS
TARGETS FOR THE YEARS. 2006-07
S.NO
I
2
3
4
5
6
Activity
Fish seeds stocking
Production of fish in public and private sector
Acution of fishing rights through auction
Income through licencing
Income through legislation
Maximum survey of Agriculture land
Targets achieved
7.5 Lac seeds
2000 M. Tons
Rs. 10.0 Lacs
Nil
Nil
30 Nos
ACHIEVEMENTS FOR THE YEARS. 2005-06
S.NO
I
2
3
4
5
6
Activity
Income through Leases
Stocking ofFish Seed in Small Dams and Private Fish Farm
Fish Production From Natural Resources, Small dams And Private Fish Farms.
Construction Of New Fish Farm & Mini Dams During 2005-06 & small Dam
Construction Of New Fish Farm & Mini Dams During 2005-06
Advisory services provided to the people who visited the office
Visit Of Private Fish Farm For Checking the water Quality and Growth ofFish.
Targets achieved
Rs. 1.696 million
1.11 million
I 487M.Tons
INo.
O-Nos
75Nos
58 Nos
ACHIEVEMENT FOR THE YEARS. 2002-03
S.NO
I
2
3
4
5
Activity
Fish seed stocking
Income through lease Money
Income through license fee
Compensation fee
Sale of fish seed
6
Sale of ornamental fish
7
8
Fish production in private sector
Fish production in other organization
Targets achieved
6.0 Lac
Rs.16.96Lac
The power has not been delegated
----- Do----No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was
transferred.
No fish Seed Hatchery or Nursery unit was
transferred.
400 M.Tons
600 M.Tons
LIST OF PRIVATE FISH FARM /MINI DAMS ESTABLISHED UNDER DISTRICT GOVERNMENT RAWALPINDI
Name of fish farm
KLMs
Acre
Location
Raja Saeed Mini Dam
70
35
Dhamial
Khizar Hayat Mini Dam
160
30
Kallir
Majid Mini Dam
140
35
Rajar
Tanweer Shah Mini Dam
125
30
Maira Sharif
Iftikhar Shah Mini Dam
84
20
- do-
Khalid Masood Mini Dam
70
35
Maira Kalan
Col Hamid Fish Farm
140
30
Rajar
Khadim Hussain Fish Farm
140
25
Dhoke Bhadal
Riaz Hussain Shah Fish Farm
135
20
Narala Khauta
Shaukat Fish Farm
140
10K
Nathote Khauta
Raja Shahid Fish Farm
94
10
Dhoke Rajgan
Kamran Fish Farm MPA
Javed Ikhlas Fish Farm Zila
Nazim
DESTO Fish Farm
133
4
Village Chakrey
70
7
Village Kolian
98
10
Chattar
Akram Fish Farm
140
10
Kalli Pari Chak Beli
Ishtiaq Fish Farm
170
13
Mari Bheer
Col Yasin Mini Dam
140
25
Bossa Ii
Ch, Tariq Fish Farm
154
12
Bhall
Afzal Fish Farm
189
10
Bijrana Kanal
Heavy Industries Taxilla
112
15
Taxilla
Mehmood Fish Farm
135
10
Dhakki Chak Beli
Aslam Fish Farm
189
17
Jerro Rattial
Hafiz Shakil Fish Farm
175
Adhi Daultala
Shiraz Fish Farm
160
Mastala Daultala
Snober Fish Farm
150
Krunb Kaswal
Shabaz Fish Farm
140
Bajnayal Near Dungi
Ch. Aftab Fish Farm
100
Misriot Dam
84
Misriot
Dungi Dam
140
Gujar Khan
Jawa Dam
125
Adiala Road
Khasala Dam
100
Village Khasala
Nirali Dam
160
Daultala
Dhoke Sunday Mar Dam
84
Sang Jani
4 Acre
Village Thallian
STAFF STRENGTH DURING 2006- 07
S.No.
Name of Posts
No of Posts Given
Grade
1
District Officer Fisheries
01
17
2
Asstt.District Officer Fisheries
01
11
3
Senior Clerk
4
Fisheries Supervisor
5
Junior Clerk
6
Fisheries Driver
7
Chowkidar
8
Fisheries Watchers
9
Fisheries Beldars
10
N aib Qasid
01
01
01
01
01
06
02
01
16
07
06
05
04
01
01
01
01
Total
Vacant Posts
01
01
01
04
07
ACTION PLAN FOR THE YEAR. 2006-2007
Under the devolution plan the above mentioned staff of the Fisheries department has been
placed at the disposal ofDCO Rawalpindi. CONSTRAINTS
1) Shortage of Staff.
2) Non-availability of vehicle.
3) There are (7) Dams in District Rawalpindi, which are under the supervision of the District
Fisheries Department.
4) Misriot Dam.
5) Dongi dam.
6) Khasala Dam.
7) Narali Dam.
8) Dhoke Sunday Mar Dam.
9) Java Dam.
10) Jamal Dam
11) Their supervision has been transferred to the District Officer Fisheries Rawalpindi in the new
devolution setup.
12) No nursery, no hatchery and no vehicle have not been transferred to the District Fisheries
Department under the new setup in this way the contractor do cooperate and stock the diseased, malnutrition, and
affected ,fish seed in this way the production of the small dam suffer.
Solution:
1) The supervision of the nurseries as well as hatchery should be transferred to the District Officer Fisheries under the
new set up.
2) The shortage of staff should be provided as per sanctioned posts given in present District budget.
3) Nets for test netting of the fish should be purchased. 4) Proper transportation should be provided for look after a,
survey of land in Rawalpindi District.
STAFF INTRODUCTION
S.No
1.
2.
3.
4.
Name
Designation
Office Tip
Asif Ali Shah
Raja Tanveer Zaman
Muhammad Asif
Mrs.Tasmina
DOF
ADOF
F?S
O/A
5110650
5110650
5110650
9290575
MOBILE
03005561148
03005549574
03015522874
03008348949
Resident Tip
0513015180
0515790736
Nil
Nil
Brief Note Of District Officer Forest, Rawalpindi.
