Lanier Technical College 2005-2006 College Catalog and Student

advertisement
SPECIAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE CATALOG
This catalog is provided to assist new students in becoming acquainted with
Lanier Technical College. It is designed as a guide to orient all students and
participants in certificate, diploma, and degree programs, business and industry seminars, workshops and training sessions, adult literacy classes, to the
functions, organizations, policies, and procedures at Lanier Technical College.
Each student should keep this catalog as a ready reference for questions that
arise while attend the college.
Statements in this document are for information and guidance only and cannot be considered the basis for a contract between the student and Lanier
Technical College. Although the provisions in the catalog represent policies
and procedures when published, Lanier Technical College reserves the right
to change any provisions including academic requirements for graduation
without notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to advise the
student body of changes; information will be available in the Office of the
Registrar, Admission, the Vice President of Instruction, the Vice President of
Student Services, the Vice President of Economic Development and the Vice
President of Operations for the Forsyth Campus.
Lanier Technical College reserves the right to change or amend its regulations, curricula, fees, and administrative procedures without prior notice.
2005 -2006
A Unit of the Georgia Department of
Technical and Adult Education
Accredited by the Commission of the Council on
Occupational Education
Inquiries should be addressed to:
Council on Occupational Education
41 Perimeter Center East, NE, Suite 640
Atlanta, Georgia 30346
Phone: 770.396.3898
It is the policy of this college that no person shall on the basis of sex, race,
color, religion, creed, national origin, handicap, age, academic disadvantage
or economic disadvantage, be excluded from participation in, be denied the
benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program
or activity or employment opportunity in this college. Additionally, none of
Lanier Tech's facilities or resources will be utilized in any
activities that promote discrimination.
Lanier Technical College Locations:
Oakwood - Hall Campus
2990 Landrum Education Dr.
Oakwood, GA 30566
770.531.6300
Forsyth Campus
7745 Majors Rd.
Cumming, GA 30041
770.781.6800
Winder - Barrow Campus
89 East Athens St.
Winder, GA 30680
770.868.4080
Jackson County Campus
675 South Elm St.
Commerce GA 30529
706.335.1931
www.laniertech.edu
1
Table of Contents
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
President’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Board of Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Faculty & Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Institutional Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Statement of Equal Opportunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Guarantee to Employers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Adult Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Economic Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
General Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Residence Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14
Entrance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Double Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Transient Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Practice Nursing Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Tech Prep Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Admissions Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Allied Health Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Dual and Joint Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Change of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Disadvantaged & Disabled Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Readmissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23
Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Quarterly Course Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Matriculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Full Time Student Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Maximum Number of Credit Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Registration Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Auditing Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Adding/Dropping Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Withdrawing from Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
No-Show Policy/Reinstatement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
2
Table of
Contents
Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Associate of Applied Technology Degrees & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Diploma Program & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Technical Certificate Programs & Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Tuition & Fee Payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Refunds Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Financial Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
HOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Grant/Scholarship Limits and Checkpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Grant/Scholarship Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Scholarship Checkpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Book Allowance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Reimbursement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
GED Voucher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Joint and Dual Enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Accel Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Transient Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Academic Progress Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
General Provisions and Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
How to Maintain Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Renewal Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Academic Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Academic Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Attendance Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Leaving Class Early . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Tardiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Withdrawals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Work Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Advanced Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Transfer Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Armed Services Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Foreign Earned Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Exemption Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Tech Prep Articulated Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Grading Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Academic Standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Change of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Directory Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Review of Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Exceptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Records Correction Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Appeal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
3
Study Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Office of the Vice President for Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Admissions & Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Career & Job Placement Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Orientation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Reception & General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Recruitment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Student Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Accidents & Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Photo ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Student Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Campus Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Campuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
On-Campus Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vehicles on Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
On-Campus Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Business Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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General Code of Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
Student Responsibilities & Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Code of Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Weapons Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Student Notification Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Drug Free Campus Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
Student Right to Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75
Sources of Help for Drug Dependency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Campus Security Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Alcohol & Illegal Drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Emergency Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Student Dress Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Program Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81
Cooperative Agreement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Faculty and Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .285
Telephone Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .294
Location Maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
4
General
Information
5
Lanier Technical College - General Information
President’s
Message
Greetings and welcome to Lanier Technical
College.
Lanier Technical College will provide you with
excellent instruction, individual customer service
through personal attention, career guidance, and
job placement. Our dedicated faculty and staff
are committed to excellence in all we do. Your
success is guaranteed with our programs, and we stand behind that guarantee 100%. The technical skills you learn as a Lanier Technical College student are the keys to unlocking a bright future.
The business and industry community demands quality in product and
process. Lanier Technical College will provide you with world-class technical education, adult literacy, continuing education, and/or economic development programs. When you finish two years at Lanier Technical College,
you will be ready for a career. During your tenure at Lanier Technical
College, as well as in the business world, you will demand excellence from
yourself--while you are in the learning process and beyond. Remember that
education is a life-long process, and it does not end when you leave Lanier
Tech. Educational opportunities abound after completion of your studies at
Lanier Technical College. Your future can be brighter than ever.
The policies contained in this catalog are set forth to guide you in your activities while enrolled as a Lanier Technical College student. We trust your
time will be both profitable and enjoyable.
Michael D. Moye, Ed.D.
President
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Lanier Technical College - General Information
State Board of Technical & Adult Education
1st Congressional District, Mr. Ben I. Copeland Sr. , Lakeland,
2nd Congressional District, Sandra B. Reed, MD, Thomasville,
3rd Congressional District Mr. Allen C. Rice, Vidalia,
4th Congressional District, Mr. George L. Bowen, III
5th Congressional District, Mr. Don L. Chapman, Atlanta
6th Congressional District, Mr. Warren "Rhubarb" Jones (Vice-Chairman),Marietta
7th Congressional District, Mr. Tyre Louis Rakestraw Jr., Dallas
8th Congressional District, Ms. Debra M. Stillo Lyons, MaconPhone: (478) 474-7398
9th Congressional District, Mr. Harold R. Reynolds (Chairman), Greensboro, GA 30642
10th Congressional District (Vacant)
11th Congressional District (Vacant)
12th Congressional District, Mr. Cedric J. Johnson, Augusta
13th Congressional District, Mr. Steve Rieck, Jonesboro
Member-at-Large, Mr. Jimmy Allgood, Dublin
Member-at-Large, Mr. Michael C. Daniel,
Member-at-Large, Ms. Sharon H. Douglas, Columbus
Member-at-Large, Ms. Mary Paige Flanders, Savannah
Member-at-Large, Dr. Alma G. Noble, Albany
Member-at-Large, Mr. Jimmy Tallent, Blairsville
Member-at-Large, Mr. Ben J. Tarbutton Jr., Sandersville
Member-at-Large, Ms. Ann R. Purcell, Rincon
Georgia Department of Technical & Adult Education
Michael F. Vollmer, Commissioner
Lanier Technical College
Board of Directors:
Board of Trustees:
E. Rhae Buckley, Hall County
Bethany R. Caldwell, Barrow County
William B. Chandler, Hall County
Henry Davis, Lumpkin County
David H. Kimbrell, Hall County
Sonia Magana, Hall County
Mary Helen McGruder, Forsyth County
Vacant, North Fulton County
Steve Schingler, Vice Chair, Jackson County
Roger D. Slaton, Dawson County
Dennis Stockton, Chair, Forsyth County
Douglas S. Ward, Banks County
Haydee Anderson, Hall County
Tommy Bagwell, Forsyth County
Phill Bettis, Forsyth County
Harris Blackwood, Forsyth County
Andy Byers, Jackson County
Rob Coile, North Fulton County
Dan Elliott, Dawson County
Bernard Gilliland, North Fulton County
Steve Jenner, Hall County
Connie Lipscomb, Forsyth County
Charlotte Massey
Keith Morris, Forsyth County
Britt Myers, Hall County
Stacey Reece,Hall County
Bill Sanders, Hall County
Anita Scott, Hall County
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Lanier Technical College - General Information
History
During the late 1950s, the Georgia State
Department of Education began the construction of area technical schools. Several
research projects and studies within the state
had shown the great need for these schools.
Industry was moving into the state while agricultural jobs were decreasing at an accelerated rate. Georgia was rapidly changing from
an agrarian economy to an industrial economy. This necessitated a rapid transition from
the previous general education to the training
of technicians, craftsmen, skilled and semiskilled workers. Georgia now has thirty-four
technical colleges, located strategically
throughout the state.
Lanier Tech began its first classes in the Fall
of 1966. The first classes were conducted in
local schools, churches, and civic buildings. In
January 1967, the classes were moved into
47,000 square foot administrative and classroom building. During the mid 1970s, Lanier
Tech's facilities were expanded to include a
modern industrial training facility and 20,000
square feet of classroom, shop, and administrative space. An additional 26,000 square
foot annex building was added in 1981. An
additional 47,000 square foot classroom addition building was added in 1996. The Forsyth
Campus is composed of two buildings. This
57,000 square foot facility opened in 1998.
Two other satellite campuses followed. In
2002 a campus opened in Winder and in
2003 a campus was opened in Commerce. In
2005, Lanier Technical College, established
its presence in cooperation with Hall County
Board of Education, at the Lanier Career
Center in Gainesville.
The first graduation was conducted in June
1967 when 51 students received diplomas. In
the fall of 2000, Lanier Tech began offering
Associate of Applied Technology degrees and
became a technical college.
Mission Statement
Lanier Technical College serves as the
leading workforce development resource for
Banks, Barrow, Dawson, Forsyth, Hall,
Jackson, Lumpkin, and North Fulton counties
by providing:
• Career-technical education programs leading to associate of applied technology
degrees, diplomas, and technical certificates of credit;
• Customized business and industry training
and economic development services;
8
• Continuing education for technical and professional development; and,
• Adult literacy and education services.
Vision
Lanier Technical College is a postsecondary
institution that provides instruction in occupational disciplines, student development services, adult literacy programs and services, continuing education for occupational advancement and personal enrichment, and economic development services to business and
industry. It is an integral part of a seamless
educational process.
Lanier Technical College offers technical and
lifelong continuing education to prepare the
adult population for entry-level employment,
job-promotion opportunities, career change,
retraining and upgrading of occupational
skills, or further educational pursuits.
Lanier Technical College’s delivery systems
provide optimal accessibility, responsiveness,
and quality that adequately address the
needs of the wide array of constituencies the
institution is committed to serve
Lanier Technical College offers credit and
noncredit instruction, which is driven by industry and student training needs. Lanier
Technical College offers instruction in varying
formats, conducted at convenient times and
locations, and made available at competitive
costs.
Instructors present competencies in ways
most conducive to adult learning patterns.
Focus
Lanier Tech has established a clear threefold
focus:
• Lanier Tech identifies, evaluates, and provides education and training in response
to current and emerging market-based
needs.
• Lanier Tech is an adaptive organization
which fosters and enhances excellence by
providing flexible and innovative services.
• Lanier Tech conducts marketing and public relations surveys which encompass
relations, business and industrial partnerships, external fund acquisition, student
recruitment, and internal pride.
Philosophy
Lanier Tech values quality education and lifelong learning, spanning the scope of societal
needs from basic skills preparation to employ-
Lanier Technical College - General Information
ability training, retraining, and upgrading for
career change or advancement. The importance and worth of people are recognized and
each individual has the opportunity to prepare
for employment in a chosen field, preparing
for a better life. Lanier Tech faculty and staff
are comprised of quality people who are innovators in their fields. They are well trained,
well educated, and are a competent, professional staff who serve as a vital link between
students and industry.
As a unit of the Department of Technical and
Adult Education, Lanier Tech subscribes to a
shared philosophy. In accordance with this
philosophy, Lanier Tech endeavors to provide
an opportunity for all area citizens, regardless
of sex, race, color, religion, national origin,
disability, veteran status, or age, to develop
and improve their academic skills, technical
competence, and attitudes necessary for
them to secure and maintain personally satisfying, useful employment. General and technical literacy are vital components of the total
education of an individual which extends from
childhood through adulthood. Included are
academic skills and knowledge, technical
skills, and attitudes needed to enjoy life, to
obtain employment, to be competitive, and to
be promotable in an occupation throughout
their careers.
A literate and technically competent citizenry:
• contributes to the attractiveness of this
state for existing, expanding, new, and
emerging business and industries;
• enhances the quality of the workforce,
improves the competitive position and productivity, and expands the public tax base
of Georgia;
• and contributes to the economic and social
growth and development of the individual
and the state.
Faculty & Staff
Faculty and staff members are deemed qualified by the Georgia Department of Technical
and Adult Education on the basis of their technical competency, experience, education, professional training as a teacher, and industry
certifications or licensures, as appropiate to
their area of expertise.
Each faculty member, of necessity, is experienced in his/her respective occupational field
and maintains high standards of instruction.
Institutional Goals
Lanier Tech has established goals to guide its
operation:
1. To meet the needs of students in our
service delivery area by providing quality
programs, faculty, staff, facilities, equipment, and services which promote the
growth and development of well-rounded, technically competent students.
2. To provide a top-quality work force for the
service delivery area in occupational and
technical positions which require less
than a four year degree.
3. To work cooperatively with other educational entities in our service delivery area
to offer an articulated, coordinated, and
continuous educational path for students
in the service area.
4. To involve the entire community in the
planning, development, implementation,
evaluation, and support of vocational,
technical, and adult education.
5. To develop, fund, and implement a marketing plan which will significantly
increase the enrollment of women,
minorities, disadvantaged, and disabled,
and other special populations as well as
the traditional populations.
6. To actively promote the economic growth
and development of the community by
offering an attractive mix of training programs and services.
7. To assist in preparing a literate adult citizenry and work force for the service
delivery area by raising the literacy of the
adult population through the offering of
and coordination of adult literacy programs with other public and private entities in the community.
8. To provide a quality developmental services program to assist students who
need such a program to improve their
academic and personal skills for study at
the occupational and technical level.
9. To provide an institutional effectiveness
systematic evaluation, planning, and
budgeting program so that Lanier Tech
can demonstrate that the administration
and delivery of programs are effective in
meeting the needs of the students, the
service delivery area, and business and
industry, while operating efficiently as a
college.
10. To develop and maintain a high-quality
faculty and administration motivated,
caring, competent, technically up-todate, and productive, and who work as a
team for meeting the goals and objectives of Lanier Tech.
9
Lanier Technical College - General Information
11. To be recognized by leaders in the community, business, industry, and education for the high quality programs and
services offered by Lanier Tech.
12. To be recognized at the local and state
level as a college which is cost effective,
efficient, and fiscally sound.
Scope
Lanier Technical College is a unit of the
Georgia Department of Technical and Adult
Education. A local board governs the school
through the Office of the President as directed
by the State Board of Technical and Adult
Education via the Office of the Commissioner.
The scope of Lanier Tech includes:
• Associate Degree and Diploma
Programs provide technical and supporting general education skills required for
employment and career growth.
• Technical
Certificate
of
Credit
Programs provide technical skills required
for employment and career growth.
• Professional Upgrade Programs provide professional, occupational development training to individuals, business, and
industries as well as provide customdesigned training for existing or expanding
industries.
• Developmental Studies Programs help
students improve their academic and personal preparedness for study at the technical level.
• Career Exploration Services enable students and prospective students to receive
personalized support in selecting career
paths which will maximize their chances
for success.
• Student Services provide support services and activities to ease the transition into
higher education, maximize chances for
success, and enhance the potential for
personal and educational growth of the
individual.
• Minority Services provide opportunities
which increase access and success in
occupational fields for minority students.
• Economic Development Services assist
local chambers of commerce and other
appropriate groups in promoting economic
development in Lanier Tech’s service
delivery area through the Quick Start
Training Program.
• Institutional Effectiveness Program
provides ongoing review and improvements of institutional programs and services.
• Adult Literacy Programs provide services to those persons functioning below the
10
ninth grade level and special populations.
Statement of Equal
Opportunity
Lanier Technical Colleges do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed,
national or ethnic origin, gender, religion, disability, age, disabled veteran, veteran of the
Vietnam Era or citizenship status, (except in
those special circumstances permitted or
mandated by law). This nondiscrimination
policy encompasses the operation of all educational programs and activities including
admissions policies, scholarship and loan
programs, athletic and other Department of
Technical and Adult Education administered
programs. It also encompasses the employment of personnel and contracting for goods
and services.
Guarantee To Employers
Curriculum standards have been developed
with direct involvement of business and industry. These standards serve as the industryvalidated specifications for each occupational
program. These standards allow the Georgia
system of technical colleges to offer their business and industry partners this guarantee:
"If one of our graduates educated under a
standard program or his/her employer finds
that the graduate is deficient in one or more
competencies as defined in the standards, the
technical college will retrain the employee at
no instructional cost to the employee or the
employer."
This guarantee is in effect for a period of two
years after graduation.
Adult Literacy
The Adult Literacy Program is specifically
designed for adults who have different needs,
backgrounds, and skills. Therefore, a flexible
program has been designed which meets the
needs of any individual who wishes to participate. Three levels of instruction have been
developed which extend from beginning reading and writing to high school completion
through the General Education Development
(GED) Program. The services are available in
the counties of Banks, Barrow, Dawson,
Forsyth, Hall, Jackson, and Lumpkin.
Adult Basic Literacy provides instruction for
reading readiness, basic mathematics skills,
and an introduction to writing and basic grammar.
Adult General Literacy provides instruction
Lanier Technical College - General Information
in reading comprehension, reading in the content areas, mathematics, and language arts.
Adult Specialized Literacy provides instruction in reading, science, social studies, grammar and writing skills, and mathematics. This
level will develop the skills necessary for
completion of the GED examination.
General Educational Development (GED)
Test
Lanier Tech is an official GED Testing Center.
The test is administered at five locations
monthly. Successful completion of the GED
Test qualifies an individual for a State of
Georgia High School Equivalency Diploma.
GED credentials are accepted by industry,
government, licensing boards, technical colleges, Arts and Sciences colleges, universities, and employers as the equivalent to a
high school education.
The GED Test is a five-part test covering the
following subject areas: Writing, Social
Studies, Science, Reading, and Mathematics.
To pass the GED, a total score of 2250 points
is required. An average of 450 points on the
test battery is needed with no individual test
score falling below 410 points. The fee for
GED testing is $55.
English Literacy Program (ELP)
Formerly known as English as a Second
Language (ESL)
Beginning ELP provides instruction in conversational English in life-coping skills and
beginning basic reading and writing.
Intermediate ELP provides continued development of conversational English in life-coping skills. This level will improve the student's
speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.
Advanced ELP provides instruction in grammar and usage, and effective speaking and
writing in English. This class provides preGED instruction for the foreign-born person
wishing to achieve a High School Equivalency
Certificate.
Adult Literacy Cost & Fees
There is no tuition charge for Adult Literacy
and ELP classes. Books are provided free for
classroom use. There is a $55 fee for the
GED Exam. For further information on Adult
Literacy, call 770.531.6363 between 8:00 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. or call one of our six county
locations:
Banks County Adult Learning Center
207 Sycamore St.
Homer, GA 30547
706.677.4302
Barrow County Adult Literacy Center
89 East Athens Street
Winder, GA 30680
770.868.4080
Dawson County Adult Literacy Center
233 Allen St.
Dawsonville, GA 30534
706.265.1690
Forsyth County Adult Learning Center
Lanier Tech Forsyth Campus
7745 Majors Road
Cumming, GA 30041
770.781.6987
Gainesville-Hall County Adult Learning
Center
4 1/2 Stallworth St.
Gainesville, GA 30501
770.531.6410
Jackson County Adult Learning Center
631 South Elm Street
Commerce, GA 30529
706.367.1931
Lumpkin County Adult Learning Center
150B Johnson Street
Dahlonega, GA 30533
706.867 2862
Economic Development
Lanier Tech's Economic Development
Division serves new, existing, and expanding
businesses and industries in North Fulton,
Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Hall, Jackson,
Barrow and Lumpkin counties. Economic
Development programs range from workshops to needs analysis and customized
training. Programs are tailored to meet specific training needs. The certificate programs
and workshops offered by Economic
Development are designed for individual and
workforce enrollment.
Computer Workshops
Needs of the business industry and the community are assessed and computer workshops scheduled to meet these needs. Day
and evening workshops are offered. Options
available include individual enrollment, oneon-one training and customized workshops.
On-line training is currently offered in many
skill areas.
Customized Training
Industry specific, or customized training
varies from modification of an existing class to
needs analysis and course development.
Training is conducted on site at the business
or industry location or at Lanier Tech.
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Lanier Technical College - General Information
Quick Start
Quick Start training is available at no cost for
qualifying businesses and industries. The
service typically includes a needs analysis,
development of a training plan, and the training itself.
Health & Safety Training
American Heart Association training is
offered. CPR, First Aid, Bloodborne
Pathogens and instructor certification training,
as well as agency affiliation are available
through our Community Training Center
(CTC). Safety or health-related organizations
may affiliate. ACLS and PALS courses are
offered at our affiliate organizations. Forklift
safety training is available specific to an organization's needs.
License Renewal Workshops
License renewal workshops are available in
these areas: plumbing, electrical, cosmetologists, nail technicians, estheticians, and insurance. Instructors are industry professionals.
Insurance Pre-licensing
Courses
Forty-hour courses are offered as preparation
for the state licensing exam. A course is
offered for Property and Casualty and one for
Life and Health.
HVAC Courses
These courses are offered on varied topics
and address several systems. Instructors are
industry professionals.
Credit Courses
Credit Courses offered through Economic
Development
include
the
Certified
Manufacturing Specialist (CMS), the Certified
Warehouse and Distributor Specialist
(CWDS) and the Certified Customer Service
Specialist (CCSS). The HOPE Grant is available for those who qualify. These courses
earn 15 hours of credit and are offered as
independent enrollment, business and industry classes, and high school joint enrollment.
Human Resource Development
Workshop topics include SPC, QS 9000, ISO
9000, Training for Supervisors, and Team
Training. Workshops and services are not limited to these topics and customized workshops in this area are available.
Maintenance Skills
Assessment
This assessment covers 27 electrical and
12
mechanical skills. The assessments are conducted individually and include written and
"hands-on" assessments. An individualized
training plan is determined for each person.
Lanier Technical College provides training in
all skill areas.
Georgia Ammonia
Refrigeration
The current Ammonia Refrigeration Training
schedule includes: Operator I, Operator II,
Process
Safety
Management/Risk
Management, Ammonia Specific HAZMAT 24
Technician, HAZMAT On Scene Incident
Command, and HAZMAT Eight (8) Hour
Refresher.
All topics area available as customized training options to meet business and industry
needs, Ammonia Refrigeration training is conducted in Lanier Technical College’s new
state-of-the art facilities. For additional information on Economic Development programs
please call 770-531-6340.
Admissions
13
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
General Policy
The admissions policy and procedures of the
Georgia Board of Technical and Adult
Education and Lanier Tech assure the citizens of Georgia equal access to the opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills, and
attitudes necessary to secure personally satisfying and socially productive employment.
By design and implementation, the policy
and procedures governing admission to
Lanier Tech are nondiscriminatory to any eligible applicant regardless of age, race, color,
national origin, religion, sex, marital status,
academic or economic disadvantage, or disability.
Lanier Tech is committed to an "open door"
admissions policy. This policy means that
any qualified applicant able to benefit from
our curriculum will be served by the institution on a first-applied, first-qualified basis.
Some programs may use a competitive
admission process. Entrance requirements
are flexible enough to allow a student opportunity for admission into a specific program.
This can be accomplished when the student
demonstrates aptitude and ability for a program as determined by satisfactory academic performance, placement tests, and other
appropriate evaluations, when deemed necessary, to determine general fitness for
admission.
Residence Requirements
Lanier Technical College shall require that a
minimum of fifty percent (50%) of the course
work of a particular program be completed at
the technical college granting the
degree/diploma, provided however, that the
50% requirement maybe waived if the student has completed a program for which
standards have been implemented within the
Georgia Department of Adult Education
System.
State Resident Policy
A. Legal residence in the State of Georgia
requires not only recent physical presence in Georgia, but also the element
of intent to remain indefinitely. Each
College has the responsibility of evaluating each application while each student has the responsibility of conveying
current and accurate residency information. This information is used in deter
mining the appropriate fees to be paid
by each student.
B. To be classified as an in-state student
for tuition purposes, an individual who is
14
18 years of age or older must show that
he/she has been a legal resident of Georgia
for a period of no less than twelve months
immediately pre-ceding the date of registration.
1. In the absence of documentation
that the individual has established
legal residence in Georgia, no
emancipated minor or other person
eighteen years of age or older shall
gain in-state status while attending
any educational institution in this
state.
2. If a person is under 18 years of
age, such person may register as
an in-state student only upon show
ing that the supporting parent or
guardian has been a legal resident
of Georgia for a period of at least
twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration.
C. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor
changes his/her legal residence in
Georgia, a minor student may continue
to take courses for a period of twelve
consecutive months as an in-state student. After the twelve month period, the
student may continue the registration
only upon the payment of fees at the
out-of-state rate.
D. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students; however, an alien who is
living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite or
permanent residence shall have the
same privilege of qualifying for in-state
tuition as a citizen of the United States.
E. In the event that a legal resident of
Georgia is appointed as guardian of a
nonresident minor, such minor will not
be permitted to register as an in-state
student until expiration of one year from
the date of court appointed, and then
only upon proper showing that such
appointment was not made to award
payment of out-of-state fees.
F. Out-of-state tuition may be waived for
exceptions as defined in this policy.
Definitions
(a) Educational institutions—An institution of higher education, public or
private, above the higher school
level.
(b) Student—A person enrolling in a
certificate, diploma or degree or pro
gram on a part-time basis.
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
(c) Minor Student—An unemancipated student under 18 years of
age.
Residency
The State Board recognizes three student
residency categories: in-state, out-of-state
and international.
A student's legal residence shall determine
the tuition rate paid by the student.
1) Students who are residents of the United
States and otherwise qualify as Georgia
residents shall pay tuition and fees prescribed by the State Board for in-state
students.
2) Students who are residents of the United
States but do not otherwise qualify as
Georgia residents shall pay tuition and
fees prescribed by the State Board for
out-of-state students.
3) Students who are residents of a country
other than the United States and are
studying at a Technical College shall pay
tuition and fees at a rate four times that
charged in-state students. These students are recognized as international students.
Non-resident tuition may be waived, normally on a quarter-by-quarter basis, for an international student by the President. Provided
however, the number of such waivers shall
not exceed two percent of the head count of
student enrollment at the Technical College
in the immediately preceding Fall Quarter.
Any non-resident student receiving a tuition
waiver shall pay the in-state tuition rate, but
is not eligible for the HOPE program.
On the application for admission, the technical college requires students to identify his or
her country of lawful residence and may
require the submission of other information
necessary to make a determination of a student's legal residency for tuition-rate and student advisement purposes.
Procedure: Residency
The institutional residency officer classifies
each person accepted by the college as an
in-state, out-of-state, or international student. Said classification is based upon all relevant information made available to the residency officer, including, but not limited to,
information submitted by or on behalf of the
student. The residency officer may, as a condition of registration, require such written
documents and other relevant evidence as
are deemed necessary or helpful to determine the residence of the applicant. Such
documentation may include, but is not limited to Georgia tax forms, utility bills, a driver's
license, voter registration card and automobile registration.
Legal residence in the State of Georgia
requires not only recent physical presence in
Georgia, but also the element of intent to
remain indefinitely. Students meeting the following exceptions shall be considered for instate residency rates:
1. Employees and their children who move
to Georgia for employment with a new or
expanding industry as defined in
O.C.G.A. §20-4-40;
2. Non-resident students who are financially dependent upon a parent, parents, or
spouse who has been a legal resident of
Georgia for at least twelve consecutive
months immediately preceding the date
of registration; provided, however, that
such financial dependence shall have
existed for at least twelve consecutive
months immediately preceding the date
of registration;
3. Full-time employees of Georgia's
Technical Colleges, their spouses, and
their dependent children;
4. Full-time teachers in the public schools of
Georgia or in a post-secondary college,
their spouses, and their dependent children. Teachers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia;
5. United States military personnel stationed in Georgia and on active duty and
their dependents living in Georgia;
6. United States military personnel and their
dependents that are legal residents of
Georgia, but are stationed outside the
State;
7. Students who are legal residents of outof-state counties bordering on Georgia
counties located in a Technical College's
service area and who are enrolled in said
Technical College when there is a local
reciprocity agreement in place;
15
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
8. International students when tuition has
been waived by the Technical College
President for a waiver; and
9. Career consular officers and their
dependents that are citizens of the foreign nation which their consular office
represents, and who are stationed living
in Georgia under orders of their respective governments. This waiver shall apply
only to those consular officers whose
nations operate on the principle of educational reciprocity with the United
States.
International Students
The Department recognized two types of
international students: (a) INS-Approved
International Students and (b) Other
International Students. The first category of
students are not U.S. residents, but have
obtained the appropriate INS approval and
documentation to attend a Technical
College. The second category of students
includes those students who are not U.S.
residents, but have provided documentation
that they have received a Georgia High
School Diploma, Georgia G.E.D., or other
documentation establishing they are legally
in the country, such as a green card.
Any student who claims that his or her status
has changed while attending a technical college may request the residency officer for a
re-classification, submitting relevant evidence in support of this claim. If the residency officer determines that a change in status
is appropriate, the new classification shall be
effective as of the beginning of the quarter
next following the determination. Decisions
on classification will be communicated to the
student in written form. Requests for a
change of classification will not be considered more than twice a year.
A student who ceases to become a Georgia
resident shall advise the college of their
change of residence and if college personnel
learn of a student's change of residence, it
may initiate a change in the student's residency status by so advising the residency
officer who shall consider the information as
he or she would regard any other residency
matter.
Any student who disagrees with his or her
classification as determined by the residency
officer may, appeal by use of the complaint
resolution process; however, the decision of
16
the President shall be final.
Emancipated and Unemancipated Students
The term "emancipated student" shall mean
a student who has attained the age of 18
years and whose parents and/or guardians:
1. Have entirely surrendered the right to the
care, custody and earnings of such student;
2. Have not claimed the student as a
dependent for tax purposes for two
years;
3. Do not provide regular financial assistance to the student; and
4. Whose income was not taken into
account by any private or governmental
agency furnishing financial education
assistance to the student, including
scholarships, loans, or otherwise.
If any of the aforesaid tests are not met, the
student shall be presumed to be unemancipated.
Unemancipated Students
Any unemancipated student whose parents
and/or legal guardians have been residents
of the state for one year immediately preceding the first class day of the first quarter
of the student's registration in a Technical
College shall be classified as a resident student as long as the parents and/or legal
guardians continue to be residents of the
state.
Any unemancipated student who initially was
classified as a non-resident student may
thereafter obtain reclassification only if the
student's parents and/or legal guardians
establish and maintain residence in Georgia
for a period of a least one year prior to the
first class day of the quarter for which the
student seeks to be reclassified as a resident
student.
The residency of an unemancipated student,
including those whose parents and/or
guardians are divorced or legally separated,
shall follow that of the parent or legal
guardian who has legal custody or the parent
or legal guardian who is responsible for the
financial support of the student, whichever
favors the student's request for resident student status.
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
An unemancipated student under guardianship shall be required to present satisfactory
documentary evidence of the appointment of
the legal guardian in addition to a certification of the residency of the guardian, which
shall be considered the residency of the student unless there are circumstances indicating that such guardianship was created primarily for the purpose of conferring resident
student status on the student.
An unemancipated student whose parent or
legal guardian is a member of the Armed
Forces and stationed in the state pursuant to
military orders shall be entitled to the classification as a resident student during any
quarter the first class day of which is encompassed by the orders.
If a parent or legal guardian of an unemancipated student ceases to be a legal resident
of Georgia, the student may continue to take
courses for a period of twelve consecutive
months as a resident student.
Emancipated Students
Any emancipated student may be classified
as an in-state student if the student meets
the following tests:
1. At the time of emancipation, the student's
parents and/or guardians were residents
of Georgia for one year immediately preceding the first class day of the first quarter of the student's registration at a
Technical College or other public institution of higher education, or having
become emancipated, the student establishes and maintains residency in
Georgia for one year immediately preceding the first day of the quarter of the
student's registration at a Technical
College or other public institution of
higher education; and
2. The student does not hold residency in
another state or foreign country; and
3. The student is and continues to be a resident of Georgia.
Any emancipated student who initially was
classified as an out-of-state student may
thereafter obtain reclassification as an instate student only if the student establishes
and maintains residency in Georgia for a
period of at least one year prior to the first
class day of the quarter for which re-classification as an in-state student is being sought.
A student from another state or foreign country who is enrolled at a Technical College for
more than 11 credits per quarter shall be presumed to be in Georgia primarily for educational purposes and will be presumed to
have not been a resident of the state during
the time so enrolled. Continued presence in
Georgia during vacation periods or occasional interruptions in the course of study will
not, of itself, overcome these presumptions.
Entrance Requirements
Applicants must complete and return all
required forms and credentials to the college
prior to open registration. Students are
encouraged to apply or update their applications well in advance of open registration.
Late applications may be considered only if
time permits. Delays in acceptance will occur
if application materials are received in several segments and/or if the applicant must be
reminded to submit certain documents.
Students applying for admission to Lanier
Tech must be 16 years of age or older.
Applicants must be 17 years of age or older
for admission into the Cosmetology and all
Health programs. The President of Lanier
Technical Colege may waive the “16 years of
age” requirement for secondary students
who are participating in an articlated program of study such as dual or joint enrollment.
A regular high school diploma or a General
Educational Development Diploma (GED) is
required as a prerequisite for entrance into
some diploma and certificate programs and
for all degree programs. See specific
entrance requirements for individual programs. A regular high school diploma or
GED is required for all associate degree programs prior to admission. The President of
Lanier Technical College may grant a waiver
to the admissions requirement as it relates to
possessing a GED or high school diploma
for those secondary students who are otherwise eligible to enroll in a program of study
that is agreed upon by the secondary school
and Lanier Technical College. This may
apply to students seeking dual or joint enrollment with Lanier Tech.
A high school diploma or a GED is not
required as a prerequisite for entrance in all
diploma programs; however, prior to gradua17
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
tion from a diploma program at Lanier Tech,
all students must receive either a high school
diploma or a GED. An applicant who does
not have a high school diploma or GED, and
who wishes to apply for financial aid, may
demonstrate eligibility for entry to those programs not requiring a high school diploma/GED if the applicant achieves acceptable
scores on the Ability-to-Benefit (ATB) ASSET
Examination as well as acceptable program
entry scores. Passing the ATB exam does
not take the place of having a high school
diploma or GED for those programs that
require a diploma or GED as a prerequisite
for admission purposes.
The federal Department of Education guidelines specify that the minimum passing
scores for HEA Title IV grant, loan, or work
assistance eligibility for ATB students is a
scale score on the ASSET admissions exam.
If these scores are not met and the student
does not have a diploma or GED, he/she is
not eligible for the federal Pell grant or
Federal Work Study.
Applicants must be physically able to attend
school. In some programs, a student who
has a physical condition that would limit participation in a class/lab should provide a written statement from a doctor indicating the
student's ability to perform all class/lab
requirements.
Admission Procedures
1.Submit a completed application and a $15
nonrefundable application fee to the
Admissions Office.
2. Submit an official copy of high school transcript or GED scores to the Admissions
Office. (Transcript request forms are available in the Admissions Office.)
3. Submit an official copy of all post-secondary transcripts to the Admissions Office.
Veterans must submit a copy of Form DD214
to verify courses completed in the military.
(Transcript request forms are available in the
Admissions Office.)
4. Take the ASSET placement test. In lieu of
the ASSET, official scores on the SAT, ACT,
CPE, or COMPASS can be submitted. These
scores may be accepted provided that they
are no more than five years old. Official transcripts from a regionally accredited postsecondary institution documenting successful
completion (a grade of C or better) in equiv18
alent, program-level English and math courses may be submitted in lieu of taking the
placement test. Reasonable accommodations may be made for students with documented disabilities. (Please notify the
Admissions Office prior to the scheduled test
date.)
5. Applicants are processed and the names
of applicants are placed on a list of programs
on a first-come, first-served priority, except in
competitive admission programs. Because
of the increasing demand for technical training, the chances of being accepted in the
desired program are better if a student
applies early. Students are notified by mail of
their acceptance into a program, and are
mailed a time and date to report for registration.
NOTE: Certain certificate programs do not
require a high school diploma, GED, or
placement test scores. Placement tests are
not required for special admission (nondegree/diploma/certificate) students unless
recommended by the Admissions Office.
Recommendation will be based on educational data listed on the Application for
Admission. Contact the Admissions Office
for details.
International Students
Individuals with permanent resident status
may be admitted under the same circumstances as any other eligible student. They
must complete the following requirements in
addition to the admission procedures for new
students:
1. Furnish an official English translation of
all secondary and postsecondary records
and an evaluation of those records performed by an independent evaluation service. Documentation of U.S. high school
equivalency is required for certain programs.
2. Provide ASSET, SAT, ACT, COMPASS or
CPE scores. If these scores are not available, report when scheduled for the admissions placement test. Foreign immigrants
who are permanent residents shall pay the
same tuition as citizens of Georgia. Note:
Lanier Tech does not issue I-20 VISAs.
3. Students who are not citizens or permanent resident aliens shall pay out of country
tuition which is four times the in-state tuition.
Double Majors
Lanier Tech does not allow a student to
enroll in two different programs at the same
time. A student must complete all require-
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
ments for one program before applying and
being accepted into another program.
Transfer Students
Applicants to Lanier Tech who have been
previously enrolled at a postsecondary institution will be considered for admission under
the following policies:
• Applicants who are in good standing at
their previous institution may be accepted in
good standing; and
• Applicants who are on academic probation at their previous institution may be
accepted on academic probation.
• Applicants who wish to transfer to Lanier
Tech must meet the entrance requirements
and follow the admissions procedures previously listed.
Transient Students
A student in good standing at another
accredited institution may be permitted to
enroll as a "transient" student on a spaceavailable basis in order to complete work to
be transferred to the parent institution. A
transient student should be advised in writing by the parent institution concerning recommended courses. The transient student
must:
• Submit an application and $15 nonrefundable application fee to Lanier Tech.
• Present a statement from the Registrar or
Academic Dean of the parent institution that
the student is in good standing and eligible to
return to that institution. Enrollment is usually limited to one quarter; and,
• Pay all scheduled tuition and fees of
Lanier Tech or have preapproval for financial
aid.
• Applicants for transient status must reap
ply and receive transient status approval
for each quarter that they wish to enroll
under the transient status.
Practical
Students
Nursing
Transfer
Applicants to Lanier Tech who have been
previously enrolled at a postsecondary institution and desire entrance into the Practical
Nursing program must meet all admissions
requirements of transfer students. In addition, these applicants must adhere to the
competitive admission process used by the
Practical Nursing program at Lanier Tech..
Applicants will then be admitted on a space
available basis within the appropriate course
sequence.
NOTE: If a transfer student has not exited
Developmental Studies courses at another
Georgia technical college, he/she will be
placed at the last level achieved at the previous institution. If a transfer student has not
exited Developmental Studies at any other
institution, he/she will be required to take the
portion of the ASSET (reading, writing, or
numerical skills) that he/she has not exited.
Tech Prep Program
The Tech Prep Program is designed to help
students get a head start on working in a
technical field or continuing their education
at technical or two year college. The program
includes a common core of math, science,
communications and technical courses
designed to lead to an associate degree,
technical diploma, or an apprenticeship in a
specific area. Students may be able to transfer high school course work to Lanier Tech or
exempt certain courses through academic
and/or performance testing.
Admissions Categories
Regular Admission of students to a program
is contingent upon their meeting statewide
admissions requirements and institutional
admissions requirements established for that
specific program and upon proper completion of all admissions procedures.
Provisional Admission of students to a program is based on an evaluation of test
scores and other admission file data by the
Office of Admissions and program faculty
and upon proper completion of all admissions procedures. Provisionally admitted students whose English, Math and/or Reading
levels do not meet regular admission
requirements must enroll in Developmental
Studies classes. Provisionally admitted students are allowed to take certain programs
specific courses as designated in the program standards. All students initially admitted on a provisional basis must meet regular
program admission requirements prior to
graduation. Provisional admission of transfer
students to a program is contingent upon
their meeting applicable licensure and
accreditation requirements.
Developmental Studies Admission is granted
to students who do not meet the regular or
provisional admission requirements. All students initially admitted on a Developmental
19
Lanier Techical College - Admissions
Studies Admissions Status must meet regular program admission requirements prior to
graduation. Students classified in this category are eligible to enroll in developmental
courses only or may be referred to Adult
Literacy depending upon test results. Adult
Literacy and/or Developmental Studies
classes are offered to enable students to
meet recommended standards. Courses
include reading, math, and English thus
improving the student's chances of success
in a regular program of study. Students may
also receive English as a Second Language
(ESL) instruction.
Special Status Admission is granted to an
applicant who desires to take credit courses
for personal or professional benefit but who
does not plan to earn a degree, diploma or
certificate. The following parameters apply to
this classification:
•
`•
•
•
•
•
Classified as non-award seeking when
granted special student status by the
Admissions Office.
Must adhere to the specific institutional
prerequisite requirements when selecting courses.
Credit is received for regular program
course work which is satisfactorily com
pleted.
Credit may be received for an unlimited
number of courses; but only 25 credit
hours may be applied toward a specific
degree, diploma or certificate program.
May apply for regular student status but
must meet the requirements of the regular student admission process. This
includes the College's assessment
process. The number of hours taken as a
special student in no way waives the
requirements of the regular admission
process.
A Special Admission Student must meet
regular admission status prior to graduation.
Allied Health Technical
Certificate
Students applying for competitive admission
Allied Health programs such as Dental
Assisting, Practical Nursing, and Surgical
Technology will be initially admitted to this
certificate program in order for them to complete core course requirements and the
competitive admission process for their program of study. Any required developmental
coursework may also be completed while
enrolled in this certificate program. Students
20
enrolled in the Allied Health Certificate may
not be eligible for Federal Financial Aid.
Dual Enrollment
High School students may enroll at Lanier
Tech and receive credits at both the high
school and Lanier Tech. A formal articulation
agreement between the high school and
Lanier Tech is required. Students must meet
the admission requirements for their intended program of study.
Joint Enrollment
High school students may enroll at Lanier
Tech and receive credit at Lanier Tech only.
Students must meet the admission requirements for their intended program of study.
Change of Program
Students desiring to change programs must
complete the appropriate forms and meet all
the admissions standards for their new program of study. If the program to which the
student is attempting to transfer has a waiting list, the student will be placed on the list
in accordance with the date of application for
transfer. The student will be notified by the
Director of Admissions of his/her admission
status into the new program. Change of program forms should be submitted prior to registration to ensure timely processing.
Disadvantaged & Disabled
Students
Within a framework of personal guidance
and evaluation, special services are provided for the disadvantaged and/or disabled
student, and students with limited English
proficiency. These services include aiding
students in setting realistic goals, making
reasonable accommodations, providing job
orientation and placement, providing assistance in determining the degree and nature
of the disability and/or disadvantage, and
suggesting community service agencies for
additional assistance. For further information, contact the Special Needs Counselor in
the Student Services Office on the Main
Campus.
Lanier Technical College - Admissions
Readmission
A student who leaves the College in good
standing may apply for readmission as early as
the next academic quarter. This should be done
through the Admission Office.
Students who have been dismissed because
of unsatisfactory academic progress may be
readmitted after one quarter of absence from
the School.
A student suspended for disciplinary reasons
may be considered for readmission at the
end of the suspension by making an appeal
through the Vice President for Student
Services' Office.
Readmission to a program will be granted on
a space-available basis within the appropriate course sequence. A student will be
required to complete the curriculum requirements in place at the time of re-enrollment.
Readmission to the Nursing
Program
Students dropped from the Practical Nursing
program for attendance (i.e., maternity,
health related, family illness, personal difficulties), academic reasons or students who
have made less than a "C" in a nursing
course will be allowed to repeat the
course(s) one time only. Readmission to the
program will be granted on a space-available
basis within the appropriate course
sequence and will be based on the date the
student applied for readmission.
21
22
Registration
23
Lanier Technical College - Registration
Registration
Registration dates will be published annually
in the school calendar. In-house memos, the
video information system, the school
newsletter, and other correspondence may
also be used to notify students and employees of registration dates and times.
Individual notices will be sent to new students only. Students are responsible for
keeping apprised of registration dates and
times. Contact the Office of Student Services
concerning registration information.
Registration Eligibility
Students who have received an official letter
of acceptance to the school and continuing
students not on academic suspension may
register for classes. Students enrolling under
the special admission provisions are also eligible to register for certain classes.
Registration Procedures
Registration for credit classes occurs in
three phases at Lanier Tech:
1.
2.
3.
Advisement/Registration for currently enrolled students - A restricted
registration held only for currently
enrolled students.
Pre-Registration – An early registration held for new students who have
completed all admission requirements.
Late Registration - An open-to-all
registration for new, current, and former students regardless of their
admissions classification.
Quarterly Course Schedule
The quarterly course schedule contains
information
concerning
registration.
Students are urged to become knowledgeable about these instructions and to follow
them explicitly. Any deviation from the prescribed procedure may result in unnecessary
delays in registration or errors in the resulting schedule. Advisors are available to students for academic advisement and scheduling of classes. Applicants will not be
approved for academic advisement and/or
registration until formally accepted by the
Admissions Office nor will they be permitted
to attend classes until registration has been
24
completed.
Matriculation
Registration is not complete until fees are
paid. Students who receive any type of financial aid must visit the Financial Aid Office
each quarter.
Full Time Student Status
A student must be registered for a minimum
of 12 quarter credit hours to be considered a
full-time student.
Maximum Number of Credit
Hours
A student may not register for more than 18
credit hours without approval from the Vice
President of Instruction, Vice President of
Operations, or their designee.
Registration Errors
It is the student's responsibility to complete
the proper forms and procedures for registration or changes to registration and to verify that his/her schedule of classes is correct.
The Registrar‘s Office cannot be held
responsible for errors resulting from the student's failure to execute the proper procedure or verify his/her schedule at the time it
is received. Any problems experienced at
registration or as a result of registration
should be reported immediately to the
Registrar.
Auditing Courses
A student who wishes to audit a course(s)
and receive no credit may apply as a special
admissions student if not already enrolled as
a regular student. By registering as an audit
student and paying the regular fees and
tuition, a student is permitted to audit a
course. Students auditing courses are not
required to take exams; however, the
instructor may request that students demonstrate required knowledge before being
allowed to perform certain tasks to operate
equipment. A student is not permitted to
change from audit to credit or from credit to
audit after the drop/add period. However, a
student will be permitted to register for the
course for credit at a later date. Students
desiring to change from audit to credit must
meet all necessary admission requirements.
Lanier Technical College - Registration
A grade of "AU" will be entered on the permanent record. Courses taken on an audit
basis will not be used for certification for
financial aid, the President's List, Social
Security, or Veteran's Administration education benefits. To audit a class, a student
should contact his/her advisor or the
Admissions Office.
Adding Courses
Through the end of the fifth day of the quarter, a student may add a course to an already
existing schedule. To add a course, a student must obtain a Drop/Add Form from
his/her advisor, obtain the signature of the
advisor, sign and date the form, and submit it
to the Office of Student Services prior to the
close of the office on the fifth day of the quarter. Students who add a course may owe
additional tuition and fees (see Financial
Information).
Dropping Courses
Through the end of the fifth day of the quarter, a student may drop a course from an
already existing schedule. To drop a course,
a student must obtain a Withdrawal Form
from his/her advisor, sign and date the form,
and submit it to the Office of Student
Services prior to the close of the office on the
fifth day of the quarter. Note: This deadline is
strictly enforced. A student who drops a
course may be due a refund (see Refund
Policy).
Withdrawing From Courses
Through the end of the last day of the quarter, a student may withdraw from a course.
To withdraw from a course, a student must
obtain a Withdrawal Form from his/her advisor, sign and date the form, and submit it to
the Office of Student Services immediately
but no later than the close of the office on the
last day of the quarter.
Note: This deadline is strictly enforced. A student dropping a course on or after the first
day of the quarter but by the midpoint date of
the quarter will receive a grade of "W." A student who drops a course after the midpoint
date will be assigned a "WP" or "WF." A student who withdraws from a course prior to
the first day of the quarter or during the five-
day drop period may be due a refund of
tuition (see Refund Policy). Students on
financial aid should be aware that a drop or
withdrawal may affect their financial aid.
Withdrawing From the
Institution
Through the end of the last scheduled class
day of the quarter, a student may drop all
courses thus withdrawing for the quarter. To
withdraw for the quarter, a student must
obtain a Withdrawal Form from his/her advisor, sign and date the form, and submit it to
the Office of Student Services immediately.
The Withdrawal Form must be turned in to
the Office of Student Services no later than
the close of the office on the last day of the
quarter. A student who withdraws may be
due a refund of tuition and fees (see Refund
Policy).
Note: This deadline is strictly enforced. If a
student withdraws prior to the first day of the
quarter, no grade will appear on the student's
official academic record. A student who withdraws after the first day of the quarter will be
assigned a grade of "W" in each class if the
withdrawal is completed by the midpoint date
of the quarter. A student who withdraws after
the midpoint date will be assigned a grade of
"WP" or "WF" if the withdrawal is submitted
to the Office of Student Services by the close
of the office on the last day of the quarter.
Note: Students who stop attending a class,
but do not complete a Withdrawal Form and
submit it to the Office of Student Services in
the required manner, will remain on the class
roll and will be assigned an appropriate
grade on the final class roll based on the
class requirements. It is the student's and
not the instructor's responsibility to complete
and submit this form.
No-Show
Policy/Reinstatement
For day students, any student who does not
attend at least one day during the first two
class days or contact their instructor will
have his or her registration terminated. For
evening and Saturday students, any student
who does not attend the first night of class,
the first Saturday class, or contact their
25
Lanier Technical College - Registration
instructor will have his or her registration terminated. Any no-show student whose registration is voided and who seeks reinstatement must obtain approval from the college
administration. If reinstated, the student
must reregister. A late fee may be charged.
Note: Some classes have waiting lists. When
a no-show student's registration is canceled,
students on waiting lists are given the opportunity to register. This means that no-show
students may lose their place in class.
