ENERGY SLOGAN BANNERS AND POSTERS

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ENERGY SLOGAN BANNERS AND
POSTERS
Lesson Description:
Students will create banners and posters that include original slogans about energy conservation.
Eco-fact:
The US contains 5 percent of the world’s population, but uses about 25 percent of the world’s
energy. That means that a person in the United States uses double the amount of energy someone in
Japan or Germany uses. Scientists say that we could be energy efficient by using half of the energy
we use now while still maintaining a comfortable lifestyle.
Procedure:
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Split the class into groups of 2-4 students.
Have each group brainstorm to develop an original green energy slogan such as:
“Turn Off the Lights, We’ll Be Alright”
“See It On, See It Off”
“Let’s Keep It Cool, While We Are In School”
Once the group has selected a slogan, they create a poster or banner containing their slogan.
Students can decorate the posters or banners with pictures or designs.
Adaptations:
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Students can work in pairs or individually to develop a slogan and create a poster or banner.
Students can create posters or banners in a drawing program on the computer. a slide show
could be made by compiling projects from entire class.
Lesson Type:
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Group Work
Project
Sustainability Topic:
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Energy
Time Needed:
30 minutes
Materials Needed:
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Construction paper or poster board
Coloring utensils
MAKE ENERGY BOARD GAMES
Lesson Description:
Students will create a Candyland style board game to show their knowledge about energy use. They
should include renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, energy saving tips, and energy wasting
habits.
Eco-fact: the energy output of 1 kilowatt of solar energy unit is roughly equivalent to the burning of
170 pounds of coal, which releases 300 pounds of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
Before creating board games:
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Some background information on sources of renewable and nonrenewable energy will be
needed to create board game.
Energy sources can be divided into two groups: renewable and non-renewable. Non-renewable
energy sources, such as fossil fuels, are rapidly being consumed and are causing considerable harm
to the environment. Coal, oil and natural gas are non-renewable energy sources. However,
renewable energy sources are environmentally friendly and replenishable. Renewable energy
sources naturally renew their energy supply. They will never run out of energy. Renewable energy
sources consist of wind energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, biomass (from plants), and
hydropower from water. Both renewable and non-renewable energy sources can produce electricity
and hydrogen, which are secondary energy sources.
These books can be used as resources:
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The Energy for Today series by Tea Benduhn which include: water power; nuclear power; wind
power; solar power; oil, gas, and coal; ethanol and other fuels.
What's so bad about gasoline?: fossil fuels by Anne Rockwell
Our Earth: Clean Energy (scholastic news nonfiction readers) by Peggy Hock
Class will develop a T-chart. Columns will be titled: energy saving tips and energy wasting
habits.
Class will develop a T-chart. Columns will be titled: renewable energy and nonrenewable energy.
Procedure for creating board games:
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Students should be given an energy related quest, journey or scenario to develop as the premise
for their game. For example, players could be travelling along a path starting at a dirty, polluted
city called Smogville and ending at a clean, healthy city called Greenville. On the path players
encounter spaces with environmental do’s and don’ts.
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It should be a game where players can roll dice to progress down a path around the board.
(Note: a game where cards are drawn generates more paper use).
Players can use recycled materials as playing pieces such as caps from milk jugs or old buttons.
Students will draw a path of spaces large enough to hold playing pieces. To keep the game
design and play manageable teacher should determine approximately how many spaces the
game should contain.
Students should identify the start of the path and mark it and end of path and mark it. For
example, the start could be surrounded by the dirty city of Smogville and the end can be in the
pristine city of Greenville. As players move down the path making green choices, the
environment on the board can be getting increasingly clean.
Spaces along the path should contain positive and negative prompts relating to energy use and
the theme of the game:
positive prompt samples:
Shut off lights when leaving room. Move ahead 2 spaces.
Remind mom to turn down thermostat at bedtime. Take an extra turn.
Use rechargeable batteries. Go ahead 1 space.
Negative prompt samples:
Leave television on when leaving room. Lose next turn.
Don’t shut off water while brushing your teeth. Go back 2 spaces.
Keep refrigerator door open for a long time. Go back 3 spaces.
Students will make a rough draft of game and test out the design by playing with classmates to
determine if the spacing works.
Make final draft of game.
After creating board games:
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Students can enjoy playing their own board games with classmates.
Students can swap board games with each other.
Adaptations:
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Students can work in pairs or groups to write riddles.
Lesson Type:
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Project
Sustainability Topic:
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Energy
Waste Reduction
GEF Program Category:
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Green Energy Challenge
Time Needed:
60-90 minutes
RENEWABLE AND
NONRENEWABLE ENERGY
RIDDLES
Lesson Description:
Students will write riddles describing sources of renewable and nonrenewable energy. Students will
give three clues to tell about the source of energy they chose. They will state if the energy is
renewable and nonrenewable.
Eco-fact: only seven percent of the nation’s energy is produced by renewable resources.
Before writing activity:
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Some background information on sources of renewable and nonrenewable energy will be
needed to write the riddle.
Energy sources can be divided into two groups: renewable and non-renewable. Non-renewable
energy sources, such as fossil fuels, are rapidly being consumed and are causing considerable harm
to the environment. Coal, oil and natural gas are non-renewable energy sources. However,
renewable energy sources are environmentally friendly and replenish able. Renewable energy
sources naturally renew their energy supply. They will never run out of energy. Renewable energy
sources consist of wind energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, biomass (from plants), and
hydropower from water. Both renewable and non-renewable energy sources can produce electricity
and hydrogen, which are secondary energy sources.
These books can be used as resources:



