SYLLABUS Fall 2018 EST202

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EST 202 Introduction to Science Technology and Society Studies
Fall 2018
M/W/F 10-11
M/W: Melville Library W4540
F: (old) Comp Sci 1310
Instructor:
David J. Tonjes
Department of Technology and Society
(old) Comp Sci 1424
631-632-8518
[email protected]
Office Hours: M/F 11:30-1
or by appointment (see the calendar hanging on my door)
Course Description:
An introduction to the interrelationship between science and technology as dynamic and
inseparable. Discusses the concepts, framework, and context of science-technology studies.
Includes ethical issues, social influences, and public policies as they influence and interact with
the social management of science and technology.
Required Texts:
Kidder, T. 1981. The Soul of a New Machine. Little, Brown and Co., Boston, MA. Some
copies in the library. Available in paperback & hardcover, new & used.
Weinersmith, K., and Z. Weinersmith. 2017. Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies that Will
Improve and/or Ruin Everything. Penguin Press, NY. Available everywhere (except
the SBU library; available from other public libraries).
Attendance counts!
All three exams will be essays (10/3, 11/7, 12/5). The exams are open book. Guest lecturer
material may be included on exams.
You have two choices for the term paper:
1) Explain how the engineering team from Soul of a New Machine was able to create a new
computer. Recapitulation of the story line is not sufficient: I expect insight and analysis.
2) Select a technology discussed in Soonish. Explain more than Soonish about the technical
and social factors that make it likely your selected technology will or won’t be
implemented in the short term. Please cite all information you use that was not contained
in Soonish, using a good referencing style.
Your paper should be about 5 pages long, 2x spacing. It is due Dec 14 by 4 pm. Late penalties
will be harsh. The term paper must be submitted through BlackBoard.
Quizzes will occur on Mondays at the beginning of class. They cannot be made up. Be on time to
class. Collaboration is encouraged for quizzes. You can also use any resource you like (phones,
etc.) to find answers to the quizzes.
Homework: there are two continuing, semester-long homework assignments, both similar in
nature. Late submissions will be penalized.
Soonish homeworks: due every Wed 9/5 through 11/14, plus 11/28. Write a couple of paragraphs
that persuade me you read the material.
Kidder homework: a 1-page summary of Kidder readings. Homework is due when your group
meets. The class will be split into three groups (A, B & C). A seminar will be held on Kidder
readings each Friday (and one Wednesday in late November for Group A).
Kidder Groups (by last names): Group A: A-G; Group B: H-L; Group C: M-Z
Do not collaborate on homework, exams, or your paper.
Nota Bene: Powerpoints will not be provided! You must come to class & take notes.
Grading Basis:
In-class Exams (3):
Homework:
Quizzes:
B+: 80-84
C+: 65-69
45%
10%
10%
A: 90+
B: 75-79
C: 60-64
F: <60
Term paper
Attendance:
30%
5%
A-: 85-89
B-: 70-74
Original Course Schedule
Week
Mondays:
Theory (lectures)
Wednesdays:
(Mostly) Technology
Examples, but Exams too
8/27, 8/29,
8/31
9/5, 9/7
9/10, 9/12,
9/14
9/17, 9/19,
9/21
9/24, 9/26,
9/28
10/1, 10/3,
10/5
10/10, 10/12
10/15,
10/17, 10/19
10/22,
10/24, 10/26
10/29,
10/31, 11/2
11/5, 11/7,
11/9
11/12,
11/14, 11/16
11/19,
11/21, 11/23
11/26,
11/28, 11/30
12/3, 12/5,
12/7
12/10,
12/12, 12/14
Introduction
XXX (Labor Day)
What is Technology
Tonjes: extra talk on home
solar energy
What is Science (lecture)
Speaker TBD
Ch 1
Ch 2
B (P, 1)
C (P, 1)
What is STS
Ethics Concepts (lecture)
Ch 3
A (2-4)
Ethics and
Technology
First World-Third
World
XXX (Fall Break)
Health Tools
Raphael Apeaning
Ch 4
B (2-4)
Exam 1
Ch 5
C (2-4)
Health & History (lecture)
Lori Clark
Ch 6
Ch 7