26
Financial
Information
27
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Cost of Degree, Diploma, and Certificate Programs
Program
Length of
Estimated Books
Programs *
&
(Qtrs.)* Tuition & Fees
Supplies
Degree Programs
Accounting
Administrative Office Technology
Banking and Finance
Business Studies
e-business Application Development
CIS - Database Specialist
CIS - Information Security Specialist
CIS – Microcomputer Specialist
CIS – Networking Specialist
CIS - Internet Specialist - Web Site Design
Criminal Justice Technology
Drafting Technology
Early Childhood Care and Education
Electronics Technology
Fire Science Technology
Health Care Management Technology
Health Studies
Industrial Systems Technology
Interiors
Management & Supervisory Development
Marketing Management
Medical Laboratory Technology
Motorsports Vehicle Technology
Occupational Health & Safety Technology
Personal/Public Studies
Public Works Civil Technology
Surgical Technology
Technical Studies
Total
Estimated
Cost
6
6
6
3
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
8
6
3
6
6
6
6
7
6
6
3
6
7
3
$3,186.00
$3,130.00
$3,410.00
$2,685.00
$2,786.00
$3,354.00
$3,074.00
$3,410.00
$3,186.00
$3,186.00
$2,935.00
$3,018.00
$3,421.00
$3,186.00
$3,464.00
$3,382.00
$2,685.00
$3,326.00
$3,354.00
$3,158.00
$3,074.00
$3,756.00
$3,326.00
$3,102.00
$2,685.00
$3,236.00
$3,448.00
$2,685.00
$1,560.00
$1,740.00
$1,690.00
$1,000.00
$1,500.00
$1,500.00
$1,700.00
$1,020.00
$1,780.00
$1,700.00
$1,500.00
$1,000.00
$1,620.00
$1,770.00
$1,960.00
$2,000.00
$930.00
$2,090.00
$1,600.00
$1,710.00
$1,770.00
$1,700.00
$1,150.00
$1,060.00
$930.00
$550.00
$1,380.00
$930.00
$4,746.00
$4,870.00
$5,100.00
$3,685.00
$4,286.00
$4,854.00
$4,774.00
$4,430.00
$4,966.00
$4,886.00
$4,435.00
$4,018.00
$5,041.00
$4,956.00
$5,424.00
$5,382.00
$3,615.00
$5,416.00
$4,954.00
$4,868.00
$4,844.00
$5,456.00
$4,476.00
$4,162.00
$3,615.00
$3,786.00
$4,828.00
$3,615.00
4
6
4
4
5
4
5
5
5
5
6
5
4
5
7
4
4
$2,264.00
$2,655.00
$2,740.00
$2,206.00
$2,739.00
$2,208.00
$2,795.00
$2,683.00
$2,739.00
$2,795.00
$2,850.00
$2,330.00
$2,180.00
$3,273.00
$4,338.00
$2,432.00
$2,376.00
$1,100.00
$1,140.00
$1,000.00
$530.00
$1,310.00
$1,560.00
$1,500.00
$1,700.00
$1,090.00
$894.00
$1,410.00
$1,390.00
$990.00
$900.00
$3,706.00
$600.00
$630.00
$3,364.00
$3,795.00
$3,740.00
$2,736.00
$4,049.00
$3,768.00
$4,295.00
$4,383.00
$3,829.00
$3,689.00
$4,260.00
$3,720.00
$3,170.00
$4,173.00
$8,044.00
$3,032.00
$3,006.00
Diploma Programs
Accounting
Air Conditioning Technology
Applied Manufacturing Tech
Automotive Collision Repair
Banking and Finance
Business Office Technology
e-business Applications Development
CIS - Information Security Specialist
CIS – Internet Specialist / Web Site Design
CIS – Microcomputer Specialist
CIS – Networking Specialist
Cosmetology
Criminal Justice Technology
Dental Assisting
Dental Hygiene
Distribution & Materials Management
Drafting Technology
28
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Program
Length of
Estimated Books
Programs *
&
(Qtrs.)* Tuition & Fees
Supplies
Early Childhood Care and Education
Electrical Control Systems
Electronics Fundamentals
Electronics Technology
Facilities Management Technology (New)
Fire Science Technology
Firefighter/EMT
Industrial Systems Technology
Interiors
Machine Tool Technology
Management & Supervisory Development
Marketing Management
Mechanical Control Systems
Medical Assisting
Medical Laboratory Technology
Motor Sports Vehicle Technology
Occupational Health & Safety Technology
Paramedic Technology
Practical Nursing
Printing and Graphics Technology
Public Works Civil Technology
Surgical Technology
Welding & Joining Technology
Total
Estimated
Cost
4
5
4
6
5
5
7
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
4
5
5
5
5
4
5
5
$2,275.00
$2,459.00
$2,040.00
$2,850.00
$2,767.00
$2,767.00
$2,671.00
$2,850.00
$2,543.00
$2,655.00
$2,655.00
$2,739.00
$2,319.00
$2,610.00
$3,057.00
$2,740.00
$2,571.00
$2,505.00
$2,946.00
$2,599.00
$2,650.00
$2,722.00
$2,319.00
$1,000.00
$1,490.00
$876.00
$1,270.00
$1,500.00
$1,390.00
$680.00
$1,690.00
$1,500.00
$770.00
$1,330.00
$1,280.00
$930.00
$1,830.00
$1,240.00
$700.00
$810.00
$1,630.00
$1,340.00
$910.00
$300.00
$1,110.00
$350.00
$3,275.00
$3,949.00
$2,916.00
$4,120.00
$4,267.00
$4,157.00
$3,351.00
$4,540.00
$4,043.00
$3,425.00
$3,985.00
$4,019.00
$3,249.00
$4,440.00
$4,297.00
$3,440.00
$3,381.00
$4,135.00
$4,286.00
$3,509.00
$2,950.00
$3,832.00
$2,669.00
2
2
2
2
3
2
8
2
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
4
5
4
3
2
2
2
$754.00
$950.00
$810.00
$1,034.00
$1,929.00
$670.00
$1,868.00
$810.00
$949.00
$1,173.00
$698.00
$824.00
$740.00
$740.00
$877.00
$740.00
$642.00
$864.00
$892.00
$1,495.00
$1,368.00
$837.00
$698.00
$586.00
$866.00
$400.00
$260.00
$550.00
$956.00
$70.00
$210.00
$110.00
$400.00
$250.00
$290.00
$290.00
$230.00
$250.00
$250.00
$310.00
$250.00
$400.00
$230.00
$330.00
$620.00
$260.00
$300.00
$230.00
$250.00
$500.00
$1,154.00
$1,210.00
$1,360.00
$1,990.00
$1,999.00
$880.00
$1,978.00
$1,210.00
$1,199.00
$1,463.00
$988.00
$1,054.00
$990.00
$990.00
$1,187.00
$990.00
$1,042.00
$1,094.00
$1,222.00
$2,115.00
$1,628.00
$1,137.00
$928.00
$836.00
$1,366.00
Certificate Programs
Accounting Assistant
Advanced Cad Technician
Advanced Fire Company Officer
Advanced General Machinist
Advanced Industrial Systems Technician
Advanced Leadership & Management
Automotive Repair & Refinishing Tech
Basic Fire Company Officer
Basic Machining (Machine Tool Oper)
Basic Printing Technician
Business Management
CAD Operator
Certified Customer Service Spec
Certified Manufacturing Specialist
Certified Nursing Assistant
Certified Warehousing & Distribution Spec
Child Development Associate I
Cisco Network Professional
Cisco Specialist
Cisco Technician
CNC Specialist
Computer Applications Specialist
Computer Essentials in Spanish
Computer Internet Communications
Computer Repair Technician
29
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Program
Length of
Estimated Books
Programs *
&
(Qtrs.)* Tuition & Fees
Supplies
Cosmetic Esthetician
Criminal Justice Specialist
Dental Assisting Technician
Dental Infection Control Specialist
Desktop Publishing
Drafting Aide
Early Childhood Program Administrator
Emergency Medical Technician – Basic
Emergency Medical Technician – Intermed.
Emergency Medical Technician +
Fire Company Officer
Fire Fighter I
Fire Fighter II
Gas Metal Arc Welding
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
General Office Assistant
Graphic Arts Fundamentals
Health Care Assistant
Horticulture Maintenance Tech
Information Security Specialist
Industrial Mechanical Tech
Industrial Motor Control Technician
Infant/Toddler Care Specialist
Interior Design Assistant
LINUX/UNIX Specialist
LINUX/UNIX Systems Administrator
Management Specialist
Manufacturing Associate Technician
Medical Coding
Medical Receptionist
Medical Secretary
Medical Transcription Technician
Microsoft Network Specialist
Microsoft Office Core Specialist
Microsoft Office Expert
Microsoft Office Master
MIG Welding
Network Support Technician
Occupational Safety Manager
PC Operations
Perioperative Nurse
Pharmacy Assistant
Phlebotomy Technician
Private Security Specialist
Programmable Logic Controllers
Public Works Civil Technician Aide
Residential Design Drafter
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
Small Business Management
Supervisory Specialist
Team Leader Specialist
30
4
2
3
2
2
2
2
2
3
4
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
2
3
2
2
2
3
2
3
4
2
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
2
2
3
3
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
$2,247.00
$894.00
$1,268.00
$681.00
$838.00
$824.00
$530.00
$786.00
$1,219.00
$2,030.00
$810.00
$824.00
$866.00
$558.00
$782.00
$950.00
$670.00
$1,312.00
$838.00
$1,117.00
$726.00
$558.00
$810.00
$1,089.00
$782.00
$1,537.00
$780.00
$838.00
$1,173.00
$949.00
$949.00
$1,369.00
$1,061.00
$698.00
$921.00
$1,089.00
$810.00
$838.00
$1,089.00
$754.00
$877.00
$1,100.00
$932.00
$830.00
$614.00
$1,201.00
$740.00
$1,257.00
$1,006.00
$838.00
$614.00
$310.00
$470.00
$355.00
$255.00
$270.00
$330.00
$100.00
$210.00
$300.00
$660.00
$300.00
$140.00
$500.00
$100.00
$260.00
$430.00
$150.00
$600.00
$110.00
$800.00
$220.00
$260.00
$280.00
$500.00
$270.00
$440.00
$600.00
$510.00
$700.00
$710.00
$350.00
$550.00
$450.00
$230.00
$340.00
$410.00
$300.00
$270.00
$200.00
$330.00
$570.00
$430.00
$210.00
$210.00
$250.00
$350.00
$120.00
$260.00
$420.00
$380.00
$250.00
Total
Estimated
Cost
$2,557.00
$1,364.00
$1,623.00
$936.00
$1,108.00
$1,154.00
$630.00
$996.00
$1,519.00
$2,690.00
$1,110.00
$964.00
$1,366.00
$658.00
$1,042.00
$1,380.00
$820.00
$1,912.00
$948.00
$1,917.00
$946.00
$818.00
$1,090.00
$1,589.00
$1,052.00
$1,977.00
$1,380.00
$1,348.00
$1,873.00
$1,659.00
$1,299.00
$1,919.00
$1,511.00
$928.00
$1,261.00
$1,499.00
$1,110.00
$1,108.00
$1,289.00
$1,084.00
$1,447.00
$1,530.00
$1,142.00
$1,040.00
$864.00
$1,551.00
$860.00
$1,517.00
$1,426.00
$1,218.00
$864.00
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Telecomm. Service & Elect. Tech
TIG Welding
Web Site Design Specialist
Web Site Fundamentals
3
2
3
2
$1,313.00
$530.00
$1,481.00
$586.00
$830.00
$130.00
$510.00
$200.00
$2,143.00
$660.00
$1,991.00
$786.00
* Based on fulltime enrollment
Some certificate programs (i.e. EMT, CMS, ACR) require higher tuition. Contact the Office of
Admissions for details. The cost of books, workbooks and other training materials will vary by
program.
Tuition & Fee Payment
• Tuition/fees may be paid by cash, personal check, money order, MasterCard,
or Visa.
• A student who has a returned check may
be required to make future payments by
cash or money order.
• Lanier Tech does not cash personal
checks.
• Checks made out to Lanier Tech should
be for the exact amount of tuition and
fees.
• Students should keep registration
receipts for future needs such as tax
information, reimbursement, etc.
• Students who register with Financial Aid,
i.e. HOPE and/or Pell are responsible for
assuring that their financial aid files are
complete prior to registration each quarter. Students who have Third Party agencies invoiced for their tuition and fees
must make sure that proper authorization
has been provided to the Financial Aid
Office prior to their scheduled registra-tion date. Third Party agencies include,
but are not restricted to: Vocational
Rehabilitation with the Georgia
Department of Labor, WIA, Workman’s
Compensation, Department of Veterans
Affairs Rehabilitation Services, Company
Billing and Georgia Department of Labor
Trade Act Training.
Refunds
Students not receiving financial assistance
and students awarded HOPE funds only, will
receive refunds in accordance with the
Institutional Refund Policy. Title IV recipients
who totally withdraw from Lanier Tech will
have their refunds calculated in accordance
with the Return of Title IV Funds Refund policy. Students receiving Title IV funds and
HOPE funds will have their refunds calculat-
ed in accordance with the Title IV refund policy and the Institutional Refund Policy. The
refund policies are outlined on the following
pages.
Return Of Title IV
Funds Policy
When a Title IV recipient totally withdraws,
Lanier Tech must use the following steps to
return Title IV aid:
1. Determine a student's withdrawal date.
2. Determine the amount of aid disbursed
for the payment period.
3. Determine the amount of Title IV aid disbursed plus the Title IV aid that could
have been disbursed for the payment
period.
4. Determine the percentage of Title IV aid
the student earned by dividing the number of calendar days attended during the
quarter by the total number of calendar
days in the quarter.
5. Calculate amount of Title IV aid earned
by the student by multiplying the above
percentage by the total of Title IV aid disbursed plus the Title IV aid that could
have been disbursed for the payment
period.
6. Determine if student is due a
Postwithdrawal Disbursement or if Title
IV aid must be returned. If the amount of
Title IV aid earned is greater than the
total of Title IV aid disbursed then subtract the Title IV aid disbursed for the
payment period from the amount of Title
IV aid earned. This is the amount of the
post-withdrawal disbursement due. If the
amount of Total Title IV aid disbursed is
greater than the amount of Title IV Aid
earned by the student, then subtract the
amount of Title IV aid earned from Title
IV aid disbursed for the payment period.
31
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
This is the amount of Title IV aid that
must be returned.
7. Calculate amount of unearned Title IV
aid due from the school. Multiply institu-tional charges for the payment period
times the percentage of Title IV aid
unearned. Compare this amount to the
amount of Title IV aid to be returned and
enter the lesser amount.
8. Determine return of funds by school. The
school must return the unearned aid for
which the school is responsible by repaying funds to the follow sources, in order,
up to the total net amount disbursed from
each source. The aid programs are as
follows: Unsubsidized FFEL/Direct
Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford
Loan, Perkins Loan, FFEL/Direct
Plus, Pell Grant, FSEOG Grant and
Other Title IV programs.
9. Calculate initial amount of unearned
Title IV aid due from student.
Subtract the amount of Title IV aid
due from the school from the amount
of Title IV aid to be returned.
10. Determine return of funds by
student.
Refund Policy for Title IV &
HOPE Recipients
If the student received federal Title IV funds
in addition to HOPE funds, Lanier Tech must
follow the Title IV Return of Funds policy to
determine the amount of federal Title IV
refund. To determine the refund to HOPE,
Lanier Tech must then follow the institutional
refund policy. If all or part of the student‘s
Title IV aid was disbursed directly to the student, the school must bill the student for the
refund. This notice will show all financial aid
received by the student, the amount earned
by the student, and the amount to be
returned by the student to the school.
Refund Policy for HOPE Only
Recipients
If a refund is due and the student received
HOPE funds but did not receive federal Title
IV funds, then such amounts must be
refunded to HOPE, by applying the institution's refund policy to the student's original
HOPE award for tuition and HOPE approved
32
mandatory fees.
Institutional Refund Policy
Students not receiving financial assistance
and students awarded HOPE Funds only will
receive refunds in accordance with the
Institutional Refund Policy. One hundred percent (100%) of tuition and all fees excluding
the application fee will be refunded if the student formally withdraws before the first day
of the quarter. For the purpose of refund calculations, the first day of the quarter is considered to be the official first day of class
shown on the school calendar. (It is not the
first day of scheduled classes for an individual student unless the student's classes are
set-up as a special part of term.) The school
calendar gives the last dates for refunds
each quarter for all classes except those that
are set-up as a special part of term.
Seventy-five percent (75%) of the tuition will
be refunded if the student formally withdraws
within the first five (5) class days for any
quarter. (It is not the first day of scheduled
classes for an individual student.)
Unexpected school closure (for example,
due to inclement weather) that occurs within
the refund period will be taken into consideration in the calculation of refunds. Under
these circumstances, the President of the
school may extend the refund period. There
will be no refund of fees (activity, registration,
late, and insurance) if the student withdraws
after the one hundred percent (100%) refund
period has passed. After the first five (5)
class days for any quarter, there will be no
refund. Any student who withdraws or is
dropped from school after the one hundred
percent (100%) refund period has passed
will forfeit all rights to any benefits from the
school activity fee.
Some courses may be cancelled due to low
enrollment. In the event of a cancellation, a
student may choose to change to an alternate course or may receive a refund.
Refunds due to a course cancellation will be
at one hundred percent (100%). Refunds are
processed when a student withdraws or is
withdrawn from the college without requiring
a request from the student. These refunds
are processed through the Registrar‘s Office
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
and the Administrative Services Office. The
refund check will be mailed to the student's
address.
Financial Aid Programs
Foundation Scholarships
The Lanier Tech Foundation, through donations from business, industry, civic organizations, and individuals, provide scholarships
for deserving students. These funds may
supplement federal and state grants and
may be used for both direct and indirect
costs associated with educational expenses
incurred during the period awarded. The
Lanier Tech Financial Aid Office announces
the availability of external scholarships as
openings arise. Students should obtain a
Foundation Scholarship application from the
Financial Aid Office. Lanier Tech Foundation
Scholarship applications will be reviewed
and awarded by the Foundation Scholarship
Committee. Please check for deadline dates.
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Pell Grant
The Pell Grant is a federal grant funded by
the Department of Education. Students who
demonstrate financial need, who are
enrolled in a Pell eligible program and have
not received a Bachelor’s degree may qualify for this grant. Most short-term certificate
programs do not meet the program length
requirements as established by the
Department of Education and therefore, do
not meet the definition of a Pell eligible program. All diploma and associate degree programs are Pell eligible programs. Pell
awards are payable in four equal installments to be disbursed after the date considered to be the mid-point of each quarter.
Students must complete the Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form in
order to determine eligibility. This aid does
not have to be repaid provided the recipient
meets all requirements.
• Developmental Studies and Special
Admissions students are not eligible for
federal financial aid benefits.
• Students enrolled in diploma programs
receiving Title IV (Pell Grant) are limited
to taking NO MORE THAN 50% of their
courses via the Internet.
• Pell Grant awards are based on a student’s enrollment status, cost of attendance, program of study and degree of
financial need.
• Students who withdraw from the college
before the 6th week of the quarter will
have their Pell award pro-rated.
Applicants who also meet the HOPE
Program eligibility requirements may use the
HOPE Grant/Scholarship to cover quarterly
tuition and fees charges. This enhancement
of the HOPE Scholarship program will allow
those applicants who qualify for any of the
federal grant awards to use this aid for other
educational expenses incurred during the
quarter.
Federal Work Study
The Federal Work Study Program provides
part-time jobs for students with financial
need, allowing them to earn money to help
pay educational expenses. This program
encourages community service work and
work related to your course of study.
Participation in the program is based on
need, the availability of jobs, and the funding
provided to Lanier Tech by the Department
of Education. Students may apply by completing the FAFSA and a Lanier Tech Federal
Work-Study Application.
Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant
This grant provides aid to students with
exceptional financial need and gives priority
to students who receive Federal Pell Grants.
The amount of the award depends upon the
financial resources of the individual and his
or her parents and the funding provided to
Lanier Tech by the Department of Education.
FSEOG is awarded on a first come basis
until all funds are exhausted. Students may
apply by completing the FAFSA.
Georgia LEAP Grant Program
(Leveraging Educational
Assistance Partnership)
The Georgia Leveraging Educational
Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Grant
Program was created to provide educational
grant assistance to residents of Georgia who
demonstrate substantial financial need. A
student must apply for and be eligible to
33
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
receive the Pell Grant and be enrolled as a
half-time undergraduate student. Awards are
made during the Fall, Winter and Spring
terms only. The minimum LEAP award
amount is $100 per quarter.
Unemployment Benefits
Eligible students should contact the
Department of Labor for information concerning regulations and requirements
regarding receipt of unemployment benefits
while attending Lanier Tech. Unemployment
forms may be completed in the Financial Aid
Office weekly once benefits have been
established by the Labor Department Claims
Center office.
Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
WIA is a form of financial aid available to
serve disadvantaged adults and dislocated
adult workers. In accordance with WIA
guidelines, HOPE and Pell funds must be
used first to pay tuition and fees before WIA
funds will be used. WIA also pays for books
and supplies for students who qualify as well
as provide assistance with daily travel and
childcare. Information and assistance may
be obtained by calling the Georgia
Mountains WIA at (770) 538-2727.
Veterans and Eligible Dependents
Lanier Tech is approved for training by the
State Department of Veteran Services.
Benefits may be obtained from the Veterans
Administration if the veteran or other eligible
persons meet the eligibility requirements. To
determine your eligibility, contact the local or
regional Veterans Administration office.
Information and assistance may be obtained
by calling the Veterans Administration toll
free at 1-888-442-4551. Application assistance is available through the Financial Aid
Office and online at www.gibile.va.gov.
Vocational Rehabilitation
Qualified students, those with certain disabilities which might prevent employment, may
receive services while attending Lanier Tech.
To determine eligibility contact a local
Vocational Rehabilitation counselor. Tuition,
fees, books and supplies may be paid.
34
Eligibility
General Eligibility Requirements
for HOPE
• Applicants must be legal Georgia residents for a period of no less than 12
months immediately preceding the
date of registration.
• There are no income, age, high school
GPA or graduation limitations for diploma
and certificate seeking applicants.
• Applicants must meet the requirements
of Selective Service Registration.
• Applicants must be in compliance with
the Georgia Drug Free Postsecondary
Act.
• Applicants cannot be in default or owe a
refund on a federal Title IV Educational
Loan or Grant.
• Full time enrollment is not required if you
attend a technical college.
Specific Eligibility Requirements for
HOPE
• Diploma and degree seeking students
who wish to be considered for federal
(Pell) and state (HOPE) student aid
should complete the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid form.
• Students enrolled in certificate programs
and diploma/degree seeking students
who do not wish to be considered for federal student aid should complete the
Georgia HOPE Scholarship & Grant
Application.
• HOPE will pay tuition and HOPEapproved mandatory fees. Graduation,
exemption, and liability insurance fees
are not covered.
• HOPE Grant recipients must be making
Satisfactory Academic Progress to maintain eligibility.
• The HOPE Grant will cover required certificate and diploma level courses that
are a part of the student’s program of
study, including developmental studies.
The only exceptions are degree level
courses that have direct and specific correlation to required courses in the student’s diploma or certificate program.
For example, English 191 (degree level
course) can be taken in place of English
101 (diploma level course), if approved
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
by the institution. This student must
meet the cut-off scores required for the
degree level English or Math. The HOPE
Grant will not cover degree level courses
used to fulfill general elective requirements for a certificate or a diploma program.
• HOPE Scholarship recipients must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average for all coursework attempted and be
making satisfactory academic progress
as defined by the school.
HOPE Grant/Scholarship Limits
amd Checkpoints
Effective Fall Quarter 2004
• Effective Fall Quarter, 2004 students are
eligible for HOPE Grant payment for a
maximum of 95 quarter hours or a maximum of 130 quarter hours, or the num
ber of hours required for graduation
whichever is less, but only if enrolled in a
diploma program that is designed to
require more than 95 quarters hours for
graduation. The credit hour count is
retroactive to Summer Quarter, 2003.
• Hours for which a student received
HOPE Grant payment for Summer term
2003, Fall term 2003, Winter term 2004,
Spring term 2004, and Summer term
2004 are counted as Paid-Hours for the
HOPE Grant limit, unless the student
was also enrolled in high school during
those terms. The maximum HOPE
Grant Paid-Hours that will be counted on
a quarterly basis is 12 credit hours even
if the student is enrolled for more hours.
• Beginning Fall term 2004, all hours for
which a student received HOPE Grant
payment are counted as Paid Hours,
regardless of whether the student is also
enrolled in high school.
HOPE Scholarship and Grant
Combined Paid-Hours Limit
• Effective Fall term 2004.
• Hours for which students received payment from the Accel, HOPE Grant and
HOPE Scholarship programs are included in calculating the total Combined-Paid
Hours.
• Hours for which HOPE Grant funds were
paid will be tracked starting with
Summer term 2003, except for hours for
•
•
•
•
which a student received HOPE Grant
payment prior to high school graduation]
and before Fall term 2004.
Hours for which Accel Program funds
were paid will be tracked starting with
Fall term 2004.
Hours for which HOPE Scholarship
funds were paid will be tracked from the
beginning of the program, Fall term
1993.
Students are eligible for combined payment for a maximum of 190 quarter
hours, unless they are enrolled in specific programs of study designed to require
more than 190 quarter hours for graduation. In that case,students are eligible for
a maximum of 225 quarter hours, OR the
number of hours required for graduation,
whichever is less.
If a student reaches the AttemptedHours limit before reaching the
Combined Paid-Hours limit, he or she is
ineligible to receive further HOPE
Scholarship payment.
HOPE Scholarship Attempted-Hours
Limit
• Went into effect Fall term 1993.
• Students are not eligible to receive
HOPE Scholarship funds if they have
attempted 190 quarter hours or more of
college-degree level credit hours, unless
they are enrolled in specific programs of
study designed to require more than 190
quarter hours for graduation.
• If a student reaches the AttemptedHours limit before reaching the
Combined Paid-Hours limit, he or she is
ineligible to receive further HOPE
Scholarship payment.
• If a student reaches the Combined-Paid
hours limit before reaching the
Attempted-Hours limit, he or she is ineli
gible to receive further HOPE
Scholarship payment.
HOPE Scholarship Checkpoints
• Effective Fall term 1993, a HOPE
Scholarship recipient must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA at the 45, 90 and 135
quarter hour checkpoints to be eligible to
renew. HOPE Scholarship eligibility can
be lost, gained or regained at these
checkpoints.
35
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
• Effective Summer term 2004, all HOPE
Scholarship recipients must have a
cumulative 3.0 GPA at the end of each
Spring term, in order to continue their eli
gibility, except for 1st tier recipients who
enrolled for less than 12 hours for each
of their first three terms.
• 1st tier recipients who enrolled for less
than 12 hours for each of their first three
terms must have a cumulative 3.0 GPA in
order to continue their HOPE
Scholarship eligibility.
HOPE Book Allowance
Students will be allotted a $100 book
allowance if they enroll in six or more credit
hours per quarter. For those students taking
five or less credit hours, the book allowance
will be $50. The bookstore will have the
authorized HOPE book allowances on file for
students who are eligible to receive a HOPE
book allowance on the first day of class for
the quarter. Online students who are eligible
for HOPE will be allowed to charge against
their HOPE book allowance and the bookstore will ship the books as soon as possible.
Students who wish to purchase books from
the bookstore by phone should be prepared
to provide the course number, book title and
ISBN number to the bookstore manager.
Students who DO NOT charge against their
HOPE book allowance at the bookstore will
receive their HOPE book checks during the
7th week of the quarter.
HOPE Reimbursement
Paying students who wish to apply for financial aid may submit the appropriate application to the financial aid office. Upon completion of their financial aid file, reimbursements
will be processed automatically for eligible
students. Reimbursements will be issued
during the 7th week of the quarter.
HOPE GED Voucher
Students who earn a GED on or after July 1,
1993, will receive a $500 voucher that can
be used for tuition, books, and supplies. At
Lanier Tech, this certificate can supplement
the HOPE tuition grant to purchase books or,
to assist with other educational expenses.
36
Joint Enrollment and Dual
Enrollment
A high school student who is seeking a diploma or certificate, and who meets all eligibility requirements permitting enrollment in an
eligible public postsecondary educational
institution on a joint or dual enrollment basis
is eligible to receive HOPE Grant if he or she
meets all other HOPE Grant eligibility
requirements. Beginning Fall term 2004,
hours for which HOPE Grant payment was
received must be counted in the HOPE
Grant Paid-Hours and the Combined Paid
Hours limits.
Accel Program
Beginning Fall term 2004 dual credit students who are simultaneously enrolled at an
eligible public Georgia high school and an
eligible Georgia public or private postsecondary institution, taking college degree
level courses can receive an Accel program
award. The award amount for Accel is the
same as for the HOPE program (tuition,
HOPE-approved mandatory fees, and a
book allowance). All hours paid for by Accel
will be included in the Combined Paid-Hours
limit, which includes payments from the
HOPE Scholarship, HOPE Grant, and Accel
programs.
Transient Students
Students who are currently enrolled at Lanier
Tech and will be taking courses from other
approved postsecondary institutions in
Transient status must have a Financial
Aid/Academic Transient letter completed by
Lanier Tech. Students must complete a
Request for Transient Status form which
may be obtained in the Student Service
Office. Transient letters are sent to the
appropriate institutions documenting financial aid and academic status.
Lanier Tech Satisfactory Academic
Progress Policy for Students
Receiving Federal or State
Financial Aid
Students receiving financial aid from federal
and state programs must be making satisfactory progress toward their diploma, certificate, or degree. Students are responsible for
maintaining an acceptable level of progress
regarding quality and quantity of work.
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Financial aid regulations require that we
monitor course completion rate as well as
cumulative GPA. To maintain eligibility for
financial aid at Lanier Tech, students must
earn a cumulative GPA (grade point average) of 2.0 or better, and satisfactorily complete at least two-thirds (67%) of all course
work (credit hours) attempted.
Classes dropped on, or after, the first day of
the quarter will appear on each student's
academic transcript and will receive a grade
of W (withdrawal), WP (withdrawn passing),
and/or WF (withdrawn failing). Grades of U,
S, I, W, WP, and IP are not used in calculating a student's GPA, but are counted as
course work attempted. Courses receiving
grades of W, WP, WF, U, I, IP, and F are not
considered satisfactorily completed hours
and will affect a student's future financial aid
eligibility.
4.
5.
6.
The Offices of Student Services and
Financial Aid have developed the following
standards of satisfactory progress which a
student must achieve in order to maintain
federal/state aid eligibility.
General Provisions & Eligibility
Requirements
1. Students must be enrolled in an eligible program to be approved for
federal or state financial aid.
Students
accepted
into
the
Developmental Studies and special
admission status are not eligible for
Title IV aid. Regular or provisionally
admitted students may receive Title
IV benefits if eligible. Technical
certificate programs are evaluated
on an individual basis to determine
if they meet the minimum training
requirements for Title IV benefits.
2. Students who do not have a high
school diploma or the equivalent
(GED) are not eligible for Title IV
financial aid unless they have
passed an independently administered test approved by the Secretary
of Education.
3. Exempted and audited courses may
not be counted in the calculation of a
student's total credit hours for determination of Title IV financial aid
7.
8.
9.
benefits.
Title IV aid can be awarded for online/Internet Courses to students
enrolled in diploma and degree programs; however, students are
limited to taking NO MORE THAN
50% of their courses via the Internet.
If a student exceeds the 50% limita
tion, they will not be eligible for Title
IV funds for the remainder of the
program.
"I" (incomplete) is used to indicate
that the student is doing satisfactory
work but has not completed all
requirements for the course by the
end of the quarter. Any course
receiving an "I" designation must be
completed by the midterm of the
following quarter or the "I" will
convert to a grade of F.
Students enrolled in Developmental
Studies courses are considered to
be making satisfactory academic
progress unless they receive a
grade of "U." Developmental studies
courses are included in hours
attempted.Students are allowed to
receive financial aid for no more
than
45
credit
hours
of
Developmental Studies courses.
When a course is repeated, the most
recent grade is used in the computation of the student's overall GPA.
Exceptions to this would be grades
of W, WP, and AU. When a W, WP,
or AU is the most recent grade, the
previous grade will be used in the
computation of the student's overall
GPA. If a student repeats a course
and the most recent grade is an "I",
the school's academic policy
concerning the conversion of an
incomplete to a grade will be
followed. Each individual program of
study sets limits on the number of
times a course may be repeated.
Academic progress determinations
will be made quarterly after grades
have been posted.
To maintain eligibility for financial aid
at Lanier Tech, students must successfully complete 67% of all
cumulative credit hours attempted
and maintain a cumulative GPA
37
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
(grade point average) of 2.0.
Courses receiving grades of I, IP, W,
WP,
WF,
F,
and
U
(for
Developmental Studies) are not
considered completed hours. A
student who fails to maintain a
cumulative GPA of 2.0 or to complete 67% of all credit hours
attempted will be placed on financial
aid probation for one quarter. The
purpose of financial aid probation is
to alert the student that his or her
academic performance is not
acceptable. A student placed on
financial aid probation must attain a
cumulative GPA of 2.0 and achieve
the required completion rate by the
end of the next quarter in attendance
to remove himself/herself from the
probationary status. Failure to obtain
the required GPA and completion
rate places the student on financial
aid dismissal and results in
the loss of Title IV eligibility and state
aid eligibility.
10. Students must complete their educational objective within a maximum
time frame based on enrollment status and program length not to
exceed 150 % of the published
length of the program. For example,
for a four quarter program, the maximum time frame to receive financial
aid is six quarters. Enrollment of less
than full-time will be pro-rated
accordingly. No financial aid will be
available after the specified limits.
However, factors beyond the student's control, such as conflicts in
scheduling classes, will be considered.
11. Any course for which a student registers will be counted in the maximum time frame and percentage
calculations as specified in number
ten. Quantitative and qualitative
standards must be cumulative and
must include all periods of the stu-dent's enrollment, even periods in
which the student did not receive
SFA funds must be counted.
12. Transfer students will be assumed to
be maintaining satisfactory academic progress for the first quarter
38
enrolled. After the first quarter, the
student will be responsible for meet
ing all Lanier Tech academic
progress requirements.
13. A student will be notified in writing by
the financial aid office if she/he is in
violation of the standards of
Satisfactory Progress, the termination of Title IV, and/or state funds.
14. Students have the right to appeal the
denial of financial aid if they feel
there are extenuating circumstances, which have prevented them
from meeting the specified requirements. Appeals must be written,
must specifically address the extenuating circumstances and must be
presented to the Financial Aid
Director within ten (10) days of notification of the failure to make satisfactory progress. The Financial Aid
Review Committee meets at the
beginning of each quarter. All documentation and/or letters of appeal
must be received by the Financial
Aid Office at least one day prior to
the Committee's scheduled meeting
in order to be considered at that
meeting. The committee will provide
a written decision to the student
within four (4) calendar days of the
committee's meeting. If a student
has circumstances that prevents
them from filing an appeal within the
ten (10) day deadline, they may
request that an exception to this policy be made.
15. Reinstatement of financial aid after a
student's aid has been terminated
for lack of satisfactory academic
progress can be achieved once a
student has attained the required
cumulative GPA of 2.0 and has successfully completed 67% of all cred
it hours attempted.
How to Maintain Your HOPE
Scholarship
Students receiving the HOPE Scholarship
must be making Satisfactory Academic
Progress as defined above, even if they
have not reached the renewal checkpoints
listed below in paragraphs A through E.
Lanier Technical College - Financial Information
Credit Hours and HOPE Cumulative Grade
Point Average for Renewal
A. Students who are eligible to receive
HOPE as entering freshmen may
receive payment through the term
that they have attempted (not
earned) at least 30 semester or 45
quarter hours. However, all HOPE
Scholarship recipients must have a
grade point average of at least a 3.0
at the end of every Spring term in
order to continue their eligibility,
except for freshmen enrolled for less
than 12 credit hours for each of their
first three school terms. Freshmen
recipients who enroll for less than 12
credit hours for each of their first
three school terms must have a
cumulative grade point average of at
least a 3.0 at the end of their third
term in order to continue their eligibility.
All attempted hours and corresponding grades as shown on official
transcripts are counted toward the
HOPE cumulative grade point average, including remedial study.
Additionally, withdrawals are counted as attempted hours even if there
is no academic penalty. Any college
degree credit hours attempted or
earned before high school gradua
tion and hours exempted by examination do not count as hours
attempted and are not included
when calculating the HOPE cumula
tive grade point average.
B. If you have a HOPE cumulative
grade point average of at least a 3.0
by the end of the term you attempted 30 semester or 45 quarter hours,
you may renew your scholarship for
31 through 60 semester hours or 46
through 90 quarter hours attempted.
quarter hours attempted.
D. If you have earned a HOPE cumulative grade point average of at least a
3.0 by the end of the term you
attempted 90 semester or 135 quarter hours, you may renew your
scholarship for 91 through 127
semester hours or 136 through 190
quarter hours attempted. However,
the total cumulative number of credit hours for which you can receive
payment from any combination of
the HOPE Scholarship, HOPE
Grant, and Accel programs is 127
semester hours or 190 quarter
hours.
E. If you are enrolled in a specific
undergraduate degree program
which is designed to be a five-year
program, you may renew your scholarship for a total of 150 semester
hours or 225 quarter hours attempted or the number of hours required
by the program, whichever is less.
However, the total cumulative number of credit hours for which you can
receive payment from any combination of the HOPE Scholarship,
HOPE Grant, and Accel programs is
150 semester hours or 225 quarter
hours or the number of hours
required by the program, whichever
is less.
Renewal Application
Students must reapply for financial aid once
each academic year (July 1 to June 30) by
completing a Free Application for Federal
Student Aid form and/or a HOPE
Scholarship & Grant Application. This
process must be completed each year after
January 1 to be considered for assistance in
the next academic year, with Summer
Quarter beginning the academic year.
C. If you have earned a HOPE cumulative grade point average of at least a
3.0 by the end of the term you
attempted 60 semester or 90 quarter hours, you may renew your
scholarship for 61 through 90
semester hours or 91 through 135
39
40
Academic
Regulations
41
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
Academic Information
The philosophy of Lanier Tech is to allow
every student the maximum opportunity to
graduate. The Georgia Department of
Technical and Adult Education implemented
a policy effective Spring Quarter 1992 which
required that, prior to graduation from Lanier
Tech, all students must receive a GED or a
high school diploma. The Adult Literacy component of Lanier Tech can advise students
on preparation and testing for the GED. For
further information, contact their office at
770.531.6363.
Attendance Regulations
1. The nature of the training programs at
Lanier Tech is such that it is necessary
for every student to attend class regularly. Students are being trained to enter
the "world of work" as an employee, and
are expected to be present and on time
every day, just as they would on their
jobs.
2. Students who are unable to attend class
or who will be late for class should make
every effort to call the College 770-5316300 (Oakwood Campus) or 770-7816800 (Forsyth Campus), 770-868-4080
(Winder-Barrow Campus), or 706-3351931 (Jackson County Campus) and
inform their instructor of their absence
or tardiness and give the reason.
3. Attendance policies vary by program. It
is the responsibility of each student to
clarify the exact attendance policy of
his/her particular program of study. No
program of study allows absences in
excess of 20% of the scheduled class
time, no matter the reason for the
absences.
4. Attendance policy for Practical Nursing
is based on the state board requirement
of 1400 hours and is more stringent than
the regular policy. Other programs which
require licensing may have different
attendance policies. Students will
receive a copy of the policy from the program instructor when they enroll.
5. Students will receive a grade of zero (0)
for any class work missed until the work
is made up. Arrangements for make-up
work must be made with each instructor
upon the student's return to class.
42
Appeals
Students who are terminated for attendance
violations may appeal only if they feel their
program attendance policy was not administered equitably to all students. These students must present evidence that this is the
case in order to schedule an appeal. The
appeal committee will support appropriate
implementation of each program's attendance policy. Requests for a hearing must
be made within three (3) days of the termination. The appeal should be scheduled
through the Vice President for Instruction or
Campus Operations. The student will then
be informed as to whether or not he/she is to
return to class until the hearing. This hearing
committee will have access to the student's
prior attendance records and information as
needed to make a fair decision regarding the
case.
Leaving Class Early
Each student who leaves class prior to the
end of the regular school day or before the
end of any class must secure the approval of
the instructor or instructors and will be counted tardy. In case of illness, the student must
check out of school through his/her instructor. Students will be expected to adhere to
the policies of their respective departments.
Failure to do so may result in termination.
Tardiness
Students are tardy if they are not in the
classroom when the class begins. Three
tardies count as an absence. It is the responsibility of the student to keep an account of
tardiness and absences. Excessive tardiness may result in dismissal.
Withdrawals
Students who transfer or withdraw from
school must inform the Student Services
Office. All information should be in writing so
as to protect the student's scholastic record
and facilitate transfers to other schools or
employment. The school's standard termination form is completed by the student and the
instructor. A reason for withdrawal should be
given. If the student plans to reenter, he/she
must complete a Re-Entry Request Form
and return it to the Admissions Office before
the anticipated registration date. An honorable dismissal cannot be given to any stu-
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
dent who has not satisfactorily accounted for
all property and financial obligations.
Work Ethics
The DTAE Work Ethics program is designed
to promote positive work behaviors and to
prepare students to be better, more productive workers. Evaluation is based on the following identified set of ten work ethics
traits: Attendance, Character, Teamwork,
Appearance, Attitude, Productivity, Organization, Communication, Cooperation, and
Respect.
Students will receive a Work Ethics grade for
all courses except Developmental Studies.
This
includes
Internet
and
Web
Enhanced/Hybrid classes. Work Ethics
grades will be reflected on student transcripts but will not be computed into the
grade point average (GPA).
Advanced Placement
Students may be eligible for advanced
placement through three methods: transfer
credit, exemption credit, and artculated credit.
Transfer Credit
Lanier Tech recognizes previous postsecondary course work by accepting credits that
are applicable to the student's program of
study earned from other regionally accredited institutions. The awarding of credit does
not guarantee that institutions subsequently
attended by the student will accept those
credits. A student may receive credit for
courses taken at another postsecondary
institution if:
• Students desiring transfer credit submit a Transfer of Credit Form to the
Registrar;
• The course taken is essentially the
same content or at a higher level as
the course at Lanier Tech;
• An official transcript is on file in the
student's admission file from all postsecondary institutions attended;
• The course has the same number of
credit hours (or greater) as the course
at Lanier Tech;
• A grade of "C" or higher has been
earned for the course to be trans
•
ferred;
Departmental approval is required when
specified by the Registrar.
Students receiving VA benefits must submit
a transfer of credit request if courses are
available for transfer. A grade of "TR" will be
entered on the permanent record if credit is
awarded. The hours will not be computed in
the grade point average.
Armed Services Credit
Armed Services Credit may be awarded for
education/training experiences in the Armed
Services. Such experiences must be certified by the American Council on Education
(identified in the Council's publication, Guide
to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences
in the Armed Services). Credit will be given
on the basis of individual evaluation.
Creditable military experience must closely
correspond in content and competencies to
courses in the Lanier Tech curriculum.
Foreign Earned Credit
Foreign Earned Credit may be awarded
based upon an evaluation performed by an
independent evaluation service. The
Registrar will make the final decision regarding the award of transfer credit. Grade points
will not be assigned to transfer credit.
Exemption Credit
Exemption Credit earned by examination, in
courses where available, may be awarded
when the student requests course exemption
by examination. The student must present
satisfactory evidence that he/she has prior
knowledge of a particular subject before
being eligible to test. A student interested in
credit by examination should confer with
his/her advisor and the instructor of the
course to be exempted. However, a student
cannot take an exemption test for a course in
which he/she is currently or was previously
enrolled.
If the student successfully passes the
exemption test, he/she will receive an "EX"
on his/her transcript. The grade will count in
total hours earned but will not be calculated
in the student's grade point average.
Courses that are exempted may not be
counted in the calculation of a student's total
43
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
credit hours for determination of financial aid
benefits, including the HOPE Book
Allowance.
An Exemption Credit Payment Form must be
completed by any student interested in
attempting credit examination. These forms
as well as a listing of courses currently available for exemption are available upon
request in the Office of Student Services.
The student will sign up to take the exam
with the exam instructor; his or her advisor
must approve the attempted exam and sign
the Exemption Credit Payment Form. The
exemption fee(s) of $5 per credit hour for the
course(s) to be exempted must be paid at
the Business Office before the student will
be allowed to test.
When the exam is graded, the student will
receive the test results and a copy of the
Exemption Credit Payment Form. If a student passes the exemption test and would
like to add an additional course during the
five (5) day add period, he or she should see
his or her advisor. If a student fails the
exemption test and would like to add this
course during the five (5) day add period, he
or she should see his or her advisor. If space
is available in the course to be added, fees
for the added course must be paid by cash,
check, credit card or invoice before the
course will be added to the student's registration.
Tech Prep Articulated Credit
Students enrolled in a Tech Prep program at
the secondary level may be able to articulate
credits to Lanier Technical College.
• Secondary articulated credit will be
transferred according to written agreements with secondary schools.
• Credit will be validated by holding it in
escrow until the student has successfully completed one quarter in his/her program of study.
• Secondary credits from schools where
there is no written agreement will be
evaluated in terms of the specific curriculum using the statewide articulation
guide.
• The determination will be made by the
Registrar in conjunction with Faculty
44
and Instructional Supervisors.
• No tuition will be charged for secondary
articulated credit.
Grading Policies
Repeated Course Policy
When a course is repeated, the highest
grade is used in the computation of the student's overall GPA. Exceptions are grades of
"W", "WP", and "AU." When a "W", "WP", or
"AU" is the most recent grade, the previous
grade is used in the computation of the student's overall GPA.
Academic Standing
Students academic standing is updated
quarterly and may be viewed via Banner
Web.
Grades
Grades will be recorded in letter grades. An
overall 2.0 GPA (Grade Point Average) is
required for graduation. A minimum grade of
"C" may be required for progress from specified courses to more advanced courses. The
following grading scale is used for all Lanier
Tech students:
90
80
70
60
59
WF
WP
W
I
S
IP
U
AU
EX
AC
TR
- 100
- 89
- 79
- 69
or below
=A (4.0)
=B (3.0)
=C (2.0)
=D (1.0)
=F (0)
Withdrawn Failing = F (0)
Withdrawn Passing
Withdrawn during first 25 class days
Incomplete
Satisfactory (Developmental Studies)
In Progress (Developmental Studies)
Unsatisfactory (Developmental Studies)
Audit (Non-Credit)
Exemption
Articulated Credit
Transfer Credit
An Incomplete (I) must be converted to a
grade before mid-term of the following quarter from the date the Incomplete was recorded or it will be converted to a punitive failing
grade.
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
An In Progress (IP Developmental Studies) must be converted to a grade of “S” before midterm of the following quarter from the date the “IP” was recorded or it will be converted to a
grade of “U” (Unsatisfactory Developmental Studies).
Withdrew (W) during the first 25 school days. This grade does not affect GPA but may affect
financial aid eligibility.
WP and WF students who withdraw after 25 school days will receive a "WP" (Withdrawn
Passing) or a "WF" (Withdrawn Failing) depending upon his/her actual grades. The grade of
"WF" will be calculated as an "F" in the GPA. These grades may affect financial aid eligibility.
Calculation of Grade Point Average (GPA)
For calculating GPA, each letter grade has a point value. Listed below are the values:
A
=
4
B
=
3
C
=
2
D
=
1
F
=
0
WF
=
0
The grade points are determined by multiplying the number of points a grade is worth times
the credit hours a course carries. Thus a grade of an "A" (4 points) in a 5 credit hour course
(4 x 5) equals 20 points. The same grade "A" in a 3 credit hour course (4 x 3) equals 12 points.
Example: An "MLT" student's grades may appear as follows:
Credit Hours
Grade
Points
AHS 101 Anatomy & Physiology
5
B (3)
15
MLT 108 Microbiology
7
D (1)
7
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
3
A (4)
12
Total Points
34
Individual course points are added together to determine total points. To determine the GPA,
divide total points by total credit hours: 34 / 15 = 2.27 GPA
Academic Probation
A student who fails to maintain a 2.0 GPA in any quarter will be placed on academic probation. The purpose of academic probation is to alert the student that his/her academic performance is not acceptable and to point out the possible consequences if improvements are
not made during the next quarter of enrollment. A student placed on academic probation (or
admitted on probation) must attain a minimum 2.0 GPA during the next quarter in attendance
to remove himself/herself from probationary status. A student who fails to do so is subject to
academic dismissal.
Academic Dismissal
A student who fails to attain a minimum 2.0 GPA the next quarter in attendance after being
placed on probation is subject to academic dismissal. A student who is academically dismissed must stay out of school one full quarter before petitioning for readmission. A second
academic dismissal could constitute a final dismissal from the student's current program of
study.
45
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
Academic Honors
President's List
Students who maintain a 4.0 GPA attain the
President's List.
Students must have completed at least 12
credit hours in the current quarter to be eligible for the President's List.*
Honor Roll
Students who maintain at least a 3.5 GPA
will be on the Honor Roll. Students must
have completed at least 12 credit hours in
the current quarter to be eligible for Honor
Roll.*
*Students accepted on a provisional basis or
those enrolled in a remedial class are ineligible for President's List or Honor Roll.
Students who receive a WP may be eligible
for President's List or Honor Roll assuming
all other requirements for President's List or
Honor Roll are met. Students who are involuntarily dropped will be ineligible for
President's List or Honor Roll.
Change of Program
Students desiring to change their program of
study must complete a Change of Program
Form available in the Admissions Office. The
requirements for the new program will be
checked against the student's test scores
and/or former course work. Retesting and/or
developmental course work may be
required. Once the form is completed and
approved, copies will be distributed to the
appropriate department and the Financial
Aid Office. Program changes may significantly impact a student's educational and
career goals. Students should discuss this
change with their academic advisor prior to
initiating the change process.
Career counselors are a valuable resource
in assisting students with career choices.
Students who are receiving benefits under
student assistance programs (federal student aid, veterans benefits) should discuss
the possible impact of the change on the
receipt of benefits. These programs have
specific guidelines concerning changes of
program. Not all credits earned under one
program may necessarily apply to the new
program. In some cases, changing programs
may lengthen the time required to complete
a program. The decision concerning trans46
ferability of credits is made by the receiving
department head and the Registrar.
Students must fill out a Request for Transfer
Credit form and submit the form to the
Registrar.
The Family Educational
Rights & Privacy Act
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act of 1974, as amended, is a federal law
which states (a) that a written institutional
policy must be established and (b) that a
statement of adopted procedures covering
the privacy rights of students be made available. The law provides that the school will
maintain the confidentiality of student educational records.
Lanier Tech accords all the rights under the
law to its students. No one outside the
school shall have access to nor will the
school disclose any information from student's educational records without the written consent of students except to personnel
within the school, to officials of other institutions in which students seek to enroll, to persons or organizations providing student
financial aid, to accrediting agencies carrying
out their accreditation function, to persons in
compliance with a judicial order, and to persons in an emergency in order to protect the
health or safety of students or other persons.
All these exceptions are permitted under the
Act.
Within the Lanier Tech community, only
those members, individually or collectively,
acting in the students' educational interest
are allowed access to student education
records. These members include personnel
in the Offices of the Registrar, Administrative
Services, Financial Aid, Admissions, and
Instructional Services within the limitations of
their need to know.
Directory Information
At its discretion, the school may provide
directory information in accordance with the
provisions of the Act. The following information is considered by Lanier Tech as directory information and may be given without the
student's consent unless the student notifies
the Student Services Office and requests the
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
information be held: Dates of Enrollment and
Withdrawal, Honors Received, Date and
Place of Birth, Address, Program Enrolled,
Parking Tag Number, Date of Graduation,
Phone Number, Social Security Number
(may be verified but not dispersed as directory information), License Number, and
Degree, Diploma, or Certificate Earned.
Students may withhold directory information
by notifying the Registrar in writing within two
(2) weeks after the first day of class for each
term. Request for non-disclosure will be honored by the school for only one academic
year; therefore, authorization to withhold
directory information must be filed annually
in the Office of the Registrar.
Review of Records
The law provides students with the right to
inspect and review information contained in
their education records, to have a hearing if
the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for
inclusion in their files if the decisions of the
hearing panels are unacceptable.
The Registrar at Lanier Tech has been designated by the school to coordinate the
inspection and review procedures for student
education records, which include admissions, personal, academic, and financial
files, and academic, cooperative education,
and placement records. Any student wishing
to review his/her education record must
make written request to the Registrar listing
the item or items of interest. Only records
covered by the Act will be made available
within forty-five days of the request.
Students may have copies made of their
records with certain exceptions (e.g., a copy
of the academic record for which a financial
"hold" exists or transcript of an original or
source document which exists elsewhere).