INTRODUCTION:
Under the local government ordinance 2001 the office of District officer Forest came into the
existence on 14/08/2001. Rawalpindi District comprises of seven Tehsils namely
Rawalpindi, Taxila, Murree, Kahuta, Kotli Sattian Gujar Khan and Kalar Syedan tehsils. Of
these Murree, Kotli Satian, Kalar Syedan and Kahuta falls in Pahar and Kahru Revenue Assessment Circle.
Upland parts of these tehsils falls in Pahar R.A.C are covered with natural pine forest with Chil, Kail and Fir
as main species. Where as Kahru R.A.C largely carry scrub species such as Kahoo, Phulai and Sanatha. In
other three tehsils natural vegetation is largely composed of scrub sp~cies and some associated species.
Some other tree species abundantly found in Rawalpindi District include Dharek, Eucalyptus, Shisham, Toot
etc. Among the planted species along farmlands, roads, streets, railway tracks and in public parks and
buildings, Eucalyptus (sufeda) is most prominent one.
Legally categories, natural forests are reserved forests (bearing no public rights), protected forests
(bearing limited public rights) and Guzara Forest. These forests are managed by provincial Forest
Department through DFO South Rawalpindi, DFO North Rawalpindi,
DFO Murree and DFO Guzara. The District Government has been transferred no area out of these forests for
the sake of management. District Government Officer Rawalpindi through his establishment will be largely
undertaking forestry operations in private lands and public parks and buildings. Besides, forestry extension
will be among the main responsibility of District Forest Officer.
Total area ofRawalpindi district is 3.405 millions hectares out of which 2.53 millions hectares are
cultivated while 0.875 million hectares are uncultivated. Both the cultivated and uncultivated lands have
great potential for the growing multi beneficial trees. These trees can help to fulfill needs of fuel wood,
fodder, and ornamental trees. Further can playa major role in reducing the contents of hazardous pollutant in
the environment.
OBJECTIVES:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Raising and promotion of roadside plantations
Promotion of social/farm forestry in private sector.
Raising of forest nurseries to cater the needs of seasonal plantings.
Establishment of amenity forests and recreational parks.
Education of public for the tree planting and provision of technical and advisory services on matters of
Afforestation to public as well as other departments in district.
6. Assessment of existing tree cover.
7. Mass media, publicity, conservation of ecosystem, enforcement and planning.
STAFF POSITION:
S.No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Name of Post
District Officer Forest
Forester
Forest Guard
Junior Clerk
Chowkidar
Naib Qasid
Sweeper
Driver
BPS
17
07
05
05
01
01
01
04
Sanction Strength
1
04
12
01
01
01
01
01
Vacant
0
00
02
0
0
0
01
01
YEAR WISE BUDGET ALLOCATION AND UTILIZATION
S.No
01
02
03
04
05
06
Year
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
Salary
968000/1032363/1357600/1322000/1537000/2059000/-
Non-Salary
114000/517100/733900/823000/981000/1113000/-
Total
1082000/1549463/2091500/2145000/2518000/3172000/-
Utilization
1082000/1521556/2072380/2038881/2501252/1380009/-
MAIN FIELD ACTIVITIES / DUTIES PERFORMED BY DISTRICT OFFICE FORESTS RAWALPINDI.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Planting through government departments
Planting through private farmers
Farmers days
Distribution of publication/publicity material
Farmers trained
6. Field days
7. Arrangement of Shajarkari walks.
8. Promoting Amenity Forestry (schools, hospitals etc.)
9. Raising of Nurseries
10. Management of Public parks.
11. Road side / avenue planting
12. Planting of Small / Mini Dam
13. General raid to control illicit movement of timber and complaints.
TREE PLANNING CAMPAIGN:
Tree planting campaigns are arranged twice every year i.e. during spring and monsoon season.
Massive campaign is organized to have maximum tree planting through ffamer at farm and barren lands,
through students and teacher at educational school lands and through health and other departments at various
government and private lands. The efforts are made to make the people tree minded.
A separate tree-planting plan is prepared and implemented during every planting season. A variety of
arrangements are made for the inauguration of tree planting campaign at different places through various
dignitaries. Tree plantation campaign targets are given by Provincial Government for each season which are
achieved 100% accordingly.
Year wise Progress of Tree Plantation Campaign is as under:
S.No
Year
Targets
Achievements
01
2001
100000
100000
02
2002
200000
200000
03
2003
213000
220000
04
2004
350000
360000
05
2005
285000
412000
06
2006
320000
335000
Total
1468000
1627000
YEAR WISE FARMER DAY
S. No
Year
Activitv
01
2001
120 nos
02
2002
140 nos
03
2003
120 nos
04
2004
100 nos
05
2005
130 nos
06
2006
140 nos
Total
750 nos
YEAR WISE DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLICATION/ PUBLICITY MATERIAL:
S.No
01
02
03
04
05
06
Year
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Total
Activity
1500 nos
2000 nos
2200 nos
1800 nos
2400 nos
2500 nos
12400 nos
YEAR WISE FARMER TRAINED
S. No
01
02
03
04
05
06
Year
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Total
Activity
11 00 nos
1200 nos
1350 nos
1300 nos
1500 nos
1487 nos
7937 nos
YEAR WISE FIELD DAYS
S.No
01
02
03
04
05
06
Year
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Total
Activity
25 nos
35 nos
45 nos
50 nos
60 nos
60 nos
275 NOS
PROBLEMS / BOTTLE NECKS
. District roads along with staff have yet not handed over to this office for management and control, while the
same has already taken its route in all the other districts of Punjab. The roadside planting has great
potential for development but no funds has been allocated in this regard so far. This aspect needs due
attention.
2. No funds have been allocated for the raising of forest nurseries since the creation of this office. Although
there is a huge demand of tree saplings by the government departments and farmers of the district.
