To Kill a Mockingbird Project (Upon completion of/in conjunction with chapters 22-31)

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To Kill a Mockingbird
Chapters 22-31
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts,
and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization,
and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.7
Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life
story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each
account.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.A
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study;
explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other
research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of
ideas
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word
choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place;
how it sets a formal or informal tone).
Laurie Edminster
To Kill a Mockingbird
Name ___________________
Chapters 22-31 Assessment
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
PICTURE THIS
In no fewer than 3 sentences, create a caption for the following
images from the Maycomb Tribune. Remember that your goal is to
illustrate your comprehension and understanding of the novel.
1.
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2.
While awaiting an appeal to his conviction,
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3.
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4.
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To Kill a Mockingbird
Journal Topics
Complete each of the following
prompts, making text-to-self and/or
text-to-world connections. Each of
your entries should be ¾ of a page,
containing minimal errors.
Chapters 22-31
A. Write about a time when someone did something “above and beyond” for you.
B. Describe a time when you were truly afraid of another person or for someone else.
C. Rite of Passage A rite of passage is an event in our lives that marks our going from one
stage of life to the next. Describe a significant rite of passage from your life.
SCORE
SelfDirected
Responder
(4)
Quality
Responses are fully
developed and clearly on
topic. Includes 100% of
required entries with
concrete details of support.
Connections
Student clearly
makes a text-to-self
or text-to-world
connection.
Reflection
Student has made
an excellent attempt
to reflect on
meaning, theme,
message, or issue of
the text.
Maturing
Responder
(3)
Responses are acceptably
developed and remain on
topic for the most part.
Includes 80% of required
entries with concrete details
of support.
Student makes a
text-to-self or textto-world
connection.
Student has made
an acceptable
attempt to reflect
on meaning, theme,
message, or issue of
the text.
Emerging
Responder
(2)
Responses are
underdeveloped but remain
on topic for the most part.
Less fully developed than
higher levels.
Student attempts to
make a text-to-self
or text-to-world
connection.
Student has made a
partial attempt to
reflect on meaning,
theme, message, or
issue of the text.
Novice
Responder
(1)
Responses are
underdeveloped and do not
remain on topic. Responses
are brief.
Student makes no
attempt to make a
text-to-self or textto-world
connection.
Student has made
no attempt to
reflect on meaning,
theme, message, or
issue of the text.
Originality
Responses show
deep, critical
thinking that digs
below the surface
meaning of the text.
Development of an
individual response
style.
Responses attempt
critical thinking that
digs below the
surface meaning of
the text. Similar to
what other
responders may
share.
Responses attempt
critical thinking that
digs below the
surface meaning of
the text. Struggles to
develop original
responses.
Response is shallow.
Understands only
the literal surface
meaning of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the
effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
Making Connections
The Changing Composition of the American Jury
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Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.7
Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a
person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details
are emphasized in each account.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.A
Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly
draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic
or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
You will be reading The Changing Composition of the American Jury by Nancy S.
Marder, Chicago-Kent College of Law.


As you read, annotate the changes in the US jury system. [10 pints]
You will need to be prepared to discuss text-to-text (article – To Kill a
Mockingbird) and text-to-world connections.
Literary Elements at Work: Chapters 22-31
Craft and Structure:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word
choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place;
how it sets a formal or informal tone).
A. Irony – when something different from the expected occurs
B. Juxtaposition – placing two opposing terms, ideas, images, etc., in
close proximity for profound effect
C. Metaphor – comparing two unlike things without using like or as
D. Symbol - an object representing another to give it an entirely
different meaning that is much deeper and more significant
E. Theme – central idea, point, or topic
Using the definitions above, write a brief explication of the examples from
this section. (30 points)
1. Chapter 22
“It was Jem’s turn to cry. His face was streaked with angry tears as we made our way through the
cheerful crowd.” [B]
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2. Chapter 23
Mr. Ewell was a veteran of an obscure war.
[C]
Jem, see if you can stand in Bob Ewell’s shoes a minute
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3. The one place where a man ought to get a square deal is in a courtroom, be he any color of
the rainbow, but people have a way of carrying their resentments right into a jury box. As you
grow older, you’ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you
something and don’t you forget it— whenever a white man does that to a black man, no
matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is
trash... [E]
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4. Chapter 25
Atticus had used every tool available to free men to save Tom Robinson, but in the secret
courts of men’s hearts Atticus had no case. Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella
Ewell opened her mouth and screamed. [C]
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5. Chapter 26 [A]
“Equal rights for all, special privileges for none,’” I quoted.