Copies will be made at the student's
expense at prevailing rates. Education
records do not include records of instructional, administrative, and educational personnel
which are the sole possession of the school,
records of the law enforcement unit, student
health records, employment records or alumni records. Health records, however, may be
reviewed by physicians of the student's
choosing.
Exceptions
Students may not inspect nor review the following as outlined by the Act: financial information submitted by their parents; confidential letters and recommendations associated
with admissions, employment or job placement, or honors to which they have waived
their rights of inspection and review; or education records containing information about
more than one student, in which case the
school will permit access only to that part of
the record which pertains to the inquiring student. The school is not required to permit
students to inspect and review confidential
letters and recommendations placed in their
files prior to January 1, 1975, provided those
letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for
the purposes for which they were collected.
Records Correction
Procedures
Any student who believes that his/her education record contains information that is
inaccurate or misleading, or is otherwise in
violation of his/her privacy or other rights
may discuss his/her problems informally with
the Registrar. If the decisions are in agreement with the student's request, the appropriate records will be amended. If not, the
student will be notified within a reasonable
period of time that the records will not be
amended; and he/she will also be informed
by the Registrar of his/her right to a formal
hearing.
Student requests for a formal hearing must
be made in writing to the Vice President for
Student Services who, within a reasonable
period of time after receiving such requests,
will inform the student of the date, place, and
time of the hearing. Students may present
evidence relevant to the issues raised and
may be assisted or represented at the student's expense. The hearing panel which will
adjudicate such challenges will be the Vice
President for Student Services, representatives from Student Services, and a faculty
representative from the student's program of
study.
47
Lanier Technical College - Academic Regulations
Decisions of the hearing panel will be final,
will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing, will consist of written
statements summarizing the evidence and
stating the reasons for the decisions, and will
be delivered to all parties concerned. The
education records will be corrected or
amended in accordance with the decisions
of the hearing panel, if the decisions are in
favor of the student. If the decisions are
unsatisfactory to the student, the student
may place with the education records statements commenting on the information in the
records or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the
hearing panel. The statements will be placed
in the education records, maintained as part
of the student's records, and released whenever the records in question are disclosed.
Appeal
Any student who believes that adjudication
of his/her challenge was unfair or not in
keeping with provisions of the Act may
request, in writing, assistance from the
President of the school to aid him/her in filing
complaints with The Family Education Rights
and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Department
of Education, Room 4074, Switzer Building,
Washington D. C. 20202. Revisions and clarifications will be published as experience
with the law and school's policy warrants.
Graduation
Each potential graduate must complete an
Application for Graduation Form the quarter
prior to the student's completion of graduation requirements. The application deadline
will be posted quarterly at each campus. The
student's faculty advisor and the Registrar
will complete a graduation audit to insure
that all requirements for graduation have
been successfully completed. Degrees,
diplomas or technical certificates of credit
cannot be ordered until final grades are submitted and the graduation audit is completed.
An overall 2.0 grade point average is
required for graduation. Students must apply
and be accepted into a program prior to completing requirements for that program.
Students cannot graduate from a program
unless they have been accepted into that
48
particular program. Lanier Tech awards
Technical Certificates of Credit or Diplomas,
which are “Embedded“ within a programs of
study. Contact the Registrar's office for information. A formal graduation ceremony is
held once each year for graduates during the
academic year. Students are encouraged to
participate in the ceremony. Specific information on each year's graduation is mailed
to all students eligible to graduate. Students
participating in the ceremony will be required
to pay a $25 graduation fee which is nonrefundable and is not covered by HOPE.
Students who achieve a final GPA of 4.0 are
provided honor cords to wear at graduation.
Outstanding Student:
Each year, the instructors in each department nominate an Outstanding Student from
the graduating a class of their occupational
training area. These students are recognized
at graduation.
Credit Hour Enrollment
Guideline
Students enrolled in twelve (12) credit hours
are considered full-time. Advisors should discourage students from enrolling in additional
courses above twelve (12) credit hours.
In order to prevent students from enrolling in
excessive hours that may jeopardize their
success, any student who wants to enroll in
more than eighteen (18) credit hours must
have written permission from the Vice
President of Instructional Services, Vice
President of Campus Operations, or his/her
designee. The appropriate vice president’s
decision to approve additional hours may be
based on student’s academic history,
employment commitments, family obligations, etc.
For students enrolled in more than eighteen
(18) credit hours, contact hours should not
exceed thirty (30) hours weekly.
Notes
49
Notes
50
Student
Services
51
Lanier Technical College - Student Services
Student Services
The Division of Student Services works in a
collaborative partnership with the instructional division and the program departments.
Student Services staff are student-centered
and customer-focused. They address the
educational process which extends outside
the classroom and continues in the social,
personal, cultural, and spiritual lives of students. Through the work of this division,
Lanier Tech students come to exemplify
integrity, pride, self-respect, and citizenship.
Office of The Vice President
For Student Services
The Vice President for Student Services and
her staff assist the President in maintaining a
campus climate that is conducive to the
learning environment and promotes the academic achievement and personal development of all students. The Vice President also
serves as the Grievance Officer. This office
files student insurance claims and has direct
supervisory responsibility for the Student
Code of Conduct as well as the ten departments of the Division: Admissions, Financial
Aid, Career Services and Job Placement,
Recruitment, New Connections To Work,
Fatherhood Program, Student Activities,
Student Records, Special Services, and
Tech Prep.
Admissions & Career
Counseling
The intent of the Admissions Office staff is to
help students achieve their career objectives
by clarifying their goals, identifying their skills
and interests, and making informed career
decisions. Specific services include career
counseling, placement testing, individual
interest inventory and assessment, job
placement outlook for specific occupations,
program entrance requirements, and costs.
Career & Job Placement
Services
The Job Placement function is performed by
the Director of Student Services/Placement
and the Career Placement Specialist.
Specific services include career counseling,
career resource library through various computer systems, employment assistance,
placement referrals, career seminars, on-site
52
employer recruiting activities and informal
oral career literature. Periodically, they offer
interviews with specific companies on campus.
The Career Placement Office maintains a
web-based job posting system which allows
all job opportunities via the Internet. To register with the Placement Office, individuals
should contact the Career Placement
Specialist at 770-531-2569. Follow-up services maintain contact with graduates.
Questionnaires are distributed to graduates/leavers as well as to employers to gather some follow-up information on whether
students are achieving educational objectives and receiving the skills they need to
become successful.
Georgia Fatherhood
The Georgia Fatherhood program offered at
Lanier Tech provides workshops that include
educational and career assessment, training
and job placement assistance for non-custodial parents with court-ordered child support.
The Fatherhood Initiative, created in 1997, is
a collaborative between the Department of
Technical and Adult Education (DTAE),
Division of Special Workforce Services, and
the Office of Child Support Enforcement
(OCSE). Other partners are: Dept. of Labor
and Dept. of Pardons and Paroles. Child
Support Enforcement refers non-custodial
parents to the program. Participants who
complete this program can enroll into any of
the diploma, degree, or certificate level programs offered at Lanier Technical College.
Financial Aid
Staff of the Financial Aid Office offer general
information, eligibility requirements, and
application procedures for HOPE Grant,
HOPE Scholarship, Pell Grant, Federal Work
Study, Federal Supplement Educational
Opportunity Grant, Veterans Benefits,
Vocational
Rehabilitation
Funding,
Unemployment Benefits, and EmployerSponsored Scholarships. Also, counselors
advise students on how to locate additional
sources of funding and how to budget for
expenses throughout the term.
Lanier Technical College - Student Services
Guidance & Counseling
The Student Services Office is for the benefit and use of all students, prospective students, and graduates. Information about
admission requirements and procedures is
available there. Guidance services include
admissions counseling, career and personal
counseling, career placement, and follow-up.
Career assessment and planning services
are available to assess one's interest, abilities, and skills in relation to training and
employment potential. These services generally begin with the pre-admission process.
New Connections to Work
This program is designed to assist single
parents, displaced homemakers and single
pregnant women who desire access to technical training and employment. It helps eliminate barriers to opportunity and promotes
self-sufficiency through technical training
with a focus on job readiness, job search and
life skills training. Participants are referred to
New Connections to Work by the Georgia
Department of Human Resources although
some may self-refer to the program.
What services are offered?
• An assessment of the individual’s aptitude and interests to help guide career
planning.
• Skills training followed by either job
search, continuing education, additional
customized training, a technical certificate of credit (TCC), degree or diploma
program.
• Customized trainings vary but may
include business office skills, retail sales,
customer service and basic computer
training.
• Job readiness and job retention skills
including interview skills, resume preparation, workplace etiquette, work ethics
and job market research.
• Life management workshops including
goal setting, money and time manage
ment, communication skills and selfesteem.
and procedures of the college. An online version is available for students unable to
attend an on-campus orientation. These provisions include a general orientation presentation on PowerPoint, etc.
Receptionist & General
Information
The Receptionist operates the school's
switchboard, receives visitors, provides general information, and locates students when
emergencies arise. In nearly every situation,
the Receptionist is the first contact for students and visitors on campus.
Recruitment
Lanier Tech‘s recruitment activities are coordinated by a Recruitment Team that is comprised of administrative staff from the
Student Services Division. Although primary
responsibility for recruitment lies with the
Recruiter, it is the philosophy of Lanier Tech
that recruitment is a responsibility of all team
members particularly instructional staff. To
that end, all team members assist with
recruitment activities in a variety of ways.
These activities include but are not limited to
the following: PROBE fairs, Career Fairs and
Expos, Area Festivals, School Visits,
Campus Tours, Classroom/lab Visits, Adult
Literacy Programs Visits, and Business and
Industry Visits.
Student Records
The Registrar and her staff maintain a permanent record on all students which
includes admissions data, educational
record, work ethics history, and termination
status. In keeping with the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (1974),
they maintain the confidentiality of personal
and academic records. Upon written request,
they issue transcripts which detail academic
history, transfer credit, and honors and
awards. In conjunction with program advisors, the Registrar’s staff advises students
on academic, transfer, and graduation
issues.
Orientation
All new students are required to attend a
new student orientation prior to registering
for credit classes. This session will properly
orient Lanier Tech students on the policies
Support Services
The Special Services Coordinator works to
meet the particular needs of students with
disabilities including the physically chal53
Lanier Technical College - Student Services
lenged and the learning challenged. The
coordinator collaborates with faculty and
staff to help them meet the needs of this student population both in and out of the classroom. As needed, students are referred to
appropriate community agencies such as the
Department of Family and Children Services,
Health
Department,
Mental
Health
Department, Vocational Rehabilitation,
Laurelwood,
and
Gateway
House.
Appropriate documentation of disability must
be provided.
Accidents, Personal Illness
or Injury
Any student who becomes seriously ill or
who is injured on campus or at a collegerelated activity should notify his/her instructor immediately. In the event the instructor is
not available, the student should notify the
Student Services Office. First aid supplies for
minor injuries are available in many classrooms and laboratories and in the Student
Services Office. For serious illness or injury
which prevents the student from transporting
himself/herself to get medical attention, the
instructor will call for an emergency vehicle
(911) and then notify the Student Services
Office immediately. Members from the
Student Services Office will aid in directing
the emergency vehicle to the appropriate
location and arrange for someone to remain
with the ill or injured student so that the
instructor does not have to leave his/her
class unattended.
Accident Investigation
For every accident, an Accident Report
should be completed by the student and
instructor and forwarded immediately to the
Vice President for Student Services who will
forward copies of the report to the Safety
Coordinator for review and referral to the
Safety Committee.
Insurance
Student insurance covers the student during
participation in official college activities on or
off the campus during regular college hours
when under the supervision of an instructor
or organization advisor. The policy provides
no payment of any kind for injury, death, or
any loss caused by injuries sustained while
54
operating or while a passenger in or on any
two-or-three wheel motor vehicle. Student
insurance policy covers only bodily injuries
due to accidents and is not guaranteed to
pay the full amount on any claim. Students
who feel this coverage is not sufficient
should contact their insurance agent for
additional coverage.
Liability Insurance
Some programs have a liability insurance
fee that must be paid annually. These fees
are not covered by traditional financial aid
(PELL Grant, HOPE Grant, HOPE
Scholarship, etc.). The fees range from
$11.00 to $46.00 depending on the program.
Contact the Office of Admissions or program
advisor for more information.
Student Insurance Claims
Students who require medical treatment for
accidents/injuries that occur during their
scheduled college hours may file claims with
their student insurance. The insurance claim
forms may be obtained from instructors or
from the Student Services Office. If possible,
the forms should be taken to the medical
facility at the time of treatment. An Accident
Report must also be filed in the Student
Services Office. When a claim is turned in to
the college, it is completed and mailed to the
insurance company. It is the responsibility of
the company to determine benefits to be
paid.
Change of Name or Address
Students should inform the Student Services
Office of any change in name, address,
phone number, or status. Change forms are
available in the Student Services Office or
may be completed by students via Banner
Web. If such changes are not reported, students may not receive grade transcripts, various announcements, etc.
General Catalog & Student
Handbook
A General Catalog & Student Handbook is
given to each student at Open Registration
and/or Orientation. It contains detailed information on the school's services, policies,
and regulations. It gives detailed information
on programs and courses offered at Lanier
Tech.
Lanier Technical College - Student Services
Photo ID
Students are required to have a photo ID
made at the beginning of their first quarter at
Lanier Tech. ID’s are valid for one academic
year. Photo ID schedules are posted on flyers throughout the college, on the closed circuit television (CCTV), and are placed in the
New Student Orientation Packets.
It is mandatory for students in certain health
related programs to have a photo ID in order
to participate in clinical experience in hospitals and other institutions. Photo ID cards are
required to purchase books from the
Bookstore if you receive any financial assistance through Lanier Tech. They may also be
used to check out books form the
Library/Media Center, to participate in student activities and to receive discounts at
some local businesses. Contact the office of
Student Services for more information about
photo ID’s.
Student Organizations
Student organizations provide a structure fro
students to grow, learn, serve others on
campus and in the comminuty, gain leadership skills, and enhance their ability to succeed at the college level and beyond. These
organizations contribute to the development
of a spirit of community participation and
involvement on campus. In addition, students learn appropiate workforce skills in
their leadership and campus service and
training, which aid them in being productive
and responsible citizens in their communities.
Chi). This affiliation provides students with
an opportunity to attend state and national
conferences.
The purpose of these organizations is to plan
projects and activities to promote leadership
development, civic consciousness, vocational understanding, and social awareness.
Annual projects include a variety of fundraisers and promoting the free enterprise
system.
Criminal Justice Technology Club
The Delta Sigma Pi chapter of the American
Criminal Justice Association is dedicated to
the furtherance of professional standards of
criminal justice and the promotion of greater
public understanding of the problems and
objectives of those agencies devoted to the
administration of criminal justice. This is
accomplished by providing students with first
hand knowledge of criminal justice agencies
in the region, as well as establishing service
opportunities to local social welfare agencies
(victim services, child advocates, domestic
violence shelters, etc.). Membership is open
to any student dedicated to understanding
more about our Criminal Justice system, as
well as honorary memberships to local criminal justice executives.
National Adult Education Honor
Society
The mission of this organization is providing
meaningful recognition to deserving adult
education students, to improve student
employment opportunities, and to develop
student ambassadors for the local adult education program.
Association of Information
Technology Professionals
The Lanier Technical College AITP chapter
is open to all students who are enrolled in a
program of study leading to entry in the field
of information processing. In addition to
holding regular meetings, the chapter sponsors computer seminars and other activities
related to computer technology.
National Vocational Honor Society
The National Technical Honor Society is an
honor organization for outstanding students
enrolled in technical programs. The purpose
of the organization is to encourage academic excellence, skill development, honesty,
service, leadership, citizenship, and individual responsibility.
Business Club/Delta Epsilon Chi
Lanier Technical College’s Business Club
and Delta Epsilon Chi organizations are affiliated with the Distributive Education Clubs of
America collegiate division (Delta Epsilon
To qualify for membership in Lanier Tech's
chapter of the National Technical Honor
Society, a student may be enrolled full-time
or part-time and must be regularly admitted
to and currently enrolled in a degree or diplo55
Lanier Technical College - Student Services
ma program, have completed at least 45
credit hours, have an overall GPA of at least
3.7, and be recommended by his/her advisor.
New Connections Support Group
The New Connections Support Group provides an avenue for single parents and displaced homemakers to share experiences
and provide advice and encouragement to
other members.
North Georgia Mountain Area
Student District of Georgia
Licensed Practical Nurses
Association
The North Georgia Mountain Area Student
District of GLPNA is the first student district
for GLPNA. The organization is open to all
nursing students at Lanier Technical College.
It’s prupose is to educate the students about
their professional organization and the
opportunities available through their organization.
Phi Beta Lambda
This is a national organization for adults in
post secondary enrollment in Business
Education. Members learn how to engage in
industry and group enterprise; how to hold
office and direct the affairs of a group; how to
work with other representatives; and how to
compete on local, state, and national levels.
Student Government Association
Student Government Association membership is open to at least on representative
from each diploma or associate degree program. Student council membership is based
on faculty nominations using the following
criteria: godd academic standing, leadership
skills, and organizational ability.
Skills USA/VICA
Formerly known as Vocational Industrial
Clubs of America (VICA), Skills USA is a club
for trade, industrial, technical, and health
occupation students. Skills USA offers leadership, citizenship, and character development progress to complement skill training.
Skills USA brings together people who share
common interests and exchange ideas.
Members may earn recognition through
school, state, and national awards and con56
tests.
The Scrub Club
The Surgical Technology Club is open to students in the Surgical Technology program.
The club provides an avenue for members to
meet to discuss issues related to their field
and to interact with surgical professionals
and guest speakers.
Campus
Facilities
57
Lanier Technical College - Campus Facilities
Campuses
Oakwood Campus
The Oakwood Campus is the original campus of Lanier Technical College and is located near exit 16 of I-985. The campus features seven buildings with lots of parking and
green space as well as a large, well-furnished library, two student centers, and a
210-seat lecture hall. Classrooms provide
opportunities for small class sizes to
enhance the learning process.
The campus opened in January 1967 with a
new 47,000 square foot administrative and
classroom building. During the mid-1970s,
the campus facilities were expanded to
include a modern industrial training facility
and 20,000 square feet of classroom, laboratory, and administrative space. Additional
buildings of 26,000 square feet and 47,000
square feet were added in 1981 and 1996
respectively. In 2002, the 5,000 square foot
Ammonia Refrigerant Building was added to
the campus. In 2005 a 4,200 square foot
maintenance building will be completed.
Located adjacent to Gainesville College and
the Lanier Career Center, the campus allows
seamless learning opportunities from high
school to technical college to a two-year college and beyond. Its location facilitates
Oakwood Campus students taking advantage of dual enrollment at the high school
and college level thus fulfilling the college’s
mission of meeting the educational and technological needs of the community.
Forsyth Campus
The Forsyth Campus of Lanier Technical
College is located at exit 13 off of GA 400.
This location makes attending classes convenient for students coming from the North
Fulton area as well as from Forsyth,
Dawson, and Lumpkin counties. This lush,
beautifully landscaped, 50+ acre campus
includes pedestrian pathways and a memorial fountain – all of which enhance the natural beauty of the area. The campus’s two
modern buildings provide 57,000 square feet
that integrate state-of-the-art technology with
sleek design. The high-tech feel is complimented with a warm and welcoming quality
to achieve and reflect the academic mission
of the college.
58
Jackson County Campus
The Jackson County Campus, located in a
shopping center in downtown Commerce.
The expansion of the campus completed in
December 2004 has 20,000 square foot, 10
classrooms, auditorium, library plus offices.
Programs available in Commerce include
Business Office Technology, Computer
Information Systems, Horticulture, and
Practical Nursing.
Winder-Barrow Campus
Lanier Technical College expanded its service delivery area in July 2002 to include
Barrow County. The Winder-Barrow campus
evolved through a partnership with the City
of Winder, Barrow County government,
Barrow County Board of Education, and the
Barrow County Industrial Development
Authority. The 25,000 square foot facility is
located in the heart of downtown Winder and
boasts a student enrollment of approximately 200 credit students. Programs available in
Winder include Accounting, Business Office
Technology, Computer Information Systems,
Early Childhood Education, EMT, Fire
Science, and Welding.
Library
Provides students and faculty the opportunity to search for information using books,
periodicals, and electronic resources. The
library’s collection provides support for the
college’s academic programs and opportunities for personal enrichment.
Computers are available with Internet
access, GALILEO, Microsoft Office programs, and the Ga. Career Information
System software. Interlibrary loan agreements allow students access to books and
periodicals from libraries across the state to
supplement the local holdings. Lanier
Technical College has a reciprocal agreement with Gainesville College to provide use
of materials and computers for faculty and
students.
Library services include reference services,
bibliographic instruction, assistance with
online databases and media production. The
library is open from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. Monday
through Thursday, and 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. on
Friday when classes are in session. Hours
vary during quarter breaks and will be posted
outside the library. The library has a branch on
Lanier Technical College - Campus Facilities
the Oakwood Campus and at the Forsyth
Campus. Resource centers with computer
access and full inter library loan capabilities
are located at the Jackson and Winder-Barrow
Campuses.
post any information which would be of benefit to the student body.
Visitors
The equipment in the classrooms and laboratories was carefully selected to provide
training that is as close to actual working
conditions and procedures as possible.
Training is conducted in the laboratories on
machines and equipment. Academic classroom study is also a vital part of the instructional delivery system.
Visitors are welcome at Lanier Tech. On the
Main Campus, visitors should register in the
main office in Building 100. On the Forsyth
Campus, visitors should register in the
Student Services/Admissions Office in
Building A. Students are not to take friends
or relatives to the classroom without
approval from the Vice President for
Instruction or the Vice President for Student
Services. One day's notice is considered
appropriate. Children are not to be brought
to class. Groups (high school classes, clubs,
etc.) wishing to visit the campus may contact
the Office of Admissions to make an appointment.
Bookstore
Textbooks and a variety of other items are
available from the campus bookstore.
Students are required to have their own textbooks, workbooks, kits, etc. Book returns for
a full refund must be made within seven days
of purchase. Returns are accepted only
when the book is in new condition and
accompanied by the original receipt. The
bookstore also buys back used books that
are still in use.
The bookstore hours are expanded during
the beginning of the quarter to meet student
needs. The regular bookstore hours are as
follows:
Oakwood Campus
Monday
9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday
9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Thursday
9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Friday
Closed
Forsyth Campus
Monday
9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Thursday
2:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Bulletin Boards
Bulletin boards are provided for student
information and/or announcements. Boards
are located throughout each campus. The
official boards in the Student Centers are for
announcements from the Administration or
the Student Government Association. The
other boards allow students to advertise or to
Classrooms & Laboratory
Equipment
Conference Rooms
Several conference rooms are available on
campus for local board meetings and conferences with program advisory board members as well as representatives from other
educational institutions and business and
industry.
Housing
Lanier Tech has no dormitories or other
housing facilities.
Lecture Hall
The 210-seat lecture hall is located in
Building 300 on the Oakwood Campus. It is
used for a variety of activities–placement
testing, student club meetings, faculty meetings, job fairs, and community meetings. For
information on renting the lecture hall,
please call 770.531.6329. An 80-seat lecture
hall is located on the Forsyth Campus. It is
used for a variety of activities - placement
testing, student club meetings, faulty meetings, job fairs, and community meetings. For
information on renting the lecture hall,
please call 770.781.6943.
Student Centers &
Picnic Areas
Food and drink are not allowed in the classrooms; therefore, student centers and picnic
areas are provided for students’ convenience. Since cleanliness is the user's responsibility, cooperation in keeping the tables and
counters clean by placing trash in the appropriate receptacles is required. Please do not
rearrange the furniture. Remember to be
considerate of others when using these facilities. Hot lunches and cafeteria services are
59
Lanier Technical College - Campus Facilities
available for students on the Oakwood
Campus at the Gainesville College Student
Center. Students are welcome to use that
facility at any time.
Technology Center
•
•
•
•
•
Visitors
Handicapped
Fire Lanes, Labs, and Shop Areas
Cosmetology Patrons (Oakwood Campus)
Outside of curbing and any
other unpaved areas
• Gainesville College parking lots.
Lanier Tech's Technology Center located in
Building 500 on the Oakwood Campus houses a variety of equipment and laboratories
for the purpose of providing pre-hire and
customized training for business and industry. The Center is also available for job fairs
and various other community events. Call
770.531.6342 for information about renting
or scheduling space in the Technology
Center
Parking for staff, faculty, administration, and
visitors is marked on designated spaces.
Parking spaces for handicapped students
are marked in blue, and handicapped signs
are displayed. Students may enter the campus only from marked entrances and must
follow arrows of traffic flow.
Telephones
On the Oakwood Campus, the driveway
around Building 100 is one-way traffic and is
limited to loading, unloading, and official
business only.
Telephones in the offices and departments
are for school business only. Public telephones are available for student use. No
incoming phone calls for students will be
accepted unless it is an emergency.
Students should inform day care centers,
family, etc. of the department in which they
are enrolled and the specific phone number
for that department. This will speed up emergency messages. Unauthorized use of
school telephones may subject students to
disciplinary actions.
Video Information System
Closed circuit televisions are located in the
hallway of each building and in the Student
Centers at the Oakwood and Forsyth
Campuses. Announcements and notices are
provided for student information.
Vehicles on Campus
Parking Regulations: Driving and parking a
vehicle on campus is a privilege and not a
right. The cooperation of everyone operating
vehicles on campus is essential to traffic
control and safety. Vehicles may be left on
campus overnight or over a weekend only
with the permission of the Vice President for
Administrative Services. Parking for Lanier
Tech students is permitted only in areas
marked for student parking. Student vehicles
parked in any of the below designated areas
are considered in violation of parking policy
and will be ticketed:
• Staff, Faculty, and Administration
60
The parking area toward Gainesville College
is reserved for Cosmetology patrons only.
Cosmetology patrons must display a valid
cosmetology patron slip while parked in this
area. Failure to comply with this policy may
result in disciplinary action. Violation of parking regulations may result in tow-away at
owner's expense. Students should display a
parking hang-tag on the rear view mirror of
their vehicles. Parking permits are issued
during registration. Students who need an
additional permit or who change vehicles
during
the
quarter
must
contact
Administrative Services. A $3 fee will be
assessed for the third replacement and each
replacement permit after the third.
Vehicular Accidents
on Campus
Vehicular accidents on campus should be
reported to the appropriate county Sheriff's
Office or Police Department who will complete and file the necessary report. This
report will be available to individuals involved
in the accident. Anyone desiring a report
must contact the appropiate county Sheriff's
Office or Police Department.
Severe Weather
Definitions of a Tornado Watch and Tornado
Warning are as follows:
Lanier Technical College - Campus Facilities
A Tornado Watch means that weather
conditions are such that a tornado may
develop. A Tornado Watch issued by the
National Weather Service will be announcement over the intercom advising students
and faculty. Appropriate contacts will be
made to the Economic Development Center
and Welding Lab at the Oakwood campus
and at the Winder-Barrow and Jackson
County Campuses advising these facilities of
the situation. An announcement will be made
over the intercom when the Tornado Watch
has been canceled.
following areas on the Oakwood Campus:
A Tornado Warning means that a tornado has formed and been sighted. A Tornado
Warning issued by the National Weather
Service will be indicated by the sounding of
sirens (series of blasts with a short pause
between each blast). Students must proceed
to designated hallway areas. Designated
areas will be explained in student orientation. Students on clinical assignment should
follow severe weather procedures for their
assigned office or hospital. When the
Tornado Warning has been canceled, students will be signaled to return to class by
reactivating the siren.
Use of tobacco products is permitted in the
following areas on the Forsyth Campus:
• Student Parking Lots
• Patio Area Outside the Student Center
• Covered Area at the end of Building B
Hazardous Weather: Any announcement of school closings due to inclement
weather will be made over the local radio
and TV stations. Every effort will be made to
announce school closing by 6:30 a.m. If day
classes are canceled, evening classes are
also canceled.
Tobacco Free Environment
Lanier Tech has created a tobacco-free environment in all of its buildings on all campuses. No smoking or tobacco use is permitted
in any buildings or entrance ways into buildings. The research on health risks associated with tobacco use and the hazards of second-hand smoke led to this stance.
Use of tobacco products is permitted in the
following areas on the Winder-Barrow
Campus:
•
•
Student parking lots
Patio tables outside Student Center
Use of tobacco products is permitted in the
•
•
•
•
Picnic tables located between the
Student Center (Building 100) and
the Giles Center (Building 200)
Picnic tables located in the grassed
areas of Student Parking between
Buildings 100 and the Technology
Center (Building 500)
Student automobiles in Student
Parking areas
Open area outside Student Center in
Building 300
Use of tobacco products is permitted in the
following areas on the Jackson County
Campus:
• Covered area
These are the only areas where tobacco use
will be permitted. Students violating this policy are subject to disciplinary action.
Please take pride in our campuses and
assist us with keeping these areas free of litter and the remains of tobacco products.
Receptacles will be provided in these areas
for that purpose. Failure to keep these areas
litter free may result in discontinuation of this
privilege.
On-Campus Services
for Students
Repair of Personal Items
Personal items belonging to students may
be repaired in the various labs. However, the
repairs will be done only when they contribute to the learning situation. Therefore, no
time or date of completion can be promised
and no guarantee will be given on the repair
work.
No item will be repaired without the consent
of the instructor involved. The school and
staff will not be held liable for items left for
repair; however, security procedures will be
in effect at all times to safeguard any items
left for repair. There will be no charge for
labor for any repair work done by the school.
61
Lanier Technical College - Campus Facilities
The only charges will be a lab fee for each
item repaired and the cost for the parts and
supplies used to repair the item. Cost of the
parts and supplies will be the school's cost
plus 10 percent. All charges for repair work
completed must be paid at the Administrative
Services Office between the hours of 8:00
a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday
or 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. on Friday and the
receipt presented to the appropriate instructor before the repair item will be released.
Any item left over 30 days after notification of
completion of repairs will become the property of the school.
Class Rings And Pins
Representatives from the manufacturers of
the school ring will be available during the
school year to accept orders for rings or pins.
The school does not accept responsibility or
liability in these purchases.
Emergency Procedures
Emergency Evacuation: During emergencies, all individuals should proceed to their
designated assembly areas and remain
there until the all-clear signal is given. Under
no circumstances are students to go to their
automobiles or attempt to remove them from
the parking lot. All traffic lanes must be clear
for emergency vehicles and traffic. The primary and secondary routes for emergency
evacuation in case of fire or bomb threat are
posted in each department. Students should
become familiar with exit routes during student orientation.
Fire Drills will be held periodically to familiarize students with the fire alarm system and
evacuation routes. Fire drills will be indicated
by a non-interrupted blast of the fire alarm.
When the fire alarm is sounded, all students,
faculty, and staff must exit the building immediately by their primary means of egress. If
the primary route is blocked by fire or explosion, the secondary egress route should be
used. Students will be signaled to return to
class by reactivating the fire alarm.
Bomb Threats will be indicated by an ongoing series of blasts from the fire alarm with
a short pause between each blast. That signal should be easily distinguishable from the
62
fire alarm. If a bomb threat should occur,
each instructor must immediately escort students from the building using the primary
means of egress. Students will be signaled
to return to class by reactivating the fire
alarm. The health and safety plan and the
physical operation plan is available to students by calling the Office of the Vice
President of Administrative Services.
Business Hours
Normal business hours are from 7:30 a.m.
until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday,
and 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Friday. The
Office of Student Services remains open
until 7:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday
when classes are in session. Hours are
extended for the first week of class each
quarter.
General
Code of
Behavior
63
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Student Responsibilities
& Rights
The following responsibilities and rights are
listed to support the concept that students
should be responsible citizens and, as such,
they are guaranteed certain rights. Students
have a responsibility to attend school regularly, and a right to learn and develop those
skills and knowledge needed to function in
society. Students have a responsibility to use
counseling services that are provided for
them for their own educational and personal
development, and a right to be accurately
informed as to the nature of guidance services available to them.
Students have a responsibility to make the
most of the educational experiences made
available to them, and a right to an education
which is appropriate to their needs. Students
have a responsibility to become informed
and to express their opinions in a suitable
manner, and a right to form and express their
own opinions without jeopardizing their relations with their instructor. Students have a
responsibility to not discriminate against any
other person because of race, age, sex,
creed, national origin, or handicap. Students
have a right to expect no discrimination
because of race, sex, age, creed, national
origin, or handicap. Students have a responsibility to maintain reasonable grades
according to their ability, and a right to
receive an academic grade that reflects their
achievement.
Students have a responsibility to discuss
grievances informally with persons involved
before invoking formal grievance action, and
a right to a standard procedure for resolution
of grievances. Students have a responsibility to publish and post information that does
not disrupt the orderly operation of the
school as determined by the President, and
a right to know the criteria that will be applied
in selection of information or materials they
wish to post or include in their publications.
Students have a responsibility to respect the
persons and property of others, and a right to
expect that their person and property will not
be violated by others while at school.
Students have a responsibility to know and
observe the institution rules and laws that
64
govern their conduct, and a right to have
clear understanding of the rules of student
conduct made available to them. Students
have a right to privacy of person, as well as
freedom from unreasonable search and
seizure of property. That individual right,
however, is balanced by the college‘s
responsibility to protect the health, safety
and welfare of all its students.
Parents, guardians or eligible students have
the responsibility of informing the college of
information that will aid in making educational decisions to benefit the student, releasing
information that will aid in making educational decisions to benefit the student, and meeting their financial obligations to the school.
Parents, guardians or eligible students have
the right to inspect, review, and challenge
information contained in records directly
relating to the student; the right to be protected by legal provisions which prohibit the
release of personally identifiable information
to other than legally authorized persons; and
a right of access to cumulative records.
Acceptable Computer
Use Policy
Administrative, Library and Computer
Laboratory Workstations
1.No software is to be added to any computer, PC, or network server owned or
leased by the College. Do not load per
sonal software or download software
from the Internet onto computers.
Exceptions are permitted on computer
laboratory workstations ONLY in those
computer labs specifically designed for
or equipped with removable hard drives
for this purpose and ONLY as directed
by the instructor for the specific course
requiring such modifications.Arrangements for modifications necessary to
accommodate special needs students
may be made through the Special
Services Office.
• Do not reconfigure the screen settings,
software, or hardware. Exceptions are
permitted on computer laboratory workstations ONLY in those computer labs
specifically designed for or equipped
with removable hard drives for this purpose and ONLY as directed by the
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
instructor for the specific course
requiring such modifications.Arrangements for modifications necessary to
accommodate special needs students
may be made through the Special
Services Office.
2.Computer
laboratory
workstations
that have CD writers installed are to
be used for saving students’ files/data
only. Any other usage of the CD writers
including reproduction of audio or software disks is subject to disciplinary
action.
3. Do not use workstations for activities
that use excessive bandwidth such as
chat rooms, realtime chats, e-mail chain
letters, automated bulk mailing, music, or
streaming video.
4. Computer laboratory workstations may
be used only as directed by the instructor.
5. Library/Media Center workstations may
be used freely for research and educational purposes and for recreational web
browsing; however, students must relinquish use of workstations if others are
waiting to use them for class work.
Computer Laboratory
Workstations
You may use these workstations only as
directed by the instructor.
Library Workstations
Use the workstations freely for
research and educational purposes.
2. You may use the workstations for
recreational web browsing, but be
ready to relinquish use of a workstation if others are waiting to use a
computer for educational purposes.
Code of Conduct
It is important for all students,1 to be aware
of conduct that will lead to disciplinary action
by Lanier Tech. In order to clarify the types of
conduct which shall be considered to affect
adversely the school's educational function
or to interfere with the rights of others to pursue their education, to conduct their schools
duties and responsibilities or to participate in
school activities, the Board of Directors
adopts the following Code of Conduct for
students:
Scope
The School may take disciplinary action for
an offense against the Code of Conduct
when the offense occurs on School premises
or at School-sponsored events, or when an
offense which occurs off campus is such that
in the judgment of the Vice President for
Student Services,2 failure to take disciplinary
action is likely to interfere with the educational process or the orderly operation of the
College, or endanger the health, safety or
welfare of the College community.
Matters Subject to
Disciplinary Actions
Appropriate disciplinary procedures and
sanctions shall be applied to any student,
acting individually or in concert with others,
who commits, or attempts to commit, any of
the following acts of misconduct:
1.
Students who violate acceptable computer
use policies will receive a warning; however,
continued failure to comply will result in loss
of these privileges and may result in dismissal from school. Employees who fail to
comply with these policies will be disciplined
up to and including termination of employment.
• Software includes, but is not limited to, any
storage media (CD's, diskettes, tapes, etc.)
and any Internet access, whether or not files
are downloaded.
1. Action(s) or conduct which hinders,
obstructs or otherwise interferes
with the learning process. This
includes but is not limited to the use
of cell phones, pagers and radios,
etc.
in
classrooms,
labs,
library/media center, and clinical settings. Use of these devices in the
settings listed above will not be permitted.
2.
Actions which have great potential
for physically harming the person or
property of others, including that of
the College, or which actually result
in physical harm, or which cause
reasonable apprehension of physical harm.
3.
Any type of sexual assault including
rape.
65
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
66
Making false representations to the
College, including forgery and unauthorized alteration of documents,
unauthorized use of any College
document or instrument of identification.
Academic dishonesty, including, but
not limited to, dishonesty in quizzes,
tests, or assignments; claiming credit for work not done or done by others; hindering the academic work of
other students; misrepresenting
academic or professional qualifications within or without the College;
and nondisclosure or misrepresentation in filling out applications or
other College records.
Substantially interfering with the
freedom of expression, movement
or activity of others.
Excessive absences or excessive
tardiness.
Violation of any probationary terms.
Failure to meet any financial obligations to the College.
Use of profane language on campus
or at School-sponsored events.
Reckless driving on campus.
Initiating or causing to be initiated
any false report, warning or threat of
fire, explosion or other emergency.
Misusing or damaging fire safety
equipment on College premises.
Theft of property or of services; possession of property that is known to
be stolen.
Failure to comply with the lawful
directions of College officials, including campus security officers and
other law enforcement officials, acting in performance of their duties.
Willfully refusing or failing to leave
the property of or any building or
other facility owned, operated, or
controlled by the College when
requested to do so by a lawful custodian of the building, facility or property if the student is committing,
threatens to commit or incites others
to commit any act which would disrupt, impair, interfere with or obstruct
the lawful mission, processes, procedures or functions of the College.
Unauthorized presence in or use of
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
College premises, facilities, or property, in violation of posted signs,
when closed, or after normal operating hours.
Illegal use, possession, or distribution of any controlled substance, illegal drug, or alcohol.
Use or possession of fireworks on
College premises or at College
sponsored events.
Use, possession, or storage of any
weapon (which includes, but is not
limited to, firearms, ammunition,
bombs, explosives, incendiary
devices, knives, or other dangerous
weapons, substances, or materials)
on College premises or at Collegesponsored
activities,
unless
expressly authorized in writing by
the President.
Misusing
College
computing
resources by intentionally making or
receiving, accessing, altering, using,
providing or in any way tampering
with files, disks, programs, passwords or hardware belonging to
other computer users without their
permission.
Receiving or transmitting offensive
material through College computers.
Violation of published or posted
College regulations or policies,
including but not limited to regulations prohibiting discriminatory activity, safety regulations, parking regulations, and regulations on designated areas for smoking, eating and
drinking.
Aid to others in committing or inciting
others to commit any act mentioned
above.
Action(s) or conduct which hinders,
obstructs or otherwise interferes
with the implementation or enforcement of the Code of Conduct including failure to appear before any of
the College‘s disciplinary authorities
and to testify as a witness when reasonably notified to do so by an
appropriate College officer.
Any other acts or omissions which
affect adversely College functions or
School-sponsored activities, interfere with the rights of others to the
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
26.
pursuit of their education, or otherwise disrupts the learning process or
is inconsistent with the educational
objectives of the College.
Violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction imposed in accordance with this Code.
1 The term "student" includes both fulltime and part-time students pursuing
credit or non-credit studies.
2 All references to College officers, by
title, in this Code shall also include
the designee(s) of that officer.
Rights of Students in
Disciplinary Matters
Students' rights under the state and federal
constitutions are specifically acknowledged
and affirmed, including the rights of freedom
of speech, freedom of association, freedom
of religion, and due process. The provisions
of this Code of Conduct shall be construed
so as not to infringe upon these rights, as
those rights are defined by law.
Sanctions
1.
Any student charged with illegal
behavior, which represents a clear
and present danger to others and/or
is disruptive to the learning process,
must be immediately removed from
the campus pending a hearing,
which must be scheduled to take
place within five school days.
Generally, prohibited behavior may
be punished by any of the following
sanctions or otherwise at the discretion of the President or his/her
designee.
2. As used in this subsection:
a.
"Verbal warning" means an oral
repri-mand.
b. "Written warning" means a written
reprimand.
c. "Disciplinary probation" means the
establishment of a time period during which further acts of misconduct
may or will result in more severe disciplinary sanctions depending on the
conditions of the probation.
Conditions of probation can include
attendance at workshops and/or
seminars including but not limited to
alcohol, drug or safety workshops
and/or seminars, mandatory mental
health evaluation and/or counseling
or other educational sanctions.
d. "Suspension" means losing student
status for a period of time specified
in the terms of the suspension. A
suspension may commence immediately upon a finding of a violation or it may be deferred to a later
time.
e. "Dismissed" means losing student
status for an indefinite period of
time. Readmission may not be
sought before the expiration of one
year from the date of expulsion, and
it is not guaranteed even after that
time.
f.
"Barred from campus" means being
barred from all or designated portions of the College property or
activities.
3.
The sanction imposed shall be set
based upon numerous factors, including the severity of the offense, the
amount of harm created, the student's
record, and sanctions imposed in
recent quarters for similar offenses. In
considering the harm created, there
shall be taken into account whether
any harm or injury was targeted against
a person or group because of that person or group's race, color, religion,
national origin, physical or mental
handicap, age, sex, sexual preference,
ancestry, or medical condition.
Implementation
The President of the College may adopt
such procedures, rules, or regulations as
deemed necessary to implement this Code
of Conduct.
Dismissal Actions
Students may be dismissed from College for
any of the following reasons:
• Taking College property. Persons will be
prosecuted.
• Intentional or malicious damage to
College property
67
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
• Violation of shop rules and safety regulations
• Excessive absences or excessive
tardies
• Unwillingness to cooperate and follow
College and department policies
• Any conduct that disrupts the learning
process or is inconsistent with the educational objectives of Lanier Tech
• Violation of any probationary terms
• Failure to meet any financial obligations
to the school
• Flagrant violation of departmental policies
• Abuse of parking rules
• Entering other departments without prior
approval from instructor
• Violation of other rules and regulations
stated
in
published
information
• Physical abuse or violence
• Falsifying records or materials related to
school
progress
or
admissions
• Possession of a firearm or any dangerous weapon
• Reckless driving on campus
• Use of profane language
• Smoking, eating, and drinking in an
undesignated area
• Participating in activities not related to
school functions during regularly scheduled school hours
• Cheating
• Receiving or transmitting offensive material through school computers
Housekeeping
Help with housekeeping and cleanliness is
expected of all students. The term "industrial
housekeeping" is not to be mistaken for a
push broom effort; it means much more than
that. It is an orderly arrangement of operations, tools, equipment, storage, facilities,
and supplies. All students should work to
maintain effective housekeeping.
Weapons Policy
It is unlawful for any person to carry or to
possess or to have under their control any
firearm, explosive material, or other dangerous weapon within a school safety zone or at
a school building, school function, or on
school property or on transportation furnished by the school.
68
The term "weapon" includes any pistol,
revolver, or any weapon designed or intended to propel a missile of any kind; or any dirk,
Bowie knife, switchblade knife, ballistic knife,
any other knife having a blade of three or
more inches, straight-edge razor, spring
stick, metal knuckles, blackjack, any bat,
club, or other bludgeon-type weapon; or any
flailing instrument consisting of two or more
rigid parts connected in such a manner as to
allow them to swing freely, which may be
known as a nun chahka, nun chuck, nunchaku, shuriken, or fighting chain; or any
disc, of whatever configuration, having at
least two points or pointed blades which is
designed to be thrown or propelled and
which may be known as a throwing star or
oriental dart; or any weapon of like kind; and
any stun gun or laser as defined in O.C.G.A.
16-11-106.
Sexual Harassment
It is the policy of Lanier Tech to maintain a
learning environment that is free from sexual harassment. It is a violation of the policy
for any member of the school staff to
harass a student through conduct or communications of a sexual nature as defined
below. It is also a violation of this policy for
students to harass other students through
conduct or communications of a sexual
nature. Unwelcome sexual advances,
requests for sexual favors, and other inappropriate oral, written or physical conduct of
a sexual nature when made by a member
of the staff to a student or when made by
any student to another student constitutes
sexual harassment when:
1. Submission to such conduct is made,
either explicitly or implicitly, as a term or
condition of an individual's education;
2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis
for academic decision affecting that individual; or
3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect
of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or professional performance or creates an intimidating, hos
tile or offensive academic environment.
Sexual harassment may include but is not
limited to:
• Verbal harassment or abuse
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
• Pressure for sexual activity
• Repeated remarks to a person with sexual or demeaning implications
• Unwelcome touching
• Suggesting or demanding sexual involvement accompanied by implied or explicit
threats concerning one's grades, job, etc.
Any person who alleges sexual harassment
by a staff member or student in the College
may complain directly to the Office of the
President. Filing of a complaint or otherwise
reporting sexual harassment will not reflect
upon the individual's status nor will it affect
future employment, grades, or job assignments. The right to confidentiality, both of the
complainant and of the accused, will be
respected consistent with the College‘s legal
obligations, and with the necessity to investigate allegations of misconduct and take corrective or disciplinary action.
shall subject such person to disciplinary
action including discharge. A substantiated
charge against a student shall subject that
student to disciplinary action including dismissal from the College.
Title IX Coordinator
Lisa Wilson
(770) 531-2558
Room 201H, Building 200
Lanier Technical College
2990 Landrum Education Drive
Oakwood, GA 30566
A substantiated charge against an employee
Procedure: Summary of Student Notification Requirements
Student Notification
Deadline
I. Voter Registration, 20 U.S.C§1094(a)(23)(A) . . . . . . .Institution must request forms
from the state‘s voter registration
deadline.
II. Drug Free Schools & Communities,
Act, 20 U.S.C. §1011(i); 34 C.F.R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annual written notice.
III. Financial Aid, Programs, and
• Athletics Information, 20 U.S.C. §86.1 et seq . . . . . . . . Annual notice
A. Financial Assistance Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Upon request must be made available to all students and to prospec
tive students before they enroll or
enter into any financial obligation
with the institution.
• B.Institutional Information, 34 C.F.R. §668.43 . . . . . . .Upon request; must be made
available to all current students and
to all prospective students before
they enroll or enter into a financial
obligation with the institution.
• C. Completion/Graduation Rate Information,
34. C.F.R. §668.45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Annually by July 1; must be made
available upon request, to all stu-dents, and to all prospective students before they enroll or enter
into any financial obligation with the
institution.
• V. Annual Security Report, 34 C.F.R. §668.46 . . . . . . .Annually to students by September
1. Submit to Secretary of Education
per electronic reporting procedure
established by Secretary.
• V. Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Act,
20 U.S.C. §1232g; 34C.F.R.§99.1 et seq. . . . . . . . . . . Annual notice
69
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Student Notification
Requirements
I. VOTER REGISTRATION, 20 U.S.C.
§1094(a)(23)(A).
The 1998 Higher Education Act requires all
post-secondary institutions to make a goodfaith effort to distribute voter registration
forms to each degree or certificate-seeking
student that attends classes on campus, and
to make such forms widely available to students. (The law does not apply in states with
no voter registration requirement or where
voters can register at the time of voting). The
institution must request forms from the state
120 days prior to the deadline for registering
to vote in the state. In Georgia, the deadline
for registering is usually the fifth prior to the
date of the primary or election. The law
applies to all general and special elections
for federal office (i.e. President, Vice
President, Senator, and Representative to
the U.S. Congress, see 2 U.S.C §431(3))
and includes elections for Governor and
other state chief executive.
II. DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES ACT, ("DFSCA"), 20 U.S.C.
§1145(g), 34 C.F.R. §86.1 et seq.
The DFSCA requires institutions receiving
federal financial assistance to establish drug
and alcohol prevention programs for students and employees. At a minimum, each
institution must distribute to all students and
employees annually:
• Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or
distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol
on school property or as part of any
school activities;
• A description of the applicable legal
sanctions under local, State, or
Federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and
alcohol;
• A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and
the abuse of alcohol;
• A description of any drug or alcohol
counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation
or re-entry programs that are available
to employees and students; and clear
statement that the institution will
impose sanctions on students and
70
employees (consistent with local,
State, and Federal law), and a description of those sanctions, up to and
including expulsion or termination of
employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of
conduct.
• The law further requires an institution
of higher education to conduct a biennial review of its program to:
i. Determine the program‘s effectiveness and implement changes
if they are needed; and
ii. Ensure that the sanctions developed are consistently enforced.
See 34 C.F.R. §86.100.
Institutions were required to make a onetime certification to the Secretary of
Education that the school has adopted and
implemented a program to prevent the use of
illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. See 34 C.F.R. §86.486.6.
The biennial review of the program and any
other records relating to the drug prevention
program certification must be retained for
three (3) years. Records relating to any litigation, claim, audit or other action involving
the records must be retained for three (3)
year or until completion of the action and resolution of all issues that arise form such litigation, claim, audit, etc. See 34 C.F.R.
§86.103
III. FINANCIAL AID, PROGRAMS AND
ATHLETICS INFORMATION, 20 U.S.C.
§1092; 34 C.F.R .§668.
Detailed information is required under the
Higher Education Amendments regarding
financial aid, tuition, fees and other costs of
attendance, academic programs, accreditation, handicapped services/facilities, study
abroad and completion/graduation, transferout rates, as applicable, and athletic program information.
A. Financial Assistance Information, 34
C.F.R. §668.42.
Institutions must publish and make readily
available to all current students and all
prospective students upon request a
description of all federal, state, local, private
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
and institutional student financial assistance
programs available to students, including
both need-based and non-need-based programs. For each financial aid program
described, the information must include:
1)
procedures and forms by which students
apply
for
assistance;
2) student eligibility requirements;
3) the criteria for selecting recipients;
and
4) the criteria for determining the
amount of a student‘s award.
These materials must be made available to
students via appropriate publications and
mailings before they enter into a financial
obligation with the institution. 34 C.F.R.
§668.42(b).
The institution must describe the rights and
responsibilities of students that receive
financial assistance under the Title IV, HEA
Programs, including specific information
regarding:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
the criteria for continued student eligibility under each program;
standards which the student must
maintain in order to be considered to
be making satisfactory progress for
purpose of receiving financial assistance and the criteria by which the
student who has failed to maintain
satisfactory progress may re-establish their eligibility for financial assistance;
the method by which financial assistance disbursements are made to
students and the frequency thereof;
the terms of any loan received by a
student, a sample loan repayment
schedule and the necessity for
repaying loans;
the general conditions and terms
that apply to any employment which
is part of a students‘ financial assistance package;
the institution must provide and collect exit counseling information as
required by 34 C.F.R. 674.42 for
Perkins Loan Program borrowers by
34 C.F.R. 685.304 for William D.
Ford Federal Direct Student Loan
Program borrowers and by 34 C.F.R.