3. One of the important duties of forestry sector of district government is to establish recreational parks and
amenity forests for general public. The objective could not be achieved due to the non-availability funds.
This aspect needs due attention.
4. Presently, the provincial forest department allows the cuttings of trees in private areas. As provincial
government lacks jurisdiction over these areas, therefore without proper verification felling permits are
issued which results in discriminate felling and diminishing of local flora.
5. Shortage of executive as well as ministerial staff The provincial government maybe requested to fulfill the
desired requirement.
ON GOING PROJECTS
1. Barani Village Development. Programme (ABAD) "Increasing Tree Cover of Farm Lands For
Conservation Of Land And Water Resources In Tehsil Gujar Khan District Rawalpindi
2. Improvement Of Urban Environment Of Rawalpindi Through Amnenity Forestry And Land Scaping.
Funded By Ministry of Environment Islamabad.
PIPE LINE PROJECTS:
1. Establishment and Maintenance of Potted Nursery in Rawalpindi District. Through Dera Programme.
2. Improvement Of Urban Environment Of Rawalpindi / Construction Of Parks In Pp-l & Pp-14
Rawalpindi. Through Ministry Of Environment Islamabad.
3. Increasing Tree Cover, Water Conservation & Mass Awareness On Farm Lands To Improve The
Environmental Status Of Rawalpindi District. Through ABAD Rawalpindi.
BACK GROUND
It is unfortunate that in spite of full scale existing of the factors required for potential
production, Pakistan is lagging behind in the field of agricultural production to the extent that
it is incapable of meeting its own food and fiber requirements. The import of food items
worth millions of rupees has become its constant need. It is not impossible to overcome this
critical situation. There is great potential of not only increasing the agricultural production
both in the irrigated as well as rain fed areas but thousands of reclaimable/barren uncultivated acres can be
brought under cultivation also and utilized for crop production.
Our agriculture depends heavily on irrigation and 80% of the agricultural out put comes from
irrigated agriculture while remaining 20% conies from' rainfed areas. Our country is fading sever water
shortage for the last few years. Lack of water conservation practices, inadequate storage facilities and low
rainfall aggravated this situation.
In this context, the rainfed area in Rawalpindi District is worth special attention. The water resources in these
areas are required to be exploited and the rain water which not only gets lost but also proves to be a cause of
soil erosion in thousands of acres annually is ought to be saved substantially to be utilized for better crop
production. In addition there are hundreds of small and big streams through which a huge amount of water is
either constantly or seasonally flowing but a very little amount .of the same is being utilized for agricultural
production. The area under irrigation is very low. The requirement is, to develop facilities to bring more area
under irrigation for efficient utilization of available water resources.
Item/
Mouza (No.) Union
Tehsils
Gujar
Reported
Councils Area (Ha)
Cultivated Un-
Culture
Area (Ha)
Cultivated
able
Area(Ha)
waste
Forest
Tubwells
384
33
14739
93036
54358
9066
2416
13
Kahuta
270
23
109987
43453
66534
8139
41675
3
Kotli
59
9
22409
7812
14596
4150
-
-
Murree
111
15
38977
12006
26971
2402
10159
-
Rawalpi
358
80
172839
97536
75303
14409
6528
380
Taxila
56
10
30433
16469
13964
1306
1996
604
Total:-
1238
170
522039
270313
251726
39463
72774
1000
Khan
Sattian
ndi
AGRICULTURE PROFILE
Area
5286 Sq. Meter
Command area under Small Dams
3400 Acree
Tube Well Irrigation
2734 Acree
Tube Wells
1000 Nos
Small dams
07 Nos.
Mini dams
86 Nos.
Ponds
70 Nos.
Soan River, Sill River, Khan River, Bunaha River, Gumrah Kass, Guliana Kass, Kanshi Nullah
are important perennial flows in the District. In addition to these flows, there are many unnamed perennial
flows, which can be exploited to irrigate the adjoining areas.
RATIONALE
The major problems of agriculture in District Rawalpindi are:
Area under irrigation is less
Scarcity of water.
Erratic rain fall.
Small and fragmented land holding
Un-leveled fields & barren land.
Lack of awareness among the fanning community about production technology of 4igh value crops and water
is mainly used for growing wheat.
Low water storage capacity.
Low soil fertility and moisture conservation.
Socio economic condition of the farming community.
OBJECTIVES
The objectives of On Farm Water Management are:
Increase agricultural production by developing irrigation facilities in Barani area
Exploit and manage water resources for efficient utilization .of water through installation of
irrigation schemes, construction of water storage tanks and other improved water management
practices to combat drought
Generate employment opportunities in the tural sector
Capacity building for irrigated agriculture, operation and maintenance of the irrigation
schemes
To mobilize the farming communities to share investment cost of irrigation developments in
the area
Functions:
1. Organization of water users associations
2. Development of irrigation schemes
Lift irrigation schemes
gravity irrigation schemes
high efficiency irrigation schemes.
3. Construction of Water Storage Tanks
4. Land development and land Leveling
5. High Efficiency Irrigation Technology (Sprinkler/Drip)
6. Installation of Turbines/Tube wells
7. Construction of Dug Well
8. Construction of Farm Drainage
9. Renting out of Agriculture machinery
10. Rain water harvesting / conservation technology
11. Farm designing and capacity building
MAJOR ACTIVITIES.
The major activities of On Fann Water Management are briefly given below:
1. Organization of Water Users Associations
The fanner are organized and registered as water user association under the water user association act 1981.
The water user associations are responsible to under take all the development works in the field by arranging
all skilled and unskilled labour and supervise the physical works. In National Programme these' Organizations
are also responsible for procurement of all sort of construction material for irrigation schemes. This ensures
participation of the farming community in the developmental works at all level.
