virtusa paper3 ans

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Qn.1
Section 1: English [ 20 questions, 30 minutes]
Read the comprehension and answer the questions that follow:
The strength of the electronics industry in Japan is the Japanese ability to organise production
and marketing rather than their achievements in original research. The British are generally
recognised as a far more inventive collection of individuals, but never seem able to exploit what
they invent. There are many examples, from the TSR Z hovercraft, high speed train and Sinclair
scooter to the Triumph, BSA and Norton Motorcycle which all prove this sad rule. The Japanese
were able to exploits their strengths in marketing and development many years ago, and their
success was at first either not understood in the West or was dismissed as something which could
have been produced only at their low price. They were sold because they were cheap copies of
other people's ideas churned out of a workhouse which was dedicated to hard grind above all
else.
It is evident from the passage that the strength of a country's industry depends upon
original research
international cooperation
dedicated workforce
electronic development
Qn.2
The sad rule mentioned in this passage refers to
the inability of the Japanese to be inventive like the British
the inability of the British to be industrious like the Japanese
the lack of variety in Japanese inventions
the poorer marketing ability of British
Qn.3
The TSR Z hovercraft, high speed train, Sinclair scooter etc. are the symbols of
Japanese success
British failure
British success
Japanese failure
Qn.4
According to the passage, prosperity in industry depends upon
productivity
inventiveness
marketing ability
official patronage
Qn.5
The main theme of this passage is
electronic industry in Japan
industrial comparison between Japan and Britain
the role of marketing efficiency in industrial prosperity
the importance of original research in industry
Qn.6
Read the comprehension and answer the questions that follow:
Scientism has left humanity in our technical mastery of inanimate nature, but impoverished us in
our quest for an answer to the riddle of the universe and of our existence in it. Scientism has
done worse than that with respect to our status as social beings, that is, to our life with our fellow
human beings. The quest for the technical mastery of social life, comparable to our mastery over
nature, did not find scientism at a loss for an answer: reason suggested that physical nature and
,social life were fundamentally alike and therefore proposed identical methods for their
domination. Since reason in the form of causality reveals itself most plainly in nature, nature
became the model for the social world and the natural sciences the image of what the social
sciences one day would be. According to scientism, there was only one truth; the truth of
science, and by knowing it, humanity would know all. This was, however, a fallacious argument.
Its universal acceptance initiated an intellectual movement and a political technique which
retarded, rather than furthered, human mastery of the social world.
The analogy between the natural and social worlds is mistaken for two reasons. On the one hand
human action is unable to model the social world with the same degree of technical perfection
that is possible in the natural world. On the other hand, the very notion that physical nature is the
embodiment of reason, from which the analogy between natural and social words derives, is
invalidated by modem scientific thought itself.
Physical nature, as seen by the practitioner of science consists of a multitude of isolated facts
over which human action has complete control. We know that water boils at a temperature of
212 degrees Fahrenheit, and by exposing it to this temperature; we can make it boil at will. All
practical knowledge of physical nature and all control over it are essentially of this same kind.
Scientism proposed that the same kind of knowledge and of control held true for the social
world. The search for a single cause, in the social sciences, was but a faithful copy of the method
of the physical sciences. Yet in the social sphere, the logical coherence of the natural sciences
finds no adequate object, and there is no single cause by the creation of which one can create a
certain effect at will. Any single cause in the social sphere can entail an indefinite number of
different effects, and the same effect can spring from an indefinite number of different effects,
and the same effect can spring from an indefinite number of different causes.
In the passage, the author is most concerned with doing which of the following?
Upholding the primacy of reason over superstition
Attacking a particular approach to the social sciences
Answer:
Attacking a particular approach to the social sciences
Explanation:
In the passage, the author is most concerned with attacking a particular approach to
the social sciences. As in the 1 st sentence of the passage he rightly quotes -"Scientism has left humanity in our technical mastery of inanimate nature".
Similarly the remaining options (1,3, 4) have no proper thematic concern to the
passage too.
Describing a method for achieving control over human social behaviour
Demonstrating the superiority of the social sciences over the natural sciences.
Qn.7
As used In the passage, the term scientism' can best be defined as
belief that the methods of the physical sciences can be applied to all fields of
inquiry.
Answer:
belief that the methods of the physical sciences can be applied to all fields of
inquiry.