7)
682.604 for Federal Stafford Loan
Program borrowers; and
the conditions under which students
receiving Federal Family Education
Loan or Ford Direct Loan assistance
may obtain repayment deferrals for
service under the Peace Corps Act,
the Domestic Volunteer Service Act
of 1973 or comparable volunteer
community service. See 34 C.F.R.
668.42.
B. Institutional Information, 34 C.F.R.
§668.43.
Institutions must publish and make readily
available to all current and prospective students certain required institutional information. This information must be made available to enrolled or prospective students, on
request, via appropriate publications, mailings or electronic media before the student
enters into a financial obligation with the
institution. 34 C.F.R. §668.41(d). The
required institutional information must
include:
1) costs of attendance, including tuition
and fees, estimates of necessary
books and supplies, estimates of typical charges for room and board,
transportation costs for students, and
any additional costs of a program in
which a student is enrolled or has
expressed an interest;
2) a statement of the refund policy for
return of unearned tuition and fees or
other costs paid to the institution;
3) the procedures for officially withdrawing from the college;
4) a summary of the requirements (under
34 C.F.R. §668.22) for the return of
Title IV grant or loan assistance;
5) the academic programs of the institu-tion, including current degree programs and other educational and
training programs, the instructional
laboratory and other physical facilities that relate to the academic program, and the institution‘s faculty
and instructional personnel;
6) the names of any entities which
accredit, approve or license the institution in its programs, and the procedures by which documents
71
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
describing that activity can be
reviewed pursuant to 34 C.F.R.
§668.43(b);
7) a description of any special facilities
and services for handicapped stu-dents;
8) the title of persons designated under
34 C.F.R. §668.44 as those who are
available on a full-time basis to
assist enrolled or prospective stu-dents in obtaining financial aid and
institutional information; and
9) a statement that enrollment in a
study-abroad program approved for
credit by the home institution may be
considered enrollment at the home
institution for purposes of applying
for assistance under Title IV, HEA
Programs. The institution must also
make available to any enrolled or
prospective student, upon request, a
copy of the documents that describe
the
institution‘s
accreditation,
approval or licensing. In addition,
unless a waiver has been granted
(pursuant to 34 C.F.R. §668.45(b)),
the institution must designate an
employee or group of employees
that must be available on a full-time
basis to assist enrolled or prospective students in obtaining the financial aid or institutional information
specified in 34 C.F.R. §668.43 and
§668.44.
C. Completion or Graduation Rate
Information,
34
C.F.R.
§668.45.
An institution is required to prepare annually
information regarding completion or graduation rates of certificate or degree-seeking
full-time undergraduate students. Institutions
whose mission is to prepare students to
enroll in another institution must compile
information on its transfer-out rate. Guidance
on the methods for determining the completion/graduation rate and transfer-out rate is
provided in 34 C.F.R. §668.45. An institution
must disclose its completion or graduation
rate and, as applicable, transfer-out rate
information no later than the July 1 immediately following the 12-month period ending
August 31 during which 150% of the normal
time for completion or graduation has
elapsed for all of the students in the group on
72
which the institution bases it completion or
graduation rate and, if applicable, the transfer-out rate calculations.
In addition, institutions may, but are not
required to calculate a completion or graduation rate for students who transfer in and/or
completion or graduation and transfer-out
rates for students who leave to serve in the
Armed Forces, on official church missions,
with foreign aid service of the U.S. or who
become totally disabled. Institutions whose
mission does not involve preparing students
to enroll in anther institution may, if they
wish, calculate a trans-fer-out rate.
The Secretary of Education may grant a
waiver of the requirements in this Section to
any institution that is a member of an athletic association or conference that has voluntarily published the completion or graduation
rate data which the Secretary determines
substantially comparable to the data
required by this Section. 34 C.F.R.
§668.45(e).
IV. ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT, 20
U.S.C. §1092; 34 C.F.R. §668.47.
The Campus Security Act requires colleges
to report crime statistics and other public
safety measures, procedures and policies by
October 1 of each year. A description of
enforcement procedures, as well as crime
prevention and education programs, including a campus sexual assault prevention program, must be contained in the Annual
Security Report. This report must be distributed to all students and employees and must
be made available to all prospective students and employees. Crime statistics must
also be reported to the U.S. Secretary of
Education per the electronic reporting procedure established by the Secretary. The
Annual Campus Security Report must
include:
1) Statistics on the occurrence on campus of the specified criminal offenses and disciplinary referrals set
forth in the regulations (34 C.F.R.
§668.47(c));
2) A statement of current campus policies regarding procedures for reporting criminal actions or other emergencies on campus and policies
concerning the institution‘s
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
response, including policies for time
ly reporting to members of the cam
pus community the occurrence of
crimes which must be reported
under Section 668.47(c) and policies
for preparing the annual crime statistics;
3) A statement of current policies concerning of use and access to campus facilities, including residences,
and security considerations in the
maintenance of campus facilities;
4) A statement of current policies concerning campus law enforcement,
including the enforcement authority
and working relationship with state
and local police agencies and
whether security personnel have
arrest powers; policies that encourage accurate and prompt reporting
of all crimes to campus police and
appropriate police agencies; and
any procedures that allow pastoral
and professional counselors to
inform people they are counseling of
any procedures for reporting crimes
on a voluntary, confidential basis;
and
5) A description of the type and frequency of programs designed to
inform students and employees
about campus security procedures
and practices and to encourage
them to be responsible for their own
security and the security of others;
6) A description of programs designed
to inform students and employees
about the prevention of crime;
7) A statement of policy about the monitoring and recording of criminal
activity at off-campus locations of
student organizations recognized by
the institution;
8) A statement of policy on the possession, use and sale of alcoholic
beverages and enforcement of
underage drinking laws;
9) A statement of policy on the possession, use and sale of illegal drugs
and enforcement of federal and
state drug laws;
10) A description of any drug or alcoholabuse education programs (the institution may cross-reference the
materials the institution uses to comply with Section 120 of the HEA,
codified at 20 U.S.C. §1011(i)).
11) A statement of policy regarding the
institution‘s campus sexual assault
programs to prevent sex offenses,
and procedures to follow when a sex
offense occurs. This statement must
include a description of educational
programs to promote the awareness
of rape, acquaintance rape and
other forcible and non-forcible sex
offenses, procedures students
should follow if a sex offense occurs,
information on a student‘s option to
notify proper law enforcement
authorities and a statement that
institutional personnel will assist the
student in notifying these authorities
if so requested, notification to students of existing on and off campus
counseling, mental health or other
student services for victims of sex
offenses, notification to students that
the institution will change a victim‘s
academic and living situations after
an alleged sex offense, and procedures for campus disciplinary action
in the case of alleged sex offenses.
These procedures for campus disciplinary actions for alleged sex
offenses must include a clear state
ment that: (1) the accused and the
accuser are entitled to the same
opportunities to have others present
during a disciplinary proceeding;
(2) both the accuser and the
accused must be informed of the
outcome of any institutional disciplinary proceeding alleging a sex
offense; and (3) sanctions that the
institution may impose following a
final determination of an institution
al disciplinary proceeding regarding
rape, acquaintance rape, or other
forcible or nonforcible sex offense.
12) A statement advising the campus
community where law enforcement
agency information concerning registered sex offenders may be
obtained. This will usually be the
local Sheriff‘s Office having primary
jurisdiction for the campus. See 42
U.S.C. §14071(j). Also, the Georgia
73
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Bureau of Investigation maintains a
searchable web site of registered
sex offenders at
www.ganet.org/gbi/sorsch.cgi.
Requirements for the distribution of the
annual security report are set forth in 34
C.F.R. §668.47(b). Each campus of an institution must comply separately with these
requirements. The annual security report
must contain the required statistics (34
C.F.R. §668.47(a)(6)) for the three (3) calendar years preceding the year the report is
issued. Current statistics must be compiled
with the definitions used in the FBI‘s Uniform
Crime Reporting Program. 34 C.F.R.
§668.47(b)(3). Under Section 668.47(e), an
institution must issue timely warnings of
reportable crimes where those warnings may
aid in the prevention of similar crimes, or
where the crimes are considered by the institution to represent a threat to students and
employees.
V. FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND
PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 ("FERPA" or
"BUCKLEY AMENDMENT"), 20 U.S.C.
§1232g; 34 C.F.R. §99.1 et. seq.
FERPA regulates the disclosure and maintenance of student records at all institutions
that receive federal funds. Since the focus of
this summary is notification requirements,
the various requirements and prohibitions of
FERPA are not discussed. For detailed information and discussion of the requirements
imposed by FERPA see:
• Department of Education Family
Compliance
Office
website
at:
w w w. e d . g o v / o f f i c e s / o m / f p c o . h t m l
• The Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act, A Legal Compendium
Steven J. McDonald, Editor, published by
NACUA
• American Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions Officers:
http://aacrao.com
• Association for Student Judicial Affairs:
http://asja.tamu.edu FERPA‘s notification
provision (34 C.F.R. §99.7) requires postsecondary institutions to give students an
annual notice describing their rights
under FERPA. This annual notice must
inform students that they have right to:
74
1)
Inspect and review their education
records;
2) Request changes to their education
records that they believe are inaccurate, misleading or in violation of the
student‘s privacy rights; and
3) Consent to disclosure of personally
identifiable information from their
education records, except to the
extent FERPA allows disclosure
without consent (see 34 C.F.R.
§99.63 and 99.64); and
4) file a complaint with the Department
of Education about the institution‘s
alleged failure(s) to comply with
FERPA.
The
annual
FERPA
notice
to
students
must
also
include:
1) the procedure for exercising the right
to inspect and review their education
records;
2) the procedure for requesting amendment of their education records; and
3) the institution‘s policy on disclosing
education records to school officials
(under
34
C.F.R.
§99.31(a)(1)) whom the institution
has determined have a legitimate
educational interest in such records.
The required annual notice may be
made "by any means that are rea
sonably likely to inform the …students of their rights." 34 C.F.R.
§99.7(b). Institutions must use effective means to notify disabled students. 34 C.F.R. §99.7(b).
Drug Free Campus Act
In accordance with the Drug Free Schools
and Communities Act Amendments of 1989,
Lanier Tech has implemented a program to
prevent the use of illicit drugs and the abuse
of alcohol by students and employees.
Lanier Tech expects faculty, staff, and students to meet appropriate standards of performance, to observe basic rules for good
conduct, and to comply with school Student
and Personnel Policies and Procedures. In
the discharge of its responsibilities as an
employer, Lanier Tech aggressively promotes and requires a drug-free campus
among its students, faculty, and staff.
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Institutional standards of conduct clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol on campus
or as part of any institutional-sponsored
activities. Sanctions up to and including dismissal and referral for prosecution will be
imposed for the violation of these standards.
The Office of Student Services provides
assistance to students with drug or alcoholrelated problems. Criminal Sanctions:
Federal law prohibits the possession, manufacture, or distribution of various controlled
substances. Penalties for these offenses
vary depending upon the severity of the convictions but may include imprisonment of up
to 40 years with large fines. Penalties double
when the offenses occur within 1,000 feet of
a postsecondary educational institution.
Title 20-1 of the Official Code of Georgia
Annotated states that any student of a public
educational institution who is convicted
under the laws of the state, the United
States, or any other state of any felony
offense involving the manufacture, distribution, sale, possession, or use of marijuana, a
controlled substance, or a dangerous drug
shall as of the date of conviction be suspended from the public educational institution in which such person is enrolled. Except
for cases in which the school has previously
taken disciplinary action against a student
for the same offense, such suspension shall
be effective as of the date of conviction even
though the educational institution may not
complete all administrative actions necessary to implement such suspension until a
later date. Except for cases in which the
institution has already imposed the term,
quarter, semester, or other similar period for
which the student was enrolled as of the date
of conviction, the student shall forfeit any
right to any academic credit otherwise
earned or earnable for such term, quarter,
semester, or other similar period; and the
educational institution shall subsequently
revoke any such academic credit which is
granted prior to the completion of administrative actions necessary to implement such
suspension.
Title 20-3-2 of the Official Code of Georgia
Annotated specifies that any student organization functioning in conjunction with, inci-
dental to the school which through its officers, agents or responsible members knowingly permits or authorizes the sale, distribution, serving, possession, consumption or
use of marijuana, a controlled substance or
dangerous drug at any affair, function or
activity of that student organization, social or
otherwise, which such sales, distribution,
serving, possession, consumption or use is
not in compliance with the laws of this state,
shall be expelled from campus for a minimum of one calendar year from the year of
determination of guilt, which it is affiliated or
at which it operates, with any and all leasing,
possession or use agreements respecting
the student organization's use of institutional
property to be terminated by operation of law
for any such knowing, permission or authorization of the unlawful actions defined in the
Code section, subject to the administrative
review and hearing procedures set for in this
Code section.
Failure to comply with any part of this program will result in serious adverse personnel
action, including dismissal or the requirement that the offender satisfactorily participate in a drug abuse assistance program
which has been approved for such purposes
by a federal, state or local health, law
enforcement, or other appropriate agency.
Questions regarding this policy should be
directed to the Personnel Office.
Student Right To Know
The Student Right to Know and Campus
Security Act of 1990 requires that all postsecondary institutions publish the persistence and/or graduation rates for their institution. The information shown below is based
on first-time postsecondary students who
enrolled at Lanier Tech for Fall Quarter 2000
(the Cohort) and have continued in or graduated from their program of study during the
designated tracking period for their particular
Cohort. The ending date for the tracking period for the Fall 2000 Cohort is Spring Quarter
2003. The information given below is a persistence rate or the percentage of the Fall
2000 Cohort who remained enrolled as of
Spring Quarter 2003
Of the Fall 2000 Cohort, 43% have persisted
in enrollment at Lanier Tech. Questions
75
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Sources of Help for Drug Dependency
Alcohol 24 -Hour Helpline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.900.658.7000
Contact Helpline Hall County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.534.0617
Georgia Mountains Community Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.781.6841
Georgia Mountains Community Service (H) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.535.5403
Lakewinds Recovery Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.535.5412
Laurelwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.531.3800
Narcotics Anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.534.3777
National Clearing House for Alcohol & Drug Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.800.729.6686
North Georgia Mental Health Substance Abuse Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.535.5412
The Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.800.417.6237
regarding this information
addressed to the Registrar.
should
be
from 7:30 a.m. through 10:30 p.m. Monday –
Thursday and 7:30 p.m. through 4:00 p.m.
on Friday.
The Student Right To Know and Campus
Security Act of 1990 requires that schools
who participate in federal financial aid programs maintain and report annually certain
campus security policies and crime information.
During the evening hours, only the main
entrances into buildings are unlocked to provide additional security for the students
attending during these hours. Consideration
is given to optimum security in the maintenance of campus facilities. The physical
facilities are regularly inspected and maintained to provide a safe campus. Areas are
well lighted and routinely checked and maintained.
Campus Security Act
Lanier Tech strives to provide a safe environment in which to learn and work. It is also
our desire to promote the concept that obeying laws and regulations is an important part
of being an educated member of our community.
Campus safety and security and crime prevention are a part of the quarterly student orientation and staff development programs at
Lanier Tech. There is an ongoing educational program to make students and staff aware
of types or trends of crime in our area,
changes of behavioral patterns that may
serve to protect the student, and crime prevention information provided by local law
enforcement authorities. Lanier Tech sponsors a Wellness Fair each year for faculty,
staff, and students. The Fair covers a wide
range of topics such as drug and alcohol
information, health information, and crime
awareness and prevention. Representatives
from the local hospital wellness programs,
the Red Cross, and area Sheriff's
Departments are among the presenters invited to attend.
Campus Law Enforcement
Lanier Tech employs off-duty sheriff's
deputies to patrol the campuses, issue citations, assist with incident reports, and provide security during business hours. During
school hours, criminal actions should be
reported to the appropriate law enforcement
agencies such as the local Sheriff's or Police
Department. The school facilities are open
76
Alcohol & Illegal Drugs
A complete statement of the school's policy
regarding alcohol and drugs is contained in
the information provided in the Code of
Conduct Policy statement.
Student Responsibility
Students are encouraged to be responsible
for their own safety and the safety of others.
The cooperation, involvement, and personal
support of students in a campus safety program are crucial to the success of the program. Students must assume responsibility
for their own personal belongings by taking
simple, common sense precautions. Keys
should be carried at all times and never lent
to others. Cars should be parked in lighted
areas and kept locked at all times. Valuables
should be concealed.
Statistics of Reported Crimes
Lanier Tech is required to collect, publish,
and distribute statistics concerning the incidence of crime on our campus. The data collected includes occurrences of the following
criminal offenses: Murder, Sex Offenses Forcible
or
Non-forcible,
Robbery,
Aggravated Assault, Burglary, Motor Vehicle
Theft, Liquor Law Violations, Drug Abuse
Violations, and Weapons Possessions.
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
In compliance with the Campus Security Act,
Lanier Tech provides the following information to all students and employees on an
annual basis. In addition, any applicant for
admission or employment will be provided
the information upon request.
July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004
Crime Category
Number of Incidents
Murder
0
Sex Offenses/Forcible or
Aggravated Assault
0
Burglary
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
Drug Abuse Violations
0
Weapons Possessions
0
Notification of Sex Offenders
Information concerning registered sex
offenders may be obtained at your local
sheriff's department or at the following GBI
web site: www.ganet.org/gbi/sorsch.cgi
Reporting of Criminal Actions
& Emergencies
All campus crimes and emergencies should
be reported directly to the appropriate party
(sheriff's and police department, fire department, hospital, ambulance, etc.) and then
reported to the Student Services Office in a
timely manner.
Americans With
Disabilities Act
entity. It is the policy of Lanier Tech to make
reasonable accommodations to facilitate
participation of people with disabilities in all
programs, activities, and procedures.
Reasonable accommodations will be made
to the extent that these accommodations do
not produce undue financial and/or administrative burdens.
All requests for modification of or additions to
facilities, programs, services, activities, or
publications shall be enumerated on the
Accommodation Form. The person requiring
accommodation will receive notification of
the President's decision relative to undue
financial and administrative burden within fifteen days of filing his/her request.
An individual with a disability who may
require assistance or accommodation in
order to participate in or receive the benefit
of a service, program or activity, or who
desires more information, may contact Todd
Powell, Coordinator of Special Services
(ADA) at 770.531.6330 (Hearing and TDD).
ADA Grievance Procedure
Lanier Tech has adopted an internal grievance procedure providing for the prompt and
equitable resolution of complaints alleging
any action prohibited by the U. S.
Department of Justice regulations implementing Title II of the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. Title II states,
in part, "No qualified individual with a disability shall on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities
of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity."
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,
as amended, and its implementing regulations provide that no qualified individual with
a disability shall, on the basis of the disability, be excluded from participation in or
denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be
subjected to discrimination by any public
Sheriff's Department Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .911
Hall County Sheriff's Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.531.6885
Forsyth County Sheriff's Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.781.2222
Vice President for Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.531.6329
Vice President for Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.531.2558
Vice President for Forsyth Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.781.6950
Barrow Sheriff’s Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.307.3080
Winder Police Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770.867.2156
Jackson Sheriff’s Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 706.367.6000
Commerce Police Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706.335.3200
77
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
Procedures for Program/Service
Complaints
1. A complaint should be filed, in writing,
with the ADA Coordinator or a designee.
A complaint must contain the name and
address of the person filing it and a brief
description of the alleged violation of the
ADA. If the complainant needs an
accommodation in order to file the complaint, he/she should inform the person
taking the complaint.
2. A complaint should be filed within 30 calendar days after the complainant
becomes aware of the alleged violation.
(Processing of allegations of discrimination which occurred before this grievance
procedure was in place will be considered on a case-by-case basis.)
3. An investigation, as may be appropriate,
will follow the filing of a complaint. The
ADA Coordinator or a designee will conduct the investigation. These rules con
template informal, but thorough, investigations, affording all interested persons
an opportunity to submit evidence relevant to the complaint.
4. A written determination as to the validity
of the complaint and a description of the
resolution, if any, will be issued by the
ADA Coordinator and a copy will be forwarded to the complainant no later than
45 calendar days after filing.
5. The ADA Coordinator will maintain the
files and records of Lanier Tech relating
to the complaints filed.
6. The complainant may request a reconsideration of the case in instances where
he/she is dissatisfied with the resolution.
The request for reconsideration should
be made to the ADA Coordinator within
15 calendar days.
Complaints should be addressed to:
Coordinator of Special Services/ADA Todd
Powell 770.531.6330 (Hearing and TDD)
Room 201L, Building 200 Lanier Technical
College 2990 Landrum Education Dr.
Oakwood, GA 30566
Procedure For Employment
Complaint
Persons with complaints against Lanier Tech
may use the agency's existing internal griev78
ance procedure or consult the state's
Commission on Equal Opportunity or the
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission.
Other Remedies
The right of a person to a prompt and equitable resolution of the complaint filed hereunder shall not be impaired by the person's
pursuit of other remedies, such as the filing
of an ADA complaint with the responsible
federal department or agency. Use of this
grievance procedure is not a prerequisite to
the pursuit of other remedies.
Rule Construction
These rules shall be constructed so as to
protect the substantive rights of interested
persons, to meet appropriate due process
standards, and to assure that Lanier Tech
complies with the ADA and the implementing
regulations.
Other Procedures
The procedures provided herein are in addition to, and not in lieu of, any other procedures or remedies available under the law or
otherwise.
Complaint Contacts
Employment and Program/Service complaints should be addressed to Todd Powell
at the address listed above.
Student
Grievance
Procedure
Purpose: To hear the civil rights or other
complaints of any student of Lanier Tech
who has exhausted all other normal channels up to the President, but who has not
received satisfaction. Limitation: The
Grievance Committee will handle questions
related to Lanier Tech campus facilities and
all school-sponsored activities off or on the
immediate campus.
Procedures for Requesting a
Hearing
The complainant within ten (10) calendar
days, while school is in session, after
becoming aware of the alleged act shall file
a written request for a hearing with the Vice
President for Student Services including the
following information:
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
• Date, time, and place
• Names of any witnesses
• The facts of the complaint
Procedural Rules Observed
by the Committee in Hearing
Complaints
The Committee should be composed of:
1. Vice President for Student Services
2. Faculty member named at the beginning of each academic year by the Vice
President for Instruction,
3. A staff member named by the Vice
President of Administrative Services at
the beginning of each academic year,
and three (3) students. The students will
be chosen as follows:
• The complainant may choose one student.
• The complainer may choose one student.
• The third student will be chosen by the
Student Government Association at
the beginning of each academic year.
The parties concerned shall be given written
notice of the time and place of the hearing at
least ten (10) calendar days, while school is
in session, in advance thereof. Such notice
may be delivered by hand or by certified or
registered mail, return receipt requested, to
the complainant's last known address. The
Committee hearing will be conducted in private and follow parliamentary procedure.
During the proceeding, the parties concerned will be permitted to have a non-participating advisor of his/her choice. A tape
recording, transcript or written summary of
the proceedings shall be kept and made
available to the parties concerned in the
event an appeal is filed. The parties concerned shall be afforded an opportunity to
obtain and present witnesses and documentary or other evidence.
The Committee shall be chaired by the
Grievance Officer or by Committee member
designated by the Grievance Officer. The
Grievance Committee shall have the right to
investigate all facts of the student's grievance. The Committee will not be bound by
strict rules of legal evidence. The Committee
may receive any evidence of probative value
in determining the issue involved. Every possible effort will be made to obtain the most
reliable evidence available.
All questions relating to admissibility of evidence or other legal matters will be decided
by the chairperson or presiding officer. An
oath or affirmation shall be administered to
all witnesses by a notary public. Where the
witness cannot appear because of illness or
other cause acceptable to the Committee,
the sworn statement (Affidavit) of the witness
may be introduced into the record.
In such event, the opposite party shall have
the right to file counter-affidavits within three
(3) days following the completion of the hearing. The recommendation of the Committee
will be based on the evidence introduced at
the hearing and should be made within ten
(10) calendar days, while school is in session, after the date of the hearing or within
ten (10) calendar days while school is in session, after receipt of the transcript of the
hearing if one is deemed necessary before a
decision is rendered.
The Committee will report its recommendations, based upon a preponderance of the
evidence, to the President. If the President
does not concur with the report, he/she
should state his/her reasons in writing to the
Committee for response before rendering
his/her final decision. Public statements and
publicity about the complaint should be
avoided. In making a decision, the President
will not be bound by recommendations of the
Committee. The President shall, within ten
(10) calendar days while school is in session, after receipt of the Committee's recommendation, advise the complainant and
other parties concerned in writing of his/her
decision. After complying with the foregoing
procedures, the President shall send an official letter to the student notifying him/her of
his/her decision. Such letter shall be delivered to the addressee only, with receipt to
show to whom and when delivered and
address where delivered. The complainant
shall also be advised in writing of his/her
right to apply to the local board for review of
the President's final decision in accordance
with the provision of State Board Policy. The
79
Lanier Technical College - General Code of Behavior
complainant shall not be harassed or penalized for proper utilization of the complaint
procedures. The mailing address and telephone number for the Council on
Occupational Education is located in the
front of this catalog for cases where the
grievance is not settled at the institutional
level.
At Your Service
The Student Services department is committed to meeting student needs for access,
development, and transition to employment
by providing services thru the following
areas:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Receptionist and General Information
Recruitment
Orientation
Admissions and Career Counseling
Career Services
Financial Aid
Support Services
Student Records
Student Activities
Fatherhood Program
New Connections to Work
Tech Prep Program
The areas listed above aid in providing a
learning environment in which students can
succeed and realize their fullest potential.
Student Dress Code
Lanier Technical College recognizes that the
dress and grooming of students are significant factors in the successful operation of
the educational program. Furthermore, it is
recognized as an educational responsibility
of the college that students are made aware
that appropriate dress, appearance, and
hygiene are conducive to their personal wellbeing and the well-being of others.
Generally, common sense and good taste
should prevail in matters of dress. Because
of safety and other concerns in some programs, a professional dress code must be
adhered to and enforced. This dress code
will be established with the approval of the
college’s administration. (For example, some
programs will require lab coats, uniforms,
long garments to protect the skin.)
80
The following regulations shall be observed
to cultivate a proper attitude toward dress
and grooming by the student:
1. Students enrolled in internships and clinical courses are required to dress appropriately according to the requirements of
the work for which they are being trained.
2. Shoes are to be worn at all times.
3. Longer knee length types of shorts such
as dress shorts, Bermudas, and culottes
are acceptable. Short shorts, tight shorts
and running/gym shorts are not permitted.
4. Cleanliness of person and clothing is
required.
5. Use of offensive, obscene, and/or abusive
words or symbols on clothing is not permitted. This includes the use of emblems,
insignias, badges, or other symbols or
lewd or vulgar words where the effect is
offensive to a reasonable person or otherwise causes disruption or interference
with the orderly operations of the college.
The supervising administrator shall determine if the particular mode of dress
results in disruptions or interference.
6. Tank tops, halter tops, tube tops or other
top garments defined as skimpy, scooped
out at the neck and shoulder, and/or
showing excessive amounts of skin area
are types of inappropriate dress.
** For documented medical reasons, the
administration is authorized to approve
exceptions to the above requirements.
Program
Descriptions
81
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Accounting
Accounting Degree
The Accounting Associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students
for careers in the accounting profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical,
and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. Areas covered in this program include maintaining a set of books for business entities,
account classifications, subsidiary record accounting, corporate accounting, cost accounting,
payroll, computerized accounting, spreadsheet and database fundamentals, tax preparation,
keyboarding and word processing. The program emphasizes a combination of accounting theory and practical application necessary for successful employment using both manual and
computerized accounting systems. Program graduates receive an Accounting Associate of
Applied Technology degree, which qualifies them as accounting technicians.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 102 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Economics
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
Credit Hours
5
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
ACC 103 Principles of Accounting III
ACC 104 Computerized Accounting
ACC 106 Accounting Spreadsheet Fundamentals
ACC 151 Individual Tax Accounting
ACC 152 Payroll Accounting
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 108 Word Processing
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
XXX xxx
Occupational Related Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
6
6
6
3
3
4
4
5
7
3
5
20
102
5
5
5
5
Accounting Diploma
The Accounting diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for
careers in the accounting profession. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and
82
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement.
The program emphasizes a combination of accounting theory and practical application necessary for successful employment using both manual and computerized accounting systems.
Program graduates receive an Accounting diploma which qualifies them to work as accounting technicians.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 73 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ENG 111
Business English
ENG 112
Business Communication
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
MAT 111
Business Math
Credit Hours
5
5
3
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
ACC 103 Principles of Accounting III
ACC 104 Computerized Accounting
ACC 106 Accounting Spreadsheet Fundamentals
ACC 152 Payroll Accounting
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 108 Word Processing
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
6
6
6
3
3
4
5
7
3
12
73
Accounting Assistant Certificate
The purpose of the Accounting Assistant certificate program is to prepare students for an
accounting assistant position within an accounting establishment or as an accounting assistant for a business operation.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 23 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
MAT 111
Business Math
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
ACC 104 Computerized Accounting
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
6
6
3
23
83
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Air Conditioning Technology
Air Conditioning Technology Diploma
The Air Conditioning Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the air conditioning industry. Learning opportunities develop academic,
occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and
advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of air conditioning theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Air
Conditioning Technology diploma and have the qualifications to be employed as air conditioning technicians.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 85 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Occupational Courses
ACT 100 Refrigeration Fundamentals
ACT 101 Principles & Practices of Refrigeration
ACT 102 Refrigeration Systems Components
ACT 103 Electrical Fundamentals
ACT 104 Electrical Motors
ACT 105 Electrical Components
ACT 106 Electric Control Systems and Installation
ACT 107 Air Conditioning Principles
ACT 108 Air Conditioning Systems Installation
ACT 109 Troubleshooting Air Conditioning Systems
ACT 110
Gas Heating Systems
ACT 111
Heat Pumps and Related Systems
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
SCT 100
Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Credit Hours
4
7
7
7
4
5
4
8
3
7
5
6
2
3
85
Applied Manufacturing Technology
Applied Manufacturing Technology Diploma
The Applied Manufacturing Technology diploma program is designed to offer business and
industry, their employees, and other individuals an educational opportunity that will recognize
successful work experience and provide further technical and academic course work. The
customized program uses a variety of instructional modes and educational experiences to
broaden the student's educational and occupational background. A major component is the
awarding of credit hours for successful work related experience. The Applied Manufacturing
Technology program is designed to accommodate the specific needs of diverse companies.
Graduates will be prepared for upward mobility or cross-trained in various manufacturing
84
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
fields. Employment opportunities will vary depending upon company purpose and needs.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Forsyth Campus.
General Core Courses
English (Courses to be identified)
Mathematics (Courses to be identified)
Social Sciences (Courses to be identified)
Total
Fundamental Core Courses OR General Core Courses
Credit Hours
(5)
(5)
(3)
13
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
Courses selected by the company from a list of over
200 state-approved credit courses OR Field based courses (OBI) 20-27
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
65-90
Banking and Finance
Banking and Finance Degree
The Banking and Finance Associate degree program prepares students for employment in a
variety of positions in today's banking, insurance, mortgage, and financial services industries.
The program provides learning opportunities that assist and reinforce industry needs. The program emphasizes a combination of advanced Banking and Finance theory and the practical
application necessary for successful employment. The program is designed for new, current,
or returning students for skill and knowledge enhancement. Program graduates receive a
Banking and Finance Associate of Applied Technology degree.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 110 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
5
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II
5
SPC 191
Fundamentals of Speech
5
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
5
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
ECO 192 Microeconomics OR ECO 193 Macroeconomics
5
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
ACC 106 Accounting Spreadsheet Fundamentals
Credit Hours
6
6
3
85
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
BAF
BAF
BAF
BAF
BAF
XXX
BAF
XXX
BAF
BAF
BAF
BAF
BUS
MKT
MKT
SCT
100
113
114
115
132
xxx
133
xxx
200
205
210
215
101
103
106
100
Introduction to Banking and Finance
Money and Banking
Bank Business and Information Systems
Financial Management & Counseling
Banking and Finance Internship O.B.I. I OR
Elective
Banking and Finance Internship O.B.I. II OR
Elective
Finance
Real Estate Finance
Contemporary Bank Management
Web Based Banking & Finance
Beginning Document Processing
Business Law
Fundamentals of Selling
Introduction to Microcomputers
5
5
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
Students can transfer in up to 15 hours from the Certified Customer Service
Specialist CCSS TCC
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
110
Automotive Collision Repair
Automotive Collision Repair Diploma
The Automotive Collision Repair diploma program is designed to prepare students for careers
in the automotive collision repair profession. Academic, technical, and professional knowledge
and skills are developed for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Specialties are major
automotive collision repair or automotive painting and refinishing. Graduates receive an
Automotive Collision Repair diploma which qualifies them as major collision repair technicians
or painting and refinishing technicians.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 67 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Course
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ACR 100 Safety (1) and
ACR 101 Automobile Components Identification (3)
4
ACR 102 Equipment & Hand Tools Identification
1
ACR 104 Mechanical & Electrical Systems
2
ACR 105 Body Fiberglass, Plastic & Rubber Repair Techniques 3
ACR 106 Welding and Cutting (4) and
86
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
ACR
ACR
ACR
SCT
107 Trim, Accessories, & Glass (2)
6
109 Damage Identification & Assessment
3
110
Minor Collision Repair (2) and
100 Introduction to Microcomputers (3)
5
AND COMPLETION OF ONE SPECIALIZATION IS REQUIRED
Major Collision Repair Specialization
ACR 120 Conventional Frame Repair (3) and
ACR 121 Unibody Identification & Damage Analysis (2)
5
ACR 122 Unibody Measuring & Fixturing Systems
2
ACR 123 Unibody Straightening Systems & Techniques
4
ACR 124 Welding Techniques (2) and
ACR 125 Unibody Structural Panel Repair & Replacement (3) 5
ACR 126 Conventional Body Structural Panel Repair
5
ACR 127 Unibody Suspension & Steering Systems
2
ACR 128 Bolt-On Body Panel Removal & Replacement
4
ACR 129 Major Collision Repair Internship/Practicum OR
DIS 150A Advanced Collision Est System
3
Paint & Refinishing Specialization
ACR 130 Sanding, Priming, & Paint Preparation (5) and
ACR 132 Special Refinishing Application (5)
10
ACR 134 Urethane Enamels Refinishing Applications
6
ACR 135 Tint & Match Colors (6) and
ACR 136 Detailing (2)
8
ACR 137 Paint & Refinishing Internship (3) and
DIS 150B Advanced Paint Mixing (3)
3
Credit hours required for graduation
67
Automotive Repair and Refinishing
Technician Certificate
The Automotive Repair and Refinishing Technician Certificate of Credit program prepares individuals to work in the structural and body repair and and refinishing of automobiles. Program
graduates will receive a Automotive Repair and Refinishing Technician Certificate of Credit.
Minimum length of 8 quarters and/or 34 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
ACR 100 Safety
1
ACR 101
Automotive Components Identification
3
ACR 102 Equipment & Hand Tools Identification
1
ACR 104 Mechanical & Electrical Systems
2
ACR 105 Body Fiberglass, Plastic & Rubber Repair Techniques 3
ACR 107 Trim, Accessories, & Glass
2
ACR 110
Minor Collision Repair
2
ACR 128 Bolt-On Body Panel Removal & Replacement
4
87
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
ACR 130 Sanding, Priming, & Paint Preparation
ACR 132 Special Refinishing Application
ACR 134 Urethane Enamels Refinishing Applications
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
5
5
6
34
Banking and Finance Diploma
The Banking and Finance programs prepare students for employment in a variety of positions
in today's banking, insurance, mortgage, and financial services industries. The programs provide learning opportunities that assist and reinforce industry needs. The program emphasizes
a combination of advanced Banking and Finance theory and the practical application necessary for successful employment. The program is designed for new, current, or returning students for skill and knowledge enhancement.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 88 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 3
ENG 111
Business English
5
ENG 112
Business Communications
5
MAT 111
Business Math
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
ACC 106 Accounting Spreadsheet Fundamentals
BAF 100 Introduction to Banking and Finance
BAF 113
Money and Banking
BAF 114
Bank Business and Information Systems
BAF 115
Financial Management & Counseling
BAF 132 Banking and Finance Internship O.B.I. I OR
XXX xxx
Elective
BAF 200 Finance
BAF 215 Web Based Banking & Finance
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
MKT 103 Business Law
MKT 104 Principles of Economics
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
88
Credit Hours
6
6
3
5
5
3
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
88
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Business Office Technology
Administrative Office Technology Degree
The Administrative Office Technology program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions in today’s administrative and business fields. The Administrative
Office Technology program provides learning opportunities, which introduce, develop, and
reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The program emphasizes the use of the keyboard and applications software. Students are also introduced to accounting database and spreadsheet fundamentals. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge
and skills or to retrain in the area of administrative office technology. Graduates of the program receive an Administrative Office Technology, Associate of Applied Technology degree.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 100 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
ECO 192 Microeconomics OR ECO 193 Macroeconomics
5
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
5
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
5
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
5
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
5
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting
ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 102 Intermediate Document Processing
BUS 103 Advanced Document Processing
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
BUS 106 Office Procedures
BUS 107 Machine Transcription
BUS 108 Word Processing
BUS 201 Advanced Word Processing
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals
BUS 203 Office Management OR
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MKT 103 Business Law
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
6
6
5
5
5
3
5
3
7
3
3
5
5
3
6
100
89
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Business Studies Degree
The Business degree program is designed to provide skills for graduates to work with both private and public agencies in various areas of business. It is for students who have completed
the required courses for a diploma in the business areas (Accounting, Banking and Finance,
Business Office Technology, Management and Supervisory Development, Marketing
Management or any business program to be offered by Lanier Technical College in the future).
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
5
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
5
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech OR
ENG 195 Technical Communications
5
MAT 190 Mathematical Modeling OR MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
5
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology OR
SOC 191
Introduction to Sociology
5
XXX xxx
Degree-Level General Core Electives
5
Occupational Courses
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
90
Business Office Technology Diploma
The Business Office Technology diploma program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions in today's automated offices. The program provides learning
opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge,
skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the
program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the
area of Business Office Technology. Graduates of the program receive a Business Office
Technology diploma with a specialization in one of the following: Business Office Specialist or
Medical Office Specialist. (Not every specialization is offered at every campus).
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 71 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 111
Business English
ENG 112
Business Communications
MAT 111
Business Math
90
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Occupational Courses
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 102 Intermediate Document Processing
BUS 103 Advanced Document Processing
BUS 108 Word Processing
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours
5
5
5
7
3
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
Business Office Specialist
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
3
BUS 106 Office Procedures
5
BUS 107 Machine Transcription
3
BUS 201 Advanced Word Processing
3
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals (ACC 106)
3
BUS 208 Office Accounting I (ACC 101)
5
XXX xxx
Electives
6
Medical Office Specialist
BUS 208 Office Accounting OR
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting
5
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology OR
BUS 212 Anatomy and Terminology
5
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Services OR
BUS 211
Medical Terminology
3
BUS 213 Medical Document Processing/Transcription
5
BUS 216 Medical Office Procedures (MAS 106)
5
BUS 226 Medical Office Coding, Billing & Insurance (MAS 115) 5
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
71
Computer Applications Specialist Certificate
The Computer Applications Specialist certificate program (formerly named Business
Computer Applications) is designed to provide educational opportunities to individuals that will
enable them to obtain knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to succeed in an entry-level
position in the field of business computer applications.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101
Beginning Document Processing
BUS 105
Database Fundamentals
BUS 108
Word Processing
BUS 201
Advanced Word Processing
BUS 202
Spreadsheet Fundamentals
SCT 100
Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
7
3
3
3
24
91
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Computer Internet Communications Specialist
Certificate
This program provides knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the graduate to successfully work as an entry-level support person in a variety of workplace settings such as
industry, administrative offices, consulting, firms, retail stores, and government agencies.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 17 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101
Beginning Document Processing
BUS 160
Electronic Communications
BUS 261
Presentation Fundamentals
BUS 262
Web Page Design
SCT 100
Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
3
3
3
17
General Office Assistant Certificate
This certificate program provides basic office and computer skills to individuals desiring to
work in local business and industry. In addition, the program will provide employability skills
which foster work attitudes and habits that will enable graduates to perform as good employees.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 30 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 102 Intermediate Document Processing
BUS 106 Office Procedures
BUS 108 Word Processing
ENG 111
Business English
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
7
5
3
30
Medical Secretary Certificate
The Medical Secretary certificate program provides educational opportunities to individuals
that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to secure an
entry level position in a physician's office, hospital, clinic or other related areas. The Medical
Secretary program enables currently employed workers to retrain themselves in computer
technology as well as non-employed individuals to attain skills that will qualify them for
employment.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 28 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
92
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 106 Office Procedures
BUS 108 Word Processing
BUS 216 Medical Office Procedures
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
5
5
7
5
3
28
Microsoft Office Specialist Core Certificate
The Microsoft Office Specialist Core certificate program is designed to provide the basic concepts of Microsoft Office products to include Word 2003, Excel 2003 and Access 2003. This
program provides short-term training in the areas needed to sit for the beginner-level MOUS
examinations.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 20 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 108 Word Processing OR
CIS 127 Advanced Word Processing
and Desktop Publishing Techniques
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
7
(6)
3
3
3
20
Microsoft Office Specialist Expert Certificate
The Microsoft Office Specialist Expert certificate program is designed to provide the basic concepts of Microsoft Office products to include Word 2003, Excel 2003 and Access 2003. This
program provides short-term training in the areas needed to sit for the expert-level Microsoft
Office User certification exams.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 26-30 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
BUS 108 Word Processing OR
CIS 127 Advanced Word Processing and
Desktop Publishing Techniques
Credit Hours
5
3
7
(6)
93
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
BUS 201 Advanced Word Processing OR
CIS 221 Microsoft Office Specialist Certification - Word
3
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals
3
BUS 260 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets OR
CIS 222 Microsoft Office Specialist Certification – Excel (3) OR
CIS 2228 Advanced Spreadsheet Techniques (6)
3
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
26-30
Microsoft Office Specialist Master Certificate
The Microsoft Office Core Specialist certificate program is designed to provide the basic concepts of Microsoft Office products to include Word 2002, Excel 2002 and Access 2002. This
program provides short-term training in the areas needed to sit for the master-level Microsoft
Office User certification exams.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 32-36 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
5
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
3
BUS 108 Word Processing OR
7
CIS 127 Advanced Word Processing and
Desktop Publishing Techniques
(6)
BUS 201 Advanced Word Processing OR
CIS 221 Microsoft Office Specialist Certification - Word
3
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals
3
BUS 260 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets (3) OR
CIS 222 Microsoft Office Specialist Certification – Excel (3) OR
CIS 2228 Advanced Spreadsheet Techniques (6)
3
BUS 261 Presentation Fundamentals
3
BUS 263 Electronic Mail Fundamentals
3
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
32-36
Certified Nurse Assisting
Certified Nurse Assisting Certificate
The Certified Nurse Assisting program provides educational opportunities to students that will
enable them to care for individuals in a healthcare setting under a licensed nurse's supervision. The student will possess the basic nursing skills and knowledge to provide this care service.
94
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening, online and weekend
classes at the Oakwood, Forsyth, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County
Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
AHS 103 Nutrition and Diet Therapy
2
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences
3
CNA 100 Patient Care Fundamentals
8
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
18
Computer Essentials in Spanish
Computer Essentials in Spanish Certificate
Introduces the fundamental concepts and operations necessary to use microcomputers.
Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include: computer terminology, introduction to the Windows environment, introduction to networking, introduction to word processing, introduction to spreadsheets, and introduction to databases.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 21 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 105 Database Fundamentals
BUS 108 Word Processing
BUS 202 Spreadsheet Fundamentals
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
7
3
3
21
Computer Information Systems
Database Specialist Degree
The Computer Information Systems - Database Specialist Associate degree program is a
sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts,
principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Program graduates
are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking.
Program graduates receive a Computer Information System - Database Specialist Associate
of Applied Technology degree and are qualified for employment as database specialists.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 108 credit hours are required for
95
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191
College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
XXX xxx
General Core Elective
Credit Hours
5
Occupational Courses
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 214 Database Management
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2128 Introduction to Database
CIS 2129 Database Administration
CIS 2130 Database Backup and Recovery
CIS 2131 Database Performance Tuning
CIS 2132 Network Administration
CIS xxxx An Operating Systems course
CIS xxxx Procedural Language Elective
CIS xxxx Specific Occupational Guided Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
5
5
6
7
7
7
7
6
6
6
7
6
3
108
5
5
5
5
5
Information Security Specialist Degree
The CIS - Information Security Specialist degree program is a sequence of courses designed
to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required
in the computer security field. Program graduates will be competent in the general area of
humanities or fine arts, social or behaviorial sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics,
as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and
development, computer networking and computer security. Program graduates will receive a
CIS - Information Security Specialist Associate of Applied Technology degree and are qualified for employment as Information Security Specialists.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 98 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
96
Credit Hours
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
ENG
ENG
HUM
ENG
SPC
MAT
MAT
SOC
PSY
XXX
191
193
191
195
191
191
196
191
191
xxx
Composition and Rhetoric I
Composition and Rhetoric II OR
Introduction to Humanities
Technical Communications OR
Fundamentals of Speech
College Algebra OR
Contemporary Mathematics
Introductory to Sociology OR
Introductory to Psychology
General Core Elective
Occupational Courses
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Maintenance
CIS 286 A+ Preparation
CIS 1115 Information Security Fundamentals
CIS 1116 Security Policies and Procedures
CIS 1117 Implementing Operating System Security
CIS 1118 Implementing Network Security
CIS 1119 Implementing Internet/Intranet Firewall OR
CIS 2721 Checkpoint Firewall Administration
CIS 1120 Computer Forensics and Disaster Recovery
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
Credit Hours
6
5
6
7
7
5
5
6
6
6
6
3
98
Internet Specialist - Web Site Design Degree
The CIS - Internet Specialist - Web Site Design Associate degree program will create a pool
of employees for entry and middle level positions who can be immediately productive with
minimal company training and supervision. These graduates will also have the skills to work
effectively at the management level as well as the foundation to continue on to higher education. Program graduates receive a CIS - Internet Specialist-Web Site Design Associate of
Applied Technology degree, which qualifies them as Internet Specialist-Web Site Designers.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 102 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
Credit Hours
5
5
5
97
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MAT
MAT
XXX
XXX
191
196
xxx
xxx
College Algebra OR
Contemporary Mathematics
General Core Elective
Social/Behavioral Science Core Elective
Occupational Courses
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2191 Internet Business Fundamentals
CIS 2201 HTML Fundamentals
CIS 2211 Web Site Design Tools
CIS 2221 Web Graphics and Multimedia
CIS 2231 Design Methodology
CIS 2261 JavaScript Fundamentals
CIS 2271 Fundamentals of CGI using Perl
CIS 2281 Database Connectivity
CIS xxxx An Operating Systems course
CIS xxxx Specific Occupational Guided Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
5
5
5
Credit Hours
5
5
6
5
3
6
6
6
4
4
7
6
6
3
102
Microcomputer Specialist Degree
The Computer Information Systems - Microcomputer Specialist Associate degree program is
a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts,
principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Program graduates
are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer
terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking.
Program graduates receive a Computer Information Systems - Microcomputer Specialist
Associate of Applied Technology degree and are qualified for employment as a microcomputer specialist.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 110 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Jackson County Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Economics
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
98
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
PSY 191
Introductory Psychology
Occupational Courses
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Maintenance
CIS 127 Advanced Word Processing and
Desktop Publishing Techniques
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2228 Advanced Spreadsheet Techniques
CIS 2229 Advanced Database Techniques
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS xxxx Language Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Special Occupation Guided Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
5
Credit Hours
5
5
7
6
6
6
6
6
7
3
23
110
Networking Specialist Degree
The Computer Information Systems - Networking Specialist Associate degree program is a
sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts,
principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Program graduates
are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking courses. Program graduates receive a Computer Information Systems - Networking Specialist
Associate of Applied Technology degree and are qualified for employment as networking specialists.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 102 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Economics
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
99
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
6
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
5
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
5
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Maintenance
7
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
6
CIS xxxx Programming Language Elective
7
XXX xxx
Networking Electives
9
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Networking Specialty
CIS 2149 Implementing MS Windows Professional
6
CIS 2150 Implementing MS Windows Server
6
CIS 2153 Implementing MS Windows Net Infrastructure
6
CIS 2154 Implementing MS Windows Directory Services
6
Cisco Networking Specialty
CIS 276 Advanced Routers & Switches
6
CIS 277 WAN Design
6
CIS 2321 Introduction to Data Communications
6
CIS 2322 Introduction to WANS and Routing
6
Linux/UNIX Networking Specialty
CIS 2554 Introduction to Linux/Unix
6
CIS 2555 Linux/Unix Administration
6
CIS 2556 Linux/Unix Advanced Administration
6
CIS 2557 Linux/Unix Shell Script Programming
6
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
102
Information Security Specialist Diploma
The CIS - Information Security Specialist diploma program is a sequence of courses designed
to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required
in the computer security field. Program graduates will be competent in the general area of
humanities or fine arts, social or behaviorial sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics,
as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and
development, computer networking and computer security. Program graduates will receive a
CIS - Information Security Specialist diploma and are qualified for employment as Information
Security Specialists.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 86 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 111
Business English
5
ENG 112
Business Communications
5
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations & Professional Development 3
100
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
Occupational Courses
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Maintenance
CIS 286 A+ Preparation
CIS 1115 Information Security Fundamentals
CIS 1116 Security Policies and Procedures
CIS 1117 Implementing Operating System Security
CIS 1118 Implementing Network Security
CIS 1119 Implementing Internet/Intranet Firewall OR
CIS 2721 Checkpoint Firewall Administration
CIS 1120 Computer Forensics and Disaster Recovery
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Requried for Graduation
5
Credit Hours
6
5
6
7
7
5
5
6
6
6
6
3
86
Internet Specialist - Web Site Design Diploma
The Computer Information Systems - Internet Specialist - Web Site Design diploma program
is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Program graduates receive a Computer
Information Systems - Internet Specialist - Web Site Design diploma and are qualified for
employment as Internet Specialists -Web Site Designers.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 88 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development
3
ENG 101 English OR
ENG 111
Business English
5
ENG 102 Technical Writing OR
ENG 112
Business Communication
5
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
5
Occupational Courses
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 2191 Internet Business Fundamentals
CIS 2201 HTMLFundamentals
CIS 2211 Web Site Design Tools
Credit Hours
5
5
6
6
5
3
6
101
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
CIS 2221 Web Graphics and Multimedia
CIS 2231 Design Methodology
CIS 2261 JavaScript Fundamentals
CIS 2271 Fundamentals of CGI using Perl
CIS 2281 Database Connectivity
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxxx Specific Occupational Guided Elective
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
6
6
4
4
7
3
4
88
Microcomputer Specialist Diploma
The Computer Information Systems - Microcomputer Specialist diploma program is designed
to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required
in computer information processing. Program graduates receive a Computer Information
Systems - Microcomputer Specialist diploma and are qualified for employment as microcomputer specialists.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 3
ENG 101 English OR
ENG 111
Business English
5
ENG 102 Technical Writing OR
ENG 112
Business Communication
5
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
5
Occupational Courses
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Repair
CIS 127 Advanced Word Processing and
Desktop Publishing Techniques
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2228 Advanced Spreadsheet Techniques
CIS 2229 Advanced Database Techniques
CIS xxxx Language Elective
CIS xxxx Occupationally Related Courses
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
102
Credit Hours
6
5
5
7
6
6
6
6
7
15
3
90
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Networking Specialist Diploma
The Computer Information Systems - Networking Specialist diploma program is designed to
provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required
in computer information processing. Program graduates receive a Computer Information
Systems - Networking Specialist diploma and are qualified for employment as networking specialists.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and Professional Development 3
ENG 101 English OR ENG 111 Business English
5
ENG 102 Technical Writing OR
ENG 112
Business Communication
5
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
6
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
5
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
5
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Repair
7
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
6
CIS xxxx Language Elective
7
CIS xxxx Networking Elective
9
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
Windows 2000 Networking Specialty
CIS 2149 Implementing MS Windows Professional
6
CIS 2150 Implementing MS Windows Server
6
CIS 2153 Implementing MS Windows Net Infrastructure
6
CIS 2154 Implementing MS Windows Directory Services
6
Cisco Networking Specialty
CIS 276 Advanced Routers & Switches
6
CIS 277 WAN Design
6
CIS 2321 Introduction to Data Communication
6
CIS 2322 Introduction to WANS and Routing
6
Linux/UNIX Networking Specialty
CIS 2554 Introduction to Linux/Unix
6
CIS 2555 Linux/Unix Administration
6
CIS 2556 Linux/Unix Advanced Administration
6
CIS 2557 Linux/Unix Shell Script Programming
6
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
90
103
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Cisco Network Professional Certificate
The purpose of the Cisco Network Professional certificate program is to provide students with
the skills and knowledge that networking professionals are expected to understand and utilize.