2. IRRIGATION SCHEMES
In canal irrigated areas there exist well planned and sanctioned watercourses (open channels) under the
control of irrigation department but in barani areas there is no concept of community watercourses except
Small Dams command areas. Mostly Individual farmers develop their own source of irrigation for their
personal use or at maximum for relatives who share certain piece of land with them. The source of irrigation
could be tubewell, perennial streams? ponds, mini or small dams. If the tubewells ,are installed in relatively
leveled areas, the irrigation by gravity flow is possible. In this situation watercourses (open channel) are
designed and then lined with installation of water control structures. In case where source of irrigation is a
perennial river, or mini dam or pond existing below the actual piece of land to be irrigated, a problem
however remained there, that how the farmers can convey the water to their field those are higher than the
source of irrigation. OFWM solved this problem through lift irrigation schemes by laying underground' pipe
lines right from the water source to the fields where irrigation has to be done.
Irrigation schemes are the development through which multifarious steps are taken to provide the water to the
crops. These irrigation schemes includes:i)
Lifting of the irrigation water from the Smal1/Mini dams, Perennial streams and other low laying
water sources through PVC/G.I pipes by using centrifugal pumps.
ii)
connecting different fields having depression in between through PVC/RCC pipes.
iii)
supplying water to the field of lower or equal evaluation through open channels and
RCC pipes.
3. WATER STORAGE TANKS
In barani area drilling upto desired depth is quit expensive and some times impossible. In this situation
farmers normally dug wells at shallow depths o~ install turbines of small discharges for irrigation purpose.
The discharge is often less to irrigate fields. With a small delivery it takes hour to irrigate a piece of land
which is the wastage of energy and times as direct application of such low discharges results in higher
conveyance and application losses.
To overcome this difficulty the small delivery water is stored in a Water Storage Tank.
When the tank is full, the water is released to thel fields with the desired discharge. This intermittent
releases not only increase the efficiency, but also saves, time and energy. Through Water Storage
Tanks can not irrigate large area but it is quite suitable for! Small 'areas especially for vegetables and
orchards.
4. Land development and Land Leveling
Studies have indicated that a significant (20-25%) amount of water is lost during application at the firm due
to poor farm designing and uneven fields . It has been noted that Most 'of the fanners apply irrigation
i
water until the highest point in the field is covered, which leads to over irrigation. The ultimate effects of over
irrigation!' is wastage of water in burani. Areas where water is already scarce and precious thing. Over
irrigation and complex water supply to higher points is wastage of lot of water, On the; other hand uneven
fields in batahi: areas ate also on; the risk of erosion during heavy rains.
Keeping in view its advantages, the city District govt, Rawalpindi has given due importance to this activity
and managed to purchase new Tractors 'and' Laser equipment alongWith other implements despite its limited
resources. Precise Land Leveling (PLL) operations are now carried out through laser equioment, which helps
to achieve the required degree of precision at lesser cost and efforts. The water is uniformly distributed in the
Leveled fields leading to better germination of seeds. It reduces the loss of plant nutrients and leads to higher
crop yield. Impact studies on laser land leveling reveals that it:1. Reduses the application losses up to 25 %
2. Reduces labour requirement for irrigation up to 35 %
3. Increase crop yield up to 20 %
OFWM staff provide free technical services for surveying, planning , designing and leveling of their firms. In
addition tractors with laser equipment , scraper, front blade and mould boold plought are rented out to farmers
on subsidized rates i.e. Rs. 250/ hour.
Installation of Turbines/Tube Wells
On farm Water Management also deals with augmentation of underground water resources through dug wells
and tube-wells. Under this activity the turbines/tube wells are installed based on the ground water potential of
the area. This activity is focused where surface water is either not available or in-efficient to meet the crop
water requirement. Deep turbines and shallow tube-wells are planned on the basis of feasibility and
requirement of the areas.
Dug wells
Apart from stream flows, small pockets of fresh ground water are also available at certain locations in District
Rawalpindi. Where Dug wells prove to be potential source for irrigation water. If the water is lifted through a
pump installed at this place the water exhaust within a short interval of time because of the fact that water is
collected in such pockets/ aquifers through a very slow horizontal and vertical seepage phenomenon. The
water is, stored/collected in the pit at the lower part of the dug well overnight which is lifted in the day time
with diesel engine pump or electric motor for irrigation.
High efficiency irrigation technology (sprinkler/ Drip):
In rain fed areas, the water being scarce resource demands that it should be used most efficiently for the crop
production with out washing single drop of water. In the undulated lands, gravity irrigation is not possible. If
the soil is sandy it causes heavy loses due to seepage. Barani areas having rich soil could be converted into
highly productive by sprinkler and drip irrigation system and more area can be brought under irrigation with
less quality of water. Sprinkler irrigation is used for growing highly value crops such as orchards, vegetables.
These schemes may be installed at dug, wells, storage reservoirs, mini dams , streams and spring in the rain
fed areas.
Rain Water Harvesting/Conservation Technology
It may be a new term for fanners in Pakistan, but it is not new in developed countries like USA and
Australia where hundred and thousand areas of land have been brought under cultivation after
introduction of this technology. Although the total rain fall in Rawalpindi is enough for crop production
yet the pattern of rainfall is not conductive for better yield. The term rainwater harvesting refer to a set of
activities. It encourages the safe reception of rainfall is encouraged that farmers should not leave the land
follow particularly during heavy rains. In filtration is increased by proper dikes and leveling of fields and the
safe run of is done by construction of spill way structure while save disposal of all flowing water from the
fields to low laying ponds or rives is carried out by planned grass water ways.
In the absence of proper land leveling, deep till age and proper dikes, both water and fertile soils are washed
away every year. In order to make best use of rain water in rain fed areas water harvesting technology sites
can be developed where in rain water form catchments areas are directed towards cropped areas. In small rain
fall areas , micro catchments with in the field can be planned.
9. Farm Designing and Capacity Building
Existing topography of lands and farmers fields in barani areas are not according to the proper design with
respect to irrigation system and water supplies. It is duel to lack of awareness about irrigated agriculture.
Hence farms are designed to bring maximum area under irrigation to minimize the field application loses and
to incrase the water productivity by economizing the available water resources. Farmers are trained for
irrigation agriculture as well as for change of cropping pattern.