Explanation:
As the author has used many more philosophical treatments regarding the term
scientism in this passage even he points out the figurative concept of this term in
the 2 nd paragraph. For instance
faith that human beings can master their own physical limitations
desire to keep the social sciences separate from the physical sciences.
opinion that scientists must take moral responsibility for their actions.
Qn.8
Which of the following statements about scientism is best supported by the passage?
Scientism provides the basis for mastery of the social world.
Scientism is only is only superficially concerned with cause-and-effect relationships
Scientism is poorly suited to explain social behaviour
Answer:
Scientism is poorly suited to explain social behaviour
Explanation:
Option 1 is not completed to fit for the question. Option 2 is also not related to the
question as well as to the passage. 4 directly denies the fact. But the option 3 is
suitable to the passage where the author states about it
Scientism is no longer applicable to the study of the natural sciences
Qn.9
According to the author, causes and effects in the social world are
unrelated to each other
difficult to identify or predict
Answer:
difficult to identify or predict
Explanation:
According to the author, causes and effects in the social world are difficult to
identify or predict. He has given the reason about it in the last paragraph of the
passage---"Any single cause in the social sphere can entail an indefinite number of
different effects, and the same effect can spring from an indefinite number of
different effects, and the same effect can spring from an indefinite number of
different causes."
subject to manipulation at will
reducible to single cause for each effect
Qn.10
The author's attitude toward the application of scientism to the social sciences is best described
as one of:
committed scrutiny
dismissal
criticism
Answer:
criticism
Explanation:
As this passage is a lucid and coherent criticism regarding scientism. The author
lucidly explains the technical theorems about the term scientism. Obviously the
author is not going to scrutinize, approve, or even dismiss the matter. Hence the
approval
Qn.11
Fill in the blank with the appropriate word.
Why are your hands so dirty? - I _______________ in the garden.
was working
have worked
worked
have been working
Qn.12
Did you remember __________ the door?
lock
to lock
locking
having locked
Qn.13
In my opinion, Sophia Loren is _______________ beautiful woman.
very
a very
an extremely
extremely
Qn.14
He drove the car ____________ the garage and left for work
into
out
out of
outside
Qn.15
Jack told her that he ____________ come the next day.
is going to
will come
wants
was going to
Qn.16
Where do you think Anne was yesterday evening? - She ______________ at home.
must have been
had to be
couldn't have been
hadn't to be
Qn.17
_________________, we won't have much to talk about.
If he not comes
Unless he comes
If he didn't come
If he came
Qn.18
I could hardly ________ the ship in the distance.
look out
make out
make up
see out
Qn.19
He has ___________ in continuing the project.
no interesting
no interest
not interest
no interested
Qn.20
In graphs, A hyperedge is an edge that is allowed to take on any number of _____________
Vertices
edges
both a and b above
labels
Qn.21
Section 2 : Logical Reasoning [ 30 questions, 30 minutes ]
Select the alternative that logically follows the two given statements.
a. No computers are televisions.
b. All cathode ray tubes are televisions.
All cathode ray tubes are computers
No cathode ray tubes are computers
All computers are cathode ray tubes
No valid conclusion possible
Qn.22
a. All schools are buildings.
b. Some schools are tents.
No buildings are tents
Not all buildings are tents
At least some buildings are tents
No valid conclusion possible
Qn.23
a. Some cars are four whealers.
b. All cars are three whealers.
No three wheelers are four wheelers
All four wheelers are three wheelers
At least some three wheelers are four wheelers
No valid conclusion possible
Qn.24
a. No *** are ###.
b. Some ^^^^ are ###.
All ^^^^ are no ***
Some *** are no ^^^^
At least some ^^^^ are no ***
No valid conclusion possible
Qn.25
a. All car drivers are environmental polluters.
b. All detergents are environmental polluters.
Some detergents are environmental polluters
All car drivers are detergents
No car driver is a detergent
No valid conclusion is possible
Qn.26
Statement: An advertisement of a Bank, "Want to open a bank account! Just dial our "room
service" and we will come at your doorstep".