Curriculum is designed to deliver skills-based training. The Cisco Network Professional certificate program is intended to prepare students for the Cisco Certified Network Professional
(CCNP) certification exam.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 2501 Advanced Routing Configuration
CIS 2502 Building Remote Access Networks
CIS 2503 Configuring LAN Switches
CIS 2504 Internet Work Troubleshooting
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
6
6
6
24
Cisco Specialist Certificate
The purpose of the Cisco Specialist certificate program is to teach students the skills needed
to design, build and maintain small-to-medium size networks (LANs and WANs). The Cisco
Specialist certificate provides students with the opportunity to enter the workforce and/or further their education and training in the computer networking field. In addition, this technical
certificate will prepare students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification
exam.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 276
Advanced Routers & Switches
CIS 277 WANS Design
CIS 2321 Introduction to LAN/WAN
CIS 2322 Introduction to WANS & Routing
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
6
6
6
24
Cisco Technician Certificate
The purpose of the Cisco Technician certificate program is to provide educational opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary
to succeed in performing technical support for networked computers. It is intended to prepare
students on the principles and practices of designing, building and maintaining networks capable of supporting national and global organizations. This certificate prepares students for the
Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 45 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
104
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 103 Operating Systems OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 122 Microcomputer Install and Maintenance
CIS 2321 Introduction to LAN/WAN
CIS 2322 Introduction to WANS & Routing
CIS 276 Advanced Routers and Switches
CIS 277 WAN Design
SCT 100 Intro to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
6
7
6
6
6
6
3
45
Computer Repair Technician Certificate
The Computer Repair Technician program (formerly PC Maintenance & Support) program provides the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the graduate to successfully work as
a computer repair technician in a variety of workplace settings such as industry, computer
companies, consulting firms, retail stores, and government agencies. The program includes
computer training to prepare students for the A+ certification exam.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 27 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 122 Microcomputer Installation and Maintenance
CIS 2321 Introduction to LAN/WAN
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
5
7
6
3
27
Information Security Specialist Certificate
The CIS - Information Security Specialist Technical Certificate of Credit program is a sequence
of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles,
and techniques required in the computer security field. Program graduates will be competent
in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, computer networking and computer security. Program graduates will receive a CIS Information Security Specialist Technical Certificate of Credit and are qualified for employment
as Information Security Specialists.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 34 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
105
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
CIS 1115 Information Security Fundamentals
CIS 1116 Security Policies and Procedures
CIS 1117 Implementing Operating System Security
CIS 1118 Implementing Network Security
CIS 1119 Implementing Internet/Intranet Firewall OR
CIS 2721 Checkpoint Firewall Administration
CIS 1120 Computer Forensics & Disaster Recovery
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
5
6
6
6
6
34
Linux/Unix Specialist Certificate
The Linux/Unix Specialist certificate provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop,
and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job
acquisition, retention, and advancement. Topics include computer concepts, operating systems, networking and programming.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 2554 Introduction to Unix/Linux
CIS 2555 Unix/Linux Administration
CIS 2556 Unix/Linux Advanced Administration
CIS 2257 Unix/Linux Shell Script Programming
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
6
6
6
24
Linux/Unix Systems Administrator Certificate
The LINUX/UNIX Systems Adiministration certificate provides skills in the computer operating
system and networking industry. Students will be able to fill LINUX/UNIX System
Administrator, LINUX/UNIX Network Adiminstrator, LAN administrator, LINUX/UNIX Shell
Script Programming, and LINUX/UNIX Help Desk Support positions.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 49 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 105 Program Design and Development
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2554 ntroduction to Unix/Linux
CIS 2555 Unix/Linux Administration
CIS 2556 Unix/Linux Advanced Administration
106
Credit Hours
6
5
5
6
6
6
6
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
CIS 2257 Unix /Linux Shell Script Programming
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers Intro
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
6
3
49
Microsoft Network Specialist Certificate
The Microsoft Network Specialist (formerly Windows 2000 Network Technician) certificate program provides training in the areas of operating systems and network operating systems. It also offers training to
prepare students for the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) exams. This program is designed for students who are new to the computer field.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 32 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 1140 Network Fundamentals
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 2149 Implementing MS WIN Professional
CIS 2150 Implementing MS WIN Server
SCT 100 Introduction to Micromputers
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
5
6
6
6
6
3
32
Network Support Technician Certificate
The objective of this program is to provide skills necessary to perform technical maintenance
and recovery support to the local or wide area networks.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 26 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 173 PC Operating Systems
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS XXX Networking Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
6
6
6
3
26
PC Operations Certificate
This certificate program trains students in concepts, terminology, processing capabilities and
communications associated with the microcomputer. Students should be skilled as end-users
on microcomputer systems and be able to recognize and resolve minor microcomputer problems. They will ultimately be prepared for entry level PC operations jobs.
107
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 23 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
CIS 101 Keyboarding
CIS 103 Operating Systems Concepts OR
CIS 173 Operating Systems Concepts
CIS 106 Computer Concepts
CIS 2229 Advanced Database Techniques
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
6
5
6
3
23
Web Site Design Specialist Certificate
The Web Site Design Specialist certificate program provides students with the hands-on skills
and knowledge necessary for Internet professionals. The program will prepare students to use
and design for the Internet as a business, communication and marketing tool. Curriculum content is designed to deliver skills-based, vendor-neutral training.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 47 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
CIS 2191 Internet Business Fundamentals
CIS 2201 HTML Fundamentals
CIS 2211 Web Site Design Tools
CIS 2221 Web Graphics and Multimedia
CIS 2231 Design Methodology
CIS 2261 JavaScript Fundamentals
CIS 2271 Fundamentals of CGI using Perl
CIS 2281 Database Connectivity
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
5
3
6
6
6
4
4
7
47
Web Site Fundamentals Certificate
The purpose of the Web Site Fundamentals certificate is to provide students with the foundation skills in Internet technologies, network infrastructure and Web authoring using HTML.
Students who complete this entry-level certificate qualify to sit for the Certified Internet
Webmaster (CIW) Foundations exam.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 17 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
CIS 1140 Networking Fundamentals
6
108
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
CIS 2191 Internet Business Fundamentals
CIS 2201 HTML Fundamentals
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
5
3
3
17
Cosmetology
Cosmetology Diploma
The Cosmetology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for
careers in the field of cosmetology. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The curriculum meets state licensing requirements of the State Board of Cosmetology. Program graduates receive a Cosmetology diploma and are employable as cosmetology salespersons, cosmetologists, salon managers, or salon owners.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 73 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 100 Basic Mathematics
Credit Hours
3
5
3
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
COS 100 Introduction to Cosmetology
5
COS 101 Introduction to Permanent Waving and Relaxing
2
COS 103 Introduction to Skin, Scalp, and Hair
2
COS 105 Introduction to Shampooing and Styling
4
COS 106 Introduction to Haircutting
3
COS 108 Permanent Waving and Relaxing
3
COS 109 Hair Color
6
COS 110
Skin, Scalp and Hair
3
COS 111
Styling
3
COS 112
Manicuring and Pedicuring
3
COS 113
Practicum I
4
COS 114
Practicum II
8
COS 115
Practicum/Internship I
4
COS 116
Practicum/Internship II
5
COS 117
Salon Management
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
73
109
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Cosmetic Esthetician Certificate
The Cosmetic Esthetician Certificate of Credit program is designed to offer esthetics training
for entry-level students. Completion of the program prepares students to sit for the Esthetics
licensure examination given by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology and to work in a variety of professions that employ estheticians in beauty salons, spas, health clubs, cosmetics
stores as well as plastic surgeons' and dematologist's offices.)
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 48 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
EST 100 Introduction to Esthetic Theory
5
EST 101 Anatomy and Physiology of Skin
5
EST 102 Skin Care Procedures
6
EST 103 Electricity and Facial Treatments with Machines
7
EST 104 Advanced Skin Care
5
EST 105 Color Theory and Makeup
4
EST 106 Practicum I
6
EST 107 Practicum II
6
COS 117
Salon Management
4
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
48
Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Technology Degree
The Criminal Justice Technology Associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic,
occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and
advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal
Justice Technology Associate of Applied Technology Degree. Graduates will be prepared to
pursue diverse opportunities in the law enforcement, corrections, security, and court-related
fields. Those graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of
career potential.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 95 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195
Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
110
Credit Hours
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
5
ECO 191 Economics
5
MAT 191 College Algebra OR MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics 5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
5
CRJ 103 Corrections
5
CRJ 104 Principles of Law Enforcement
5
CRJ 105 Criminal Procedures
5
CRJ 202 Constitutional Law
5
CRJ 206 Criminology
5
CRJ 207 Juvenile Justice
5
CRJ 209 Criminal Justice Technology Practicum/Internship
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
CRJ xxx
Occupationally Related Objectives
12
XXX xxx
Other Approved Electives
10
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
95
Criminal Justice Technology Diploma
The Criminal Justice Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for Criminal Justice professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Criminal Justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Criminal Justice
diploma. Graduates will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the law enforcement,
corrections, security, and court-related fields. Those graduates who are current practitioners
will benefit through enhancement of career potential.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 70 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
PSY 101 Basic Psychology
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
5
CRJ 103 Corrections
5
CRJ 104 Principles of Law Enforcement
5
CRJ 105 Criminal Procedures
5
CRJ 202 Constitutional Law
5
CRJ 206 Criminology
5
CRJ 207 Juvenile Justice
5
CRJ 209 Criminal Justice Technology Practicum/Internship
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
111
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
XXX xxx
Occupationally Related Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
12
70
Criminal Justice Specialist Certificate
The Criminal Justice Specialist certificate program provides educational opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for success in an entry-level position in a criminal justice agency.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 28 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
MSD 175 Business Spanish
CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CRJ 103 Corrections
CRJ 104 Principles of Law Enforcement
CRJ 202 Constitutional Law
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
3
28
Private Security Specialist Certificate
The Private Security Technician certificate provides learning opportunities which introduce,
develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required
for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Topics include: basic psychology, cultural perspectives for law enforcement, private and industrial security services, incident and report writing, and hospital security.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
PSY 101 Basic Psychology
CRJ 121 Introduction to Private Security
CRJ 140 Cultural Perspectives for Law Enforcement
CRJ 160 Private and Industrial Security Services
CRJ 175 Incident ans Report Writing
CRJ 180 Hospital Security
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
112
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
1
4
25
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Drafting
Drafting Technology Degree
The Drafting program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions
in the drafting field. The program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and
reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition,
retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in drafting. Graduates of the program receive an
Associates Degree in Drafting Technology.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 96 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
ENG
HUM
ENG
MAT
MAT
MAT
PSY
XXX
PHY
PHY
SPC
ENG
191
191
193
191
193
194
191
xxx
190
191
191
195
English Composition and Rhetoric I
Introduction to Humanities OR
Composition and Rhetoric II
College Algebra
College Trigonometry OR
Pre-Calculus
Introductory Psychology OR
Social Science
Introduction to Physics OR
Mechanics
Fundamentals of Speech OR
Technical Writing
Occupational Courses
DDF 100 Drafting Fundamentals OR
DDF 101 Introduction to Drafting
DDF 102 Size and Shape Description I
DDF 107 CAD Fundamentals
DDF 111
Intermediate CAD
DDF 112
3D Drawing and Modeling
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Mechanical Drafting Specialization (29 Hours)
DDF 103 Size and Shape Description II
DDF 105 Auxiliary Views
DDF 106 Fasteners
DDF 108 Intersections and Development
DDF 109 Assembly Drawings I
XXX xxx
Elective
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Credit Hours
6
5
6
6
6
3
5
3
6
5
5
5
113
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Architectural Drafting Specialization (29 Hours)
DDS 203 Surveying I (3) OR
DDS 204 Estimating (3)
DDS 205 Residential Architectural
DDS 207 Mechanical Systems for Architecture
DDS 208 Residential Architectural Drawing II
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
3
6
3
6
11
96
Drafting Technology Diploma
The Drafting Technology diploma program is designed to prepare students for employment
in a variety of positions in the drafting field. The program provides learning opportunities that
introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes
required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides
opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in drafting. Graduates of
the program receive a Drafting diploma.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 77 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MAT 104 Geometry and Trigonometry
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
DDF 100 Drafting Fundamentals (6) OR
DDF 101 Introduction to Drafting (6)
DDF 102 Size and Shape Description I
DDF 107 CAD Fundamentals
DDF 111
Intermediate CAD
DDF 112
3D Drawing and Modeling
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
And completion of one of the following specializations:
Mechanical Drafting Specialization (27 Credit Hours)
DDF 103 Size and Shape Description II
DDF 105 Auxiliary Views
DDF 106 Fasteners
DDF 108 Intersections and Development
DDF 109 Assembly Drawings I
XXX xxx
Electives
Architectural Drafting Specialization (27 Credit Hours)
DDS 203 Surveying I OR
DDS 204 Estimating
Credit Hours
114
6
5
6
6
6
3
5
3
6
5
5
3
3
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
DDS 205 Residential Arch, Drawing I
DDS 207 Mechanical Systems for Architecture
DDS 208 Residential Arch. Drawing II
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
6
3
6
9
77
Advanced CAD Technician Certificate
The Advanced Cad Technician certificate program provides advanced level
CAD skills to individuals interested in furthering their knowledge in the area of
computer-aided drafting.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 22 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
DDF 106 Fasteners
DDF 109 Assembly Drawing I
DDF 112
3-D Drawing & Modeling
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
6
5
6
22
CAD Operator Certificate
The CAD Operator certificate program provides intermediate level CAD skills to individuals
interested in furthering their knowledge in the area of computer-aided drafting. This program
is designed for individuals who have completed the Drafter's Assistant certificate program.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 17 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
DDF 103 Size & Shape Description II
DDF 105 Auxiliary Views
DDF 111
Intermediate CAD
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
6
3
17
Drafting Aide Certificate
The Drafting Aide certificate program (formerly Drafter's Assistant) provides beginning drafting and CAD skills to individuals interested in pursuing a career in the drafting and/or CAD
fields. This program will provide the foundation for further education and training in
Drafting/CAD study.
115
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 17 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
Certificate Outline
DDF 100 Drafting Fundamentals OR
DDF 101 Introduction to Drafting
DDF 102 Size and Shape Description I
DDF 107 CAD Fundamentals
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
6
5
6
17
Residential Design Drafter Certificate
The Residential Design Drafter certificate program provides drafting/CAD skills to individuals
who wish to expand their knowledge in the field of architecture and residential design. This
program is designed for individuals who have completed the Drafting Aide certificate program.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
DDS 205 Residential Architectural Drawing I
DDS 207 Mechanical Systems for Architecture
DDS 208 Residential Architectural Drawing II
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
3
6
15
Dental Assisting
Dental Assisting Diploma
The Dental Assisting diploma program is designed to develop the necessary skills for each
student to function as a competent dental assistant. Students will study courses in General
Studies, Biological Sciences, Dental Sciences, and Clinical Sciences. Upon successful completion of the program, students qualify to sit for the Dental Assisting National Board
Examination. Program graduates receive a Dental Assisting diploma.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 89 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 101 English
MAT 100 Basic Mathematics
PSY 101 Psychology
116
Credit Hours
5
3
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Occupational Courses
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
DEN 101 Basic Human Biology
DEN 102 Head & Neck Anatomy
DEN 103 Preventive Dentistry
DEN 105 Microbiology and Infection Control
DEN 106 Oral Anatomy
DEN 107 Oral Pathology & Therapeutics
DEN 109 Dental Assisting National Board
Examination Preparation
DEN 134 Dental Assisting I
DEN 135 Dental Assisting II
DEN 138 Scopes of Professional Practice
DEN 139 Dental Radiology
DEN 136 Dental Assisting III
DEN 137 Dental Assisting - Expanded Functions
DEN 140 Dental Practice Management
DEN 146 Dental Practicum I
DEN 147 Dental Practicum II
DEN 148 Dental Practicum III
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
3
2
4
3
5
4
3
7
7
2
5
4
4
5
2
2
8
3
89
Dental Assisting Technician Certificate
This program prepares individuals to work in a variety of dental offices and clinic settings. In
concert with dentists, graduates of the program will be prepared to instruct patients in oral
hygiene and plaque control programs and perform basic dental clinic duties such as patient
preparation, equipment set-up, record keeping, insurance filing, and radiology.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 39 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
AHS 104 Introduction to Healthcare
DEN 101 Basic Human Biology
DEN 102 Head & Neck Anatomy
DEN 105 Microbiology & Infection Control
DEN 134 Dental Assisting I
DEN 135 Dental Assisting II
DEN 139 Dental Radiology
DEN 140 Dental Practice Management
DEN 146 Dental Practicum I
DEN 147 Dental Practicum II
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
3
2
3
7
7
5
5
2
2
39
117
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Dental Infection Control Specialist Certificate
The Dental Infection Control Specialist Certificate prepares individuals to
work in a variety of dental offices and clinic settings. In concert with dentists,
graduates of the program will be prepared to perform basic dental clinic
duties such as patient preparation, equipment set-up, record keeping, and
dental health education.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 20 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
AHS 104 Introduction to Healthcare
3
DEN 105 Microbiology & Infection Control
3
DEN 106 Oral Anatomy
5
DEN 134 Dental Assisting I
7
DEN 146 Dental Practicum I
2
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
20
Dental Hygiene
Dental Hygiene Diploma
The Dental Hygiene joint degree program prepares students for positions in the dental profession. Academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement are developed. Program graduates receive an Associate of
Applied Science from Gainesville College and a diploma from Lanier Technical College.
Minimum length of 7 quarters and/or 111 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses (Gainesville College)
ENGL 1101 Composition I (3) and
ENGL 1102 Composition II (3)
CHEM 1115 Bio/Nutritional Chemistry for Dental Hygiene
Credit Hours
(To be taken during the clinical portion of the Dental Hygiene program)
2
3
3
3
COMM 1101 Human Communications
PSYC 1101 General Psychology
MATH 1101 Mathematical Modeling
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3) and
POLS 1101 OR POLS 1115 American Government (3)
PHED 1020 Personal Health/Wellness (1)
PHED 1002 CPR/First Aid (1)A
BIOL 2120; BIOL 2130; BIOL 2500; CHEM 1151
HIST 2111 Survey of U. S. History I OR
HIST 2112 Survey of U. S. History II
Occupational Courses
DHY 100 Tooth & Root Morphology
118
6
6
2
16
3
Credit Hours
3
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
DHY 101 Embryology & Histology
DHY 102 Anatomy of Oral Facial Structure
DHY 103 Dental Materials
DHY 104 Preclinical Dental Hygiene Lecture
DHY 105 Preclinical Dental Hygiene Lab
DHY 108 Radiology
DHY 110
Clinical Dental Hygiene I Lecture
DHY 111
Clinical Dental Hygiene I Lab
DHY 200 Periodontology
DHY 205 Oral Pathology
DHY 201 Clinical Dental Hygiene II Lecture
DHY 202 Clinical Dental Hygiene II Lab
DHY 206 Pharmacology & Pain Control
DHY 207 Community Dental Health
DHY 208 Clinical Dental Hygiene III Lecture (2) and
DHY 209 Clinical Dental Hygiene III Lab (4)
DHY 213 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV Lecture (2) and
DHY 214 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV Lab (4)
DHY 220 Clinical Dental Hygiene V Lecture (2) and
DHY 221 Clinical Dental Hygiene V Lab (4)
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
2
3
3
2
2
3
2
3
4
4
2
4
3
4
6
6
6
3
109
Early Childhood Care & Education
Early Childhood Care and Education Degree
The Early Childhood Care and Education Associate degree program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students for careers in child care and related fields. The program
emphasizes a combination of early childhood care and education theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an Early Childhood
Care and Education Associate of Applied Technology Degree and have the qualification of
early childhood care and education paraprofessional or early childhood program management
director.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 110 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191
College Algebra
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
119
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
5
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care & Education
5
ECE 103 Human Growth & Development I
5
ECE 105 Health, Safety & Nutrition
5
ECE 112
Curriculum Development
3
ECE 113
Art for Children
3
ECE 114
Music & Movement
3
ECE 115
Language Arts & Literature
5
ECE 116
Math/Science
5
ECE 121 Early Childhood Care & Education Practicum I
3
ECE 122 Early Child Care & Education Practicum II
3
ECE 201 Exceptionalities
5
ECE 202 Social Issues and Family Involvement
5
ECE 224 Childhood Care & Education Internship
12
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
Paraprofessional Specialization
ECE 203 Human Growth and Development II
5
ECE 211
Methods and Materials
5
ECE 212 Professional Practices
5
Program Management Specialization
ECE 217 Program Administration
ECE 221 Facility Management
ECE 222 Personnel Management
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
5
5
5
110
Early Childhood Care and Education Diploma
The Early Childhood Care and Education diploma program is a sequence of courses
designed to prepare students for careers in child care and related fields. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job
acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of early
childhood care and education theory and practical application necessary for successful
employment. Program graduates receive an Early Childhood Care and Education diploma
and have the qualification of early childhood care and education provider.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 73 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
120
Credit Hours
3
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MAT 101
General Math
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care & Education
5
ECE 103 Human Growth & Development I
5
ECE 105 Health, Safety & Nutrition
5
ECE 112
Curriculum Development
3
ECE 113
Art for Children
3
ECE 114
Music & Movement
3
ECE 115
Language Arts & Literature
5
ECE 116
Math/Science
5
ECE 121 Early Childhood Care & Education Practicum I
3
ECE 122 Early Childhood Care & Education Practicum II
3
ECE 202 Social Issues and Family Involvement
5
ECE 224 Early Childhood Care & Education Internship
12
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
73
Child Development Associate I Certificate
The Child Development Associate I certificate program provides early childhood caregivers
the knowledge, skills and techniques necessary to meet the specific needs of children and
families. The program is supported by the Georgia Childhood Care and Education
Professional Development System and meets the credentialing requirements set forth by the
Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 19 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education 5
ECE 103 Human Growth and Development I
5
ECE 105
Health, Safety and Nutrition
5
ECE 125 Professionalism through CDA Certificate Preparation
2
ECE 126 CDA Certificate Assessment
2
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
19
Early Childhood Program Administrator Certificate
The purpose of this certificate program is to provide the necessary skills to administer and
manage a child-care business anywhere in the state of Georgia and to provide a career path
for people working in the field who wish to move into administration.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
121
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
ECE 217 Day Care Administration
ECE 221 Facility Management
ECE 222 Personnel Management
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
15
Infant and Toddler Child Care Specialist Certificate
The Infant and Toddler Child Care Specialist certificate program provides instruction in theory, methods and practices desirable for caregivers who work with children from birth to three
years of age in a variety of care settings. Competencies for the courses are aligned with CDA
standards from the Council for Early Childhood Recognition.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Care and Education 5
ECE 103 Human Growth and Development I
5
ECE 105 Heath, Safety and Nutrition
5
ECE 132 Infant/Toddler Development
5
ECE 134 Infant/Toddler Group Care
5
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
25
Electronics Technology
Electronics Technology Degree
The Electronics Technology Associate degree program is a sequence of courses designed to
prepare students for careers in electronics technology professions. Learning opportunities
develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of electronics technology theory and practical application necessary for successful employment using both manual and computerized electronics systems. Program graduates receive an Electronics
Technology Associate of Applied Technology degree which qualifies them as electronics technicians with a specialization in general electronics or industrial technology.
Minimum length of 7 quarters and/or 102 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG
ENG
SPC
ENG
122
191
195
191
193
Composition and Rhetoric I
Technical Communications OR
Fundamentals of Speech
Composition and Rhetoric II OR
Credit Hours
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
HUM
MAT
MAT
PSY
ECO
191
191
193
191
191
Introduction to Humanities
College Algebra
College Trigonometry OR MAT 194 Precalculus
Introductory Psychology OR
Principles of Economics
5
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ELC 104 Soldering Technology
2
ELC 108 Direct Current Circuits II
4
ELC 110
Alternating Current II
4
ELC 115
Solid State Devices II
4
ELC 117
Linear Integrated Circuits
4
ELC 118
Digital Electronics I
4
ELC 119
Digital Electronics II
4
ELC 120 Microprocessors Fundamentals
4
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
2
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
4
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
4
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
4
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
General Electronics Technology
ELC 123 Communications Electronics Survey
7
ELC 124 Industrial Electronics Survey
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
XXX xxx
Technically Related Elective(s)
14
Industrial Electronics Technology
ELC 211
Process Control
6
ELC 212 Motor Controls
6
ELC 213 Programmable Controllers
5
ELC 214 Mechanical Devices
3
ELC 215
Fluid Power
3
ELC 216 Robotics
2
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
102
Electronics Fundamentals Diploma
The Electronics Fundamentals diploma program is designed to prepare students for careers
in electronics professions. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of electronics theory and practical application necessary for
successful employment. Program graduates receive an Electronics Fundamentals diploma,
which prepares them for entry-level positions in the electronics field and qualifies them for
admission to the Electronics Technology program.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 65 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
123
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and
Professional Development
ENG 101
English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MAT 104 Geometry & Trigonometry OR
MAT 105 Trigonometry
Credit Hours
Occupational Courses
ELC 104 Soldering Technology
ELC 108 Direct Current Circuits II
ELC 110
Alternating Current II
ELC 115
Solid State Devices II
ELC 117
Linear Integrated Circuits
ELC 118
Digital Electronics I
ELC 119
Digital Electronics II
ELC 120 Microprocessors Fundamentals
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
2
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
2
4
4
4
3
65
3
5
5
5
Electronics Technology Diploma
The Electronics Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare
students for careers in electronics technology professions. Learning opportunities develop
academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition,
retention, and advancement. Program graduates are to be competent in the general areas
of communications, mathematics, computer literacy, and interpersonal relations. The program emphasizes a combination of electronics technology theory and practical application
necessary for successful employment using both manual and computerized electronics systems. Program graduates receive an Electronics Technology Diploma, which qualifies them
as electronics technicians with a specialization in General Electronics or Industrial
Electronics Technology.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100
Interpersonal Relations and
Professional Development
ENG 101
English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MAT 104 Geometry & Trigonometry OR
MAT 105 Trigonometry
124
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ELC 104 Soldering Technology
2
ELC 108 Direct Current Circuits II
4
ELC 110
Alternating Current II
4
ELC 115
Solid State Devices II
4
ELC 117
Linear Integrated Circuits
4
ELC 118
Digital Electronics I
4
ELC 119
Digital Electronics II
4
ELC 120 Microprocessors Fundamentals
4
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
2
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
4
IFC 102
Alternating Current I
4
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
With completion in one of the following specializations listed below:
General Electronics Technology Specialization:
ELC 123 Communications Electronics Survey
7
ELC 124 Industrial Electronics Survey
4
XXX xxx
Technically Related Electives
14
Industrial Electronics Technology Specialization:
ELC 211
Process Control
6
ELC 212 Motor Controls
6
ELC 213 Programmable Controllers
5
ELC 214 Mechanical Devices
3
ELC 215 Fluid Power
3
ELC 216 Robotics
2
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
90
Telecommunications Service and Electronics
Technician Certificate
This certificate program prepares students for immediate employment as advanced telecommunications installers or as electronics technicians in the telecommunications industry. It will
provide knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for success in systems installation and electronics troubleshooting.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 41 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
ELC 118
Digital Electronics I
ELC 260 Telecommunication and Data Cabling
ELC 261 Telecommunications Systems Installation
and Programming
Credit Hours
4
4
3
125
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
ELC 262
Telecommunications and Data
Transmission Concepts
ELC 217 Computer Hardware
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
MAT 101 General Math
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
3
7
4
4
4
5
3
41
Emergency Medical Technician
Paramedic Technology Diploma
The Paramedic Technology diploma program prepares students for employment in paramedic
positions in today's health services field. The Paramedic Technology program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills from the basic EMT level
to retrain as a paramedic. Graduates of the program receive a Paramedic Technology diploma and are eligible to sit for the paramedic certification test.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 78 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 101 English
5
MAT 101 General Math
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
EMS 126 Introduction to the Paramedic Profession
3
EMS 127 Patient Assessment
4
EMS 128 Applied Physiology and Pathyophysiology
3
EMS 129 Pharmacology
4
EMS 130 Respiratory Emergencies
5
EMS 131 Trauma
5
EMS 132 Cardiology I
5
EMS 133 Cardiology II
5
EMS 134 Medical Emergencies
4
EMS 135 Maternal/ Pediatric Emergencies
5
EMS 136 Special Patients
2
EMS 200 Clinical Applications of Advanced Emergency Care 10
EMS 201 Summative Evaluations
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
78
126
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Emergency Medical Technician (Intermediate)
Certificate
The Emergency Medical Technician Intermediate certificate program (formerly EMT
Intermediate) provides prerequisite study for the Paramedic Technology Diploma program. It
also prepares individuals for entry skills and knowledge levels in the field of emergency medicine as well as for state certification as an Emergency Medical Technician. Employment
opportunities include working in fire departments, private and government ambulance services, hospitals and industry. The Emergency Medical Technician (Intermediate) training is established through a national curriculum designed by the National Transportation Safety Board
and leads to certification as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
EMS 120 Emergency Medical Technology I - Basic
8
EMS 121 Emergency Medical Technology II - Basic
7
EMS 122 Emergency Medical Technology III- Intermediate
9
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
24
Emergency Medical Technology (Basic) Certificate
The Emergency Medical Technology (Basic) certificate program (formerly Emergency Medical
Technician - Basic) provides entry-level training to first responding, non-transport personnel.
Usually these people are firefighters who do not need the advanced training provided by the
EMT - Intermediate program. The EMT - Basic training is established through a national curriculum designed by the National Transportation Safety Board and leads to certification as a
Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
EMT 120 Emergency Medical Technology I - Basic
EMT 121 Emergency Medical Technology II - Basic
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
8
7
15
Emergency Medical Technology (Plus) Certificate
The Emergency Medical Technology - Plus is a bridge program between the standardized
EMT technical certificate of credit program and the Paramedic Technology diploma program.
The program allows students who know they intend to enter the Paramedic program an opportunity to take the general core courses that are prerequisites to the Paramedic courses while
completing the EMT certificate. The Emergency Medical Technology Plus training is established through a national curriculum designed by the National Transportation Safety Board
and leads to certification as a Basic Emergency Medical Technician.
127
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 42 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
ENG 101 English
5
EMS 120 Emergency Medical Technology I - Basic
8
EMS 121 Emergency Medical Technology II - Basic
7
EMS 122 Emergency Medical Technology III - Intermediate
9
MAT 101 General Mathematics
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
42
Facilities Management Technology
Facilities Management Technology Diploma
The Facilities Management Technology diploma program prepares facility managers to lead
their units toward efficiently and effectively achieving organizational objectives of maintaining
a facility's physical assets and planning and conducting proper facility maintenance.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 89 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algrebraic Concepts
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
6
CIS 103 Operating System Concepts
6
FMT 100 Facilities Management
5
FMT 101 Facilities Management Planning
5
FMT 102 Risk Management
5
FSC 230 Fire Service Building Construction
5
MKT 101 Principles of Management
5
MSD 102 Legal Environment for Supervisors OR
OHS 106
Health and Safety Legal Rights and Responsibilities 5
MSD 113
Ethical Management
5
MSD 152 Project Management
5
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
5
OHS 100 General Industry Standards
5
OHS 101 Safety Program Planning and Management
5
128
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
OHS 103 Accident Prevention
OHS 105 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
3
3
3
89
Fire Science Technology
Fire Science Technology Degree
The Fire Science Associate of Applied Technology terminal degree program is a sequence of
courses designed to prepare fire service personnel at all levels to become better officers and
leaders. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce
academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain and
upgrade present knowledge and skills. Completion of the program of study leads to an AAT
degree in Fire Science.
Minimum length of 8 quarters and/or 108 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 195 Technical Communications
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 190 Introduction to Math Modeling OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
CHM 191 Chemistry I OR BIO 191 Biology OR
PHY 190 Introductory Physics
Credit Hours
5
5
Occupational Courses
FSC 101 Introduction to Fire Science
FSC 110
Fire Science Supervision/Leadership
FSC 121 Fire Fighting Strategy & Tactics
FSC 132 Fire Service Instructor
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
FSC 151 Fire Prevention and Inspection
FSC 161 Fire Service Safety & Loss Control
FSC 201 Fire Service Management
FSC 210 Fire Service Hydraulics
FSC 220 Fire Protection Systems
FSC 230 Fire Service Building Construction
FSC 241 Incident Command
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
129
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
FSC 260 Fire Service Information Management
FSC 270 Fire Investigations
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
5
5
3
5
108
Fire Science Technology Diploma
The Fire Science Associate of Applied Technology terminal Diploma program is a sequence
of courses designed to prepare fire service personnel at all levels to become better officers
and leaders. The program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, ski9lls, and attitudes required for job acquisition,
retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain and
upgrade present knowledge and skills. Completion of the program of study leads to an AAT
Diploma in Fire Science.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 89 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
FSC 101 Introduction to Fire Science
FSC 110
Fire Science Supervision/Leadership
FSC 121 Fire Fighting Strategy & Tactics
FSC 132 Fire Service Instructor
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
FSC 151 Fire Prevention and Inspection
FSC 161 Fire Service Safety & Loss Control
FSC 201 Fire Service Management
FSC 210 Fire Service Hydraulics
FSC 220 Fire Protection Systems
FSC 230 Fire Service Building Construction
FSC 241 Incident Command
FSC 260 Fire Service Information Management
FSC 270 Fire Investigations
XXX xxx
Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
3
89
Firefighter/EMT Diploma
The Firefighter/EMT diploma program is designed to qualify graduates to become successful
130
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
fire service personnel with additional training in emergency medical technology. Completion of
the diploma requirements rewards the recipient with two interrelated occupational qualifications: (1) an Emergency Medical Technician certificate, and (2) the minimum National
Professional Qualification System - Firefighter I Certification.
Minimum length of 7 quarters and/or 80 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations OR
FSC XXX Fire/EMS Customer Service
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
(3)
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
EMS 120 Emergency Medical Technology I - Basic
8
EMS 121 Emergency Medical Technology II
7
EMS 122
Emergency Medical Technology III
9
FSC 102* Emergency Service Fundamentals
3
FSC 103 Basic Firefighter Module I
6
FSC 104 Basic Firefighter Module II
3
FSC 105* Fire and Life Safety Educator I
5
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
5
FSC 161 Fire Service Safety & Loss Control
5
FSC xxx
Fire Ground Operations
4
FSC xxx
Introduction to Technical Rescue
6
FSC xxx
Fire Prevention, Preparedness, and Maintenance
3
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
*FSC 102 and FSC 105 may be taken at a minimum age of 16
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
80
Advanced Fire Company Officer Certificate
The purpose of the Advanced Fire Company Officer certificate is the final step accomplished
while a student works toward completion of the Fire Science Technology diploma, or independently of the diploma option. It meets qualification standards for national certification. This
program presents critical subject matter to students who, upon completion of the certificate,
would meet the requirements for the NFPA Fire Officer II.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
ENG 101 English
FSC 105 Fire and Life Safety Educator
Credit Hours
5
5
131
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
FSC 220 Fire Protection Systems
FSC 260 Fire Service Info. Management
FSC 270 Fire Investigation
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
5
5
5
25
Basic Fire Company Officer Certificate
The purpose of the Basic Fire Company Officer is the first of three steps accomplished while
a student works toward completion of the Fire Science Technology diploma, or independently
of the diploma option. It meets qualification standards for national certification. The Basic Fire
Company Officer program presents critical subject matter to students who, upon completion
of the certificate, may be assigned in their present fire service position to ride in charge of an
engine company, rescue company, etc. on a temporary basis in their daily assigned duties.
The assignment would typically involve supervising a crew of firefighters, emergency medical
technicians and paramedics. This assignment would require the student to serve as the initial
incident commander on fire, rescue and other emergency scenes.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers night and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline Credit Hours
FSC 101 Intro to Fire Service
FSC 121 Fire Fighting Strategy and Tactics
FSC 161 Fire Service Safety & Loss Control
FSC 230 Fire Service Building & Construction
FSC 241 Incident Command
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
5
5
5
5
5
25
Fire Company Officer Certificate
The purpose of the Fire Company Officer certificate is the second of three steps accomplished
while a student works toward completion of the Fire Science Technology diploma or independently of the diploma option. It meets qualification standards for national certification. The
Fire Company Officer program presents critical subject matter to students who, upon completion of the certificate, would be prepared to serve as a fire department supervisor on a permanent basis.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
FSC 110
Fire Science Supervision
FSC 132 Fire Service Instructor
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
FSC 151 Fire Prevention & Inspection
FSC 201 Fire Service Management
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
132
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
25
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Fire Fighter I Certificate
This technical certificate will be conducted in cooperation with the Georgia Fire Academy
and Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training to ensure graduates have the skills, knowledge and credentials to serve as firefighters in paid and volunteer fire departments.
Graduates will be tested and certified at the National Professional Qualifications level.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 17 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
FSC 102* Emergency Service Fundamentals
FSC 103 Basic Firefighter Module I
FSC 104 Basic Firefighter Module II
FSC 105* Fire and Life Safety Educator I
Credit Hours
3
6
3
5
*These courses may be taken at a minimum age of 16.
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
17
Fire Fighter II Certificate
This technical certificate will be conducted in cooperation with the Georgia Fire Academy and
Georgia Firefighter Standards and Training to ensure graduates have the skills, knowledge
and credentials to serve as firefighters in paid and volunteer fire departments. The certificate
builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in the Fire Fighter I certificate and parallels the
Advanced Firefighter Curriculum being developed by the Georgia Fire Academy.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
FSC xxx Fire Ground Operations
4
FSC xxx Introduction to Technical Rescue
6
FSC xxx Fire Prevention, Preparedness and Maintenance
3
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
5
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
18
General Studies
Health Studies Degree
The Health Studies Associate degree program is designed to provide skills for graduates to
work with both private and public agencies in various areas of the medical field. (It is for students who have completed the required courses for a diploma in the health area of Dental
Assisting, Dental Hygiene, Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technology, Practical
Nursing, Paramedic Technology, Surgical Technology or any other allied health program to be
offered by Lanier Technical College in the future).
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
133
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology OR
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
XXX xxx
Degree-Level General Core Electives
Credit Hours
Occupational Courses
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
90
5
5
5
5
5
5
Personal/Public Service Studies Degree
The Personal/Public Service Studies Associate degree program is designed to provide skills
for graduates to work with both private and public agencies in various areas of personal and
public services. (It is for students who have completed the required courses for a diploma in
the personal/public services area of Cosmetology, Criminal Justice Technology, Early
Childhood Care and Education, Fire Science Technology, Firefighter/EMT or any
personal/public program to be offered by Lanier Technical College in the future).
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology OR
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
XXX xxx
Degree-Level General Core Electives
Credit Hours
Occupational Courses
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
90
134
5
5
5
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Technical Studies Degree
The Technical Studies Associate degree program is designed to provide skills for graduates
to work with both private and public agencies in various technical fields. It is for students who
have completed the required courses for a diploma in the technical area of Air Conditioning
Technology, Applied Manufacturing Technology, Automated Manufacturing Technology,
Automotive Collision Repair, Computer Information Systems, Drafting, Electronics
Technology, Industrial Systems Technology, Machine Tool Technology, Motorsports Vehicle
Technology, Printing and Graphics Technology, Welding and Joining Technology or any technical program to be offered by Lanier Technical College in the future.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology OR
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
XXX xxx
Degree-Level General Core Electives
Credit Hours
Occupational Courses
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
90
5
5
5
5
5
5
Health Care Managment
Healthcare Management Technology Degree
The Healthcare Management Technology Associate degree program prepares students for a
variety of positions in the healthcare environment. Graduates of the program generally find
positions such as office managers, departmental supervisors/managers, admissions coordinators, etc. and generally work in hospitals, clinics, physicians' offices, long term care facilities, insurance companies, or managed care organizations. Since most of the classes are
offered as online classes, the program provides an excellent opportunity for individuals currently working in the healthcare environment to upgrade their skills and knowledge. Graduates
of the program receive an Associate Degree in Applied Technology in Healthcare
Management Technology.
135
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 8 quarters and/or 109 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
BIO 193 Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 194 Anatomy and Physiology II
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities OR
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
HMT 101 Introduction to Healthcare Management
HMT 102 Administrative Procedures in HMT
HMT 103 Medical Law and Ethics
HMT 104 Healthcare Statistics
HMT 110
Medical Records Systems and Management
HMT 111
Medical Coding
HMT 112
Medical Insurance
HMT 113
Advanced Coding
HMT 200
Management of Healthcare Organizations
HMT 201 Healthcare Financial Management
HMT 202 Long-term Care Administration
HMT 203 Human Resource Management
HMT 204 Current Trends in Managed Care
HMT 205 HMT Internship
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
5
3
4
5
3
5
5
3
5
5
5
5
5
10
3
109
5
5
5
5
Health Care Assistant Certificate
The Health Care Assistant certificate prepares individuals to work in a variety of specializations in the medical workplace. The specialty areas build upon a common core of general education and allied health courses. Graduates would also have the option to complete more than
one specialization in order to be more attractive to employers seeking multi-skilled health care
assistants.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 39 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth, Winder-Barrow and Jackson County Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 101 English OR
136
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
5
MAT 101 General Math OR
MAT 191 College Algebra
5
PSY 101 Basic Psychology OR
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology OR
BIO 193 Anatomy and Physiology I
5
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
3
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences
3
SCT 100 I ntroduction to Microcomputers
3
Students must select at least one of the specialization areas listed
below:
Health Care Administrative Assistant Specialization Course
BIO 194
Anatomy and Physiology II
5
HMT 101 Introduction to Health Care
5
HMT 102 Administrative Procedures in Healthcare Management 3
HMT 103 Medical Laws and Ethics for Healthcare Personnel
4
Medical Unit Secretary Specialization Course
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing AND
BUS 106 Office Procedures
10
Medical Transcription Specialization Course
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing AND
BUS 108 Word Processing
12
BUS 213 Medical Document Processing Transcription
5
Radiographic Assistant Specialization Course
RAD 101 Introduction to Radiography
5
RAD 107 Principles of Radiographic Exposure I
4
RAD 123 Radiologic Science
5
Surgical Assistant Specialization Course
SUR 101 Introduction to Surgical Technology
6
SUR 102 Principles of Surgical Technology
5
SUR 108 Surgical Microbiology
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
39+
Medical Coding Specialist Certificate
The Medical Coding Specialist certificate program provides short-term training in the Medical
Assisting/Healthcare Management field. The program offers basic training in anatomy and
physiology, medical terminology, communications, word processing and medical/physicians
procedural coding skills. The curriculum provides both advanced training in coding skills for
persons who want to develop these skills to enhance their job performance and entry-level
training for individuals interested in entering this field.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 36 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
137
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Science
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
ENG 101 English
HMT 111
Medical Coding
HMT 112
Medical Insurance
HMT 113
Advanced Coding
MAS 112
Human Diseases
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
5
5
5
5
3
5
36
Horticulture Maintenance
Horticulture Maintenance Technician Certificate
The Horticulture Maintenance Technician Certificate prepares students in environmental horticulture. This program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce
academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention,
and advancement.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 26 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Jackson County Campus.
Certificate Outline
EHO 100 Horticulture Science
EHO 101 Woody Ornamental Plant ID
EHO 108 Pest Management
EHO 112
Landscape
EHO 133 Turf Management
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
6
5
5
5
26
Interior Design
Interiors Degree
The Interiors degree program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of
positions in today's interiors field. The Interiors program provides learning opportunities which
introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes
required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The knowledge and skills emphasized in this program include nontextile and textile use, basic blueprint reading, elementary
use of computers in drafting, communication with architects and contractors, historical perspective of architecture, interior design fundamentals, selection and use of furniture and interior finishes, and client presentations. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to
upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of interiors. Graduates of the
program receive an Interiors Degree.
138
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 108 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
General Core Courses
ECO 191
Principles of Economics
ENG 191 Composition & Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition & Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics OR
MAT 191 College Algebra
PSY 191
Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
INT 100 Interior Design Fundamentals
5
INT 102 Furniture and Accessories I
5
INT 103 Furniture and Accessories II
5
INT 104 Architecture
5
INT 105
Blueprint Reading for Interiors
2
INT 106 Building and Technical Services for Interiors
2
INT 107 Lighting Technology for Interiors
2
INT 108 Color Theory
2
INT 109 Design Studio I
2
INT 110
Materials and Resources I
4
INT 111
Materials and Resources II
4
INT 112
Business Practices and Portfolio Development
8
INT 113
Design Studio II
2
INT 115
Introduction to Drawing for Interior Designers
3
INT 116
Introductory Computer-Aided Drafting Survey
3
INT 140 Interior Seminar
3
INT 142 Interiors Internship I
4
INT 143 Interiors Internship II
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
XXX xxx
Electives
10
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
108
Interiors Diploma
The Interiors program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of positions
in today's interiors field. The Interiors program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes
required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The knowledge and skills emphasized in this program include nontextile and textile use, basic blueprint reading, elementary
use of computers in drafting, communication with architects and contractors, historical perspective of architecture, interior design fundamentals, selection and use of furniture and inte139
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
rior finishes, and client presentations. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to
upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of interiors. Graduates of the
program receive an Interiors diploma.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 81 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and
Professional Development
ENG 111
Business English
MAT 111
Business Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
INT 100 Interior Design Fundamentals
5
INT 102 Furniture and Accessories I
5
INT 103 Furniture and Accessories II
5
INT 104 Architecture
5
INT 105 Blueprint Reading for Interiors
2
INT 106 Building and Technical Services for Interiors
2
INT 107 Lighting Technology for Interiors
2
INT 108 Color Theory
2
INT 109 Design Studio I
2
INT 110
Materials and Resources I
4
INT 111
Materials and Resources II
4
INT 112
Business Practices and Portfolio Development
8
INT 113
Design Studio II
2
INT 115
Introduction to Drawing for Interior Designers
3
INT 116
Introductory Computer-Aided Drafting Survey
3
INT 140 Interior Seminar
3
INT 142 Interiors Internship I
4
INT 143 Interiors Internship II
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
81
Interior Design Assistant Certificate
The Interior Design Assistant TCC is to provide learning opportunities, which develop academic, technical and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention
and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of Interior Design theory and
practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a
technical certificate of credit of Interior Design Assistant.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 33 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
140
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
MKT 103 Business Law
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
MKT 109 Visual Merchandising
INT 100 Interior Design Fundamentals
INT 105
Blueprint Reading for Interiors
INT 106 Building and Technical Services for Interiors
INT 107 Lighting Technology for Interiors
INT 108 Color Theory
INT 115
Introduction to Drawing for Interior Designers
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
4
5
2
2
2
2
3
3
33
Industrial Systems Technology
Electrical Control Systems Diploma
The Electrical Control Systems diploma program is a sequence of courses designed to prepare students in the field of electrical control systems. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge, along with skills required for job acquisition, retention, and
advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training in PLC's, electrical controls, and
instrumentation. Graduates of the program receive an Electrical Control Systems diploma that
qualifies them for employment as industrial electricians or industrial control technicians.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 78 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
Occupational Courses
IDS 101 Industrial Computer Applications
IDS 103
Industrial Wiring
IDS 105 DC and AC Motors
IDS 110
Fundamentals of Motor Controls
IDS 113
Magnetic Starters and Braking
IDS 115
Two-Wire Control Circuits
IDS 121 Advanced Motor Controls
IDS 131 Variable Speed Motor
IDS 141 Basic Industrial PLCs
IDS 142 Industrial PLCs
IDS 209 Industrial Instrumentation
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Credit Hours
5
6
3
3
3
2
2
3
6
6
6
141
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
IFC 103 Solid State Devices
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
2
4
4
4
3
3
78
Industrial Systems Technology Diploma
The Industrial Systems Technology diploma program is designed for the student who wishes
to prepare for a career as an Industrial Systems technician/electrician. The program provides
learning opportunities that introduce, develop and reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skill, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally,
the program provides opportunities to retrain or upgrade present knowledge and skill. The
diploma program teaches skills in Industrial Systems Technology providing background skills
in several areas of industrial maintenance including electronics, industrial wiring, motors, controls, plc's, instrumentation, fluidpower, mechanical, pumps and piping, and computers.