Selection Criteria:
Defining a transparent and viable selection criteria is a prerequisite for achieving envisaged benefits from
their from their implementation. An advertise in the national Newspaper is published at start of financial year
for awareness of farming community.
i)
Technical
•
•
•
•
•
•
Availability of water source for maximum period of the like perennial water stream, small
dam, mini dam, water storage tank, pond , tube well and dug- well etc.
Adequate quantity of water for irrigation.
Command areas at least 40 Kanals (5 acers)
Maximum water head/ lift depth of 50 meters.
Output capacity and development status of the land resources.
Implement able with in stipulated time frame.
Maximum weight point = 40
ii)
social
• socially acceptable
• first come first serve basis depending upon the feasibility.
• Formation of water users associations.
• Desirability for development
• Schemes with maximum potential to improve income / livelihood of the community
• Free from any litigation among beneficiaries.
Maximum Weight point= 30
iii) Financial
-Initial and operational cost effectiveness
-Maximum development cost Rs.20000/acre
- Affordable for the farmers to contribute their shate of20% as a total labor charges I
- Availability of material/skilled labor
Maximum weight point
iii)
I
~
= 30
Financial
•
•
•
•
Initial and operational cost effectiveness
Maximum development cost Rs. 20000/acre
Affordable for the farmers to contribute their share of 20 as a total labor charges
Availability of material / skilled labor
Maximum weight point= 30
Note: Any scheme securing 60 points will qualify for development under NPIW
COST SHARING
Approach.
On Farm Water Management follows a bottom-up approach to practice efficient irrigated
agriculture through active involvement of the farming community. Farmers/water users are
initially informed about the objectives of OFWM Program and its expected outcome. Afterwards,
farmers are motivated through repeated follow-up visits to organize themselves into groups and are
registered as water users association (WUAs) under on farm water management and water user’s
association ordinance 1981. the WUAs undertake development works of all the OFWM activities
like irrigation schemes, construction of water storage tanks, drip/Sprinkler irrigation Schemes and
land leveling etc. All of OFWM program to create sense of ownership and possession amongst the
farming community.
In NPIW program this ratio is 80:20. Government provides 80% subsidy and farmers have to bear
20% of the total expenditures in the form of skilled and unskilled labor. Joint accounts are opened
in the bands where funds are transferred in three installments after the verifications of consultants.
Farmers committee finalizes the material rates for construction of schemes and all procurements
are carried out by the farmers.
ACHIEVEMENTS
Completed Projects:
1-
OECF (Japan Assisted) Project.
On farm water management (OFWM) in District Rawalpindi has implemented an OECF (Japan
Assisted) Project from July 1992 to March 2000. The following activities were carried out under
this project:
S.No.
Activities
1
Water
Achievements
Course
Improvement/ 47 Nos.
Irrigation Schemes
2
Demonstration
Centers
(Zero 52
Tillage/ Furrow irrigation)
3
Precision Land Leveling
2270
4
Water Storage Tanks
18 Nos.
5
Water Harvesting Sites
5 Nos.
6
Installation
of
Drip
Irrigation 2 Nos.
Systems
7
Training
of
Water 2560 Nos.
Users/Professionals
Total Area brought under Irrigation.
II-
=
5640 (acres)
DIMRC Programme.
Three schemes were implemented under drought (DIMRC) Program in three year 2002-2005. The
achievements of physical and financial targets in District are given below:Physical Progress of DIMRC, OFWM, Rawalpindi.
S.NO.
Activity
Total Targets
Total
1
2
3
4
1
Installation
of
lift 257
259
lrrigation schemes, water
resources
2
Pressurized
Irrigation
Scheme
3
i)
Sprinkler
3
3
ii)
Drip
3
3
50
51
Water storage Tanks
4
Dug well
24
24
Total area brought under irrigation is 4977 Acres.
FINANCIAL UTILIZATION (MILLION)
Total Amount of Allocation
Rs.53.37 millions
Total Amount Released
Rs.52.13 millions
Total Expenditure
Rs.52.13 millions
256 Nos. of sub-schemes have been developed with and amount of Rs. 52.13 million. The average cost of
development per acre is Rs. 10400/On going projects.
National Program for improvement of water recourses
The NPIW has been launched in District Rawalpindi during 2004-05, for the period of 4 years
with a total targets of 175 irrigation schemes.
The target assigned and completed are as under:•
•
Achievement of targets of Irrigation Scheme during 2004-2005
Achievement of targest of Irrigation Scheme during 2005-06
=
=
25
71
The 100% physical as well financial targets have been completed well in time, for which Rawalpindi District
was declared at NO. 1 in Banni area. Appreciation letters were issued by the provincial as well District
Government for excellent performance.
Based on the achievements of 1st two years, Governmentrdof Punjab has enhanced the targest under NPIW to
130 Irrigation Scheme in District Rawalpindi , for the 3 year, i.e. 2006-07.
MONITORING ARRANGEMENTS
The success of any program is primarily on intensive monitoring of the program. It is important that
functionaries at that level must have clear vision about the program. The role of monitoring functionaries is to
facilitate, keep eye on the work, trouble shoot, avoid delays, ensure adherence to the standards and
specifications, avoid wastage of resources and deep the program on track so that it meets its objectives.
There is an elaborate arrangement for internal and external monitoring and evaluation of OFWM, works being
carried out under different programs. A brief description is given below:i)
Beneficiary Involvement (Cost sharing)
Water user associations (WUA) of farmers are organized at all schemes prior to their development. The
farmers assist OFWM technical staff in survey of command area of irrigation schemes and in the
finalization of its designs. Framers arrange the construction material at site and ensure its quantity/ quality
before making the payments to the suppliers. Farmers carry out execution of works their sites and they
ensure that the execution of civil works have been accomplished according to the standards and
specifications being the payment masters of all skilled and unskilled labor in addition to bearing the cost
of water source and land development. In this way, in execution of schemes, farmers share investment
cost of about 50% and they always try to get best possible quality of work of their sites.
ii)
Supervision by OFWM Staff
Water management officer/Supervisors however provide technical assistance for planning, designing, and
during construction of irrigation schemes and supervise all the execution work as per standards and
specifications. Moreover Assistant Agriculture Engineer, office of the District Officer, OFWM, carries
out inspection of the irrigation schemes from the initial stage of surveying till its final completion i.e.
design approval, spot checking and verification of completion, reports. District Officer, OFWM, at
District level also carries out field inspections to check the physical works in the field.