A (5-8)
B (5-8)
Medicine
Yiyi Wang
Ch 8
C (5-8)
Health & the Future I
Health and the Future II
(lecture)
Exam 2
Ch 9
A (9-13)
Ch 10
B (9-13)
Energy and the
Environment
Climate Change
Firman Firmansyah
Ch 11
C (9-13)
Energy Technology &
the Future
The Cell Phone
A (14-16, E)
Exam 3
C (14-16, E)
The Future
XXX
Papers due, 5 pm
Energy
Soonish
Chapters
due
(Wed)
Fridays:
(Chapters)
(in CS 1410)
A (P, 1)
XXX (Thanksgiving)
Ch 12
B (14-16, E)
Course Schedule changed late October
Week
Mondays:
Theory (lectures)
Wednesdays:
(Mostly) Technology
Examples, but Exams too
8/27, 8/29,
8/31
9/5, 9/7
9/10, 9/12,
9/14
9/17, 9/19,
9/21
9/24, 9/26,
9/28
10/1, 10/3,
10/5
10/10, 10/12
10/15,
10/17, 10/19
10/22,
10/24, 10/26
10/29,
10/31, 11/2
11/5, 11/7,
11/9
11/12,
11/14, 11/16
11/19,
11/21, 11/23
11/26,
11/28, 11/30
12/3, 12/5,
12/7
12/10,
12/12, 12/14
Introduction
XXX (Labor Day)
What is Technology
Tonjes: extra talk on home
solar energy
What is Science (lecture)
Speaker TBD
Ch 1
Ch 2
B (P, 1)
C (P, 1)
What is STS
Ethics Concepts (lecture)
Ch 3
A (2-4)
Ethics and
Technology
First World-Third
World
XXX (Fall Break)
Health Tools
Raphael Apeaning
Ch 4
B (2-4)
Exam 1
Ch 5
C (2-4)
Health & History (lecture)
Lori Clark
Ch 6
Ch 7
A (5-8)
B (5-8)
Medicine
Yiyi Wang
Ch 8
C (5-8)
Health & the Future I
Health and the Future II
(lecture)
Exam 2
Ch 9
A (9-13)
Ch 10
B (9-13)
Energy
Energy and the
Environment
No Class (Prof. in
Saratoga)
Energy Technology &
the Future
The Cell Phone
The Future
Soonish
Chapters
due
(Wed)
A (P, 1)
Ch 11
Climate Change (lecture)
(with quiz!)
XXX (Thanksgiving)
A (14-16, E)
Fridays:
(Chapters)
(in CS 1410)
Ch 12
C (9-13)
B (14-16, E)
Exam 3
C (14-16, E)
XXX
Papers due, 5 pm
Americans with Disabilities Act: If you have a physical, psychological, medical or learning
disability that may impact your course work, please contact Disability Support Services,
ECC(Educational Communications Center) Building, Room 128, (631)632-6748. They will
determine with you what accommodations, if any, are necessary and appropriate. All information
and documentation is confidential.
Academic Integrity: Each student must pursue his or her academic goals honestly and be
personally accountable for all submitted work. Representing another person's work as your own
is always wrong. Faculty are required to report any suspected instances of academic dishonesty to
the Academic Judiciary. Faculty in the Health Sciences Center (School of Health Technology &
Management, Nursing, Social Welfare, Dental Medicine) and School of Medicine are required to
follow their school-specific procedures. For more comprehensive information on academic
integrity, including categories of academic dishonesty, please refer to the academic judiciary
website at http://www.stonybrook.edu/uaa/academicjudiciary/
Plagiarism on the term paper will be actively searched for, and any incidents of submitting
work that is not your own will not only result in a 0 for the paper but will also be
prosecuted through the formal CEAS process (resulting in Q-grades, loss of academic
scholarship opportunities, and forfeiture of honors designations, among other evils).
Therefore, only submit work that you have created yourself.
Critical Incident Management: Stony Brook University expects students to respect the rights,
privileges, and property of other people. Faculty are required to report to the Office of University
Community Standards any disruptive behavior that interrupts their ability to teach, compromises
the safety of the learning environment, or inhibits students' ability to learn. Faculty in the HSC
Schools and the School of Medicine are required to follow their school-specific procedures.
Further information about most academic matters can be found in the Undergraduate Bulletin,
the Undergraduate Class Schedule, and the Faculty-Employee Handbook.
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