Asumptions:
I. There is a section of people who requires such service at their home.
II. Now-a-days banking has become very competitive.
If only assumption I is implicit;
If either I or II is implicit;
If only assumption II is implicit;
If neither I nor II is implicit;
Qn.27
Statement: All the employees are notified that the organization will provide transport facilities
at half the cost from the nearby railway station to the office except those who have been
provided with travelling allowance.
Assumptions:
I. Most of the employees will travel by the office transport.
II. Those who is provided with travelling allowance will not read such notice.
If only assumption I is implicit;
If either I or II is implicit;
If only assumption II is implicit;
If neither I nor II is implicit;
Qn.28
Statement: If it is easy to become engineer, I don’t want to be an engineer.
Assumptions:
I. All individual aspires to be professional.
II. One desire to achieve a thing which is hard earned.
If only assumption I is implicit;
If either I or II is implicit;
If only assumption II is implicit;
If neither I nor II is implicit;
Qn.29
In each question, a statement is followed by two assumptions numbered I and II. Consider the
statement and the following assumptions to decide which of the assumptions is implicit in the
statement.
Statement: Like a mad man, I decided to follow him,
Assumptions:
I. I am not a mad man
II. I am a mad man.
If only assumption I is implicit;
If either I or II is implicit;
If only assumption II is implicit;
If neither I nor II is implicit;
Qn.30
Study the following in formation carefully and answer the question given below them:
(i) A certain city is served by six subway lines, designated by the letters A, B and C, and the
numbers 1,2 and 3.
(ii) When it snows, morning service on the B line is delayed.
(iii) When it rains or snows, service on the A, 2 and 3 lines is delayed both in the morning as
well as in the afternoon.
(iv) When the temperature drops below 30o F, afternoon service if cancelled on either the A line
or the 3 line, but not both.
(v) When the temperature rises above 90o F, afternoon service is cancelled on either the C line or
the 3 line, but not both.
(vi) When service on the A line is cancelled, service on the C line, which connects the A line, is
delayed
(vii) When service on the 3 line is cancelled, service on the B line which connects the 3 line, is
delayed.
On January 10, with the temperature at 15o F, it snows all day. On how many lines will the
service be affected, both in the morning as well as in the afternoon?
3
2
4
5
Qn.31
On August 15, with the temperature at 97o F, it begins to rain at 1 p.m. What is the minimum
number of lines on which the service will be affected?
3
2
4
5
Qn.32
On which of the following occasions would service on the least number of lines be disrupted?
A snowy morning with temperature 45o F
A snowy afternoon with temperature 45o F
A rainy morning with temperature 45o F
A snowy afternoon with temperature 20o F
Qn.33
A chemical company recently introduced a new type of foam spray that it claims will reduce the
rate of erosion from walls of road cuts. A study by the company showed that the rate of erosion
was low on a road cut where the from was applied.
Which of the following, if true, would most seriously weaken the company's conclusion?
Because the foam itself weathers, the foam would have to be reapplied every four
years in order to maintain protection against erosion.
Road cuts similar to the one studied typically show low rates of erosion without the
foam.
Studies by the company that produces the material are sometimes unreliable
because of conflicts of interest.
The rate of erosion from the road cut in the study was greater then expected based
on computer simulation models.
Qn.34
A highly cohesive work group is a prerequisite for high team performance. Sociologists point
that the association between groups cohesion and success is owing to the support individual team
members give to one another and their acceptance of the group's goals and activities.
Each of the following, if true, either providers support for or cannot weaken the sociologists'
assumption about the relationship between cohesion and success EXCEPT
University researchers found that there was a significant correlation between team
productivity and the extent to which team members understood and complied with
the group's objectives.
A group of Japanese researchers found that successful work teams were headed by
dominant leaders.
American researchers found that successful team member tended to rate their fellow
members more favorable.
Industrial Psychologists in the UK found that work groups who tended to
participate in after hours social activities were more productive.
Qn.35
If Pen is coded as Pencil, Pencil as Chalk, Chalk as Slate, Slate as Paper, then by which do you
mostly write?
Pen
Pencil
Chalk
Slate
Qn.36
If MAGIC is coded as PXJFF then how will LEASH be coded?
PBDVD
OBDVL
OHEOK
OBDPK
Qn.37
If SPANK is coded as PSNAK then how will THROW be coded?