The Energy for Today series by Tea Benduhn which include: water power; nuclear power; wind
power; solar power; oil, gas, and coal; ethanol and other fuels.
What’s so bad about gasoline?: Fossil Fuels by Anne Rockwell
Our Earth: Clean Energy (scholastic news nonfiction readers) by Peggy Hock
Writing activity:
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Students will choose a source of renewable and nonrenewable energy.
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They will write 3 statements and ask one question. One sentence should state if the chosen
source is renewable and nonrenewable energy. Use first person point of view. Students can tell
how the energy is used and where it is found.
For example:
I can provide heat for your house when I’m burned in your furnace.
I am taken from the earth.
I am a nonrenewable energy source.
What am I?
After writing activity:
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Students can share riddles with classmates. Classmates can try to identify the type of renewable
and nonrenewable energy described in the riddle.
Adaptations:
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Students can work in pairs or groups to write riddles.
Students can write more than 3 sentences of clues.
Lesson Type:
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Group Work
Other
Sustainability Topic:
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Energy
GEF Program Category:
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Waste Reduction Challenge
Green Energy Challenge
Time Needed:
30 minutes
MAKE REMINDER PLATES FOR
LIGHT SWITCHES AND
THERMOSTATS
Lesson Description:
Students will create reminder plates to be hung by light switches and thermostats in their homes or
classrooms. They can make their own original designs or embellish the templates provided below.
Eco-fact: Compact fluorescent light bulbs not only last longer, they are more energy efficient than
incandescent bulbs.
Before activity:
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The US Department of Energy suggests these thermostat temperatures.
Winter: 68 degrees while you are awake, 53 to 58 while you are asleep or away. You can easily
save energy in the winter by setting the thermostat to 68°f while you're awake and setting it
lower while you're asleep or away from home. By turning your thermostat back 10°–15° for 8
hours, you can save about 5%–15% a year on your heating bill—a savings of as much as 1% for
each degree if the setback period is eight hours long.
Summer: 78 degrees while you are home, higher when you are gone. In the summer you can
follow the same strategy with central air conditioning. Keep your house warmer than normal
when you are away and lower the thermostat setting to 78°f (26°c) only when you are at home
and need cooling.
Procedure:
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For a measuring activity students can measure drawing paper or cardboard and cut to these
specifications:
o Paper or cardboard cut into 2 inch by 3 inch rectangles for light switch
o Paper or cardboard cut into 6 inch by 4 inch rectangles for thermostat
Students can write the following messages on the reminder cards:
o Always turn off the lights when not in use.
o Use natural daylight as much as possibe.
o (For winter) set your thermostat to 68 degrees while you are awake and 53-58 degrees
while you are asleep or away.
o (For summer) keep your house warmer than normal when you are away and lower the
thermostat setting to 78°f only when you are at home and need cooling.
Students can design and draw small pictures or logos to decorate their reminder plates.
Adaptations:
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Students can use the provided cards to below and add their own art work. the illustrated version
below can be shown to students as examples for art work.
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Teacher can provide younger students with pre-cut pieces of paper and cardboard. Students can
write a sentence and decorate reminder cards.
Lesson Type:

Project
Sustainability Topic:
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Energy
GEF Program Category:
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Green Energy Challenge
Time Needed:
30 minutes
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