Graduates of the program receive an Industrial Systems Technology diploma.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
Occupational Courses
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
IDS 101 Industrial Computer Applications
IDS 103 Industrial Wiring I
IDS 105 DC and AC Motors
IDS 110
Fundamentals of Motor Controls
IDS 113
Magnetic Starters and Braking
IDS 115
Two-Wire Control Circuits
IDS 121 Advanced Motor Controls
IDS 131 Variable Speed Motor Control
IDS 141 Basic Industrial PLCs
IDS 142 Industrial PLCs
IDS 209 Industrial Instrumentation
IDS 215 Industrial Mechanics
IDS 221 Industrial Fluidpower
IDS 231 Pumps and Piping Systems
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
142
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Credit Hours
2
4
4
4
5
6
3
3
3
2
2
3
6
6
6
6
7
2
3
90
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Mechanical Control Systems Diploma
The Mechanical Control Systems diploma program provides instruction to prepare students
for employment in a variety of positions within the industrial production equipment maintenance field. The program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop and reinforce
academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention,
and advancement. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to retrain or upgrade present knowledge and skills. Graduates of the program receive a Mechanical Control Systems
diploma that qualifies them for employment as industrial millwrights or industrial maintenance
mechanics.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 73 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
ACT 100 Refrigeration Fundamentals
IDS 215 Industrial Mechanics
IDS 221 Industrial Fluidpower
IDS 231 Pumps and Piping Systems
IDS 241 Maintenance for Reliability
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits I
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
MCH 109 Lathe Operations I
MCH 115
Mill Operations I
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
WLD 133 Metal Welding and Cutting Techniques
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
4
6
7
2
7
2
4
4
7
7
3
3
4
73
Industrial Mechanical Technician Certificate
The Industrial Mechanical Technician certificate program provides mechanical maintenance
skills and competencies to maintenance personnel who are primarily trained in the electrical
areas. The program introduces industrial power transmission encompassing both mechanical
and fluid power technologies.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 22 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
IDS 215 Industrial Mechanics
Credit Hours
6
143
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
IDS 221 Industrial Fluid Power
IDS 231 Pumps & Piping Systems
IDS 241 Maintenance for Reliability
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
7
2
7
22
Industrial Motor Control Technician Certificate
The Industrial Motor Control Technician certificate program is designed to provide motor and
motor control training to employees in maintenance or a peripheral of the maintenance
department in local plants.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 16 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
IDS 105 AC & DC Motors
IDS 110
Fundamentals of Motor Control
IDS 113
Magnetic Starter and Braking
IDS 115
Two-wire Control Circuits
IDS 121 Advanced Motor Controls
IDS 131 Variable Speed Motor Controls
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
3
3
2
2
3
16
Programmable Logic Controllers Technician
Certificate
The Programmable Logic Controllers Technician certificate program offers specialized programmable logic controller training to qualified industrial technicians. It introduces operational
theory, systems terminology, field wiring/installation and develops operational skills in the use
of PLC equipment and peripheral devices with emphasis on PLC programming, installation
and troubleshooting/repair.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
IDS 110
Fundamentals of Motor Controls
IDS 141 Basic Industrial PLC
IDS 142 Industrial PLCs
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
144
Credit Hours
3
6
6
3
18
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Machine Tool Technology
Machine Tool Technology Diploma
The Machine Tool Technology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the machine tool technology field. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention,
and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of machine tool theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Machine
Tool Technology diploma and have the qualifications of a machine tool technician.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 85 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
MCA 211
CNC Fundamentals
MCH 101 Introduction to Machine Tool
MCH 102 Blueprint Reading for Machine Tool
MCH 104 Machine Tool Math I OR
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MCH 105 Machine Tool Math II OR
MAT 104 Geometry and Trigonometry
MCH 107 Characteristics of Metal/Heat Treatment I
MCH 109 Lathe Operations I
MCH 110
Lathe Operations II
MCH 112
Surface Grinder Operations
MCH 114
Blueprint Reading II
MCH 115
Mill Operations I
MCH 116
Mill Operations II
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
7
6
5
5
5
4
6
6
3
5
6
6
3
5
85
Advanced General Machinist Certificate
The Advanced General Machinist certificate provides training for graduates to gain employment as machine tool technicians.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 33 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
145
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
MCA 201 Advanced Milling I
MCA 203 Advanced Milling II
MCA 205 Advanced Lathe Operations I
MCA 207 Advanced Lathe Operations II
MCA 208 Advanced Grinding I
MCA 209 Advanced Grinding II
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
7
6
7
6
4
3
33
Basic Machining Certificate
The purpose of the Basic Machining certificate (formerly Machine Tool Operator) program is
to prepare students for a machine tool operator position within a CNC machine tool establishment or as a machine tool assistant for a business operation. The Basic Machining certificate program provides knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for success in performing
machine tool operator functions within a machine tool manufacturing facility.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 28 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
MCH 101 Introduction to Machine Tool
MCH 102 Blueprint Reading I
MCH 104 Machine Tool Math I
MCH 109 Lathe Operations I
MCH 115
Mill Operations I
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
5
5
6
6
28
CNC Specialist Certificate
The CNC Specialist certificate provides training for graduates to gain employment as CNC
machine tool technicians.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 41 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
MCA 211
CNC Fundamentals
7
MCA 213 CNC Mill Manual Programming
8
MCA 215 CNC Lathe Manual Programming
8
MCA 217 CNC Practical Applications
6
MCA 219
CAD/CAM Programming
7
XXX xxx
Elective
5
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
41
146
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Management
Management and Supervisory Development Degree
The Management and Supervisory Development Associate degree program prepares experienced workers for entry into management or supervisory occupations in a variety of businesses and industries. The Management and Supervisory Development Associate degree
program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic
and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and
advancement. Program graduates who are experienced workers are prepared to perform
management and supervisory functions such as employee training, labor relations, employee
evaluation, and employee counseling and disciplinary action. Each course within all of Lanier
Technical College's diploma/certificate level programs is acceptable for full credit toward the
general elective hours for this associate degree. Graduates of the program receive a
Management and Supervisory Development Associate of Applied Technology degree.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 101 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ECO 191 Principles of Economics OR
ECO 192 Microeconomics
5
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
5
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
5
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
5
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
5
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
MKT 101 Principles of Management
5
MKT 105 Accounting for Marketing Applications OR
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting (6)
5
MSD 101 Interpersonal Employee Relations
5
MSD 102 Employment Law
5
MSD 106 Performance Management
5
MSD 107 Employee Training and Development
5
MSD 108 Management and Supervisory Seminar
5
MSD 110
Management and Supervision Occupation
Based Instruction I
3
MSD 113
Business Ethics
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
A minimum of 20 credit hours will be selected from the following:
MSD 103 Leadership
5
MSD 104 Human Resource Management
5
147
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MSD
MSD
MSD
MSD
MSD
105
150
151
152
154
Labor Management Relations
Production Management
Personal Development for Supervisors
Project Management
Organizational Communications and
Information Technology
MSD 156 Supervision in a Service Environment
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
MSD 160 Business Plan Development
AND
XXX xxx
Elective (outside course-major)
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
101
Distribution & Materials Management Diploma
The Distribution and Materials Management program prepares students for employment in a
variety of businesses and industries. The Distribution and Materials Management program
provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Graduates of the program receive a Distribution and Materials Management diploma.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 79 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 111
Business Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
DMM 101 Inventory Planning and Control
5
DMM 102 Purchasing
5
DMM 105 Distribution Principles
5
DMM 106 Materials Handling Management
10
DMM 107 Quality Improvement Concepts
5
DMM 108 Distribution Occupation-Based Instruction I
3
DMM 109 Distribution Occupation-Based Instruction II
3
DMM 110
Manufacturing Resources Planning/Just-In-Time
7
MKT 100 Introduction to Marketing
5
MKT 141 Supervision and Leadership I
5
MSD 102 Employment Laws
5
MSD 154 Organizational Communications
and Information Technology
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
79
148
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Management and Supervisory Development Diploma
The Management and Supervisory Development diploma program prepares experienced
workers for entry into management or supervisory occupations in a variety of businesses and
industries. The Management and Supervisory Development program provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills,
and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Graduates of the program receive a Management and Supervisory Development diploma.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 85 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 111
Business English
ENG 112
Business Communications
MAT 111
Business Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MKT 104 Principles of Economics
MKT 105 Accounting for Marketing Applications OR
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting (6)
MSD 101 Interpersonal Employee Relations
MSD 102 Employment Law
MSD 103 Leadership
MSD 104 Human Resource Management
MSD 106 Performance Management
MSD 107 Employee Training and Development
MSD 108 Management and Supervisory Seminar
MSD 110
Management and Supervision
Occupation Based Instruction I
MSD 151 Personal Development for Supervisors
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
3
5
5
3
84-85
Advanced Leadership and Management Certificate
This certificate program provides training in the operation and management of business. The
program will develop professional expertise in leading and managing employees and will
familiarize students with the challenges and responsibilities of leadership.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 20 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
149
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
MSD 104 Human Resource Management
MSD 108 Management and Supervisory Seminar
MSD 151 Personal Development for Supervisors
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
20
Business Management Certificate
The purpose of the Business Management certificate program is to provide training in the
operation and management of businesses for those individuals who have an immediate need
for training in these areas to meet their employment or business ownership responsibilities.
The Business Management certificate program develops professional expertise in planning
and operating a business and to familiarize students with the challenges and responsibilities
of the business owner.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 21 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MSD 102 Employment Law
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
5
5
3
5
21
Management Specialist Certificate
The Management Specialist certificate program (formerly Leadership & Management) provides training in the operation and management of business. The program will develop professional expertise in leading and managing employees and will familiarize students with the
challenges and responsibilities of leadership.
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 20 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MSD 101 Interpersonal Employee Relations
MSD 103 Leadership
MSD 106 Performance Management
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
20
Supervisory Specialist Certificate
The purpose of the Supervisory Specialist (formerly Supervisory Development)certificate program is to train experienced workers to effectively perform management and supervisory func150
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
tions such as employee recruiting, selecting and hiring, employee performance monitoring
and evaluation and employee-related motivation and problem solving. The Supervisory
Specialist certificate program provides individuals with training to attain skills needed to qualify for employment in a management and supervisory function.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 26 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
MAT 111
Business Math
MSD 103 Leadership
MSD 104 Human Resource Management
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
3
5
26
Team Leader Specialist Certificate
The Team Leader Specialist certificate provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the
team leader position. Topics include: interpersonal employee relations, leadership and decision-making, introduction to microcomputers, and total quality management principles.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
MSD 101 Interpersonal Employee Relations
MSD 103 Leadership
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
3
18
Manufacturing Associate Technician
Manufacturing Associate Technician Certificate
The Manufacturing Associate Technician certificate program provides training in manufacturing skills for individuals who want to prepare for an automated manufacturing position.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 26 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
151
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
AMF 108
Applied Hydraulics, Pneumatics & Mechanisms
3
IFC 100* Industrial Safety Procedures
2
IFC 101 Direct Current Circuits
4
IFC 102 Alternating Current I
4
IFC 103 Solid State Devices I
4
IMT 102 Problem Solving in Technology
4
MSD 157 Total Quality Management Principles
5
*CIBA Vision employees exempt from this class
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
24-26
Marketing
Marketing Management Degree
The Marketing Management Associate degree program prepares students for employment in
a variety of positions in today's marketing and management fields. The program provides
learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational
knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement.
Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to
retrain in the area of marketing management. Program graduates receive a Marketing
Management Associate of Applied Technology degree.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 98 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Economics
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics OR
MAT 191 College Algebra
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology OR
SOC 191 Introduction to Sociology
Credit Hours
5
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
MKT 103 Business Law
MKT 100 Introduction to Marketing
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
MKT 107 Buying
Credit Hours
6
5
5
5
5
5
152
5
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MKT 108 Advertising
MKT 109 Visual Merchandising
MKT 110
Entrepreneurship
MKT 130 Marketing Administration O.B.I. I
MKT 131 Marketing Administration O.B.I. II
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx Technical Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
4
4
8
3
3
3
12
98
Marketing Management Diploma
The purpose of the Marketing Management diploma program is to provide educational opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to succeed in the field of Marketing Management. The Marketing Management program is intended to produce graduates who are prepared for employment as Marketing
Management assistants. Program graduates are competent in the general areas of communications, math, and interpersonal relations. Graduates specializing in marketing administration are to be competent in marketing, management, business law, economics, selling, buying, advertising, visual merchandising, and entrepreneurship. Program graduates receive a
Marketing Management Diploma.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 88 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 111
Business English
ENG 112
Business Communications
MAT 111
Business Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I
MKT 100 Introduction to Marketing
MKT 101 Principles of Management
MKT 103 Business Law
MKT 104 Principles of Economics
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
MKT 107 Buying
MKT 108 Advertising
MKT 109 Visual Merchandising
MKT 110
Entrepreneurship
MKT 130 Marketing Administration O.B.I. I
MKT 131 Marketing Administration O.B.I. II
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
XXX xxx
Technical Electives
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
8
3
3
3
9
88
153
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certified Customer Service Specialist Certificate
The Certified Customer Service Specialist certificate program provides training in the core
interpersonal and technical skills required to deliver exceptional customer service in a broad
range of customer contact jobs.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
MKT 161 Service Industry Business Environment
2
MKT 162 Customer Contact Skills
6
MKT 163 Computer Skills for Customer Service
3
MKT 164 Business Skills for the Customer Service Environment3
MKT 165 Personal Effectiveness in Customer Service
1
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
15
Certified Manufacturing Specialist Certificate
The Certified Manufacturing Specialist certificate program is designed to provide students with
a basic understanding of manufacturing processes and concentrates on those areas successful applicants need to gain entry level employment.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
AMF 152 Manufacturing Organizational Principles
AMF 154 Manufacturing Workforce Skills
AMF 156 Manufacturing Production Requirements
AMF 158 Automated Manufacturing Skills
AMF 160 Representative Manufacturing Skills
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
2
2
2
3
6
15
Certified Warehousing and Distribution Specialist
Certificate
This certificate program teaches students the fundamental processes of warehousing and distribution systems. It also provides practice in the application of technology and concepts of
efficiency to operations and practice in the application of core warehousing skills ranging from
materials handling systems and their containment and containment of materials for storage
and shipping.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
154
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
DMM 154 Working in the Warehousing Environment
DMM 156 Warehousing and Distribution Processes
DMM 158 Warehousing Technology
DMM 160 Workplace Practices and Skills
DMM 162 Core Warehousing Skills
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
2
2
3
4
4
15
Retail Department Management Certificate
The Retail Department Management certificate program is to prepare students for department
management positions within a retail establishment or as small business managers for retail
operations. The Retail Department Management certificate program provides knowledge,
skills, and attitudes necessary for success in managing a department within a retail establishment.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 30 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
ENG 111
Business English
5
MAT 111
Business Math
5
MKT 100 Introduction to Marketing
5
MKT 101 Principles of Management
5
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
5
MKT 125 Retail Operations of Management
5
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
30
Small Business Management Certificate
The Small Business Management certificate provides learning opportunities which summarizes competencies included in the entrepreneurship specialization and provides opportunities
for application and demonstration of skills. Topics include: management principals, marketing
functions, financial applications, and entrepreneurial growth potential.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 32 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
MKT 100 Introduction to Marketing
MKT 103 Business Law
MKT 106 Fundamentals of Selling
MKT 123 Small Business Management
MKT 108 Advertising
MKT xxx
Electives
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
4
8
32
155
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Medical Assisting
Medical Assisting Diploma
The Medical Assisting diploma program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today's medical offices. The Medical Assisting program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and
attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the program
provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of
medical assisting. Graduates of the program receive a Medical Assisting diploma. The LTC
Medical Assisting program at the Oakwood Campus is accredited by the Commission on
Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs upon recommendation of the Curriculum
Review Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (CRB-AAMAE).
CAAHEP, 35 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60601, (312) 553-9355
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 83 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
PSY 101 Basic Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
3
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences
3
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
5
MAS 101 Legal Aspects of the Medical Office
2
MAS 103 Pharmacology
5
MAS 106 Medical Office Procedures
4
MAS 114
Medical Administrative Procedures I
3
MAS 115
Medical Administrative Procedures II
3
MAS 108 Medical Assisting Skills I
5
MAS 109 Medical Assisting Skills II
5
MAS 112
Human Diseases
5
MAS 113
Maternal and Child Care
5
MAS 117
Medical Assisting Externship
8
MAS 118
Medical Assisting Seminar
4
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
83
Medical Receptionist Certificate
The Medical Receptionist certificate provides the educational opportunities to individuals that
will enable them to obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to secure an entry level position as a receptionist in a physician's office, hospital, clinic or other related areas.
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Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 28 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
BUS 101 Keyboarding
5
ENG 101 English
5
AHS 101 Anatomy & Physiology
5
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences
3
MAS 106 Medical Office Procedures
4
MAS 114
Medical Administrative Procedures 1
3
MAS 115
Medical Administrative Procedures 2
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
28
Medical Transcription Technician Certificate
The Medical Transcription Technician certificate program provides entry level training for medical clerical support in preparation for employment in a medical office with a concentration in
medical transcription procedures.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 43 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood, Forsyth and Winder-Barrow Campuses.
Certificate Outline
AHS 101
Anatomy & Physiology
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
BUS 102 Intermediate Document Processing
BUS 103 Advanced Document Processing
BUS 108 Word Processing
BUS 213 Medical Transcription
BUS 214 Medical Transcription II
ENG 111
Business English
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
5
5
5
7
5
3
5
43
Medical Laboratory Technology
Medical Laboratory Technology Degree
The Medical Laboratory Technology associate degree program is a sequence of courses that
prepares students for technician positions in medical laboratories and related businesses and
industries. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge
and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes
a combination of didactic and clinical instruction necessary for successful employment.
Program graduates receive a Medical Laboratory Technology Associate of Applied Technology
degree, have the qualifications of a medical laboratory technician, and are eligible for certification. "The Medical Laboratory Technology program is accredited by the National Accrediting
157
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, which is located at 8410 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite
670, Chicago, IL 60631. (773) 714-8880."
Minimum length of 7 quarters and/or 120 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
CHM 191 Chemistry I
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
3
BIO 193 Anatomy and Physiology I
5
BIO 194
Anatomy and Physiology II
5
CHM 192
Chemistry II
5
MLT 101 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology
3
MLT 103 Urinalysis/Body Fluids
3
MLT 104 Hematology/Coagulation
8
MLT 105 Serology/Immunology
3
MLT 106 Immunohematology
7
MLT 107 Clinical Chemistry
7
MLT 108 Microbiology
8
MLT 109 Clinical Phlebotomy, Urinalysis And Serology Practicum
4
MLT 110
Clinical Immunohematology Practicum
6
MLT 111
Clinical Hematology/Coagulation Practicum
6
MLT 112
Clinical Microbiology Practicum
6
MLT 113
Clinical Chemistry Practicum
6
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
XXX xxx
Electives
2
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
120
Motorsports Vehicle Technology
Motorsports Vehicle Technology Degree
The Motorsports Vehicle Technology Associates degree program prepares the student for an
entry level position in a racing team shop. Focus is on many forms of racing vehicles including sports cars, stock cars, drag cars, and open wheel cars. Students will learn chassis setup, engine designs, brake systems, transmissions, electrical systems, fuel systems, and fabrication skills unique to racing vehicles. Students will also be taught precision measurement,
math, and communication skills required of professional racing team members. Graduates of
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Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
the program receive an Associate of Applied Technology Degree in Motorsports Vehicle
Technology.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 107 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ECO 191 Principles of Economics
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT 196 Contemporary Mathematics
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
MCH 101 Introduction to Machine Tool
6
MST 100 Introduction to Motorsports Engine Technology
3
MST 101 Racing Vehicle Systems
3
MST 102 Suspension & Frame Designs
3
MST 103 Suspension & Chassis Set-up
5
MST 104 Brake Systems
3
MST 105 Transmission/Transaxle Fundamentals
3
MST 106 Electrical Systems
3
MST 107 Ignition & Electronics Systems
3
MST 108 Fuel & Exhaust Systems
3
MST 109 Lubrication & Cooling Systems
3
MST 110
Engine Design, Blueprinting & Testing
4
MST 111
Racing Fabrication Techniques
4
MST 112
Motorsports Internship I
12
MST 114
Motorsports Internship II
12
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding
6
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
107
Motorsports Vehicle Technology Diploma
The Motorsports Vehicle Technology diploma program prepares the student for an entry level
position in a racing team shop. Focus is on many forms of racing vehicles including sports
cars, stock cars, drag cars, and open wheel cars. Students will learn chassis set up, engine
designs, brake systems, transmissions, electrical systems, fuel systems, and fabrication skills
unique to racing vehicles. Students will also be taught precision measurement, math, and
communication skills required of professional racing team members.
159
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Minimum length of 4 quarters and/or 90 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
MCH 101 Introduction to Machine Tool
6
MST 100 Introduction to Motorsports Engine Technology
3
MST 101 Racing Vehicle Systems
3
MST 102 Suspension & Frame Designs
3
MST 103 Suspension & Chassis Set-up
3
MST 104 Brake Systems
3
MST 105 Transmission/Tranaxle Fundamentals
3
MST 106 Electrical Systems
3
MST 107 Ignition & Electronics Systems
3
MST 108 Fuel & Exhaust Systems
3
MST 109 Lubrication & Cooling Systems
3
MST 110
Engine Design, Blueprinting & Testing
4
MST 111
Racing Fabrication Techniques
4
MST 112
Motorsports Internship I
12
MST 114
Motorsports Internship II
12
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding
6
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
90
Occupational Health & Safety
Occupational Health & Safety Degree
The Occupational Health & Safety Associate degree program prepares individuals to work in
the position of Safety Manager or Director. Graduates will work independently or as part of a
team to make the workplace healthier and safer by identifying potential job-related hazards
and possible ways to address them through engineering solutions, administrative practices,
and training of workers in healthy and safe work practices. Program graduates receive an
Occupational Health & Safety Asssociate of Applied Technology degree, which qualifies them
as Occupational Health & Safety technicians. Each course within all of Lanier Technical
College's diploma/certificate level programs is acceptable for full credit toward the general
elective hours for this associate degree.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 99 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
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Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
General Core Courses
CHM 191 Chemistry I
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra OR
MAT1 96
Contemporary Mathematics
PSY 191 I ntroductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
FSC 101 Introduction to Fire Science
5
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
5
FSC 230 Fire Service Building Construction
5
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
2
OHS 100 General Industry Standards
5
OHS 101 Safety Program Planning
Procedures and Management
5
OHS 102 Workers' Compensation Cost Containment
3
OHS 103 Accident Investigation and Hazard Recognition
5
OHS 104 Ergonomics
3
OHS 105 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
3
OHS 106 Health and Safety Legal Rights and Responsibilities 5
OHS 107 Safety Training Methods
5
OHS 108 Facility Safety and Security
5
SCT 100
Introduction to Microcomputers
3
XXX xxx
Electives (total of 5)
5
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
99
Occupational Health & Safety Technology Diploma
The Occupational Health & Safety Technology diploma program prepares individuals to work
as Safety Coordinators. Graduates will work independently or as part of a team to make the
workplace healthier and safer by identifying potential job-related hazards and possible ways
to address them through engineering solutions, administrative practices, and training of
workers in healthy and safe work practices. Graduates receive a Diploma in Occupational
Health & Safety Technology.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 82 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and Personal Development 3
ENG 101 English
5
161
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
MAT 103
Algebraic Concepts
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
FSC 101 Introduction to Fire Science
5
FSC 141 Hazardous Materials
5
FSC 230 Fire Service Building Construction
5
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
2
OHS 100 General Industry Standards
5
OHS 101 Safety Program Planning Procedures
and Management
5
OHS 102 Workers' Compensation Cost Containment
3
OHS 103 Accident Investigation and Hazard Recognition
5
OHS 104 Ergonomics
3
OHS 105 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
3
OHS 106 Health and Safety Legal Rights and Responsibilities 5
OHS 107 Safety Training Methods
5
OHS 108 Facility Safety and Security
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
XXX xxx
Elective
5
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
82
Occupational Safety Manager Certificate
This certificate program prepares individuals to work in the position of Safety Manager.
Graduates will work independently or as part of a team to make the workplace healthier and
safer by identifying potential job-related hazards and possible ways to address them through
engineering solutions, administrative practices, and training of workers in healthy and safe
work practices.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 33 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
IFC 100 Industrial Safety Procedures
2
MSD 152 Project Management
5
OHS 100 General Industry Standards
5
OHS 101 Safety Program Planning and Management
5
OHS 105 Introduction to Industrial Hygiene
3
OHS 106 Health and Safety Legal Rights and Responsibilities 5
OHS 107 Safety Training Methods
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
33
162
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Perioperative Nurse
Perioperative Nurse Certificate
The Perioperative Nurse certificate program is designed to help meet the statewide shortage
of experienced registered nurses for the operating room. The program prepares students in
the areas of didactic and clinical instruction in perioperative nursing.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
SUR 301 Principles of Perioperative Nursing
SUR 302 Fundamentals of Perioperative Nursing
SUR 303 Perioperative Nursing Internship
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
8
18
Practical Nursing
Practical Nursing Diploma
The Practical Nursing diploma program is designed to prepare students to write the NCLEXPN for licensure as practical nurses. The program prepares graduates to give competent nursing care. This is done through a selected number of academic and occupational courses providing a variety of techniques and materials necessary to assist the student in acquiring the
needed knowledge and skills to give competent care. A variety of clinical experiences are
planned so that theory and practice are integrated under the guidance of the clinical instructor. Program graduates receive a Practical Nursing diploma and have the qualifications of an
entry-level practical nurse.
Minimum length of 6 quarters and/or 95 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood, Forsyth, and Jackson County Campuses.
General Core Courses
Credit Hours
ENG 101 English
5
MAT 101 General Math
5
PSY 101 Basic Psychology
5
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
5
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
3
AHS 109 Medical Terminology for Allied Health Sciences
3
Occupational Courses
AHS 102
Drug Calculation and Administration
AHS 103 Nutrition and Diet Therapy
NSG 110
Nursing Fundamentals
Credit Hours
3
2
10
163
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
NSG 112
Medical Surgical Nursing I
NSG 113
Medical Surgical Nursing II
NPT 112
Medical Surgical Practicum I
NPT 113
Medical Surgical Practicum II
NSG 212 Pediatric Nursing
NPT 212 Pediatric Nursing Practicum
NSG 213 Obstetrical Nursing
NPT 213 Obstetrical Nursing Practicum
NSG 215 Nursing Leadership
NPT 215 Nursing Leadership Practicum
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
9
9
7
7
5
2
5
3
2
2
95
Printing and Graphics Technology
Printing & Graphics Technology Diploma
The Printing & Graphics Technology diploma program prepares students for employment in a
variety of positions in today's modern printing industry. The Printing & Graphics Technology
program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce knowledge,
skills, and attitudes required for getting a job, keeping it, and being promoted. Additionally, the
program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the
area of Printing & Graphics Technology. Graduates of the program receive a Printing &
Graphics Technology diploma with a specialization in one of the following areas: Printing
Technology Specialization; Prepress Technology Specialization.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 83 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
3
5
5
Occupational Courses
Credit Hours
BUS 101
Beginning Document Processing
5
PGT 101 Introduction to the Printing Industry
8
PGT 110
Digital Imaging Practicum/Internship
12
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
And completion of specialization in one of the following areas:
Printing Technology Specialization
PGT 102 Basic Publication Design
6
PGT 115
Image Output and Preflight
6
PGT 128 Black and White Photo Manipulation
6
PGT 111
Basic Press Operations
8
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Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
XXX xxx
Elective(s) (Area of Specialization)
OR
Prepress Technology Specialization
PGT 102 Basic Publication Design
PGT 103
Advanced Publications Design
PGT 115
Image Output and Preflight
PGT 128 Black and White Photo Manipulation
PGT 107 Scanning
PGT 109 Color Digital Production
XXX xxx
Elective(s) (Area of Specialization)
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
16
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
83
Basic Printing Technician Certificate
The Basic Printing Technician certificate program is designed to provide educational opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to succeed in an entry-level position within the printing and graphics technology field.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 36 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
PGT 101 Introduction to the Printing Industry
PGT 115
Image Output and Preflight
PGT 111
Basic Press Operations I
PGT 112
Basic Press Operations II
PGT 151 Half-time Internship
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
8
6
8
8
6
36
Desktop Publishing Technician Certificate
The Desktop Publishing Technician certificate program is designed to provide educational
opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes
necessary to succeed in an entry-level position as a desktop publishing technician and other
support positions.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 26 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
Credit Hours
BUS 101 Beginning Document Processing
5
PGT 102 Basic Publications Design
6
PGT 103 Advanced Publications Design
6
PGT 128 Black & White Photo Manipulation and Scanning
6
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
3
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
26
165
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Graphic Arts Fundamentals Certificate
The Graphic Arts Fundamentals certificate program is designed to provide educational opportunities to individuals that will enable them to obtain the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to succeed in an entry-level position as a graphic artist technician or other support
positions.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 20 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Forsyth Campus.
Certificate Outline
PGT 101 Introduction to the Printing Industry
PGT 102 Basic Publication Design
PGT 128 Black and White Photo Manipulation
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
8
6
6
20
Pharmacy Assistant
Pharmacy Assistant Certificate
This program prepares individuals to work as pharmacy assistants in a variety of settings
(hospitals, retail pharmacies, nursing homes, medical clinics, pharmaceutical sales firms,
etc.). Graduates possess knowledge in anatomy and physiology, fundamental concepts and
principles of the pharmaceutical field, drug calculation and administration, and principles of
receiving, storing and dispensing medications.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 33 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
AHS 102 Drug Caculation and Administration
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
DIS 50
Directed Independant Study
MAT 101 General Math
PHR 101 Pharmacy Technology
PHR 102 Principles of Dispensing
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
166
Credit Hours
5
3
3
3
5
5
6
3
33
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Phlebotomy
Phlebotomy Technician Certificate
The Phlebotomy certificate provides learning opportunities that introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the phlebotomy
position.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 18 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood and
Forsyth Campuses.
Certificate Outline
AHS 101 Anatomy and Physiology
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
PHL 103 Introduction to Venipuncture
PHL 105 Clinical Practice
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
5
3
4
6
18
Public Works Civil Technology
Public Works Civil Technology Degree
The Public Works Civil Technology Associate degree program is designed to provide skills for
site inspectors, managers, and surveyors to work both privately and publicly with city, county,
state and Department of Transportation agencies and construction firms. The curriculum was
developed by an industry team to be taught at the secondary and post-secondary level. This
model will allow dually enrolled secondary students, new college entrants, and current city,
county, and DOT employees to receive standardized traning to fill 300+ positions around the
state annually. Program graduates receive a Public Works Civil Associate of Applied
Technology degree, which qualifies them as Public Works Civil technicians. This program can
be completed within 18 to 30 months depending on student courseload.
Minimum length of 12 quarters and/or 92 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
ENG 195 Technical Communications OR
SPC 191 Fundamentals of Speech
MAT 191 College Algebra
MAT 194 Pre Calculus
PSY 191 Introductory Psychology
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
5
167
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Occupational Courses
CET 130 CAD
CET 190 Construction Materials
DDS 203 Surveying I
DDS 219 Route Location
PWC 100 Public Works Infrastructure
PWC 105 Construction Methods and Cost Estimating
PWC 110
Plan Reading
PWC 115
Highway Design
PWC 120 Project Management
PWC 140 Internship
XXX xxx
Elective
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
4
5
3
7
5
5
5
5
5
10
5
3
92
Public Works Civil Technology Diploma
The Public Works Civil Technician will have knowledge and basic skills to assume entry level
paraprofessional tasks and responsibilities in the areas of public works infrastructure construction, construcion inspection, and public works infrastructure maintenance, as well as
learning to perform these tasks and responsibilities independently in a minimum period of
time. The PWCT will also have the knowledge base to quickly and efficiently learn to assume
supervisory and management responsibilities in these career areas. Graduates will receive a
diploma as a Public Works Civil Technician. This program can be completed within 18 to 30
months depending on student courseload.
Minimum length of 10 quarters and/or 75 credit hours are required for
graduation. Contact Student Services at 770-531-6300 for class times at
the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations and
Professional Development
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MAT 104 Geometry & Trigonometry
Credit Hours
Occupational Courses
CET 190 Construction Materials
CET 130 CAD
DDS 203 Surveying I
DDS 219 Route Location
PWC 100 Public Works Infrastructure
PWC 105 Construction Methods/Cost Estimating
PWC 110
Plan Reading
PWC 115
Highway Design
PWC 120 Project Management
Credit Hours
5
4
3
7
5
5
5
5
5
168
3
5
5
5
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
PWC 140 Internship
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
10
3
75
Public Works Civil Technician Aide Certificate
The objectives of the Public Works Civil Technician Aide are to provide the basic intellectual
tools, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry, some workplace skills, microcomputers, and CAD
plus introduction to several specialized knowledge areas. This curriculum will prepare graduates for a meaningful internship as well as for continuing with the program at Lanier Technical
College. At the same time, it will give the student a good understanding of civil engineering
career areas including the paraprofessional and professional level civil engineering.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 37 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day, evening and online classes at the
Oakwood Campus.
Certificate Outline
ENG 101 English
MAT 103 Algebraic Concepts
MAT 104 Geometry & Trigonometry
CET 190 Construction Materials
PWC 110
Plan Reading
CET 130 CAD
PWC 115
Highway Design
SCT 100 Introduction to Micromputers
Credit Hours Required for Certificate
Credit Hours
5
5
5
5
5
4
5
3
37
Surgical Technology
Surgical Technology Degree
The Surgical Technology Associate degree program prepares students for employment in a
variety of positions in the surgical field. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to
upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in Surgical Technology. Graduates of the
program receive an Associate of Applied Technology degree in Surgical Technology and are
qualified for employment as surgical technologist.
Minimum length of 7 quarters and/or 109 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
ENG 191 Composition and Rhetoric I
ENG 193 Composition and Rhetoric II OR
HUM 191 Introduction to Humanities
MAT 191 College Algebra
Credit Hours
5
5
5
169
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
PSY 191
SOC 191
SPC 191
Introductory Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Fundamentals of Speech
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
BIO 193 Anatomy and Physiology I
BIO 194
Anatomy and Physiology II
BIO 197 Introductory Microbiology
SUR 101 Introduction to Surgical Terminology
SUR 102 Principles of Surgical Technology
SUR 109 Surgical Patient Care
SUR 110
Surgical Pharmacology
SUR 112
Introduction to Surgical Practicum
SUR 203 Surgical Procedures I
SUR 204 Surgical Procedures II
SUR 213 Specialty Surgical Practicum
SUR 214 Advanced Specialty Surgical Practicum
SUR 224 Seminar in Surgical Technology
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
Credit Hours
3
3
5
5
5
6
5
3
3
7
6
6
8
8
3
3
109
Surgical Technology Diploma
The Surgical Technology diploma program prepares students for employment in a variety of
positions in the surgical field. The Surgical Technology Diploma program provides learning
opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and technical knowledge,
skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. Additionally, the
program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in
Surgical Technology. Graduates of the program receive a Surgical Technology diploma and
are qualified for employment as surgical technologists.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 87 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day classes at the Oakwood Campus.
General Core Courses
PSY 101 Psychology
ENG 101 English
MAT 101 General Math
Credit Hours
5
5
5
Occupational Courses
AHS 101 Anatomy & Physiology
AHS 104 Introduction to Health Care
AHS 109 Medical Terminology
SUR 101 Introduction to Surgical Terminology
SUR 102 Principles of Surgical Technology
Credit Hours
5
3
3
6
5
170
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
SUR 108 Surgical Microbiology
SUR 109 Surgical Patient Care
SUR 110
Surgical Pharmacology
SUR 112
Introduction to Surgical Practicum
SUR 203 Surgical Procedures I
SUR 204 Surgical Procedures II
SUR 213 Specialty Surgical Practicum
SUR 214 Advanced Specialty Surgical Practicum
SUR 224 Seminar in Surgical Technology
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
3
3
3
7
6
6
8
8
3
3
Welding
Welding and Joining Technology Diploma
The Welding and Joining Technology diploma is designed to prepare students for careers in
the welding industry. Program learning opportunities develop academic, technical, professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The program emphasizes welding theory and practical application necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive a Welding and Joining Technology dilploma, have the qualifications of a welding and joining technician and are prepared to take qualifications tests.
Minimum length of 5 quarters and/or 73 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
General Core Courses
EMP 100 Interpersonal Relations
ENG 100 English
MAT 100 Basic Math
Credit Hours
3
5
3
Occupational Courses
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding Technology
WLD 101 Oxyfuel Cutting
WLD 103 Blueprint Reading I
WLD 104 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I
WLD 105 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II
WLD 106 Shielded Metal Arc Welding III
WLD 107 Shielded Metal Arc Welding IV
WLD 108 Blueprint Reading II
WLD 109 Gas Metal Arc Welding
WLD 110
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
WLD 112
Preparation to Industrial Qualification
XXX xxx Electives
OR
Credit Hours
6
4
3
6
6
6
6
3
6
4
4
5
171
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
WLD 160 Welding & Joining Half-time Internship
SCT 100 Introduction to Microcomputers
Credit Hours Required For Graduation
(5)
3
73
Gas Metal Arc Welding Certificate
The Gas Metal Arc Welding certificate program provides current curriculum and instructional
materials which teach knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the welding industry
needs and will prepare students for positions in the welding industry.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 16 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
Certificate Outline
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding Technology
WLD 101 Oxyfuel Cutting
WLD 109 Gas Metal Arc Welding
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
6
4
6
16
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Certificate
The Gas Tungsten Arc Welding certificate program provides current curriculum and instructional materials which teach knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the welding industry needs and will prepare students for positions in the welding industry.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 24 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
Certificate Outline
MAT 100 Basic Mathematics
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding Technology
WLD 103 Blueprint Reading I
WLD 108 Blueprint Reading II
WLD 110
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
WLD 150 Advanced Tungsten Arc Welding
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
6
3
3
4
5
24
MIG Welding Certificate
The MIG Welding certificate program provides current curriculum and instructional materials
which teach knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the welding industry needs and will
prepare students for positions in the welding industry.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 25 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
172
Lanier Technical College - Program Descriptions
Certificate Outline
MAT 100 Basic Mathematics
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding Technology
WLD 101 Oxyfuel Cutting
WLD 103 Blueprint Reading I
WLD 108 Blueprint Reading II
WLD 109 Gas Metal Arch Welding
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
6
4
3
3
6
25
Shielded Metal Arc Welding Certificate
The Shielded Metal Arc Welding certificate program provides current curriculum and instructional materials which teach knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the welding industry needs and will prepare students for positions in the welding industry.
Minimum length of 3 quarters and/or 39 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
Certificate Outline
MAT 100 Basic Mathematics
WLD 100 Introduction to Welding Technology
WLD 103 Blueprint Reading I
WLD 108 Blueprint Reading II
WLD 104 Shielded Arc Metal Welding I
WLD 105 Shielded Arc Metal Welding II
WLD 106 ShieldedArc Metal Welding III
WLD 107 ShieldedArc Metal Welding IV
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
6
3
3
6
6
6
6
39
TIG Welding Certificate
The TIG Welding certificate program provides current curriculum and instructional materials
which teach knowledge, skills and attitudes appropriate to the welding industry needs and will
prepare students for positions in the welding industry.
Minimum length of 2 quarters and/or 15 credit hours are required for
graduation. This program offers day and evening classes at the
Winder-Barrow Campus.
Certificate Outline
MAT 100 Basic Math
WLD 103 Blueprint Reading I
WLD 110
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
WLD 150 Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
Credit Hours Required For Certificate
Credit Hours
3
3
4
5
15
173
174
Cooperative
Degree
Programs
175
Lanier Technical College - Cooperative Degree Program
Gainesville College/ Lanier Technical College
Cooperative Degree Program
Through cooperative and joint-degree programs with Gainesville College, Lanier Tech is
also able to offer its students an Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) option in a
variety of academic programs. This degree can be earned by completing an approved diploma at the Lanier Tech campus and a corresponding set of general studies courses at the
Gainesville College Campus.
1. Associate of Applied Science in
Business
a. Accounting
b. Business & Office Technology
c. Computer Information Systems
d. Management & Supervisory
Development
e. Marketing Management
2. Associate of Applied Science in Health
a. Dental Hygiene
b. Medical Assisting
c. Medical Laboratory Technology
d. Paramedic Technology
e. Practical Nursing
3. Associate of Applied Science in
Services
a. Cosmetology
b. Early Childhood Care & Education
4. Associate of Applied Science in
Technology
a. Air Conditioning Technology
b. Applied Manufacturing Technology
c. Automated Manufacturing
Technology
d. Drafting/Advanced Drafting
e. Electronics Technology
f. Fire Science Technology
g. Industrial Systems
h. Industrial Systems Technology
i. Machine Tool Technology/
Advanced Machine Tool Technology
j. Printing/Graphics Technology
The required general education component of the AAS degree at Gainesville College consists of not less than 20 semester credit hours exclusive of Physical Education hours. Some
programs may require more than 20 semester credit hours at Gainesville College. Coursework
from Lanier Technical College will be transferred upon completion of the Technical College
component. There must be a total of at least 60 semester credit hours, excluding Physical
Education,for the AAS degree. Elective credit hours to complete the 60 semester hour requirement may be taken at either institution.
• The student must satisfy admissions requirements at both institutions.
• Each institution will evaluate each applicant and accept or reject the applicant based on
its established admission policies.
• Any CPC deficiencies will be waived for students who transfer a completed program for
their vocational/technical area of specialization from Lanier Technical College
to Gainesville College.
• Students will have three options for pursuit of the cooperative degree:
1. Take the Gainesville College component first, or
2. Take the Technical College component first, or
3. Take both institutional components simultaneously.
• Student financial aid will be administered by the institution from which the student is
taking courses. If the student elects to take courses from both institutions
simultaneously, the student will choose which institution administers the financial aid.
• Transcripts of completed credits will be exchanged by both institutions upon receiving a
written request from the student.
• The student must submit an application for graduation to the Gainesville College
Registrar’s Office.
• All diploma requirements must be satisfied at Lanier Technical College before
an Associate of Applied Science degree will be awarded.
176
Course
Description
177
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ACC 101 - PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the basic concepts of the complete accounting cycle and provides the student with
the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a sole proprietorship. Topics include:
accounting vocabulary and concepts, the accounting cycle and accounting for a personal
service business, the accounting cycle and accounting for a merchandising enterprise, and
cash control. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class. Prerequisites:
Program admission. Corequisites: None.
ACC 102 - PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Applies the basic principles of accounting to specific account classifications and subsidiary
record accounting. Topics include: receivables, inventory, plant assets, payroll, payables, partnerships, and sales tax returns. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class.
Prerequisites: ACC 101. Corequisites: None.
ACC 103 - PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING III
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Emphasizes a fundamental understanding of corporate and cost accounting. Topics include:
accounting for a corporation, statement of cash flows, cost accounting, budgeting and long
term liabilities. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class. Prerequisites: ACC
102. Corequisites: ACC 102.
ACC 104 - COMPUTERIZED ACCOUNTING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes operation of computerized accounting systems from manual input forms. Topics
include: equipment use, general ledger, accounts receivable and payable, payroll, cash management, and financial reports. Laboratory work includes theoretical and technical application.
Prerequisites: ACC 102, SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
ACC 106 - ACCOUNTING SPREADSHEET FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the use of electronic spreadsheet software packages for program-related spreadsheet applications. Students become proficient in creation, modification, and combination of spreadsheet. Topics include: spreadsheet creation, data entry, data entry modification, computation using functions, and program-related spreadsheet applications.
Laboratory work includes theoretical and technical application. Prerequisites: SCT 100.
Corequisites: None.
ACC 107 - FULL-TIME ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides in-depth application and reinforcement of accounting and employability principles in
an actual job setting. Allows the student to become involved in intensive on-the-job accounting applications that require full-time concentration, practice, and follow-through. Topics
include: appropriate work habits, acceptable job performance, application of accounting
knowledge and skills, interpersonal relations, and progressive productivity. The full-time
accounting internship is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans,
written performance evaluation, weekly documentation or seminars and/or other projects as
required by the instructor. Prerequisites: All non-elective courses required for program comp.
Corequisites: All non-elective courses required for program completion.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ACC 108 - HALF-TIME ACCOUNTING INTERNSHIP
(6 credit/18 contact hours)
Introduces the application and reinforcement of accounting and employability principles in an
actual job setting. Acquaints the student with realistic work situations and provides insights
into accounting applications on the job. Topics include: appropriate work habits, acceptable
job performance, application of accounting knowledge and skills, interpersonal relations, and
development of productivity. The half-time accounting internship is implemented through the
use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and weekly documentation or seminars and/or other projects as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: All
non-elective courses required for program completion. Corequisites: All non-elective courses
required for program completion.
ACC 150 - COST ACCOUNTING
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Emphasizes a thorough understanding of cost concepts, cost behavior, and cost accounting
techniques as they are applied to manufacturing cost systems. Topics include job order cost
accounting, process cost accounting, and standard cost accounting. Prerequisites: ACC 103.
Corequisites: None.
ACC 151 - INDIVIDUAL TAX ACCOUNTING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction for preparation of both state and federal income tax. Topics include: taxable income, income adjustments, schedules, standard deductions, itemized deductions,
exemptions, tax credits, and tax calculations. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
ACC 152 - PAYROLL ACCOUNTING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an understanding of the laws that affect a company's payroll structure and practical
application skills in maintaining payroll records. Topics include: payroll tax laws, payroll tax
forms, payroll and personnel records, computing wages and salaries, taxes affecting employees and employers, and analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions. Prerequisites: ACC
101. Corequisites: ACC 101.
ACC 154 - PERSONAL FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces practical application of concepts and techniques used to manage personal finance.
Topics include: cash management, time value of money, credit, major purchasing decisions,
insurance, investments, retirement, and estate planning. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites:
None.
ACC 155 - LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces law and its relationship to business. Topics include: legal ethics, legal processes,
business contracts, business torts and crimes, real and personal property, agency and
employment, risk-bearing devices, and Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
ACC 156 - BUSINESS TAX ACCOUNTING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction for preparation of both state and federal partnership, corporation and
other business tax returns. Topics include: organization form, overview of taxation of partnership, special partnership issues, corporate tax elections, adjustments to income and expenses, tax elections, forms and schedules, tax credits, reconciliation of book and tax income, tax
179
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
depreciation methods, and tax calculations. Prerequisites: ACC 101, ACC 151. Corequisites:
None.
ACC 157 - INTEGRATED ACCOUNTING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Emphasizes use of database management packages, electronic spreadsheet packages, and
accounting software packages for accounting/financial applications with more advanced systems. Topics include: creation and management of database applications, creation and management of spreadsheet applications, and creation and management of accounting integrated software systems. Prerequisites: ACC 106, ACC 103, ACC 104, SCT 100.
Corequisites: None.
ACC 158 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Emphasizes the interpretation of data by management in planning and controlling business
activities. Topics include: budgeting, capital investment decisions, price level and foreign
exchange, analysis of financial statements, and internal reporting. Prerequisites: ACC 103.
Corequisites: None.
ACC 159 - ACCOUNTING SIMULATION
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Develops skills for the potential accountant to effectively prepare financial statements for presentations and income tax returns. Emphasis is placed on providing students with opportunities for application and demonstration of skills associated with automated accounting. Topics
include: financial statement preparation, accounting system installation, automated accounting work sheet preparation, automated accounting income tax return preparation, and job
search planning. Prerequisites: ACC 104, ACC 106, SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
ACC 160 - ADVANCED ACCOUNTING SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Provide the fundamental, intermediate and advanced Microsoft Excel competencies to provide user with the skills necessary to obtain the expert user certification. Topics include
spreadsheet creation, financial statements, forecast, amortization schedules, workgroup editing and advanced features such as macros, using charts, importing and exporting data, HTML
creation, formulas, Web queries, built-in function, templates, and trends and relationships.
Prerequisites: ACC 106, BUS 202. Corequisites: None.
ACC 165 - CAPSTONE REVIEW COURSE OF ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Guides the student in dealing with ethics, internal control, fraud and financial statement analysis in the accounting environment which will require students to confront and resolve accounting problems by integrating and applying skills and techniques acquired from previous courses. Will prepare students in developing a personal code of ethics by exploring ethical dilemmas and pressures they will face as accountants. Will help the student understand financial
statement analysis and the relation to fraud, and fraud detection. Will prepare the student for
the ACAT Comprehensive Examination for Accreditation in Accountancy. Prerequisites: ACC
101, ACC 102, ACC 103, ACC 150, ACC 152, ACC 156 or 2 year Associate degree in
Accounting. Corequisites: None.
ACR 100 - SAFETY
(1 credit/1 contact hours)
Provides instruction in procedures and practices necessary for safe operation of automotive
collision repair facilities. Topics include: work facility safety, work facility cleanliness, safety
180
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
devices, fire prevention and safety, and environmental safety. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
ACR 101 - AUTO COMPONENTS IDENTIFICATION
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces the structural configuration and identification of the structural members of various
automotive unibodies and frames. Topics include: unibody construction, frame types, stub
frame types, body panels, and mechanical components. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission/ACR 100. Corequisites: None.
ACR 102 - EQUIPMENT AND HAND TOOLS IDENTIFICATION
(1 credit/2 contact hours)
Introduces equipment and hand tools used in automotive collision repair. Topics include: safety procedures, hand tools identification, power hand tools identification, air supply systems,
and hydraulic systems. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission, ACR 100. Corequisites: None.
ACR 104 - MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
(2 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces various mechanical and electrical systems requiring repair of damages incurred
through automobile collisions. Topics include: engine accessory systems, emission control
systems, air conditioning systems, braking systems, steering column damage, engine removal
and replacement sequence, lighting systems, engine wiring, power accessories systems, and
restraint systems. Prerequisites: Program Admission, ACR 100, ACR 101, ACR 102.
Corequisites: None.
ACR 105 - BODY FIBERGLASS PLASTIC AND RUBBER
REPAIR TECHNIQUES
(3 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides instruction in non-metallic auto body repair techniques. Topics include: cracked or
splintered area repair, bonding agent usage, fiberglass and plastic body parts removal and
replacement procedure, partial fiberglass header panel replacement procedure, plastics identification, plastic and rubber welding techniques, and Sheet Molded Compound (SMC) repairs.
Prerequisites: Program Admission/ ACR 100, ACR 101, ACR 102. Corequisites: None.
ACR 106 - WELDING AND CUTTING
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces welding and cutting procedures used in auto collision repair. Emphasis will be
placed on MIG welding techniques. Topics include: MIG welding, oxyfuel welding, metal cutting techniques, resistance welding, unibody welding techniques, weld removal techniques,
and safety procedures, and plasma arc cutting. Prerequisites: ACR 100, ACR 107.
Corequisites: None.
ACR 107 - TRIM ACCESSORIES AND GLASS
(2 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides instruction in removal and replacement methods of a variety of nonstructural cosmetic and safety features of the automobile. Topics include: interior and exterior trim, mirrors,
weather stripping, stationary and non-stationary glass, interior components, fasteners, and
safety procedures. Prerequisites: ACR 100. Corequisites: None.
ACR 109 - DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces procedures and resources used in the identification and assessment of automotive
collisions damages. Topics include: assessment plan determination, damage analysis, colli181
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
sion estimation, service manual use, and computerized estimation. Prerequisites: Program
Admission/ ACR 101, ACR 102, ACR 106, ACR . Corequisites: ENG 101.
ACR 110 - MINOR COLLISION REPAIR
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces the materials and operations required to repair minor collision damage. Topics
include: pick, file, and finish procedures; body repair materials identification; body fillers
usage; disc grinder procedures; safety procedures, and stud welders. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission, ACR 100. Corequisites: None.
ACR 120 - CONVENTIONAL FRAME REPAIR
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes the diagnosis, straightening, measurement, and alignment of conventional automobile and truck frames. Topics include: alignment measurement systems; damage diagnosis; equipment types and usage; frame straightening, repair, and alignment; safety precautions, and computerized damage diagnosis. Prerequisites: ACR 109, SCT 100. Corequisites:
None.
ACR 121 - UNIBODY IDENTIFICATION AND DAMAGE ANALYSIS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the diagnosis, straightening, measurement, and alignment of conventional automobile and truck frames. Topics include: alignment measurement systems; damage diagnosis; equipment types and usage; frame straightening, repair, and alignment; safety precautions, and computerized damage diagnosis. Prerequisites: ACR 109, ACR 100. Corequisites:
None.
ACR 122 - UNIBODY MEASURING AND FIXING SYSTEMS
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in a variety of alignment measuring and fixturing systems. Topics include:
universal mechanical measuring system, universal laser measuring system, dedicated fixture
system, upper body panel measurement, and English/metric tape alignment measurement.
Prerequisites: ACR 121. Corequisites: None.
ACR 123 - UNIBODY STRAIGHTENING SYS TECH
(4 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces unibody straightening systems and techniques used in automotive collision repair.
Topics include: equipment types and usage, safety procedures, primary/rough and secondary
damage pull, single pull correction, multiple pull correction, and impact or pull stress relief.
Prerequisites: ACR 122, ACR 127. Corequisites: None.