HTORW
HTWOR
HTWRO
HTRWO
None of these
Qn.38
”˜mouse’ is called ”˜keyboard’, ”˜keyboard’ is called ”˜CPU’, ”˜CPU’ is called ”˜monitor’,
”˜monitor’ is called ”˜UPS’, ”˜UPS’ is called ”˜floppy’. Then find the article which is useful in
entering inputs?
mouse
keyboard
monitor
UPS
CPU
Answer:
CPU
Explanation:
The article which is useful in entering inputs is ‘keyboard’. But ‘keyboard’ is called
as ‘CPU’ answer = ‘CPU’
Qn.39
In a certain code language '123' means—”˜Mahendra is Able', '345' means—'Sunita is unlucky',
'526' means—'Mahendra was unlucky', then what is the code used for unlucky?
2
3
1
Can not be determined
None of these
Qn.40
Study the following in formation carefully and answer the question given below them:
Six products U, V, W, X ,Y, and Z are to be placed in display windows of a shop. There are six
display windows 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and one product is to be displayed in one window. Moreover, U
cannot be displayed immediately to the left or immediately to the right of V. W must be
displayed immediately to the left of X. Z cannot be displayed in window number 6.
Which of the following products cannot be displayed in window number 1?
V
U
W
X
Qn.41
If X is displayed in window number 3, then W must be displayed in which window?
2
1
4
5
Qn.42
Study the following Graph to answer the given questions:
Annual dividend offered by two companies over the years
Sri Giridhar invested total amount of Rs. 25000/- in 1994 for one year in the two companies
together and got a total dividend of Rs 3340/-. What was the amount invested in company A
Rs 12,000.00
Rs 9,000.00
Rs 16,000.00
Can't be determined
None of these
Qn.43
Anuja, invested Rs. 35,000.00 in company B in 1996. After one year the transferred the entire
amount with dividend to Company A in 1997 for one year. What amount will be received back
by Anuja including dividend?
Rs. 49,980.00
Rs 49,000.00
Rs. 48,300.00
Rs. 49,563.00
None of these
Qn.44
An amount of Rs. 18000.00 was invested Company A in 1997. After one year the amount was
reinvestd for one more year. What was the total dividend received at the end of two years?
Rs. 5805.00
Rs. 7063.20
Rs. 6480.00
Rs. 6840.00
None of these
Qn.45
In the year 1999. Suraj invested Rs. 56000.00 in company B. How much more or less dividend
he would have received had the amount been invested in Company A?
Rs. 1640.00 more
Rs. 1640.00 less
Rs. 1860.00 less
Rs. 1680.00 less
None of these
Qn.46
Bhushan invested different amounts in Companies A na B in 2000. in the ratio 5:8 respectively.
What will be the ratio between amounts of dividends received from Companies A and B
respectively?
2:3
5:6
3:4
Can't be determined
None of these
Qn.47
Find the figure continuing the series:
A
B
C
D
E
Answer:
E
Explanation:
The small figures are shifted upwards or downwards.
Qn.48
Find the odd one:
A
B
C
D
E
Answer:
E
Explanation:
The two small circles cannot be connected with a straight line running through the
centre of the large circle.
Qn.49
Find the figure continuing the series:
A
B
C
Answer:
C
Explanation:
In each row the signs point to a different direction. In addition, in each row one
circle appears solid, one circle appears half solid, and one circle appears hollow.
D
E
Qn.50
Find the odd one:
A
B
C
Answer:
C
Explanation:
All figures are rectangular, c is a triangle; e is also correct as it is the only figure
that is not symmetrical
D
Qn.51
Section 3 : C / Java programming [ 20 questions, 30 minutes]
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
int a=0;
#if (a==0)
printf("Equal");
#else if printf("Not equal");
#endif
return 0;
}
Equal
Not equal
null
Garbage
Compilation error
Qn.52
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
for(;NULL;)
printf("cquestionbank");
return 0;
}
c
bank
cquestionbank
Infinite loop
Compilation error
Qn.53
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
int num,a=5;
num=-a--;
printf("%d %d",num,a);
}
54
-4 4
-5 4
-4 5
Qn.54
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
int i=3,val;
val=sizeof f(i)+ +f(i=1)+ +f(i-1);
printf("%d %d",val,i);
}
int f(int num)
{
return num*5;
}
20
71
17 0
21
Qn.55
What will be the content of array variable table after executing the following code?