Besides, Executive District Officer, Agriculture also visit the offices of District Officer, OFWM, and
Deputy District Officers, OFWM, and field works in all thesils. So much so District Coordination Officer,
Rawalpindi himself inspects many sites of OFWM, in the field to check quality and impact of the
schemes.
iii)
Project Management Unit.
In national program for improvement of Watercourse in Pakistan (The Punjab Component), project
management unit has been established to supervise the office record as well as field works to ensure the
completion of this program as per standards and specification.
iv)
Supervisory Consultants
The supervisory consultant is recruited by the government to undertake supervision and monitoring for
third party validation. In National Program for Improvement of Watercourses, “Punjab Water
Management Consultants” has been assigned this job. The consultants are responsible to approve the
design of schemes; spot-checking for quality cont4rol of material and physical works at site and verify the
completion reports.
v)
Performance Evaluation/Impact Assessment
The activities carried out by OFWM, department Rawalpindi have changed the economic condition of the
farmers as they are getting more yields after the installation of irrigation schemes. It has changed the life
style and mind of the people and they are taking more interest in agriculture as ever before, they are
generating their income from the agriculture land and it ahs changed the trend of migration from rural to
urban areas. The employment opportunities have been generated in the rural sector which has supported
the government in providing employment to unemployed persons, because most of the members of the
family and of other families are engaged with this profession.
Agencies like WAPDA, Punjab Economic Research institute (PERI) and P&D had been doing impact
evaluation of different OFWM, activities in the past to determine their overall impact on crop, yield, area
and production etc. similar arrangement in future will also be made.
ORGANIZATION ARRANGEMENTS.
The On Farm Water Management is Component of Agriculture Department. At District level it is under
Executive District Officer, Agriculture. The organizational set up is given as annexure- A.
JURISDICTION
The District Officer. On Farm Water Management covers six Tehsils of District Rawalpindi with three
Deputy district Officer having two tehsils each:
1. Deputy District Officer Rawalpindi
2. Deputy District Officer GujarKhan
3.Deputy District Officer, Taxila
Tehsil, Rawalpindi and Kotli Sattian
Tehsil, Gujar Khan and Kahuta
Tehsil Taxila and Murree
Audit of Accounts
Audit procedure is a regular procedure of OFWM, as well. Detailed audit of 100% expenditure is to be
carried out by A.G, teams. In addition internal audit is also a regular feature of OFWM, activities.
Future vision.
In District Rawalpindi cultivated area is more than 6 lackh acres whereas the area under irrigation is very
less. The area brought under irrigation is given below:1.
2.
3.
4.
The total command area under 6 small dams in Rawalpindi District
Area brought under OFWM, OECF Project (1992-2000)
Area brought under irrigation with DIMRC Project
In NPIW, the area under irrigation in first two year is
= 3400 acre
=5640
=4977 acre
=768 acre
In this way the area brought under irrigation with OFWM, interventions is 11385 acre, which is more
three times the command area of 6 small dams.
The future requirement is to construct;
i)
ii)
iii)
More irrigation schemes are to be developed to convert rainfed agriculture to irrigated agriculture,
so that the agriculture production can be increased.
The maximum use of perennial streams can be made to install bigger community irrigation
schemes as well as small irrigation schemes on individual water sources.
More small dams and mini dams to increase water storage capacity.
CONSTRAINTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
S.NO
1.
ISSUES
Three payment procedure
needs to be revised for barani
area.
2.
Less unit cost of irrigation
schemes and average
procedure in barani area is
different than irrigated area.
3.
Delay in budget release.
4
Deficiency of staff
5.
Non provision of computer,
motorcycles and level sets.
6
Design approval and
verification by PWM
consultant for 2nd installment
delay the pace of work.
Irrigaton schemes with higher
cost are not covered under
NPIW
7
RECOMMENDATIONS
Three payment
procedure may be revised in barani area as under:
• 1stndInstallment
= 70%
• 2rd Installment
=20%
• 3 Installment
=10%
because the material is purchased once due to non-availability
at local level,
Average cost of irrigation scheme is 160,000/- which is less. In
irrigated area against an average unit cost of 0.7 million, the
schemes of 1.4 million have been completed and average is taken
at district level which comes within the limit of 0.7 million. The
same procedure as an average at district level may be adopted in
barani area as well.
Budget may be released as per assigned targets during early part
of the year so that execution of the field work may be smooth and
on time.
Out of total strength of 49 OFWM in Rawalpindi, 10 posts are
vacant at present. There is no additional staff provided in batani
area and programme is being executed with the regular staff only.
Deficiency of staff may hamper the progress and cause difficulty
in achieving the target on time.
New computers motorcycles and level sets have been provided in
irrigated area. Accordingly the same may be provided in burani
area also.
One field engineer consultant be deputed in each case District .
The irrigation schemes with higher most may be covered under
DERA programme. The funds of DERA programme may also be
allocated to on farm water management, Rawalpindi .
DO SOIL CONSERVATION RAWALPINDI.
BRIEF NOTE ON SOIL CONSERVATION IN DISTRICT RAWALPINDI
HISTORY OF DEVELOPMENT.
A Soil Conservation Pilot Project was ~established in 1953 with the help of lCA of U.S.A and a
Directorate of Soil Conservation and Erosion Control was created in Punjab in 1954 within the Forest
Department with "Ws headquarter at Rawalpindi. The Soil Conservation Directorate was taken away from the
Forest Department in 1960 and made a wing of the Agriculture Department. Thus the activities of the Soil
Conservation Directorate continued in the four Provinces on West Pakistan basis till the disintegration of one
unit.