ACR 124 - WELDING TECHNIQUES
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in specific welding applications in automotive collision repair. Topics
include: MIG welder panel welding, plug weld collision repair, butt weld collision repair, lap
weld collision repair, safety procedures, resistance welding, aluminum MIG welding, and aluminum TIG welding. Prerequisites: ACR 122. Corequisites: None.
ACR 125 - UNIBODY STRUCTURAL PANEL REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides instruction in attachment methods, proper repair and replacement of structural panels, dimensional control, areas of high stress concentration, sectional principles, and crush
zones. Selection and preparation of recycled parts will be emphasized. Topics include: primary
structure, rear cross member, apron and rails, trans X member, rocker, w/s posts, hinge pillar,
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
center pillar, floor pan, spot weld removal, panel sectional cuts, and damaged panel removal
and replacement. Prerequisites: ACR 122, ACR 124. Corequisites: None.
ACR 126 - CONVENTIONAL BODY STRUCTURAL PANEL REPAIR
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces conventional body structural panel repair. A variety of removal and replacement
techniques is emphasized. Topics include: partial or complete quarter panel removal and
replacement, rocker panel removal and replacement, and center pillar post removal and
replacement. Prerequisites: ACR 120. Corequisites: None.
ACR 127 - UNIBODY SYSPENSION AND STEERING SYSTEMS
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in unibody suspension and steering system damage analysis and repair.
Topics include: parallelogram suspension parts removal and replacement, rack and pinion
steering system removal and replacement, damage analysis, quick check system damage
determination, front end suspension equipment usage, and safety procedures. Prerequisites:
ACR 122. Corequisites: None.
ACR 128 - BOLT-ON BODY PANEL REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the removal and replacement of bolt-on automobile body panels. Topics
include: hood, deck panels, and header panels removal and replacement; fender removal and
installation/coining; door removal and installation; headlamp and filler panels removal and
replacement; grill removal and replacement; and headlamp adjustment. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ACR 129 - MAJOR COLLISION REPAIR INTERNSHIP/PRACTICUM
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides occupation-based learning opportunities for students pursuing the Major Collision
Repair specialization. Students will be mentored by qualified professional technicians as they
experience working in the Automotive Collision Repair profession in an industry standard commercial repair facility or industry standard simulated on-campus facility. Topics include: conventional frame repair, unibody damage identification and analysis, unibody measuring and
fixturing systems, unibody straightening systems and techniques, unibody welding techniques, unibody structural panel repair and replacement, conventional body structural panel
repair, unibody suspension and steering systems, and bolt-on body panel removal and
replacement. Prerequisites: Completion of all required courses. Corequisites: None.
ACR 130 - SANDING, PRIMING, AND PAINTING PREPARATION
(5 credit/9 contact hours)
Introduces the materials and procedures involved in preparing automobile bodies for refinishing. Topics include: featheredging; masking procedures; safety procedures; surface preparation; corrosion preventative application; primers, sealers, and primer surfacer applications;
and spraygun operation and maintenance. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission, ACR 100.
Corequisites: None.
ACR 132 - SPECIAL REFINISHING APPLICATION
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the equipment, material, and techniques used in the application of special paints. Emphasis will be placed on automotive refinishing procedures. Topics include:
safety; paint identification; base metals preparation and priming; equipment use and maintenance; color application; original finish sealing; panel and spot repair and blending; thinners,
reducers, and additives; and fiberglass, plastics, and rubber refinishing. Prerequisites: ACR
109, ACR 136. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ACR 134 - URETHANE ENAMELS REFINISHING APPLICATION
(6 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the equipment, material, and techniques used in the application of urethane enamels paint. Emphasis will be placed on automotive refinishing procedures. Topics
include: safety; paint identification; base metals preparation and priming; equipment use and
maintenance; base coat/clear coat application; color application of solid and metallic finishes;
original finish sealing; panel and spot repair and blending; thinners, reducers, and additives;
and tri-coat finishing. Prerequisites: ACR 109. Corequisites: ACR 136.
ACR 135 - TINT AND MATCH COLORS
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces methods and techniques used in the process of color matching and production.
Topics include: tinting methods, gun techniques, variables adjustments, color flip-flop determination and correction, and reduction procedures. Prerequisites: ACR 131, ACR 132, ACR
133, or ACR 134. Corequisites: None.
ACR 136 - DETAILING
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the methods and techniques used in detailing a refinished automotive surface.
Topics include: finish analysis, color sanding, polishes and glazes, cleaning vehicle, and decal
and stripes. Prerequisites: ACR 134. Corequisites: None.
ACR 137 - PAINT AND REFINISHING INTERNSHIP
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides occupation-based learning opportunities for students pursuing the Paint and
Refinishing specialization. Students will be mentored by qualified professional technicians as
they experience working in the Automotive Collision Repair profession in an industry standard
commercial repair facility or industry standard simulated on-campus facility. Topics include:
sanding, priming, and paint preparation; special refinishing applications; urethane enamels;
tint and match colors; detailing; and employability skills. Prerequisites: Completion of all
required courses in Paint and Refinish specialization. Corequisites: None.
ACT 100 - REFRIGERATION FUNDAMENTALS
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces basic concepts and theories of refrigeration. Topics include: the laws of thermodynamics, pressure and temperature relationships, heat transfer, refrigerant identification, the
refrigeration cycle, and safety. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ACT 101 - PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF REFRIGERATION
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the use of refrigeration tools, materials, and procedures needed to install, repair,
and service refrigeration systems. Topics include: refrigeration tools; piping practices; service
valves; leak testing; refrigerant recovery, recycling, and reclamation; evacuation; charging;
and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 100. Corequisites: None.
ACT 102 - REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS COMPONENTS
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides the student with the skills and knowledge to install, test, and service major components of a refrigeration system. Topics include: compressors, condensers, evaporators, metering devices, service procedures, refrigeration systems, and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 100,
ACT 101. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ACT 103 - ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduction to fundamental electrical concepts and theories as applied to the air conditioning
industry. Topics include: AC and DC theory, electric meters, electric diagrams, distribution systems, electrical panels, voltage circuits, code requirements, and safety. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ACT 104 - ELECTRICAL MOTORS
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Continues the development of skills and knowledge necessary for application and service of
electric motors commonly used by the refrigeration and air conditioning industry. Topics
include: diagnostic techniques, capacitors, installation procedures, and types of electric
motors, electric motor service, and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 103. Corequisites: None.
ACT 105 - ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
(5 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides instruction in identifying, installing, and testing commonly used electrical components in an air conditioning system. Topics include: pressure switches, overload devices,
transformers, magnetic starters, other commonly used controls, diagnostic techniques, installation procedures, and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 103. Corequisites: None.
ACT 106 - ELECTRIC CONTROL SYSTEMS AND INSTALLATION
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides instruction on wiring various types of air conditioning systems. Topics include: servicing procedures, solid-state controls, system wiring, control circuits, and safety. Prerequisites:
ACT 105. Corequisites: None.
ACT 107 - AIR CONDITIONING PRINCIPLES
(8 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental theory and techniques needed to identify major components and
functions of air conditioning systems. Instruction is given on types of air conditioning systems
and use of instrumentation. Topics include: types of AC systems, heat-load calculation, properties of air, psychrometrics, duct design, air filtration, and safety principles Prerequisites: ACT
102. Corequisites: None.
ACT 108 - AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS AND INSTALLATION
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction on the installation and service of residential air conditioning systems.
Topics include: installation procedures, service, split-systems, add-on systems, packaged systems, and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 102, ACT 106. Corequisites: None.
ACT 109 - TROUBLESHOOTING AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction on troubleshooting and repair of major components of a residential air
conditioning system. Topics include: troubleshooting techniques, electrical controls, airflow,
refrigeration cycle, and safety. Prerequisites: ACT 108, ENG 100. Corequisites: None.
ACT 110 - GAS HEATING SYSTEMS
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces principles of combustion and service requirements for gas heating systems. Topics
include: service procedures, electrical controls, piping, gas valves, venting, code requirements, principles of combustion, and safety.Prerequisites: ACT 102, ACT 106, MAT 101.
Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ACT 111 - HEAT PUMPS AND RELATED SYSTEMS
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction on the principles, application, and operation of a residential heat pump
system. Topics include: installation procedures, servicing procedures, electrical components,
geothermal ground source energy supplies, dual fuel, troubleshooting, valves, and safety.
Prerequisites: ACT 102, ACT 106. Corequisites: None.
AHS 101 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on basic normal structure and function of the human body. Topics include: medical
terms describing the human body and structure and function of the human body.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
AHS 102 - DRUG CALCULATION AND ADMINISTRATION
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Uses basic mathematical concepts and includes basic drug administration. Emphasizes critical thinking skills. Topics include: systems of measurement, calculating drug problems,
resource materials usage, basic pharmacology, administering medications in a simulated clinical environment, principles of IV therapy techniques, and client education. Prerequisites: MAT
101. Corequisites: None.
AHS 103 - NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
A study of the nutritional needs of the individual. Topics include: nutrients, standard and modified diets, nutrition throughout the lifespan, and client education. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: Program Admission.
AHS 104 - INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore
various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: basic life support/CPR, basic
emergency care/first aid and triage, vital signs, infection control, and blood/air-borne
pathogens. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: Provisional Admission.
AHS 105 - BASIC INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces chemical concept principles, laws, and techniques applicable to the medical laboratory. Topics include: laboratory safety, fundamental principles of chemistry, weight and
measures, solutions, and basic laws of chemistry. Prerequisites: MAT 101. Corequisites:
None.
AHS 109 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity
with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins
(roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, terminology related
to the human anatomy, reading medical orders and reports, and terminology specific to the
student's field of study. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 103 - MANUFACTURING PROCESS SURVEY
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Familiarizes students with the production processes a flexible manufacturing system may per
form. Topics include: modern manufacturing concepts; product manufacturing stages; manu
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
facturing specifications and quality control; industrial materials; materials testing; casting and
molding processes; materials cutting, removal and forming processes; welding and jointing
processes; and parts assembly. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 104 - INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FOR
FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops basic microcomputer skills for solving engineering technology and production problems found in flexible manufacturing system environments. Topics include: computer programming, computer hardware and software, BASIC or other structured language programming, and computer operating systems. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites:
None.
AMF 106 - INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Explores basic robotic concepts. Studies robots in typical application environments. Topics
include: robot history and fundamentals, robot classification, power sources, robot applications in the workplace, robot control techniques, path control, end of arm tooling, robot operation and robot controllers, controller architecture in a system, robotic language programming,
and human interface issues. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites:
None.
AMF 107 - MACHINE TOOL NUMERICAL CONTROL THERORY AND
PRACTICE
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides an overview of machine tool technology. Topics include: benchwork operations, CNC
fundamentals, CNC mill programming and operation, and CNC lathe programming and operation. Prerequisites: Program Admission, AMF 103. Corequisites: None.
AMF 108 - APPLIED HYDRAULICS, PNEUMATICS AND MECHANISMS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes mechanical techniques for maintaining, troubleshooting, installing, and repairing
drives, conveyor systems, and valves. Topics include: gas laws; pressure and force calculations; hydraulic systems vs pneumatic systems; cylinders, pressure controls, and system controls; hydraulic and pneumatic symbology; hydraulic and pneumatic system layout; interfacing
hydraulic or pneumatic systems with other systems; applied mechanisms; belt, chain, and
gear drives; drive train components; valves; and conveyor systems. Prerequisites: PSC 150
(diploma) or PHY 191 (degree). Corequisites: None.
AMF 109 - ANALOG CIRCUITS
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Studies linear integrated circuits. Topics include: linear I.C. devices, differential amplifiers, I.C.
operational amplifiers, active filter fundamentals, I.C. timers, special linear I.C. devices/circuits, power supply regulation, single supply circuits, solid state control devices/circuits,
switches and relays, transducers, final control elements and servo amplifiers, servo-mechanisms, interfacing and signal conditioning, digital to analog conversion, analog to digital conversion, D/A and A/D convertors with microprocessors, and industrial timing. Prerequisites:
AMF 110. Corequisites: None.
AMF 110 - INTRODUCTION TO ACTIVE DEVICES AND CIRCUITS
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Explores active device basic principles, including low frequency applications and troubleshooting. Topics include: semiconductor fundamentals, diode applications, BJT character187
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
istics, bipolar transistor circuits, and unipolar devices. Prerequisites: IFC 102, ENG 101
(diploma) or ENG 191 (degree). Corequisites: None.
AMF 111 - INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL LOGIC
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Explores digital electronic system mathematics and circuits. Focuses on binary arithmetic,
Boolean algebra, and electronic logic circuitry. Topics include: digital systems, number systems, logic gates and truth tables, logic simplification, flip-flops, counters, shift registers, conversion circuits, display devices, switching and digital signals, multivibrator troubleshooting,
digital arithmetic circuits, logic families and specifications, A/D and D/A conversions, and computer and microprocessor concepts. Prerequisites: IFC 102. Corequisites: None.
AMF 113 - PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLERS I
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Studies basic programmable controller application skills and techniques as well as programmable controllers in typical environs and as an element of a complex manufacturing cell.
Topics include: CRT hardware; power-up and initialization; CRT capabilities and mode selection; rack addressing; basic ladder programming; ladder editing and display; time scan, data
entry, monitoring, forcing, and cross referencing using the CRT as a terminal; and printer operation and printout routines. Prerequisites: IFC 102. Corequisites: None.
AMF 115 - MANUFACTURING CONTROL AND WORK CELL
INTERFACING
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Studies open and closed loop controls and cell level interfacing. Emphasizes human factors
related to automated systems. Topics include: process control; sensors and interfacing; fluid
pressure and level measurement; fluid flow instrument; instruments for temperature measurement; instruments for mechanical measurement; pneumatic controls; cell level interfacing;
automatic control systems application; and human interface issues of operator training,
acceptance, and safety. Prerequisites: AMF 110; PSC 150 (diploma) OR PHY 191 (degree).
Corequisites: None.
AMF 152 - INTRODUCTION TO MANUFACTURING
(2 credit/24 contact hours)
This course provided learners with an overview of the functional and structural composition of
organizations. Topics include supply and demand, product flow, types of manufacturing
process, structure of manufacturing organizations, manufacturing business principles,
employee impact on the bottom line and work place ethics. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 154 - MANUFACTURING WORK FORCE SKILLS
(2 credit/24 contact hours)
This course provides the personal and interpersonal effectiveness skills required to succeed
in the manufacturing environment. Topics include listening, communication, team skills, personal wellness, managing change and creating a positive attitude. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 155 - MEASURING LOCATION AND DEFINING SHAPES
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Provide experience in measuring location and defining shapes. Topics include: measuring
hole locations, introducing parallelism tolerances, perpendicular tolerances, introduction to
dial indicators, measurement with dial indicators, full indicator movement measurement, introducing straightness tolerances, introducing circularity tolerances, and introducing cylindrical
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tolerances. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 156 - MANUFACTURING PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS
(2 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with the knowledge and skills associated with quality and productivity in the
manufacturing environment. Problem solving and statistical process control are emphasized
in this section. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 158 - AUTOMATED MANUFACTURING SKILLS
(3 credit/32 contact hours)
Provides students with more in-depth knowledge of skills used in manufacturing environments. Students also are introduced to computerized process control and the operational
requirements associated with automated machines in the manufacturing environment.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 160 - REPRESENTATIVE MANUFACTURING SKILLS
(6 credit/60 contact hours)
Provides students with an introduction to representative manufacturing skills and associated
safety requirements. Subjects include fractions, metric measurement system, measurement
systems and safety for individual trucks. The student also combines all of the skills studied
and as a team participates in a manufacturing simulation. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
AMF 204 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROPROCESSOR-BASED SYSTEMS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Explores up-to-date interfacing concepts and standard peripheral device operation/interfacing
with a microcomputer. Topics include: communications codes and number systems, fundamental microprocessor and system architecture, microprocessor digital concepts,
software/hardware interaction, microprocessor interfacing techniques, machine language programming, and comparative microprocessor architecture. Prerequisites: AMF 111.
Corequisites: None.
AMF 206 - WORK CELL DESIGN LABORATORY
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Allows students to work in instructor-supervised teams, assembling and operating an automated production system's cell. Students will select equipment, write specifications, design
fixtures and interconnects, integrate systems/provide interfaces, and operate the assigned
system. Topics include: work cell requirement analysis, work cell specifications, work cell
assembly, work cell programming, work cell debugging/troubleshooting, and prototype or
demonstration work cell operation. Prerequisites: AMF 115. Corequisites: None.
AMF 207 - FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS I
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Reviews flexible system electrical, electronic, and mechanical principles. Provides opportunities to plan and prepare for constructing and operating an actual flexible automated system.
Topics include: electrical, electronic, and mechanical systems; and flexible manufacturing system planning and preparation. Prerequisites: AMF 115. Corequisites: None.
AMF 208 - FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS II
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Continues studying flexible manufacturing systems. Students will employ planning documentation skills developed in AMF 207 to install an automated system, produce a first run product,
and operate the system. Topics include: system installation to produce a first run product and
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
automated system operation. Prerequisites: AMF 207. Corequisites: AMF 209.
AMF 209 - FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS PROJECT
(2 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides an opportunity for students to use the flexible characteristics of the automated system developed in AMF 208. Emphasizes changing the function or product produced by the
automated system to adapt the automated system to function as a flexible system. Topics
include: adaptation of automated systems for flexible manufacturing. Prerequisites: AMF 207.
Corequisites: AMF 208.
BAF 100 - INTRODUCTION TO BANKING AND FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the history, documents, and operational functions of the banking
industry. Topics include: history, documents, operations, specialized services and electronic
banking. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BAF 113 - MONEY AND BANKING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the relevance of monetary instruments, intermediaries, and the central banks as
they impact local, state, national, and international economics. Topics include: history and
evolution of financial institutions; monetary instruments and flow; and central banking, operation, and policies. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BAF 114 - BANKING BUSINESS AND INFO SYSTEM
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes basic calculator, teller terminal, proof machine, and financial computer use.
Topics include: introduction to types of equipment, calculators, teller machines, proof
machines, and financial computers. Prerequisites: MAT 111. Corequisites: None.
BAF 115 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND COUNSELING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides knowledge and applications in the management of personal and consumer finance.
Topics include: record keeping, budgeting, credit principles, investment principles, and forecasting. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BAF 132 - BANKING AND FINANCE INTERNSHIP
(5 credit/15 contact hours)
Introduces the application and reinforcement of banking and finance and employability principles in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into
banking and finance applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to
the job set- ting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of banking and finance techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented
through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation,
required weekly seminar, and required practicum or on-the-job training. Prerequisites: BAF
100, ENG 111, Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BAF 133 - BANKING AND FINANCE OCCUPATIONAL BASED
INTERNSHIP II
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on the application and reinforcement of banking and finance and employability principles in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into
banking and finance applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of banking and finance techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented
through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation,
required weekly seminar, and required practicum or on-the-job training. Prerequisites: BAF
132. Corequisites: None.
BAF 151 - INTRODUCTION TO THE BANKING ENVIROMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the banking industry and to the various types of financial institutions. Topics include: customer service, security procedures, organizational structure, counting money, use of an electronic calculator and types of accounts. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
BAF 152 - BANK TELLER FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on the various types of financial transactions. Emphasis is placed on recognizing forgery, counterfeits and other types of fraud. Topics include: managing a cash drawer, balancing and electronic banking services. Students are required to visit several types of financial
institutions for the purpose of observing the role of the teller in financial institutions.
Prerequisites: BAF 151. Corequisites: None.
BAF 153 - BANKING REGULATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the study of financial transactions and provides information on federal and state
regulations. Students are required to visit several types of financial institutions for the purpose
of documenting how bank employees remain current on new regulations and changes in regulations. Prerequisites: BAF 152. Corequisites: None.
BAF 200 - FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to financial markets, institutions and management in contemporary
society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the financial markets in which
funds are traded, the financial institutions participating in facilitating the trade of such funds
and the financial principles and concepts behind sound financial management. Topics include:
financial systems of the United States, business finance management and financing other
sectors of the economy. Prerequisites: ACC 101. Corequisites: None.
BAF 205 - REAL ESTATE FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the relevance of land value, legal titles, legal descriptions, types of real estate
finance, the leverage of real estate, the bank funding requirement, mortgage amortizations,
financial theory and real estate markets. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites:
None.
BAF 210 - CONTEMPORARY BANK MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the relevance of banks and the economy, bank regulations and policy, bank organizational structure, bank management, the financial institutions' environment, bank deregulation and asset/liability management. Prerequisites: BAF 100. Corequisites: None.
BAF 215 - WEB-BASED BANKING AND FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the origins of virtual banking, the new Web-O-Nomics (a concentra191
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
tion economy), converging technologies, digital value chains and hands-on Web Bank and
Financial Services account set-up. Topics include: amorphing of Financial Services, student
Web site assignments/navigation, networking, icons, gateways, I.S.P.N.s, Internet bandwidth
consideration, R.A.M., R.O.M. and N.V.I. memories, making recurring Web payments, Web
new account set-up, Web brokering, Web bank regulations, bank security, technology
resources, data warehouses, digital currency, rich information exchange, b-web partnering,
universal standards, TCP/IP protocol, H.T.M.L. and Java network significances, performance
and fidelity, S.S.L. encrypting, adding new functionality to financial services, accounting software review and multiple case studies. Prerequisites: BAF , SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
BIO 191 - BIOLOGY I
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts. Topics include: classification of plants
and animals, cell theory, cell structure, plant and animal tissues and organs, nutritional
requirements of plants and animals, energy metabolism, and use of basic biology laboratory
techniques and equipment. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BIO 193 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes.
Topics include: body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, the
integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the respiratory system, the
digestive system, and the urinary system. Laboratory experience supports classroom learning. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
BIO 194 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include: the
reproductive system, the cardiovascular system, the blood and lymphatic systems, the nervous and sensory systems, the endocrine system, and the immune system. Laboratory experience supports classroom learning. Prerequisites: BIO 193. Corequisites: None.
BIO 197 - INTRODUCTORY MICROBIOLOGY
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious diseases. Topics include: characterization, classification, and description of microorganisms; use
of compound microscope; morphology and fine structure of bacteria; gram positive and gram
negative bacteria; reproduction and growth of bacteria; viral diseases; host-parasite relationship; host defense mechanisms; epidemiology; antimicrobial and chemotherapeutic agents;
control of microorganisms; and laboratory safety. Prerequisites: BIO 193. Corequisites:
None.
BUS 101 - BEGINNING DOCUMENT PROCESSIING
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the touch system of keyboarding placing emphasis on correct techniques, mastery
of the keyboard, and basic business documents. Students attain a minimum typing speed of
25 words per minute with a maximum of 3 errors on a 3 minute timed keyboarding test. Topics
include: learning the keyboard, building speed and accuracy, formatting basic business documents, language arts, and proofreading. Laboratory practice parallels class instruction.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
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BUS 102 - INTERMEDIATE DOCUMENT PROCESSING
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues the development of keyboarding speed and accuracy with further mastery of correct keyboarding techniques. Students attain a minimum typing speed of 40 words per minute
with a maximum of 5 errors on a 5 minute timed keyboarding test. Topics include: building
speed and accuracy, formatting and producing business documents, language arts, and proofreading. Laboratory practice parallels class instruction. Prerequisites: BUS 101. Corequisites:
None.
BUS 103 - ADVANCED DOCUMENT PROCESSING
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues the development of keyboarding speed and accuracy with mastery of complex document production. Students attain a minimum typing speed of 50 words per minute with a
maximum of 5 errors on a 5 minute timed keyboarding test. Topics include: building speed and
accuracy, integrated projects/applications, decision making, language arts, and proofreading.
Laboratory practice parallels class instruction. Prerequisites: BUS 102, ENG 111.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 105 - DATABASE FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes use of database management software packages to access, manipulate, and
create file data. Topics include: data entry, data access, data manipulation, database creation,
and file documentation. Prerequisites: Program Admission, SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
BUS 106 - OFFICE PROCEDURES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes essential skills required for the business office. Topics include: office protocol,
time management, telecommunications and telephone techniques, office equipment, office
mail, references, records management, and travel and meeting arrangements. Prerequisites:
Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
BUS 107 - MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes transcribing mailable documents from dictation using word processing software.
Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area management,
transcription techniques, productivity and accuracy, proofreading, and language arts skills.
Prerequisites: BUS 102, ENG 111, SCT 100. Corequisites: BUS 101.
BUS 108 - WORD PROCESSING
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Emphasizes an intensive use of word processing software to create and revise business documents. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area management, word processing software, and productivity. Prerequisites: SCT 100 and/or BUS
101. Corequisites: None.
BUS 109 - APPLIED OFFICE PROCEDURES
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Serves as a capstone course which provides students with the opportunity to apply skills
acquired in other coursework. Topics include: applied word/information processing skills,
applied communications skills, applied telecommunications skills, applied records management skills, public relations skills, use of office equipment, and procurement of office equipment/supplies. Prerequisites: Must be in last quarter; may take concurrently with last quarter
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coursework. Corequisites: None.
BUS 158 - LEGAL TERMINOLOGY
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the elements of legal terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with
legal words that apply to the court system, contracts, family law, real estate, litigation,
wills/probate, bankruptcy, and general legal terms. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 160 - ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Serves as a capstone course which provides students with the opportunity to acquire skills
using electronic communications. Topics include: electronic mail, the Internet, Worldwide
Web, Gopher servers, and graphic presentation software. Prerequisites: BUS 101, SCT 101.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 201 - ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced word processing. Topics include: advanced word processing
concepts and applications, and proofreading. Prerequisites: BUS 108, ENG 111. Corequisites:
None.
BUS 202 - SPREAD SHEET FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the use of electronic spreadsheet software in business applications.
Students become proficient in creating and modifying spreadsheets in a business environment and in printing files that meet business standards. Topics include: spreadsheet creation,
data entry, entry modification, and computation using functions, charts and graphs, and printing. Prerequisites: Program Admission, MAT 111, SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
BUS 203 - OFFICE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provide students with an overview of management concepts, styles, and skills. Topics include:
Management styles, leadership traits, ergonomics/workflow, communication channels, business ethics, supervisory techniques, and job performance evaluation techniques.
Prerequisites: PSY 191, BUS 191. Corequisites: None.
BUS 204 - HALF-TIME BUSINESS OFFICE SPECALIST INTERNSHIP
(6 credit/18 contact hours)
Provides student work experience in a professional environment. Topics include: application
of classroom knowledge and skills, work environment functions, and listening/following directions. Students will be under the supervision of the Business and Office Technology program
faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required coursework. Corequisites: None.
BUS 208 - BUSINESS OFFICE ACCOUNTING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental concepts of accounting. Topics include: accounting equation, debits,
credits, journalizing, posting and proving ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and
payroll. Both manual and computerized concepts are taught. Prerequisites: MAT 111.
Corequisites: None.
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BUS 212 - ANATOMY AND TERMINOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the structure and function of the human body including medical terminology. Topics
include: body structures, body functions, and medical terminology. Prerequisites: BUS 211.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 213 - MEDICAL DOCUMENT PROCESSING TRANSCRIPTION
(5 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides experience in medical machine transcription working with the most frequently used
medical reports. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work area
management, spelling, definitions, punctuation, processing/transcription speed and accuracy,
resource utilization, and pronunciation. Prerequisites: BUS 102, BUS 211, ENG 111.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 214 - MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION II
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the development of speed and accuracy in the transcription of medical reports.
Topics include: equipment and supplies, maintenance and usage, work area management,
pronunciation, spelling, definitions, punctuations, typing speed and accuracy, and resource
utilization. Prerequisites: BUS 212, BUS 213. Corequisites: None.
BUS 215 - MEDICAL OFFICE SPECIALIST INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides student work experience in an off-campus medical environment. Topics include:
application of classroom knowledge and skills, work environment functions, and listening/following directions. Students will be under the supervision of the Business and Office
Technology program faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience
arrangements. Prerequisites: Must be in last quarter; may take concurrently with last quarter
coursework. Corequisites: None.
BUS 216 - MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes essential skills required for the medical office. Topics include: medical law and
ethics, patient relations/human relations, medical records management, scheduling appointments, pegboard accounting, health insurance, and billing/collection. Prerequisites: BUS 102,
BUS 212. Corequisites: None.
BUS 217 - LEGAL OFFICE PROCEDURES I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces office procedures practiced by the legal secretary. Topics include: legal terminology, preparation of legal documents and correspondence, ethics, and legal office procedures.
Specific topics covered include legal office duties, the courts and court documents, litigation,
criminals, wills, probate, real estate, corporations, family law, and noncourt documents.
Prerequisites: BUS 102, ENG 111, BUS 158. Corequisites: None.
BUS 218 - LEGAL OFFICE PROCEDURES II
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
A continuation of office procedures practiced by the legal secretary. Topics include: legal terminology, transcription, preparation of legal documents and correspondence, client and financial records maintenance, ethics, and legal office procedures. Specific topics covered include
legal office procedures, the courts and court documents, litigation, criminals, family law, wills,
probate, real estate, corporations, and noncourt documents. Prerequisites: BUS 102, ENG
111, BUS 158. Corequisites: None.
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BUS 224 - BUSINESS OFFICE SPECIALIST INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides student work experience in an off-campus business office. Topics include: application of classroom knowledge and skills, work environment functions, and listening/following
directions. Students will be under the supervision of the Business and Office Technology program faculty and/or persons designated to coordinate work experience arrangements.
Prerequisites: Must be in last quarter; may take concurrently with last quarter coursework.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 226 - MEDICAL OFFICE BILLING/CODING/INSURANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to medical coding skills and applications of international coding standards for billing of health care services. Provides the knowledge and skills to apply coding of
procedures for billing purposes. Provides an introduction to medical coding as it relates to
health insurance. Topics include: International classification of diseases, code book formats:
guidelines and conventions; coding techniques; formats of the ICD-9 and CPT manuals;
health insurance; billing and collections. Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 211, BUS 212, ENG
111. Corequisites: None.
BUS 227 - LEGAL DOCUMENT PROCESSING/TRANSCRIPTION
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides experience in legal machine transcription working with the most frequently used legal
reports. Topics include: equipment and supplies maintenance and usage, work station management, spelling, definitions, punctuation, processing/transcription speed and accuracy,
resource utilization,and pronunciation. Prerequisites: BUS 102, BUS 108, BUS 217, ENG 112.
Corequisites: None.
BUS 260 - ADVANCED ELECTRONIC SPREADSHEETS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a study of the advanced features of creating and modifying electronic spreadsheets.
Topics include integration with other applications, using templates, printing workbooks, working with named ranges, working with toolbars, using macros, auditing a worksheet, formatting
data, using analysis tools, and collaborating with workgroups. Prerequisites: ACC 106 or BUS
202. Corequisites: None.
BUS 261 - PRESENTATION FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a study of the fundamentals of creating and modifying a presentation. Topics include
creating a presentation, modifying a presentation, working with text, working with visual elements, customizing a presentation, creating output, delivering a presentation, and managing
files. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
BUS 262 - WEB PAGE DESIGN
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in Web page authoring and site management. Emphasizes the concepts
necessary for individuals to create and manage professional quality Web sites. Topics include:
Web Site Creation, Web Page Development and Design, Hyperlink Creation, Test, and Repair,
Integration, Web Site Navigation, and Web Site Management. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
BUS 263 - ELECTRONIC MAIL FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the fundamentals of communicating with others inside and outside the
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organization. Emphasizes the concepts necessary for individuals and workgroups to organize, find, view, and share information via electronic communication channels. Topics include:
Internal and External Communication, Message Management, Calendar Management,
Navigation, Contact Usage, Tasks Usage, Notes Usage, and Integration with other
Applications. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
CET 130 - COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN
(4 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental concepts, techniques, and terminology necessary for CAD applications. Topics include: terminology, CAD commands, basic entities, and basic CAD applications
with emphasis on public works drawing. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
CET 190 - CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental construction materials and their engineering
properties used in roadway and bridge construction. Topics include: aggregates,
asphalt materials, Portland cement, and iron and steel construction Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
CHM 191 - CHEMISTRY I
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include: measurement, atomic structure, chemical bonding, physical
states of matter, nomenclature, and stoichiometry. Prerequisites: Program Admission level
math achievement. Corequisites: None.
CHM 192 - CHEMISTRY II
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Continues the exploration of basic chemical principles and concepts. Topics include: equilibrium theory, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM
191. Corequisites: None.
CIS 101 - KEYBOARDING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the effective and efficient use of electronic machine keyboards.
Topics include: touch typing skills, and text formatting and manipulation. Manual dexterity is
developed using microcomputers and machine driven exercises. Prerequisites: Provisional
admission. Corequisites: None.
CIS 103 - OPERATING SYSTEMS CONCEPTS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides an overview of operating systems functions and commands that are necessary in a
computer working environment. Topics include: multiprogramming, single and multi-user systems, resource management, command languages, and operating system utilities, file system
utilization and multiple operating systems. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: SCT 100.
CIS 105 - PROGRAM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an emphasis on business problem identification and solution through systems of
computer programs using such tools as structure charts, flowcharts, and pseudocode. Topics
include: problem solving process, fundamentals of structured programming, program development building blocks, fundamentals of file and report structure, and business application
structure. Prerequisites: Keyboarding Skills. Corequisites: CIS 106.
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CIS 106 - COMPUTER CONCEPTS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an overview of computers and information processing. Topics include: computer history and terminology, data representation, data storage concepts, fundamentals of information
processing, fundamentals of hardware operation, fundamentals of communications and networking, structured programming concepts, program development methodology, system
development methodology, and computer number systems. Prerequisites: SCT 100.
Corequisites: SCT 100.
CIS 1115 - INFORMATION SECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course provides a broad overview of information security. It covers terminology, history,
security systems development and implementation. Student will also cover the legal, ethical,
and professional issues in information security Prerequisites: Program admission, CIS 103,
CIS 106, CIS 122, CIS 1140 . Corequisites: None.
CIS 1116 - SECURITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course provides knowledge and experience to develop and maintain security policies and
procedures. Students will explore the legal and ethical issues in information security and the
various security layers: physical security, personnel security, operating systems, network, software, communication and database security. Students will develop an Information Security
Policy and an Acceptable Use Policy. Prerequisites: CIS 1115 Security Fundamentals.
Corequisites: CIS 1115 Security Fundamentals.
CIS 1117 - IMPLEMENTING OPERATING SYSTEM SECURITY
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
This course will provide knowledge and the practical experience necessary to configure the
most common server platforms. Lab exercises will provide students with experience of establishing security for the network environment. Prerequisites: Program admission, CIS 1115
Security Fundamentals. Corequisites: None.
CIS 1118 - IMPLEMENTING NETWORK SECURITY
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
This course provides knowledge and the practical experience necessary to evaluate, implement and manage secure information transferred over computer networks. Topics include network security, intrusion detection, types of attacks, methods of attacks, security devices,
basics of cryptography and organizational security elements. Prerequisites: CIS1115
Information Security Fundamentals; CIS1117 Implementing Operating Systems Security.
Corequisites: CIS1117 Implementing Operating Systems Security.
CIS 1119 - IMPLEMENTING INTERNET/INTRANET FIREWALL
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Students will learn how to plan, design, install and configure firewalls that will allow key services while maintaining security. This will include protecting the Internal IP services, configuring a firewall for remote access and managing a firewall. Prerequisites: CIS1115 Information
Security Fundamentals. Corequisites: None.
CIS 1120 - COMPUTER FORENSICS AND DISASTER RECOVERY
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
This course serves as a capstone course for the information security specialist. The course
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will include implementing a plan to detect intruders, determine the damage caused, and discuss what precautions to use to avoid disasters. Prerequisites: CIS1116; CIS1117; CIS1118
and CIS1119. Corequisites: CIS1119 Computer Forensics and Disaster Recovery.
CIS 113 - COBOL I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides a study of the COBOL programming language to solve business applications. Topics
include: divisions, input/output operations, arithmetic operations, sequence verbs, conditional
control, editing input, and single level control breaks Prerequisites: Program Admission; CIS
105. Corequisites: None.
CIS 1140 - NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces networking technologies and prepares students to take the CompTIA™s broadbased, vendor independent networking certification exam, Network +. Covers a wide range of
material about networking, from careers in networking to local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, transmission media, and security. Focuses on operating network
management systems, and implementing the installation of networks. It reviews cabling, connection schemes, the fundamentals of the LAN and WAN technologies, TCP/IP configuration
and troubleshooting, remote connectivity, and network maintenance and troubleshooting.
Prerequisites: SCT 100, CIS 106, or an Advisor's Approval. Corequisites: None.
CIS 122 - MICROCOMPUTER INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of installing and maintaining microcomputers.
Topics include: identifying components and their functions, safety, installation procedures,
troubleshooting techniques, and preventive maintenance. Prerequisites: CIS XXXX - An operating system operating course. Corequisites: None.
CIS 124 - MICROCOMPUTER DATABASE PROGRAMMING
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides a study of database programming using microcomputer database management systems (DBMS) software packages. Topics include: development of systems, structured programming techniques, data editing, and output design. Prerequisites: CIS 105, CIS 128.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 127 - WORD PROCESSING/DESKTOP PUBUBLISHING
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides a study of word processing and desktop publishing. Topics include: word processing
fundamentals, desktop publishing fundamentals, advanced word processing concepts, development of macros, and presentation graphics fundamentals. Prerequisites: SCT 100.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 156 - INTRODUCTION TO INTERNET AND WANS
(5 credit/ contact hours)
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CIS 157 - INTRODUCTION TO WINDOWS PROGRAM BASICS
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces Microsoft Windows event-driven programming. Along with this new method of programming, common elements of Windows applications will be discussed. These elements will
be created and manipulated using Microsoft™s Visual BASIC development environment.
Topics include: Windows applications, user interface design, capturing and validating input,
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event-driven programming design, conditional processing, file processing, and incorporating
graphics. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: CIS 105.
CIS 173 - OPERATING SYSTEMS CONCEPTS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides a study of underlying command prompt functions in personal computer (PC) operating systems in terms of its functions and structure, for managing files and directories, and running programs. It also includes navigating through the operating system from command line
prompts and procedures for accessing and retrieving information. Provides a study of
installing, configuring and upgrading PC operating systems. Provides a study of diagnosing
and troubleshooting common problems relating to PC Operating systems. This includes
understanding normal operations and symptoms relating to common problems. Provides a
study of network capabilities of PC operating systems and how to connect to networks on the
client side, including what the Internet is about, its capabilities, basic concepts relating to
Internet access and generic procedures for system setup. The scope of this topic is only what
is needed on the client side to connect to a network. Prerequisites: CIS 106. Corequisites: CIS
106.
CIS 2128 - INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
This course provides an introduction to the ORACLE database management system platform
and to Structured Query Language (SQL) and ORACLE PL/SQL. Prerequisites: SCT 100, CIS
105, CIS 106, Programming Language. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2129 - DATABASE ADMINISTRATION
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
This course enables the database student to be able to fine tune ORACLE databases. Topics
include: ORACLE architectural components, ORACLE administration tools, ORACLE
instances, creation of an ORACLE database, construct Data Dictionary views, Maintain the
control file, Maintain the Redo Log File, Manage table spaces and data files, Understand relationships and impacts on storage structures, Manage tables, indexes and segments, maintain
data integrity, manage users, profiles, privileges, roles, understand and use database auditing options, using National Language Support (NLS). Prerequisites: CIS 2128 Introduction to
Databases. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2130 - BACKUP AND RECOVERY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
This course introduces participants to the critical task of planning and implementing database
backup and recovery strategies. The class addresses backup and recovery techniques and
examines various backup, failure, restore and recovery scenarios. Generic backup, restore
and recovery operations. Through hands-on exercises, participants will examine backup
methodologies based on business requirements in a mission critical enterprise. Participants
will utilize multiple strategies and Oracle tools such as Recovery Manager to perform
backups, and restore and recovery operations. Prerequisites: CIS 2129 Architecture and
Administration. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2131 - DATABASE PERFORMANCE TURNING
(10 credit/7 contact hours)
This course enables the database student to be able to fine tune ORACLE databases. Topics
include: Tuning overview, Oracle Alert and Trace Files, Utilities and Dynamic Performance
Views, Tuning the Shared Pool, Tuning the Buffer Cache, Tuning the Redo Log Buffer,
Database Configuration and I/O Issues, Using Oracle Blocks Efficiently, Optimizing Sort
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Operations, Tuning Rollback Segments, Monitoring and Detecting Lock Contention, SQL
Issues and Tuning Considerations for different applications, Managing a Mixed Workload,
Tuning with oracle Expert, Multithreaded Server Tuning Issues. This course enables participant to be able to fine tune ORACLE databases. Prerequisites: CIS 2130. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2132 - NETWORK ADMINISTRATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Oracle Network Administration covers the tools and techniques used when configuring an
Oracle8i Database Management System in a network environment. Upon completion of this
course, the students will have the skills necessary to configure and troubleshoot network connections to the Oracle8i database. Prerequisites: CIS 2130 Database Performance Tuning.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 214 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the skills and knowledge of database application systems which are
used in business, government, and industry. Topics include: models, structures, physical database, logical database, and accessing techniques. Prerequisites: Advanced language course
that requires random file accessing techniques. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2149 - WINDOWS 2000 PROFESSIONAL
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides the ability to implement, administrator, and troubleshoot Windows Professional as a
desktop operating system in any network environment. Prerequisites: CIS XXXX an operating
system course, CIS 1140 or an Advisor's Approval. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2150 - IMPLEMENTING MICROSOFT WINDOWS SERVER
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides the ability to implement, administrator, and troubleshoot Windows 2000 Server as a
member server of a domain in an Active Directory. Prerequisites: CIS 2149. Corequisites:
None.
CIS 2152 - IMPLEMENTING WINDOWS PROFESSIONAL AND SERVER
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Microsoft
Windows Professional on stand-alone computers and on client computers that are part of a
workgroup or a domain. In addition, this course provides the skills and knowledge necessary
to install and configure Windows Server to create file, print, and servers Prerequisites: CIS
140. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2153 - IMPLEMENT MS WIN2000 NET INFRA
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary for new-to-product support professionals who will be responsible for installing, configuring, managing, and supporting a network
infrastructure that uses the Microsoft Windows server family of products. Prerequisites: CIS
2150 OR 2152. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2154 - IMPLEMENTING MICROSOFT WINDOWS NETWORK
DIRECTORY
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure, and administer the
Microsoft Windows Active Directory™ service. The course also focuses on implementing
Group Policy and understanding the Group Policy tasks required to centrally manage users
and computers. Prerequisites: CIS 2153. Corequisites: None.
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CIS 2161 - STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE (SQL)
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
A course designed to allow the student to solve common database retrieval problems through
the use of the SQL Language that supports common databases such as SQL/Server, ORACLE, DB2, ACCESS and other database systems. Topics include: Understanding database
vocabulary, understanding object and relational database concepts, understanding and implementing SQL statements that retrieve, insert, update and delete data in a database, ability to
implement aggregate and group SQL functions, create, edit and drop database tables, query
data from multiple databases, design queries and sub queries, develop an understanding of
union, and join operations,understand how to execute and implement database triggers.
Prerequisites: SCT100, CIS106, CIS105, and an operating systems course. Corequisites:
None.
CIS 2191 - INTERNET BUSINESS FUNDAMENTALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Internet Business Fundamentals teaches students how to access the Internet and the World
Wide Web using a Web Brower as a general-purpose Internet application. Students will learn
to use the Internet for e-mail, the World Wide Web, news-groups, Gopher, Veronica, File
Transfer Protocol (FTP) and Telnet. Student will gain experience using and configuring both
Netscape Navigator Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2201 - HTML FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
HTML Fundamentals is designed to teach basic through intermediate concepts in Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML) authoring, including forms, complex table design, graphic elements, and client-side image maps. Students will design interlinking pages that incorporate,
design, graphic elements, and client-side image maps. Students will design inter-linking pages
that incorporate, in practical applications, a wide range of HTML tags and attributes.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: Program Admission.
CIS 221 - MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION - WORD
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provide the fundamental, intermediate and advanced instruction in Microsoft Word competencies to provide user with the skills necessary to obtain the expert user certification. Topics
include all skill areas as defined by Microsoft Office User Specialist Expert exam objectives
and additional information in workgroup editing and advanced features such as macros,
mailmerge, HTML creation, and tables Prerequisites: CIS 127. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2211 - WEB SITE DESIGN TOOLS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Web Site Design Tools teaches an understanding of how to create and manage impressives
using the sizeable amounts of new technology available on the Web. Students will learn to
create web sites using various web tools such as FrontPage, NetObjects Fusion, Dynamic
HTML, and various multimedia and CSS standards. Prerequisites: Program admission.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 222 - MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION -EXCEL
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provide the fundamental, intermediate and advanced Microsoft Excel competencies to provide user with the skills necessary to obtain the expert user certification. Topics include
spreadsheet creation, financial statements, forecast, amortization schedules, workgroup editing and advanced features such as macros, using charts, importing and exporting data, HTML
creation, formulas, Web queries, built-in function, templates, and trends and relationships.
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Prerequisites: CIS – Advanced Spreadsheet Techniques. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2221 - WEB GRAPHICS AND MULTIMEDIA
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Web Graphics and Multimedia teaches the use of powerful tools for modeling scanned images
and illustrations into creative artwork. In this course, students will learn techniques for quickly creating attractive textures for backgrounds, compositing images seamlessly, simulating
surface reflections and shadows, and creating effects with type. Advanced tools will be used
for selecting parts of images, moving, duplicating, and resizing images. Students will utilize
painting tools to manipulate images, and will perform adjustments to contrast and color
balance. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2228 - ADVANCED SPREADSHEET
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides a study of spreadsheets. Topics include: advanced spreadsheet concepts, development of macros, data integration concepts, troubleshooting spreadsheets. Prerequisites:
Program Admission SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2229 - ADVANCED DATABASE
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides a study of databases. Topics include: advanced database management concepts,
development of macros, data integration concepts, development of user interfaces, relational
database concepts, troubleshooting databases. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2231 - DESIGN METHODOLOGY
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Design Methodology teaches students how to create and mange Web sites using FrontPage,
NetObjects Fusion Dynamic HTML, and various multimedia and CSS standards. Students will
also implement the latest strategies to develop third generation Web site, evaluate design
tools, discuss future technology standards, and explore the incompatibility issues surrounding
current browsers. Prerequisites: CIS 2201, CIS 2211, CIS 2221. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2261 - JAVASCRIPT FUNDAMENTALS
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
JavaScript Fundamentals teaches developers how to use the features of the JavaScript language and the Netscape Navigator browser. Students learn how to write JavaScript programs
that can be plugged into Web pages or customized, and examine advanced issues such as
debugging techniques and JavaScript security. Prerequisites: CIS 2251. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2271 - FUNDAMENTALS CGI USING PERL
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Fundamentals of CGI Programming using PERL and server-Side Scripting teach students
how to use Common Gateway Interface (CGI) PERL programs and scripts on a Web server.
Students will learn how to writer print-to-screen scripts, customize Web page hit counters, create and use business forms that interface with text files, manipulate data in a database, work
with a relations database via Open Database Connectivity ODBC), and explore Web server
security issues related to CGI. A survey of other products such as Microsoft Active Server
Pages, Netscape LiveWire, and Cold Fusion by Allaire will be discussed. Security issues using
server-side scripting will also be studied, and students will learn how to add security elements
to their scripts. Prerequisites: CIS 2201. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2281 - DATABASE CONNECTIVITY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Database Connectivity teaches students how to manipulate data in a database, work with
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ferent database systems. Students will learn to install and configure Cold Fusion, or equivalent software, and use the system to develop forms and applications to interact with file systems, e-mail and database servers. Prerequisites: CIS 2191. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2321 - INTRODUCTION TO LAN/WAN (Cisco-Sem 1)
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides students with classroom and laboratory experience in current and emerging network
technology. Topics include safety, networking, network terminology and protocols, network
standards, local-area networks (LANs), widearea networks (WANs), Open System
Interconnection (OSI) models, cabling, cabling tools, routers, router programming, Ethernet,
Internet Protocol (IP) addressing, and network standards. Particular emphasis is given to the
use of decision-making and problem-solving techniques in applying science, mathematics,
communication, and social-studies concepts to solve networking problems. In addition,
instruction and training are provided in the proper care, maintenance, and use of networking
software, tools, and equipment and all local, state, and federal safety, building and environmental codes and regulations. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2322 - INTRODUCTION TO WANS AND ROUTING
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
This course provides instruction on performing basic router configuration and troubleshooting.
Prerequisites: CIS 2321. Corequisites: None.
CIS 250 - INTRODUCTION TO RPG PROGRAMMING
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces programming business applications using the RPG programming language. Topics
include: introduction to RPG programming, input and output processing, arithmetic operations,
edit codes/words, selection operations, control breaks, multiple control breaks, do loops,
exception output, external files - physical and logical, and sequential file access methods.
Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: CIS 105.
CIS 2501 - BUILDING SCALABLE CISCO NET
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
This course focuses on advanced routing and using Cisco routers connected in local-area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks (WANs) typically found at medium to large network
sites. Upon completion of this training course, the student will be able to select and implement
the appropriate Cisco IOS services required to build a scalable routed network. This curriculum prepares the student for the BSCN exam one of four for the CCNP Certification.
Prerequisites: Students must have received their CCNA certification or have completed the
courses in the Cisco CCNA Specialist. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2502 - BUILDING REMOTE ACCESS NETWORKS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
The focus of this course is on how to use one or more of the available WAN permanent or
dialup technologies to connect company sites. Students will be able to connect, configure, and
troubleshoot the various elements of a remote network in a WAN environment. This course
prepares students for the BCRAN exam one of four for the CCNP Certification. Prerequisites:
CIS 2501. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2503 - CONFIGURING LAN SWITCHES
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
The focus of this course is on how to build and manage high-speed Ethernet networks. This
course also introduces the emerging Multilayer Switching technology and describes how it
enhances performance and scalability in campus networks. Finally, the course explores how
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to manage traffic traversing the network. The student will be able to connect, configure, and
troubleshoot the various elements of a campus network in an Ethernet environment. This curriculum prepares the student for the BCMSN exam one of four for the CCNP Certification.
Prerequisites: CIS 2502. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2504 - CISCO INTERNETWORKING TROUBLESHOOTING
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
The focus of Cisco Internetworking Troubleshooting is on troubleshooting network problems.
Upon completion of this training course, the student should be better able to analyze and
resolve problems. This curriculum prepares the student for the CIT exam one of four for the
CCNP Certification. Prerequisites: CIS 2503. Corequisites: None.
CIS 252 - DATA ENTRY OPERATIONS
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
This course teaches the skills necessary to transfer input data from source documents to disk
in an accurate and timely manner. Some exercises are keyed on microcomputer while others
are keyed on CRT under the control of an on-line data entry system. For successful completion, the student is required to key for 10 minutes at a rate of 10,000 strokes per hour
Prerequisites: Unavailable. Corequisites: Unavailable.
CIS 255 - INTRODUCTION TO "C" PROGRAMMING
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides opportunity to gain a working knowledge of "C" programming. Includes creating, editing, executing, and debugging "C" programs of moderate difficulty. Topics include: basic "C"
concepts, simple I/O and expressions, I/O and control statements, and managing data and
developing programs. Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: CIS 105.