for(int i = 0; i < 3; i + +)
for(int j = 0; j < 3; j + +)
if(j = i) table[i][j] = 1;
else table[i][j] = 0;
100
010
001
000
000
000
100
110
111
001
010
100
Qn.56
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
int num,a=10;
num=a&&0+ +-1&&a;
printf("%d %d",num,a);
}
11
00
1 10
0 10
Qn.57
Given the following code:
class Base { int x = 10; }
class Derived extends Base
{ int x = 20; }
Base b = new Base();
Derived d = new Derived ( );
Base bd = new Derived();
The statement
System.out.println(b.x + " " + d.x + " " + bd.x);
will produce the output
10 20 10
10 20 20
20 10 20
20 20 10
Qn.58
You read the following statement in a Java program that compiles and executes.
submarine.dive(depth);
What can you say for sure?
depth must be an int
dive must be a method.
dive must be the name of an instance field.
submarine must be the name of a class
submarine must be a method.
Qn.59
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
int a[]={0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
int i=0,num;
num=a[++i+a[++i]]+a[++i];
printf("%d",num);
}
6
7
8
9
Qn.60
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
int i;
(i=8)+=1;
printf("%d",i);
}
9
10
32
34
Qn.61
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main()
{
char c=-'a';
printf("%d",c);
}
65
-65
-a
-97
Qn.62
What will be output if you will execute following c code?
#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int a=5;
{
int b=10;
++b;
++a;
{
int a=20;
++a;
a=++b;
}
++a;
++b;
printf("%d %d",a,b);
}
printf(" %d",a);
}
7 13 7
13 13 13
13 13 5
6 13 5
Qn.63
What is the output of following block of program ?
boolean var = false;
if(var = true)
{
System.out.println("TRUE");
}
else
{
System.out.println("FALSE");
}
TRUE
Answer:
TRUE
Explanation:
The code compiles and runs fine and the ‘if’ test succeeds because ‘var’ is set to
‘true’ (rather than tested for ‘true’) in the ‘if’ argument.
FALSE
Compilation Error
Run-time Error
Qn.64
Determine the output when the value of x is zero:
if(x >= 0)
if(x > 0)
System.out.println("x is positive");
else
System.out.println("x is negative");
"x is negative"
Answer:
"x is negative"
Explanation:
The "else" statement corresponds to the second "if" in this case. To have it
correspond to the first "if", curly braces
"x is positive" and "x is negative"
"x is positive"
None of these
Qn.65
What is byte code in the context of Java?
The type of code generated by a Java compiler
The type of code generated by a Java Virtual Machine
It is another name for a Java source file
It is the code written within the instance methods of a class.
It is another name for comments written within a program.
Qn.66
Which of the following may be part of a class definition?
instance variables
instance methods
constructors
all of the above
none of the above
Qn.67
Word processing, spreadsheet, and photo-editing are examples of:
application software.
system software.
operating system software.
platform software.
Qn.68
The term bit is short for:
megabyte.
binary language.
binary digit.
binary number.
Qn.69
Routers operate at which layer of the OSI model?
physical
transport
network
MAC sublayer of the data link layer
Qn.70
Consider
public class MyClass{
public MyClass()
{/*code*/}
// more code...
}
To instantiate MyClass, you would write?
MyClass mc = new MyClass();
MyClass mc = MyClass();
MyClass mc = MyClass;
MyClass mc = new MyClass;
It can't be done. The constructor of MyClass should be defined as public void
MyClass(){/*code*/}
Qn.71
Section 4 : Technicle [ 20 questions, 20 minutes ]
____________terminals (formerly known as cash registers) are often connected to complex
inventory and sales computer system.
Data
Point-of-sale (POS)
Sales
Query
Qn.72
A function prototypes are useful
Because they tell the compiler that a function is declared later.
Because they make the program more readable.
Because they allow the programmer to see a quick list of functions in the program
along with the arguments for each function.
Because they allow the programmer to see a quick list of functions in the program
along with the arguments for each function.