After dissolution of one unit in 1970 the Directorate of Soil Conservation Punjab, which now forms a
Wing of the Agriculture Department, Punjab is functioning largely over the potohar tract, salt range and the
foothills of Dera Ghazi Khan District. The Directorate acts both as an extension service for providing the
advice to the farmers about soil and Water Conservation as well as an operational agency for assisting them in
the Soil Conservation works and practices.
After the implementation of Devolution Programme in 2001 in Punjab, the post of District Officer,
Soil Conservation in Rawalpindi District has been created with Deputy District Officer, Soil Conservation in
Kahuta and Gujar Khan Tehsil carrying out the same functions.
TOPOGRAPHY.
Rawalpindi District comprises Seven Tehsils (Rawalpindi, Jaxila, Murree, G!ljar Khan, Kotli Sattian,
Kallar Saydian and Ka1}.uta) with total area 12,90,013 acres with cultivated area 6,65,560 acres and
uncultivated area 6,24,453 acres.
Rawalpindi District constitutes the e~stern' half of ;the Potohar uplands qnd lies between latitudes 32°
30' and 34° 30' N, and longitudes 72° 30' and 73° 30' E. In the North's and East the area is bounded by the
Himalayan foothills, in the South by the Salt range and in the West by Attock District and the Gandgarh
range.
The High Potwar Plateau represents a synclinal trough between the salt range and the Rawalpindi
foothills, filled with Tertiary and quaternary deposits. The District has a complex geological history of
mountain building, alluvial and loessic depositions and erosional cycles. Interbedded conglomerates,
sandstones, shale' s and siltstones mainly underlie the area of whole district. The Haro and Soan Rivers
comprise the main drainage of the potwar uplands unlike the rivers of the Punjab Plain's; the Potwar Uplands
Rivers are eroding material, not depositing it. The riverbeds lie far below the general level of the land
consequently erosion has been very active in the plains and has resulted in a network of deep gullies.
CLIMATE
The average rainfall in the district varies from about 45 inches in the North's to less than 20 inches in
the South east. The climate of the area is characterized by rainfall from both monsoon and Western
disturbances giving a twin peak type distribution with the maximum precipitation occurring in July to
September. The summers are pleasantly cool (90-100 fO) while winters are severe with considerable frost
and snow in month of January.
OBJECTIVES
The main objectives of the Soil Conservation Department are as under:
i)
To contain soil erosion process in the cultivable areas and the adjoining uncultivated lands and to
save these areas from further degradation through adoption of sustainable soil conservation
program on' catchments/ sub catchments basis.
ii)
To make maximum use of run off by conserving it into the field by various moisture conservation
measures.
iii)
To bring more area under cultivation through reclamation and gully control techniques.
iv)
Exploitation of water resources through various means of providing assured water supply for
irrigation purposes. (Mini Dams, Ponds and Dug wells).
ACTIVITIES:
To achieve the objectives, the following Soil and Water Conservation activities are carried out:
.
i)
TREATMENT OF CULTIVATED LAND:
The cultivated arable land is the most valuable assest in the catchment areas. These lands are situated at
the foot of the hills and are largely sloping. They however have been damaged very severely by sheet and
gully erosion. Their treatment consists in the construction of new terraces, improvement of the existing
terraces strengthening of embankment, construction of water disposal outlets, chiseling and deep ploughing,
introduction of cover' crops, contour ploughing, conservation oriented tillage and practices and introduction of
high yielding varieties of crops. Detailed designs are prepared after studying the condition of each individual
field in each catchment. These operations are supplied by the Govt. to the farmers at subsidized rates at
District level.
ii) Treatment Of Eroded Gullied Land.
The gullies are situated at the lower end of watershed and they conduct the bulk of the rainwater coming
from above. This is a continuous process and keeps the gullies eating back into the arable lands. The eating
back process is so fast that some of the lands which were shown as cultivated fields during the settlement of
1905 did not exist at all during the settlement carried out in 1955. It is, therefore, imperative that the growth
of gullies should be arrested as soon as possible. This is done by diverting the water from the watersheds and
plugging the gullies. The gully plugging serves another may useful purpose of reclaiming valuable
agricultural lands in the beds of gullies. These operations being expensive are carried out after detailed
survey. Proper designs are prepared for the construction of check dams and spillways etc. The technical
advice where required is being\ extended at District level by the experts in line.
iii)Range Improvement Afforestation And Check Damming
The lands situated at higher elevations, in the hills and mountains and those having shallow soil or having
badly cut up topography are suitable only for raising trees, shrubs find grasses for vegetation. Such lands are
generally the communal lands, are overgrazed and denuded. These lands in fact are the source of excessive
run off eroding lands, causing gullies, washing away embankments and structures and silting up water works
finally resulting lip serious soil destruction. To avert this catastrophe, such lands are planted with trees,
grasses bushes etc and check dams are also provided to retard the run off and arrest the sediment load
depending upon t;4e nature of soil. The economical results from such lands accrue after long periods and the
work being of protective nature. These areas after necessary treatment are protected and used for grazing.
iv)Development Of Mini Dams/Ponds
The collection of water into Mint Dams/Ponds is also an improvement measure in reducing run off intensity.
The farmers are encouraged to set up small storages for the dual purpose of drinking water for livestock and
local irrigation. The Ponds and storage tanks are designed after proper survey and investigation.
v)Stream Bank/Kas Traininf!
The hill torrents cause considerable damage through steam bank erosion particularly wren they enter the
arable lands or the plains. Apart from eroding the valuable agricultural lands, they also spread large tman6ties
of sterile sand and debris on the adjoining agricultural fields. The' stream bank erosion is controlled through
the construction of water diversion spurs/walls and planting trees grasses along the bank wherever necessary.