“Very good, Jean Louise, very good,” Miss Gates smiled. In front of DEMOCRACY, she
printed WE ARE A. “Now class, say it all together, ‘We are a democracy.’” We said
it. Then Miss Gates said, “That’s the difference between America and Germany. We
are a democracy and Germany is a dictatorship. Dictator-ship,” she said. “Over here
we don’t believe in persecuting anybody. Persecution comes from people who are
prejudiced. Prejudice,” she enunciated carefully.
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6. Chapter 30 [D]
Atticus sat looking at the floor for a long time. Finally he raised his head. “Scout,” he
said, “Mr. Ewell fell on his knife. Can you possibly understand?” Atticus looked like
he needed cheering up. I ran to him and hugged him and kissed him with all my might.
“Yes sir, I understand,” I reassured him. “Mr. Tate was right.” Atticus disengaged himself
and looked at me. “What do you mean?” “Well, it’d be sort of like shootin‘ a mockingbird,
wouldn’t it?”
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CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.5
Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots),
and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.7
Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is
emphasized or absent in each treatment
In his poem “The Swimmers,” Allen Tate depicts with chilling awareness the grim aftermath of a lynching
in 1911 Kentucky, just 20 some odd years before To Kill a Mockingbird takes place. Compare the poem’s
theme, narrative, and story-telling methods to that of Scout’s. How does the poem, like Lee’s novel,
employ two points of view? Where does the first point of view stop and the second begin?
The Swimmers
Allen Tate
SCENE: Montgomery County,
Kentucky, July 1911
Kentucky water, clear springs: a boy fleeing
To water under the dry Kentucky sun,
His four little friends in tandem with him, seeing
Long shadows of grapevine wriggle and run
Over the green swirl; mullein under the ear
Soft as Nausicaä’s palm; sullen fun
Savage as childhood’s thin harmonious tear:
O fountain, bosom source undying-dead
Replenish me the spring of love and fear
And give me back the eye that looked and fled
When a thrush idling in the tulip tree
Unwound the cold dream of the copperhead.
-- Along the creek the road was winding; we
Felt the quicksilver sky. I see again
The shrill companions of that odyssey:
Bill Eaton, Charlie Watson, “Nigger” Layne
The doctor’s son, Harry Duèsler who played
The flute; and Tate, with water on the brain.
Dog-days: the dusty leaves where rain delayed
Hung low on poison-oak and scuppernong,
And we were following the active shade
Of water, that bells and bickers all night long.
“No more’n a mile,” Layne said. All five stood still.
Listening, I heard what seemed at first a song;
Peering, I heard the hooves come down the hill.
The posse passed, twelve horse; the leader’s face
Was worn as limestone on an ancient sill.
Then, as sleepwalkers shift from a hard place
In bed, and rising to keep a formal pledge
Descend a ladder into empty space,
We scuttled down the bank below a ledge
And marched stiff-legged in our common fright
Along a hog-track by the riffle’s edge:
Into a world where sound shaded the sight
Dropped the dull hooves again; the horsemen came
Again, all but the leader. It was night
Momently and I feared: eleven same
Jesus-Christers unmembered and unmade,
Whose Corpse had died again in dirty shame.
The bank then levelling in a speckled glade,
We stopped to breathe above the swimming-hole;
I gazed at its reticulated shade
Recoiling in blue fear, and felt it roll
Over my ears and eyes and lift my hair
Like seaweed tossing on a sunk atoll.
I rose again. Borne on the copper air
A distant voice green as a funeral wreath
Against a grave: “That dead nigger there.”
The melancholy sheriff slouched beneath
A giant sycamore; shaking his head
He plucked a sassafras twig and picked his teeth:
“We come too late.” He spoke to the tired dead
Whose ragged shirt soaked up the viscous flow
Of blood in which It lay discomfited.
A butting horse-fly gave one ear a blow
And glanced off, as the sheriff kicked the rope
Loose from the neck and hooked it with his toe
Away from the blood. – I looked back down the slope:
The friends were gone that I had hoped to greet. –
A single horseman came at a slow lope
And pulled up at the hanged man’s horny feet;
The sheriff noosed the feet, the other end
The stranger tied to his pommel in a neat
Slip-knot. I saw the Negro’s body bend
And straighten, as a fish-line cast transverse
Yields to the current that it must subtend.
The sheriff’s Goddamn was a murmured curse
Not for the dead but for the blinding dust
That boxed the cortège in a cloudy hearse
And dragged it towards our town. I knew I must
Not stay till twilight in that silent road;
Sliding my bare feet into the warm crust,
I hopped the stonecrop like a panting toad
Mouth open, following the heaving cloud
That floated to the court-house square its load
Of limber corpse that took the sun for shroud.
There were three figures in the dying sun
Whose light were company where three was crowd.
My breath crackled the dead air like a shotgun
As, sheriff and the stranger disappearing,
The faceless head lay still. I could not run
Or walk, but stood. Alone in the public clearing
This private thing was owned by all the town,
Though never claimed by us within my hearing.
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