Qn.73
In _____________tree, the heights of the two child subtrees of any node differ by at most one
Binary tree
Red black tree
Splay tree
AVL tree
Qn.74
An empty list is the one which has no
nodes
data
both a and b above
address
Qn.75
All of the following are said to have taken place at the Ring except
ghostly apparitions
boxing matches
hangings
secret assignations
theatrical performances
Qn.76
The ”curious enquiry" refers to finding out
why happy lovers never met there
why interviews never took place there
what historical events took place there
how the amphitheatre came to have sinister associations
why the amphitheatre lay in ruins
Qn.77
Can stack be described as a pointer?
Yes
No
Qn.78
On which prinicple does Queue work?
FILO
FIFO
LILO
Both a and b above
Qn.79
A ___________ tree is a tree where for each parent node, there is only one associated child node
balanced binary tree
rooted complete binary tree
complete binary tree
degenerate tree
Qn.80
Key value pair is usually seen in
Hash tables
Heaps
Both a and b
Skip list
Qn.81
Servers are computers that provide resources to other computers connected to a:
network.
mainframe.
supercomputer.
client.
Qn.82
____________ controls the way in which the computer system functions and provides a means
by which users can interact with the computer.
The platform
The operating system
Application software
The motherboard
Qn.83
The two broad categories of software are:
word processing and spreadsheet
transaction and application.
Windows and Mac OS.
system and application.
Qn.84
Which of the following ways below is a In order traversal?
Root->left sub tree-> right sub tree
Root->right sub tree-> left sub tree
right sub tree-> left sub tree->Root
left sub tree-> right sub tree->Root
Qn.85
A tree cannot contain cycles.
False
True
Qn.86
Which model __________ 250 k.p.h.?
does go
goes
have gone
going
Qn.87
After a picture has been taken with a digital camera and processed appropriately, the actual print
of the picture is considered:
data.
output.
input.
the process.
Qn.88
____________ tags, when placed on an animal, can be used to record and track in a database all
of the animal’s movements.
POS
RFID
PPS
GPS
Qn.89
Suppose that s1 and s2 are two strings. Which of the statements or expressions are valid?
(A) String s3 = s1 + s2;
(B) String s3 = s1 - s2;
(C) s1 <= s2
(D) s1.compareTo(s2);
(E) int m = s1.length();
(A), (C) & (E)
(A), (B) & (C)
(A), (D) & (E)
(C), (D) & (E)
(D) & (E)
Qn.90
In a heap, element with the greatest key is always in the ___________ node
leaf
root
first node of left sub tree
first node of right sub tree
Qn.91
Section 5 : Learning Ability [ 10 questions, 15 + 10 minutes]
15 minutes for reading passage and 10 minutes for answering .
Read the comprehension and answer the questions that follow:
The Ring at Casterbridge was merely the local name of one of the finest Roman amphitheatres, if
not the very finest remaining in Britain.
Casterbridge announced old Rome in every street, alley, and precinct. It looked Roman, bespoke
the art of Rome, concealed dead men of Rome. It was impossible to dig more than a foot or two
deep about the town fields and gardens without coming upon some tall soldier or other of the
Empire, who had laid there in his silent unobtrusive rest for a space of fifteen hundred years. He
was mostly found lying on his side, in an oval scoop in the chalk, like a chicken in its shell; his
knees drawn up to his chest; sometimes with the remains of his spear against his arm; a brooch of
bronze on his breast or forehead; an urn at his knees, a jar at his throat, a bottle at his mouth; and
mystified conjecture pouring down upon him from the eyes of Casterbridge street boys, who had
turned a moment to gaze at the familiar spectacle as they passed by.
Imaginative inhabitants, who would have felt an unpleasantness at the discovery of a
comparatively modern skeleton in their gardens, were quite unmoved by these hoary shapes.
They had lived so long ago, their time was so unlike the present, their hopes and motives were so
widely removed from ours, that between them and the living there seemed to stretch a gulf too
wide for even a spirit to pass.
The Amphitheatre was a huge circular enclosure, with a notch at opposite extremities of its
diameter north and south. It was to Casterbridge what the ruined Coliseum is to modern Rome,
and was nearly of the same magnitude. The dusk of evening was the proper hour at which a true
impression of this suggestive place could he received. Standing in the middle of the arena at that
time there by degrees became apparent its real vastness, which a cursory view from the summit
at noon-day was apt to obscure. Melancholy, impressive, lonely, yet accessible from every part
of the town, the historic circle was the frequent spot for appointments of a furtive kind. Intrigues
were arranged there; tentative meetings were there experimented after divisions and feuds. But
one kind of appointment - in itself the most common of any - seldom had place in the
Amphitheatre: that of happy lovers.