All these activities/interventions are executed with full participation and involvement of farmers/farming
community on 50:50 and 20:80 cost sharing basis. All the expenditure on these activities is incurred by, the
farmer himself under the technical supervision of field staff and after completion 50% or 80% share of the
farmer is reimbursed to him in the form of Bank DraftiRTR/Cheque/Pay Order etc.
ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE TARGETS UNDER DISTRICT RAWALPINDI
a. Projects, completed UP to June 2005
i.
Water Resources Development in District Rawalpindi for Drought Mitigation through Construction of
Mini Dams. Ponds. Due wells etc.
This project was started on 01-07-2002 and completed on 31-12-2004. Total fund allocated under this project
were Rs.20.00 Mil1ion. The Targets al10cated and progress achieved are given below:
Physical Progress
Activities
Targets
Achievement
Construction of Mini Dams(Nos)
16 Nos.
17 Nos.
Development of Ponds
(Nos)
20 Nos.
20 Nos.
Dug Wells
(Nos)
80 Nos.
82 Nos.
Water disposal Outlet
(Acres)
500Acres.
(Nos)
Gul1y Plugging Structure (Acres)
(Nos)
544 Acres
100 Nos
110 Nos.
500Acres.
520 Nos.
50 Nos1
53 Nos.
ii) Improvement of Environmental Conditions and Control of Pollution throu2h various
Soil and Water Conservation measures in District Rawalpindi.
This project was started on 01.09.2004 and completed on 31.12.2004. Total Funds allocated under this
project were Rs.9.076 Million. The Targets allocated and progress achieved is given below:
,.
Physical Progress
Activities
Tar2ets
Construction of Mini Dams(Nos)
8 Nos.
Achievement
6 Nos.
Development of Ponds
(Nos)
10 Nos.
5 Nos.
Dug Wells
(Nos)
90 Nos.
55 Nos.
750 Acres.
108 Acres.
150 Nos.
27 Nos.
Water disposal Outlet
(Acres)
(Nos)
Gully Plugging Structure(Acres)
,
(Nos)
1000 Acres.
100 Nos.
119 Acres
17 Nos.
iii) Normal Pro2ramme for Soil Conservation Works
The total allocation for the normal programme for the year 2004-05 was Rs,2.2 Million. The achievement is detailed
below:
Sr. No.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Name of activities
Targets
Moisture Conservation through wat 250 acrs
bundi & Out let construction
Gully plugging structures
Afforestation
Achievements
250 acrs
135
60
8 No.
10 KM
Ponds
Streem Bank training
135
60
8
10
b. Proiects under Operation
i.
Barani Village area Development Project (BVDP) is under operation in Tehsil Gujar Khan. The upto date
financial & Physical progress of said project is given below:
PHYSICAL ACHIEVEMENT OF BVDP IN GUJAR KHAN AREA
Sr.No
Name of
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
Total
Activities
I.
Mini Dams
(Nos.)
11
08
04
08
31
2.
Ponds (Nos.)
09
06
06
08
29
3.
S.C.Works
(Acres)
Nurseries
(Nos.)
Lift Irrigation
219
210
219
262
910
01
2
02
-
-
-
1
01
50000
87070
175070
4.
5.
02
07
Scheme (Nos.)
6.
Plantation
(Nos.)
-
38000
FINANCIAL ACHIEVEMENTS
1.
S.C.Works
3.960
2.918 Million
Million
2.
Farm
Machinery
-
0.040 Million
1.144
1.903
9.925
MiIlihn
Million
Million
0.012
Million
0.023
Million
Total:-
0.075
Million
10.00
Million
ii. Normal pr02ramme for S.C.Works
The Normal programme for Soil Conservation Works is also under operation.
c. Proposed Action Plan for the Year 2005-06
The detail of the projects submitted for approval is given below:
Sr.
No.
I.
2.
3.
4.
Name of Project
Land Stabilization & Water Pollution Control through Various
Soil & Water Conservation Measures in TehsiI Mun-ee Phase-I.
Water Resources Development in District Rawalpindi through
Construction of Mini Dams, Dug Wells & Ponds under Drought
Impact Mitigation Recovery Component (DIMRC-I1)
!
Programme.
Water Resources Development & Erosion Control in District
I'
Rawalpindi under ADP for the year 2005-06.
Establishment of Forest & Fruit Plants Nursery to ensure the
availability of the plants to the farmers in District Rawalpindi.
Total Cost
Proposed
50.00 Million
Duration
20.00 Million
1 Year
6.50
Million
3.241 Million
1 Year
5 Years
5 Years
7. ORGANIZATION CHART.
Organization chart attached
8. CONSTRAINTS & SOLUTION
i)
staff:
The Staff in the office of the undersigned is short. One post for Deputy District Officer Soil
Conservation at Murree is required and other vacant posts may be filled to overcome this difficulty.
ii) transport
Three Jeeps are available in the office ot undersigned which are not sufficient for field staff. Therefore
more jeeps & Motor Cycles are needed to mobilize the field staff.
9. STAFF INTRODUCTION
Sr.No.
Name of Officers
Designation
1.
Iftikhar Ahmad Qureshi
2.
Zahoor Ahmad Khan
District Officer Soil
Conservation
Rawalpindi.
Soil Conservation
Officer Rawalpindi
Soil Conservation
Officer Taxila
Soil Conservation
Officer
Murree
Deputy District Officer
Soil Conservation
Kahuta
Soil Conservation
Officer Kahuta
Soil Conservation
3.
Shabbar Hussain Shah
4.
Muhammad Rafiq Ch:
5.
Iftikhar Ahmad Qureshi
(Additional Charge)
6.
Sultan Mehmood Nasir
7.
Rana Qaiser Humayyun
Officer Kallar Syedan.
8.
Mehram Khan
Gulshad
Deputy District Officer
Soil Conservation
Gujar Khan
9.
10.
Vacant
Soil Conservation
Vacant
Officer Guiar Khan
Soil Conservation
Officer Doultala
Office
Phone No.
051-9290185
051-9290185
051-9290185
051-3312282
Residence
Phone No.1
Mobile No.
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