Why, seeing that it was pre-eminently an airy, accessible, and sequestered spot for interviews,
the cheerfullest form of those occurrences never took kindly to the soil of the ruin, would he a
curious inquiry. Perhaps it was because its associations had about them something sinister. Its
history proved that. Apart from the sanguinary nature of the games originally played therein,
such incidents attached to its past as these: that for scores of years the town-gallows had stood at
one corner; that in 1705 a woman who had murdered her husband was half-strangled and then
burnt there in the presence of ten thousand spectators. Tradition reports that at a certain stage of
the burning her heart burst and leapt out of her body, to the terror of them all, and that not one of
those ten thousand people ever cared particularly for hot roast after that. In addition to these old
tragedies, pugilistic encounters almost to the death had come off down to recent dates in that
secluded arena, entirely invisible to the outside world save by climbing to the top of the
enclosure, which few townspeople in the daily round of their lives ever took the trouble to do. So
that, though close to the turnpike-road, crimes might be perpetrated there unseen at mid-day.
Some boys had latterly tried to impart gaiety to the ruin by using the central arena as a cricketground. But the game usually languished for the aforesaid .reason - the dismal privacy which the
earthen circle enforced, shutting out every appreciative passer's vision, every commendatory
remark from outsiders - everything, except the sky; and to play at games in such circumstances
was like acting to an empty house. Possibly, too, the boys were timid, for some old people said
that at certain moments in the summer time, in broad daylight, persons sitting with a book or
dozing in the arena had, on lifting their eyes, beheld the slopes lined with a gazing legion of
Hadrian's soldiery as if watching the gladiatorial combat; and had heard the roar of their excited
voices; that the scene would remain but a moment, like a lightning flash, and then disappear.
Henchard had chosen this spot as being the safest from observation which he could think of for
meeting his long-lost wife, and at the same time as one easily to be found by a stranger after
nightfall. As Mayor of the town, with a reputation to keep up, he could not invite her to come to
his house till some definite course had been decided on.
The boys had given up cricket in the Amphitheatre in part because
it was too dark
crimes commonly took place there
there were no spectators or passers-by to applaud their efforts
they were afraid of being caught
Qn.92
The author’s primary purpose is to
justify his opinion of the Ring
attempt to account for the atmosphere of a place
chronicle the development of the Amphitheatre
describe the location of a Roman relic
explain the uses to which historical sites are put
Qn.93
____________ is the science that attempts to produce machines that display the same type of
intelligence that humans do.
Nanoscience
Nanotechnology
Simulation
Artificial intelligence (AI)
Qn.94
The amphitheatre is described as a ”suggestive" place because
its real size could not be appreciated at a glance.
it was full of historical associations
mysterious meetings took place there
it was lonely yet accessible
it was best appreciated in the evening.
Qn.95
It can be inferred from the last paragraph that Henchard
is afraid of his wife
has something to hide from the townspeople
is a stranger to the Ring
is about to commit a crime
is an infamous resident of Casterbridge
Qn.96
The incident of the woman who was burnt is mentioned in order to
horrify the reader
illustrate one reason for the unsavoury reputation of the place
show the bloodthirsty nature of former occupants
add realistic details to an imaginary plot
show the magnitude of the gulf between the past and the present
Qn.97
It appears that in general the attitude of Casterbridge residents to the Roman past suggests that
they
appreciated the art of the Romans
feared the ghosts of the buried Roman soldiers
felt far removed from the concerns of the Romans
were awe-struck by their civilization
were proud of their heritage
Qn.98
The attitude of the local residents to the unearthed remains of dead Romans was one of
total apathy
confusion and unease
trepidation
momentary interest
revulsion
Qn.99
What will the function Math.ceil(-99.9) return?
-99
99.0
100.0
-99.0
Answer:
-99.0
Explanation:
ceil() returns the smallest whole number less than or equal to the given argument. It
returns a double type value.
-100.0
Qn.100
The ring was ”safest from observation" because
no one inside could be seen from outside the arena
it was far from the main road
people found it a pleasant place only in Summer
no one except lovers ever went there after dark
it was too inaccessible
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