CIS 2554 - INTRODUCTION TO LINUX/UNIX
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
This course introduces the Linux/UNIX operating system skills necessary to perform entrylevel user functions. Topics include: History of Linux/UNIX, login and logout, the user environment, user password change, the file system, hierarchy tree, editors, file system commands
as they relate to navigating the file system tree, Linux/UNIX manual help pages, using the
Linux/UNIX graphical desktop, and command options. In addition, the student must be able to
perform directory and file displaying, creation, deletion, redirection, copying, moving, linking
files, wildcards, determining present working directory and changing directory locations.
Prerequisites: CIS 106 and SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
CIS 2555 - LINUX/UNIX ADMINISTRATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Covers Linux/UNIX operating system administration skills necessary to perform administrative
functions. Topics include: Installing Linux/UNIX, configuring and building a custom kernel,
adding and removing software packages, managing run levels, managing users and groups,
implementing security permissions, introduction to shell programming, managing and fixing
the file system, managing memory and swap space, managing and scheduling jobs, managing system logs, understanding the boot process, system configuration files, file backup and
restore, file compression, fault tolerance, and printing. Prerequisites: CIS 2554. Corequisites:
None.
CIS 2556 - LINUX/UNIX ADVANCED ADMINISTRATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Covers Linux/UNIX operating system advanced administration skills necessary to perform
advanced administrative functions. Topics include: understanding Linux/UNIX networking,
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managing network printing, configuring and troubleshooting TCP/IP on Linux/UNIX, configuring DHCP, DNS, a Web server, an FTP server, an E-mail server, and understanding NIS (yp)
and NFS. Also, includes the following: understanding advanced security issues such as firewalls and NAT, using network commands, use of graphical system such as X Windows, sharing files and printers, and advanced shell programming. Prerequisites: CIS 2555.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 2557 - LINUX/UNIX SHELL SCRIPT PROGRAMMING
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Course covers Linux/UNIX shell programming techniques necessary for Linux/UNIX System
Administrators to understand and create shell script programs in a Linux/UNIX environment
Topics include: Shell variables, running shell script program, conditional processing, looping
structures, arrays, functions, arithmetic operators, logical operators such as AND, OR, and
NOT, positional parameters and process variables, redirection, piping and standard error, use
of backslash, quotes and back quotes. Prerequisites: CIS 2556. Corequisites: None.
CIS 260 - INTRODUCTION TO FOURTH GENERATION LANGUAGES
(8 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides skills and knowledge required for use of fourth generation languages. Topics include:
fourth generation languages, advantages and disadvantages of the fourth generation languages, fourth generation language structure, and fourth generation language applications.
Prerequisites: Unavailable. Corequisites: Unavailable.
CIS 2721 - CHECKPOINT FIREWALL ADMINISTRATION
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
In this course, students cover the purpose of firewalls, the different firewall architectures and
the various components of VPN/FireWall as well as how to install and configure VPN/FireWall
to protect an organization's resources with a single comprehensive Security Policy. Hands on
labs help students build the skills necessary to manage and maintain the Security Policy using
tools provided by VPN/FireWall. Prerequisites: CIS XXXX – An operating system course.
Corequisites: None.
CIS 276 - ADVANCED ROUTERS AND SWITCHES-CISCO 3
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces LAN design, LAN switching and switch segmentation, advanced routing, and multiple protocols. Topics include: a review of semesters I and II, local area network (LAN) switching, virtual local area networks (VLANS), local area network (LAN) design, interior gateway
routing protocols (IGRP), access control lists, and Novell IPX. Prerequisites: CIS 142, CIS
258. Corequisites: None.
CIS 277 - WAN DESIGN (Cisco-Sem4)
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Emphasizes WAN design utilizing point-to-point protocol (PPP), integrated services digital
network (ISDN), and frame relay. Topics include: a review of semesters I II and III, wide area
network, wide area network design, point-to-point protocol, integrated services digital network
(ISDN), and frame relay. Prerequisites: CIS 142, CIS 258, CIS 276. Corequisites: None.
CIS 282 - INTRODUCTION TO C++ PROGRAMMING
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Develops skills for the programmer to write programs using the language of C++. Emphasis
is placed on utilizing the added feature of C++, which will be added to the skills mastered in
Programming with C. Topics include functions, objects, classes, inheritance, overloading,
polymorphism, streams, and containers. Prerequisites: CIS 256. Corequisites: None.
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CIS 286 - AA+ PREPARATION
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides the student with the fundamentals of configuring, installing, diagnosing, repairing,
upgrading, and maintaining computers and their peripherals. To fundamentally prepare the
student for the A+ certification examination. Topics include: A+ Core Module, A+
DOS/Windows Operating Systems, PC hardware and configuration, Peripherals, Preventive
Maintenance, Customer Interaction, Virus protection, Safety and Electrostatic Discharge, and
Networks. Prerequisites: CIS 122. Corequisites: None.
CNA 100 - CNA FUNDAMENTALS
(8 credit/11 contact hours)
Introduces student to the occupation of Certified Nurse Assistant. Emphasis is placed on
human anatomy and physiology, cardiac pulmonary resuscitation, and nutrition and diet therapy. Topics include: role and responsibilities of the Certified Nurse Assistant; topography,
structure, and function of body systems; legal and safety requirements in the patient care field;
equipment use and care; and performance skills standards and procedures. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
COS 100 - INTRODUCTION TO COSMETOLOGY THEORY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theory and practices of the cosmetology profession. Emphasis will
be placed on professional practices and safety. Topics include: state and local laws, rules, and
regulations; professional image; bacteriology; decontamination and infection control; chemistry fundamentals; safety; Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance; and anatomy and
physiology. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
COS 101 - INTRODUCTION PERM WAVING AND RELAXING
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the chemistry and chemical reactions of permanent wave solutions and relaxers.
Topics include: permanent wave techniques, chemical relaxer techniques, chemistry, physical
and chemical change, safety procedures, and permanent wave and chemical relaxer application procedures on manikins. Prerequisites: COS 100. Corequisites: None.
COS 103 - INTRODUCTION TO SKIN, SCALP AND HAIR
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the theory, procedures, and products used in the care and treatment of the skin,
scalp, and hair. Topics include: basic corrective hair and scalp treatments, plain facial, products and supplies, diseases and disorders, and safety precautions. Prerequisite: COS 100
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
COS 105 - INTRODUCTION TO SHAMPOOING AND STYLING
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theory and skills required to shampoo and create shapings, pincurls, fingerwaves, roller placement, and combouts. Laboratory training includes styling training to total 20 hours on manikin and 25 hours on live models without compensation. Topics
include: braiding/intertwining hair, shampoo chemistry, shampoo procedures, styling principles, pincurls, roller placement, fingerwaves, combout techniques, skipwaves, ridgecurls, and
safety precautions. Prerequisite: COS 100 Prerequisites: COS 100. Corequisites: None.
COS 106 - INTRODUCTION TO HAIRCUTTING
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces the theory and skills necessary to apply haircutting techniques. Safe use of haircutting implements will be stressed. Topics include: haircutting terminology, safety, decontamination, and precautions, cutting implements, haircutting techniques, and client consultation,
head/hair/body analysis. Prerequisites: COS 100. Corequisites: None.
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COS 108 - PERMANENT WAVING AND RELAXING
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the application of permanent waves and relaxers. Precautions and special problems involved in applying permanent waves and relaxers will be emphasized.
Application of perms and relaxers on live models is included. Topics include: timed permanent
wave, timed relaxer application, safety precautions, and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Prerequisites: COS 101. Corequisites: None.
COS 109 - HAIR COLOR
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Presents the application of temporary, semi-permanent, deposit only, and permanent hair coloring and decolorization products. Topics include: basic color concepts, law of color, hair structure and color, classifications of color, safety precautions, skin and hair reactions, level of
color, consultation, communication and record and release forms, product knowledge, formulations, chemistry, application procedures, lighteners, toners, special problems in hair color
and corrective coloring, terminology review, and lash and brow tints. Prerequisites: COS 100,
COS 101, COS 103, COS 105, COS 106, COS 107, COS 108 and . Corequisites: None.
COS 110 - SKIN, SCALP, AND HAIR
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides instruction on and application of techniques and theory in the treatment of the skin,
scalp, and hair. Emphasis will be placed on work with live models. Topics include: implements,
products and supplies, corrective hair and scalp treatments, facial procedures and manipulations, safety precautions, cosmetic chemistry/products and supplies, and treatment theory:
electrotherapy, electricity and light therapy. Prerequisites: COS 100, COS 101, COS 103,
COS 105, COS 106, COS 108, COS 109, COS 110. Corequisites: None.
COS 111 - STYLING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the theory and application of hairstyling and introduces thermal techniques. Topics
include: blow dry styling, thermal curling, thermal pressing, thermal waving, advanced sets,
safety precautions, and artificial hair and augmentation. Prerequisites: COS 100, COS 101,
COS 103, COS 105, COS 106, COS 107, COS 108, COS 109, COS 110. Corequisites: None.
COS 112 - MANICURING AND PEDICURING
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides manicuring and pedicuring experience on live models. Topics include: implements,
products and supplies, hand and foot anatomy, diseases and disorders, manicure techniques,
pedicure techniques, nail product chemistry, safety precautions, and advanced nail techniques. Prerequisites: COS 100. Corequisites: None.
COS 113 - PRACTICUM I
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be
a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is prescribed by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the
hours required for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and
bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; and
Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Prerequisites: COS 107, COS 108, COS 109,
COS 110, COS 111, COS 112, ENG 101, MAT 100, PSY 100, SCT 100. Corequisites: COS
108, COS 109, COS 110, COS 111, COS 112.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
COS 114 - PRACTICUM II
(8 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides laboratory experiences necessary for the development of skill levels required to be
a competent cosmetologist. The allocation of time to the various phases of cosmetology is prescribed by the Georgia State Board of Cosmetology. This course includes a portion of the
hours required for licensure. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair color and
bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair treatments; haircutting; styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure/advanced nail techniques; reception; safety precautions/decontamination; Hazardous
Duty Standards Act compliance; advanced styling and shaping; industry concepts; and surviving in the salon (transition from class to employment). Prerequisites: COS 113.
Corequisites: COS 113.
COS 115 - PRATICUM/INTERNSHIP I
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements
for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The appropriate number of applications for completion of state board service
credit requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting or in a combination of a
laboratory setting and an approved internship facility. The maximum number of internship
hours for this course is 50 clock hours. Interns must be approved with a minimum "B" average in both course work and work ethics. Topics include: permanent waving and relaxers; hair
color and bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair; haircutting; styling; dispensary; manicure/pedicure;
reception; safety precautions; and Hazardous Duty Standards Act compliance. Prerequisites:
COS 113, COS 114. Corequisites: None.
COS 116 - PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP II
(5 credit/13 contact hours)
Provides experience necessary for professional development and completion of requirements
for state licensure. Emphasis will be placed on the display of professional conduct and positive attitudes. The requirements for this course may be met in a laboratory setting or in a combination of a laboratory setting and an approved internship facility. Topics include: permanent
waving and relaxers; hair color and bleaching; skin, scalp, and hair; haircutting; dispensary;
styling; manicure/pedicure; reception; safety precautions; Hazardous Duty Standards Act
compliance; and state licensure preparation Prerequisites: COS 113, COS 114. Corequisites:
None.
COS 117 - SALON MANAGEMENT
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the steps involved in opening and operating a privately owned cosmetology salon
or barber/styling shop. Topics include: planning a salon/shop, business management, retailing, public relations, sales skills, career development, and client retention. Prerequisites: COS
100, Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 101 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Examines the emergence, progress, and problems of the Criminal Justice system in the
United States. Topics include: the American Criminal Justice system; constitutional limitations;
organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and
requirements. Prerequisite: Provisional Admission Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 103 - CORRECTIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an overview of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives. Topics include: history and evolution of correction209
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
al facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilities and procedures; probation, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community
involvement; and . Prerequisite: Provisional Admission Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 104 - PRINCIPLES OF LAW ENFORCEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Examines the principles of organization and administration and the duties of local and state
law enforcement agencies with emphasis on police departments. Topics include: history and
philosophy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American
law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 105 - INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL PROCEDURES
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces the substantive law of major crimes against persons and property. Attention is
given to observation of courtroom trials. Topics include: laws of arrest and search and seizure;
procedures governing arrest, trial, and administration of criminal sanctions; rules of evidence;
general court procedures; rights and duties of officers and citizens; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to Criminal Justice /overview of Constitutional Law. Prerequisites: CRJ 101.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 121 - INTRODUCTION TO PRIVATE SECURITY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an orientation to the development, philosophy, responsibility, and function of the
Private Security Industry. A historical and philosophical perspective of private Security will help
students better understand the present stage of private security, its principles, its legal authority and its effect on society in general. Topics include: Private Security: An Overview; Basic
Security Goals, and Responsibilities; When Prevention Fails: Security Systems at Work:
Putting It All Together, and Challenges Facing the Security Profession in the 1990’s and
beyond Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 123 - COMPUTER SECURITY
(5 credit/50 contact hours)
Provides an orientation that contains a step-by-step approach to the investigation, seizure,
and evaluation of computer evidence. Topics include: computer-related evidence, crime scene
investigation, evidence evaluation and analysis, passwords and encryption, networks, and
investigative computer systems. The second part of this course provides an orientation that
focuses on corporate fraud as it relates to computerized accounting systems and its
technology, the various types of corporate computer fraud and simple audit techniques that
can assist in investigating and detecting fraud. Topics include:history and evolution of fraud,
mindset: step one in fraud auditing, corporate fraud in the current environment, corporate
fraud investigation in the electronic data processing era, defenses against corporate fraud,
theft and embezzlement, and auditing for inventory shortage. Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 140 - CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT
OFFICERS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
development of personal intercultural growth plan. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 152 - POLICE ADMINISTRATION
(5 credit/50 contact hours)
This course explores the managerial aspects of effective and efficient police administration.
Emphasis is directed towards increasing organizational skills and overcoming interdepartmental and inter-agency non-communication. Topics include: environmental management,
human resources, and organizational concerns. Prerequisites: Program admission.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 160 - PRIVATE AND INDUSTRIAL SECURITY SERVICES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course will provide an overview of the private and industrial security as it relates to the
protection of industry, the community, and as helping hand to law enforcement agencies and
organizations. Emphasis is placed on the role of watchman, guards, and patrolmen. Topics
include: industry concerns, and occupational techniques. Prerequisites: Program admission.
Corequisites: None.
CRJ 162 - METHODS OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
(5 credit/50 contact hours)
Presents the fundamental principles of criminal investigation. Emphasis is placed on legal
requirements stated in Georgia Criminal Law, definition of felony crimes stated in the Georgia
Code and fundamentals of: investigative procedures, crime scene searches, identification and
collection of evidence, note-taking and report writing, surveillance, identification of witnesses
and suspects, interviews and interrogation, and preparation and presentation of evidence in
court. Topics include: Georgia Criminal Law, common investigative techniques, and
procedures used for investigating various crimes. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 165 - COMMUNITY POLICING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents the fundamentals for the community-oriented policing philosophy. Topics include:
comparison of traditional and community policing philosophies; law enforcement and community relationships; importance of political and public support and involvement; attitudinal
changes involving the roles of police management, supervisors and line personnel; organizational mental and physical restructuring; creation of partnerships with community organizations, businesses, private security, other governmental agencies, and special interest groups;
and police problem-solving methodologies Prerequisites: CRJ 104. Corequisites:
None.
CRJ 175 - INCIDENT AND REPORT WRITING
(1 credit/1 contact hours)
This course is designed to provide skills training in the critical area of report writing as it pertains to the front line security officer. In this course, students will learn why accurate reports
are necessary, how to write basic reports and how to communicate those reports. Students
will be introduced to the Georgia Private and Security Detective and Security Agencies Act
Rules and Regulations Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 180 - HOSPITAL SECURITY
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
This course will provide an overview of the safety and security issues relating to the modern
medical facility. Topics include: hospital environment, security operations, special operations
and concerns, workplace violence, CPR/First Aid training, alcohol and drugs, infant abduction
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
and basic firearms safety. Students will be introduced to OHSA regulations and blood borne
pathogens training. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 202 - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics
include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government, principles governing the operation of the Constitution, and Bill of Rights and the Constitutional Amendments.
Prerequisites: CRJ 101. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 206 - CRIMINOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice. Topics
include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government, principles governing the operation of the Constitution, and Bill of Rights and the Constitutional Amendments.
Prerequisites: CRJ 104. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 207 - JUVENILE JUSTICE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Analyzes the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in
the field of juvenile justice. Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult
and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency.
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
CRJ 209 - CRJ PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP
(5 credit/15 contact hours)
Provides experiences necessary for further professional development and exposure to related agencies in the law enforcement field. The student will either pursue a study project directed by the instructor within the institution, or an internship in a related agency supervised by
the instructor subject to the availability of an approved site. Topics include: observation and/or
participation in law enforcement activities, law enforcement theory applications, and independent study project. Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses Prerequisites:
Completion of all required courses. Corequisites: None.
DDF 100 - DRAFTING FUNDAMENTALS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental concepts and operations necessary to utilize microcomputers for
developing fundamental drafting techniques. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts, terminology, and techniques necessary for CAD applications. Topics include: history of drafting,
safety practices, geometric terms/media sizes, hardware and software care and use, basic
entities, CAD commands, line relations, basic CAD applications, and geometric construction.
Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
DDF 101 - INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Emphasizes the development of fundamental drafting techniques. Topics include: safety practices, terminology, care and use of drafting equipment, lettering, line relationships, and geometric construction. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DDF 102 - SIZE AND SHAPE DESCRIPTION I
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides multiview and dimensioning techniques necessary to develop views that completely
describe machine parts for manufacture. Topics include: multi-view drawing, basic dimen212
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
sioning practices, tolerances and fits, sketching, and precision measurement. Prerequisites:
DDF 101. Corequisites: DDF 101, DDF 107.
DDF 103 - SIZE AND SHAPE DESCRIPTION II
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues dimensioning skill development and introduces sectional views. Topics include:
advanced dimensioning practices and section views. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites:
None.
DDF 105 - AUXILIARY VIEWS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces techniques necessary for auxiliary view drawings. Topics include: primary auxiliary
views and secondary auxiliary views. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDF 106 - FASTENERS
(6 credit/9 contact hours)
Provides knowledge and skills necessary to draw and specify fasteners. Topics include: utilization of technical reference sources, types of threads, representation of threads, specifying
threads, fasteners, and welding symbols Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDF 107 - CAD FUNDAMENTALS
( 6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces basic concepts,terminology, and techniques necessary for CAD applications.
Topics include: terminology, CAD commands, basic entities, and basic CAD applications.
Prerequisites: DDF 100 or DDF 101. Corequisites: None.
DDF 108 - INTERSECTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the graphic description of objects represented by the intersection of geometric
components. Topics include: surface development, establishment of true length, and intersection of surfaces. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDF 109 - ASSEMBLY DRAWINGS I
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides knowledge and skills necessary to make working drawings. Topics include: detail
drawings, orthographic assembly drawings, pictorial assembly drawings, and utilization of
technical reference source. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDF 111 - INTERMEDIATE CAD
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues developing CAD utilization skills in discipline-specific applications. Topics include:
intermediate CAD commands, entity management, advanced line construction, block construction and management, command reference customization, advanced entity manipulation,
and system variables. Prerequisites: DDF 107. Corequisites: None.
DDF 112 - 3D DRAWING AND MODELING
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues developing CAD utilization skills in discipline-specific applications. Topics include:
advanced CAD commands, CAD applications, macro utilization, application utilization, 3D
modeling, rendering, advanced application utilization, and pictorial drawings. Prerequisites:
DDF 111. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
DDF 150 - PERSPECTIVES, SHADES AND SHADOWS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Advanced study of visual representation in three dimensions. Topics include: descriptive
geometry, perspective views, and shades and shadows. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites:
None.
DDF 151 - INTRODUCTION TO BLUEPRINT READING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to fundamentals of interpreting blueprints. Topics include terminology
and symbols, dimensions, orthographic drawings, sketching and ANSI Standards.
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
DDF 152 - ARCHITECTURAL BLUEPRINT READ
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental principles and practices associated with interpreting residential
and commercial architectural blueprints. Topics include: specifications and materials, architectural styles, construction methods, working drawing interpretation, and dimensioning and
scales. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
DDF 201 - STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a non-calculus based overview of the behavior of materials when subjected to different loadings and restraints and the prediction of materials behavior in different situations.
Topics include: concepts of stress, concepts of strain, tension, moments of inertia, and beam
bending. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDS 203 - SURVEYING I
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental plane surveying concepts, instruments, and techniques. Topics
include: linear measurements, instrument use, angles, bearings, and directions. Prerequisites:
DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDS 204 - ESTIMATING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the essential skills necessary for assessing the expected materials,
labor requirements and costs for given structures or products. Topics include:
blue print reading, material take-offs, price extension and utilization of reference
sources. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDS 205 - RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING I
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces architectural drawing skills necessary to produce a complete set of construction
drawings given floor plan information. Topics include: footing, foundation, and floor plans; interior and exterior elevations; sections and details; window, door, and finish schedules; site
plans; and specifications. Prerequisites: DDF 102. Corequisites: None.
DDS 207 - MECHANICAL SYSTEMS FOR ARCHITECTURE
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Reinforces technical knowledge and skills required to develop accurate mechanical and electrical plans. Topics include: heating, ventilation, and air conditioning calculations and plans;
electrical calculations and plans; and plumbing calculations and plans. Prerequisites: DDF
102. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
DDS 208 - RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECTURAL DRAWINGS II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Continues in-depth architectural drawing practice and develops architectural design skills.
Plans are designed to meet applicable codes. Topics include: footing, foundation, and floor
plans; interior and exterior elevations; sections and details; window, door, and finish schedules; site plans; specifications; and mechanical and electrical systems. Prerequisites: DDS
205. Corequisites: None.
DEN 101 - BASIC HUMAN BIOLOGY
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Focuses on basic normal structure and function of the human body with an emphasis on organ
systems. Topics include: medical terminology as it relates to the normal human body; and normal structure and function of the human body-cells and tissues, organs and systems, and
homeostatic mechanisms. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DEN 102 - HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Focuses on normal head and neck anatomy. Topics include: osteology of the skull, muscles
of mastication and facial expression, temporal mandibular joint, blood lymphatic and nerve
supply of the head, and salivary glands and related structures. Prerequisites: DEN 101.
Corequisites: None.
DEN 103 - PREVENTIVE DENISTRY
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides students with theory and clinical experience in the area of preventive and public
health dentistry. Topics include: etiology of dental disease, patient education techniques,
plaque control techniques, types and use of fluoride, diet analysis for caries control, and
dietary considerations for the dental patient. Prerequisites: DEN 106, DEN 134. Corequisites:
DEN 106, DEN 134.
DEN 105 - MICROBIOLOGY AND INFECTION CONTROL
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental microbiology and infection control techniques. Topics include: classification, structure, and behavior of pathogenic microbes; mode of disease transmission;
body’s defense and immunity; infectious diseases; and infection control procedures in accordance with CDC recommendations and OSHA guidelines Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: None.
DEN 106 - ORAL ANATOMY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on the development and functions of oral anatomy. Topics include: dental anatomy,
oral histology, and oral embryology. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
DEN 107 - ORAL PATHOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS
(4 credit/40 contact hours)
Focuses on the diseases affecting the oral cavity and pharmacology as it relates to dentistry.
Topics include: identification and disease process, signs/symptoms of oral diseases and systemic diseases with oral manifestations, developmental abnormalities of oral tissues, basic
principles of pharmacology, drugs prescribed by the dental profession, drugs that may contraindicate treatment, and applied pharmacology (regulations, dosage, and application).
Prerequisites: DEN 106, DEN 101. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
DEN 109 - DENTAL ASSISTING NATIONAL BOARD EXAMINATION
PREPARATION
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Reviews information concerning all didactic areas tested by the Dental Assisting National
Board (DANB). Topics include: collecting and recording clinical data, dental radiography, chairside dental procedures, prevention of disease transmission, patient education and oral health
management, office management procedures, and test taking skills. Prerequisites: Successful
completion of all dental assisting didactic courses or two years of full-time work experience
(3,500 hours) as a dental assistant, along with recommendation from the dentist
employer. Corequisites: None.
DEN 134 - DENTAL ASSISTING I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces students to chairside assisting with diagnostic and operative procedures. Topics
include: four-handed dentistry techniques, clinical data collection techniques, introduction to
operative dentistry, dental material basics, and infection control procedures in the dental environment with emphasis on CDC and ADA guidelines Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: AHS 104, DEN 105, DEN 106.
DEN 135 - DENTAL ASSISTING II
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on chairside assisting with operative and nonsurgical specialty procedures. Topics
include: operative dentistry, prosthodontic procedures (fixed and removable), orthodontics,
and pediatric dentistry. Prerequisites: DEN 134. Corequisites: None.
DEN 136 - DENTAL ASSISTING III
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on chairside assisting in surgical specialties. Topics include: periodontic procedures,
oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures, endodontic procedures, management of dental
office emergencies, and medically compromised patients Prerequisites: DEN 135.
Corequisites: None.
DEN 137 - DENTAL ASSISTING - EXPANDED FUNCTIONS
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on expanded duties of dental auxiliary personnel approved by the Georgia Board of
Dentistry. Topics include: expanded functions approved by law for performance by dental
assistants in the state of Georgia. Prerequisites: DEN 134, DEN 135. Corequisites: DEN
136.DEN 138 - SCOPES OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE(2 credit/2 contact hours)Focuses
on ethics, jurisprudence, and employability skills for the dental assistant. Students will relate
integration of didactic and laboratory instruction with clinical experiences. Topics include:
ethics and jurisprudence related to the dental office, and employability skillsPrerequisites:
Program admission. Corequisites: None.
DEN 139 - DENTAL RADIOLOGY
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
After completion of the course the student will be able to provide radiation safety for patient
and self, expose x-rays, process x-rays, and prepare dental films for the dental office. Topics
include: fundamentals of radiology and radiation safety, radiographic anatomy and interpretation, intraoral and extraoral radiographic techniques, and quality assurance
techniques.Prerequisites: DEN 102,. Corequisites: Pre/Co Den 106.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
DEN 140 - DENTAL PRACTICE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes procedures for office management in dental practices. Topics include: oral and
written communication, records management, appointment control, dental insurance form
preparation, accounting procedures, supply and inventory control, and basic computer skills.
A computer lab provides basic skills in computer use and utilization of these skills to perform
office procedures on a microcomputer.Prerequisites: DEN 134. Corequisites: None.
DEN 146 - DENTAL PRACTICUM I
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Practicum focuses on infection control in the dental office and assisting with diagnostic and
simple operative procedures. Topics include: infection control procedures, clinical diagnostic
procedures and general dentistry procedures.Prerequisites: AHS 104, DEN 105, DEN 134,
DEN 139. Corequisites: AHS 104, DEN 105, DEN 134, DEN 139.
DEN 147 - DENTAL PRACTICUM II
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Practicum focuses on advanced general dentistry procedures and chairside assisting in dental specialties with special emphasis on nonsurgical specialties. Topics include: advanced
general dentistry and specialties.Prerequisites: DEN 132, DEN 141, DEN 146. Corequisites:
DEN 132, DEN 141, DEN 146.
DEN 148 - DENTAL PRACTICUM III
(8 credit/24 contact hours)
Practicum continues to focus on assisting chairside with advanced general dentistry procedures with emphasis on dental office management, preventative dentistry and expanded functions. Topics include: advanced general dentistry procedures, preventive dentistry, dental
office management, expanded functions, chairside in specialties, and management of dental
office emergencies.Prerequisites: DEN 103, DEN 137, DEN 140, DEN 134, DEN 135, DEN
136, DEN 146, DEN 147. Corequisites: DEN 103, DEN 137, DEN 140, DEN 134, DEN 135,
DEN 136, DEN 146, DEN 147.
DHY 100 - TOOTH ANATOMY AND ROOT MORPHOLOGY
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides the student with a thorough knowledge of external and internal morphological characteristics of human primary and secondary teeth. Topics include: oral cavity clinical structures, dental anatomy, occlusion, and dental terminology.Prerequisites: Program admission.
Corequisites: DHY 101.
DHY 101 - ORAL EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Focuses on the study of cells and tissues of the human body, with emphasis on those tissues
that compose the head, neck, and oral cavity. Topics include: oral cavity, general histology,
embryology, and dental histology.Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
DHY102 - ANATOMY OF ORAL FACIAL STRUCTURE
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Focuses on the anatomy of oral facial structure. Topics include: anatomic landmarks, intraoral anatomy, osteology of the skull, muscles of facial mastication, muscles of facial expression,
cranial nerves, central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, sympathetic and
parasympathetic nervous system, arteries and veins of the head and neck, immunology and
the lymphatic system, endocrine and exocrine glands of the head and neck, nasal and
paranasal sinuses, and facial spaces and the spread of dental infections.Prerequisites: DHY
101. Corequisites: None.
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DHY 103 - DENTAL MATERIALS
(3 credit/4 contact hours)Focuses on the nature and qualities of modern dental materials, their
composition and manipulation and how this will assist the dental hygienist in professional
duties. Topics include: dental material properties, restorative dental materials, dental material
standards, preventive dental agents, adjunct dental materials, and quality assurance for
dental material.Prerequisites: DHY 100. Corequisites: None.
DHY 104 - PRECLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE LECTURE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Provides didactic information relating to fundamental skills to be utilized in the delivery of optimum patient care by the dental hygienist. Topics include: professionalism, patient assessment, patient history, intro and extra oral examination and documentation, basic setup, caries
detection and classification, dental charting, documentation, periodontal probing and charting,
and oral health education.Prerequisites: AHS 104, DHY 100. Corequisites: None.
DHY 105 - PRECLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE LAB
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides fundamental skills to be utilized in the delivery of optimum patient care by the dental hygienist. Topics include: asepsis, patient examination, emergencies, instrumentation,
charting, patient positioning, ethics, and oral health Prerequisites: DHY 100. Corequisites:
DEN 102, DHY 103, DHY 104.
DHY 108 - RADIOLOGY
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Emphasizes the application of radiology principles in the study of the teeth and their surrounding structures. Topics include: radiation physics principles, radiation biology, radiation
safety, radiographic quality assurance, imaging theory, radiographic interpretation, and legal
issues of dental radiography.Prerequisites: DHY 103. Corequisites: DHY 110, DHY 111.
DHY 110 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I LECTURE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Continues the development of knowledge in patient care. Topics include: caries, prevention,
occlusion, instrumentation, dental appliances, patient management, and impression and study
cast techniques.Prerequisites: DHY 102. Corequisites: None.
DHY 111 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I LAB
(3 credit/9 contact hours)
Continues the development of student skills in patient care. Topics include: caries, prevention,
occlusion, instrumentation, dental appliances, impression and study cast techniques, and
applied techniques.Prerequisites: DEN 102. Corequisites: DHY 108.
DHY 200 - PERIODONTOLOGY
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides fundamental information on periodontal anatomy, pathogenesis of the periodontal
diseases, and an introduction to modern rational periodontal therapy, including preventive,
nonsurgical, and surgical methods. Topics include: periodontal disease complex, disease prevention, disease treatment, and drug therapy. Prerequisites: DHY 111.Corequisites: DHY 201,
DHY 202.
DHY 201 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II LECTURE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
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Continues the development of student knowledge in treating patients and preventing oral disease. Topics include: instrument sharpening, patient assessment, treatment planning, antimicrobial use, ultrasonic and air polishing devices, amalgam polishing/recontouring, pulp vitality
testing, oral irrigation devices, and treatment of hypersensitivity.Prerequisites: DHY 105, DHY
108. Corequisites: DHY 200, DHY 202.
DHY 202 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II LAB
(3 credit/9 contact hours)
Continues the development of student skills in treating patients and preventing oral disease.
Topics include: instrument sharpening, patient assessment, treatment planning, oral irrigation
devices, and treatment of hypersensitivity. Prerequisites: DHY 111. Corequisites: None.
DHY 205 - ORAL PATHOLOGY
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces pathology, including etiology, progression of and recognition of various pathological conditions. Emphasizes pathology of the oral structures and oral manifestations of systemic disease which affect oral health. Topics include: terminology, pathology of oral structures, systemic diseases that affect the oral cavity, biopsy procedures, infectious diseases,
dental anomalies, genetic diseases, inflammation and regeneration, pathology of oral structures, cysts and tumors of the head and neck, diseases of salivary glands, blood dyscrasias,
diseases of bone, vesiculo-erosive diseases, and autoimmune diseases.Prerequisites: DHY
101, DHY 102. Corequisites: None.
DHY 206 - PHARMACOLOGY AND PAIN CONTROL
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces principles of basic pharmacology as they pertain to the practice of dentistry and
dental hygiene. Emphasizes actions and reactions of medications commonly used in the dental office or taken by dental patients. Topics include: pharmaceutical referencing, legal and
ethical considerations, drug effects, contraindications, drug related emergencies, and dental
related anesthesia.Prerequisites: DHY 110. Corequisites: None.DHY 207 - COMMUNITY
DENTAL HEALTH( credit/ contact hours)Course currently being developed. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
DHY 208 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III LECTURE
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Continues the development of student knowledge necessary for treatment and prevention of
oral disease. Topics include: instrument sharpening, scaling and root planing, oral irrigation
and antimicrobial agents, dental health education, and special needs patients.Prerequisites:
DHY 111, DHY 200, DHY 201, DHY 202, DHY 205, DHY 206. Corequisites: DHY 209.DHY
209 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III LAB(3 credit/9 contact hours)Continues the development of student skills necessary for treatment and prevention of oral disease. Topics include:
instrument sharpening, scaling and root planing, oral irrigation and antimicrobial agents, dental health education, special needs patients, and applied techniques.Prerequisites: DHY 111,
DHY 200, DHY 201, DHY 202, DHY 205, DHY 206. Corequisites: DHY 208.
DHY 213 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV LECTURE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Continues the development of student knowledge necessary for treatment and prevention of
oral disease. Topics include: indices, dietary surveys, recall systems, and applied techniques.Prerequisites: DHY 111, DHY 201, DHY 202. Corequisites: DHY 214.
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DHY 214 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV LAB
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Continues the development of student skills necessary for treatment and prevention of oral
disease. Topics include: indices, dietary surveys, recall systems, and applied techniques
Prerequisites: DHY 111, DHY 201, DHY 202DHY 200, DHY 205, 212DHY 206, DHY 207,
DHY. Corequisites: DHY 200, DHY 205, DHY 206, DHY 207, DHY 212 DHY 213 .
DHY 220 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE V LECTURE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Focuses on the dental hygiene field and presents the fundamental concepts and principles
necessary for successful participation in the dental profession. Topics include: employability
skills, State of Georgia Dental Practice Act, office management, expanded duties, legal
aspects, ethics, dental hygiene practice settings, and dentistry and dental hygiene regulation
Prerequisites: DHY 214. Corequisites: DHY 221.
DHY 221 - CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE V LAB
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Focuses on the dental hygiene field and presents the fundamental skills necessary for successful participation in the dental profession. Topics include: employability skills, office management, expanded duties, and applied techniques Prerequisites: DHY 214. Corequisites:
DHY 220.
DMM 101 - INVENTORY PLANNING AND CONTROL
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary for successful control of a company's inventory. Emphasis will be placed on inventory methods and control systems, physical inventories, prevention of shortages, and how current technology can assist the manager
in inventory planning and control. Topics include: systems, area of management attending,
economic order quantities, ABC analysis, MRP, bar coding, physical inventory, and cycle
counting. Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 102 - PURCHASING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
A study of the fundamental aspects of industrial and governmental purchasing. Emphasis is
placed on procedures, techniques, and challenges in the field of purchasing, as well as the
basic organization of purchasing departments. Topics include: purchasing's role in business,
industrial purchasing, purchasing capital equipment, purchasing management and organization, governmental purchasing, electronic data interchange, and ordering decisions.
Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 105 - DISTRIBUTION PRINCIPLES
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides an opportunity to study the wholesaling function and the movement and storage of
goods. Emphasis is placed on the transportation, storing, and material handling functions.
Topics include: historical and contemporary wholesale distribution, inbound and outbound
operations, traffic operation concepts, distribution center safety and security, purchasing,
inventory, financial management, and inside and outside selling. Prerequisites: Provisional
admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 106 - MATERIALS HANDLING MANAGEMENT
(10 credit/11 contact hours)
Provides an opportunity to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for the suc220
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cessful management and handling of materials. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and
organization, as well as traffic management, shipping and receiving, materials identification,
and storage systems. Topics include: motivation and incentives, measured standards, freeing
bottlenecks, reducing handling times and travel distances, quality control, cube utilization,
handling of materials, and traffic management. Prerequisites: Provisional admission.
Corequisites: None.
DMM 107 - QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CONCEPTS
(6 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides students with the tools and techniques to solve problems and improve processes,
which are necessary for the successful implementation of a quality improvement program.
Emphasis will placed on the use of the quality improvement tools. Topics include: history of
quality improvement, quality improvement leaders, quality tools, quality improvement implementation, team building for quality improvement, and future quality tenders. Prerequisites:
Program admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 108 - DISTRIBUTION OCCUPATION-BASED INSTRUCTION I
(3 credit/9 contact hours)
Introduces students to the application and reinforcement of distribution and employability principles in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into
management applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job
setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of distribution management techniques,
and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the
use of a practicum or internship and all of the following: written individualized training plans,
written performance evaluation, and a required weekly seminar. Prerequisites: Provisional
admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 109 - DISTRIBUTION OCCUPATION-BASED INSTRUCTION II
(3 credit/9 contact hours)
Continues the application and reinforcement of distribution and employability principles in an
actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational
responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into management applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting,
use of proper interpersonal skills, application of distribution management techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of
a practicum or internship and all of the following: written individualized training plans, written
performance evaluation, and a required weekly seminar. Prerequisites: DMM 108, MAT 111.
Corequisites: None.
DMM 110 - MANUFACTURING RESOURCES PLANNING/JUST-IN-TIME I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides introductory instruction and hands-on experience in utilizing Manufacturing
Resources Planning (MRP II)/Just-In-Time, a fully integrated production and information management software system. Instruction moves step-by-step through system implementation
and teaches how a state-of-the-art Manufacturing Resources Planning (MRP II) system works
in today's zero inventory and Just-In-Time environment. Topics include: bills of material, MRP
II logic, inventory planning, master production schedule, planning policies, statistical quality
control (SQC), and quality at the source. Prerequisites: Provisional admission level math competency. Corequisites: None.
DMM 111 - MANUFACTURING RESOURCES PLANNING/JUST-IN-TIME II
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides detailed instruction and hands-on computer experience in utilizing Manufacturing
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Resources Planning (MRP II)/Just-In-Time, a fully integrated production and information management software system. Instruction stresses MRP II system implementation in today's zero
inventory and Just-In-Time environment. Topics include: bills of material, MRP II logic, inventory planning, master production schedule, planning policies, statistical quality control (SQC),
and quality at the source. Prerequisites: DMM 110. Corequisites: None.
DMM 150 - TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to traffic management in industry. Topics include: freight regulations,
rates, classifications, documents, principles of managing traffic operations in a distribution
center environment, international distribution, and hazardous material distribution.
Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 154 - WORKING IN THE WAREHOUSE ENVIRONMENT
(2 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with an overview of the functional and structural composition of warehousing organizations. The student is also introduced to the business principals for operation.
General safety practices are introduced to the student along with the concept of change as a
process. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 156 - WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION PROCESSES
(2 credit/22 contact hours)
The student is provided training in the area needed to be successful on the job. Those skills
include communication, personnel wellness, problem solving and job interview skills along
with teamwork. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 158 - WAREHOUSING TECHNOLOGY
(3 credit/30 contact hours)
This course introduces the mission of warehouses and distribution centers. Various types of
jobs are covered along with the organization needed to assure completion of the mission of
the warehouse. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 160 - WORKPLACE PRACTICES AND SKILLS
(4 credit/40 contact hours)
Core warehousing skills covers the practices important to working safely, ability to use various
types of equipment and perform in a variety of task to assure delivery and storage or product.
The handling, waste recovery, and containment are covered for hazardous materials.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
DMM 162 - CORE WAREHOUSING SKILLS
(4 credit/40 contact hours)
Provides students with an introduction to computerized tools and skills utilized in warehouses
and distribution centers. Material handling systems, communication technologies and computer hardware are covered to allow for use on the job. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
ECE 101 - INTRODUCTION EARLY CHILD CARE AND EDUCATION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
A variety of early childhood care and education situations. This course addresses key CDA
competency goals and functional areas. Topics include: historical perspectives, career opportunities, work ethics, functioning in a team environment, guidance, transitional activities, program management, learning environment cultural diversity, licensing and accreditation, and
professional development file (portfolio) guidelines. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
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ECE 103 - HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT I
(5 credit/ contact hours)
Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of the
young child (0 through 5 years of age). Provides for competency development in observing,
recording, and interpreting growth and development stages in the young child, advancing
physical and intellectual competence, supporting social and emotional development, and providing positive guidance. Topics include: developmental characteristics, observation and
recording theory and practice, guidance techniques, developmentally appropriate practice,
and introduction to children with special needs. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
ECE 105 - HEALTH SAFETY & NUTRITION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the theory, practices, and requirements for establishing and maintaining a safe,
healthy learning environment. Topics include: CPR and first aid, health issues, safety issues,
child abuse and neglect, and nutritional needs of children. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 112 - CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Develops knowledge and skills that will enable the student to establish a learning environment
appropriate for young children. Topics include: instructional media, learning environments,
curriculum approaches, development of curriculum plans and materials, community
resources, transitional activities, and approaches to teaching, learning, and assessing.
Prerequisites: ECE 101, ECE 103. Corequisites: None.
ECE 113 - ART FOR CHILDREN
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the concepts related to creativity in art. This course combines lecture and lab experiences to introduce the many media areas used by children to express themselves. Topics
include: concepts of creativity; art media, methods, and materials for creative activities; planning and preparation of art experiences; appreciation of children’s art processes and products;
developmental stages in art; and art appreciation. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
ECE 114 - MUSIC AND MOVEMENT
(3 credit/ contact hours)
Introduces the concepts related to creativity in music and movement. This course combines
lecture and lab experiences to introduce media, methods, and materials used to foster musical activity and creative movement. Topics include: spontaneous and planned music and
movement; media, methods and materials; coordination of movement and music; developmental stages of music; and music appreciation. Prerequisite: Provisional Admission
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 115 - LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops knowledge and skills that will enable the student to plan and implement developmentally appropriate listening, speaking, writing, and reading activities for young children.
Topics include: reading readiness, oral communication activities, writing readiness, listening
comprehension, literature selection, story presentation, and stages of language acquisition.
Prerequisites: ECE 103, ENG 191(degree) or ENG 101 (diploma). Corequisites: None.
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ECE 116 - MATH & SCIENCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents the process of introducing science and math concepts to young children. Includes
planning and implementation of appropriate activities and development of methods and techniques of delivery. Topics include: cognitive stages and developmental process in math and
science, math and science activity planning, and development of math and science materials.
Prerequisites: ECE 103. Corequisites: None.
ECE 121 - CHILD CARE INTERNSHIP I
(3 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain a supervised experience in an actual or simulated work setting allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work.
Practicum training topics include: good work habits, supervised planning, interaction with children, parents, and co-workers, application of guidance techniques, classroom management,
and documentation of child’s development. Prerequisites: Department Approval. Corequisites:
None.
ECE 122 - CHILD INTERNSHIP II
(3 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain additional supervised experience in an actual or simulated work setting allowing demonstration of techniques obtained from course work.
The course will emphasize planning and implementation of activities and physical, social,
emotional, and cognitive development of the child. Practicum training topics include: good
work habits, application of guidance techniques, human relations, program planning, and
classroom management. Prerequisites: Departmental Approval. Corequisites: None.
ECE 125 - PROFESSIONALISM CDA CERT PREPARATION
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides training in professionalism through Child Development Associate Credentialing
Certificate preparation in the following areas: applying for the Child Development Associate
Credential through Direct Assessment; professional resource file development; and, strategies to establish positive and productive relationships with families. Prerequisites: Program
Admission, ECE 101, ECE 103, ECE 105, ( or 480 clock hours of work experience with young
children within the past five years) and/or ECE 125. Corequisites: None.
ECE 126 - CDA CERTIFICATE ASSESSMENT
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides opportunities to demonstrate and obtain documentation of competency in the following areas: Professional resource file completion; parent opinion questionnaires; formal
observation; oral in review; and written assessment. Prerequisites: Program admission, ECE
101, ECE 103, ECE 105, 480 clock hours of work experience within the last five years with
young children or ECE 121, ECE 122 and ECE 224.. Corequisites: ECE 125.
ECE 132 - INFANT/TODDLER DEVEOPMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the three developmentally meaningful age periods during infancy. Provides knowledge, grounded in brain and attachment research, about how children learn and the skills and
attitudes necessary to support optimum social/emotional, cognitive, and physical development
for children from birth to three. Principles of brain development and language and communication will be explored in depth. Special emphasis is placed on experiential learning to show
caregivers practical ways of meeting the fundamental needs of all infants in group care settings and of helping them learn the lessons that every infant comes into the world eager to
learn. The needs of infants and toddlers with established disabilities as well as those at risk
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for developmental problems will be examined from the perspective of early intervention and
inclusion. Prerequisite: Provisional Admission Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
ECE 134 - INFANT/TODDLER GROUP CARE
(5 credit/0 contact hours)
Provides the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to meet the fundamental needs of children from birth to three in-group care settings. Establishes a foundation for a responsive, relationship-based curriculum for children birth to three who are in-group care settings. Introduces
the philosophy behind primary care, continuity of care, and respectful care. Explores ways of
creating environments for infant/toddler group care which foster optimum social/environmental, physical and cognitive development, promote cultural sensitivity and encourage positive
parent caregiver relations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 151 - INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY ISSUES
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Introduces the student to social and cultural issues, which affect families and familiarizes the
student with local resources, which offer services to families in crisis. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 152 - EARLY ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, intellectual development and the
early adolescent (12-15 years of age). Provides learning experiences related to the principles
of human growth, development, and maturation, and theories of learning and behavior.
Prerequisites: Unavailable. Corequisites: None.
ECE 201 - EXCEPTIONALITIES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides for the development of knowledge and skills that will enable the student to understand individuals with special needs and appropriately guide their development. Special
emphasis is placed on acquainting the student with programs and community resources that
serve families with special needs persons. Topics include inclusion/least restrictive environment (LRE), physical disabilities and health disorders, intellectual exceptionalities,
social/emotional disorders, and community resources. Prerequisites: ECE 103. Corequisites:
None.
ECE 202 - SOCIAL ISSUES & FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Enables the student to become familiar with the social issues that affect families of today and
to develop a plan for coping with these issues as they occur in the occupational environment.
Students are introduced to local programs and agencies that offer services to those in need.
Topics include: professional responsibilities, family/social issues, community resources, parent education and support, teacher-parent communication, community partnerships, social
diversity and anti-bias issues, transitioning the child, and school family activities.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 203 - HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of the
school age child (6 to 12 years of age). Provides learning experiences related to the principles
of human growth and development, and theories of learning and behavior. Topics include:
developmental characteristics, guidance techniques, developmentally appropriate practice,
introduction to children with special needs, and observation skills. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
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ECE 211 - METHODS AND MATERIALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops skills to enable the student to work as a paraprofessional in a program for prekindergarten through elementary aged children. Topics include: instructional techniques, curriculum, materials for instruction, and learning environments. Prerequisites: ECE 202.
Corequisites: None.
ECE 212 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops skills and knowledge of professional practices applicable to programs for pre-kindergarten and school-aged children. Topics include: professional qualifications and professionalism Prerequisites: ECE 212. Corequisites: None.
ECE 217 - DAY CARE ADMINISTRATION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides training in planning, implementation, and maintenance of an effective early childhood
program. Topics include: organization, mission, philosophy, goals and history of a program;
types of programs; laws, rules, regulations accreditation and program evaluation; needs
assessment; administrative roles and board of directors; marketing, public and community
relations, grouping, enrollment and retention; working with parents; professionalism and work
ethics; and time and stress management Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites:
None.
ECE 221 - FACILITY MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides training in early childhood facilities management. Topics include: space management, money management, and program, equipment and supplies management.
Prerequisites: ECE 123. Corequisites: None.
ECE 222 - PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides training in personnel management in early childhood settings. Topics include: staff
records; communication; personnel planning; personnel policies; managing payroll, recruitment, selection, interviewing, hiring, motivating, firing, and staff retention; staff scheduling;
staff development; providing guidance and supervision; conflict resolution; and staff evaluation. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECE 224 - EARLY CHILDCARE & EDUCATION INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides the student with the opportunity to gain experience in a simulated or actual work setting. Students will be placed in an approved setting(s) through-out the quarter where planning,
implementing, observing, and evaluating activities are the focus of their involvement. An evaluation procedure will be used by the designee of the institution and the on-site supervisor to
critique the student's performance. Topics include: problem solving, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of developmentally appropriate practice, professional development
and resource file (portfolio) development. Prerequisites: Departmental Approval. Corequisites:
None.
ECE 251 - DESIGNING PROGRAMS AND ENVIRONMENTS FOR
SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN AND YOUTH
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
Provides the student with information about preparing appropriate environments and planning
and implementing activities for school age children and youth. This class includes 30 hours of
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lab, during which the students will be observed implementing the concepts learned in class.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.. Corequisites: None.
ECO 191 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society.
Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as
they apply to everyday life. Topics include: basic economic principles; economic forces and
indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income;
and United States economy in perspective. Prerequisite: Program Admission. Prerequisites:
Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECO 192 - MICROECONOMICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a description and analysis of microeconomic operations in contemporary society.
Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of microeconomic concepts and theories
as they apply to daily life. Topics include: basic economic principles; theory of the corporate
firm; market system; market structure, pricing, and government regulation; resource markets;
and international trade. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ECO 193 - MACROECONOMICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a description and analysis of macroeconomic operations in contemporary society.
Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of macroeconomic concepts and policies. Topics include: basic economic principles, macroeconomic principles, macroeconomic
theory, macroeconomic policy, money and banking, and United States economy in perspective. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
EHO 100 - HORTICULTURE SCIENCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamentals of plant science and horticulture as a career field. Topics include:
industry overview, plant parts, plant functions, environmental factors in horticulture, soil function and components, fertilizer elements and analysis, and propagation techniques.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
EHO 101 - WOODY ORNAMENTAL PLANT ID
(6 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides the basis for a fundamental understanding of the taxonomy, identification, and culture requirements of woody plants. Topics include: introduction to woody plants, classification
of woody plants, and woody plant identification and culture requirements. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
EHO 108 - PEST MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides experience in insect, disease, and weed identification and control with emphasis on
safety and legal requirements for state licensure. Topics include: identification of insects, diseases, and weeds; safety regulations; equipment use and care; and regulations for licensure.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
EHO 112 - LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces cultural techniques required for proper landscape maintenance with emphasis on
practical application and managerial techniques. Topics include: landscape management and
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administrative functions for landscape management Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
EHO 133 - TURF MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/8 contact hours)
A study of turfgrass used in the southern United States. Topics include: industry overview, soil
and soil modification; soil fertility; turf installation; turf maintenance, turf diseases, insects and
weeds: and estimating costs on management practices Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
ELC 104 - SOLDERING TECHNOLOGY
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Develops the ability to solder and desolder connectors, components, and printed circuit
boards using industry standards. Topics include: safety practices, total quality management
concepts, soldering, desoldering, anti-static grounding, and surface mount techniques.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 108 - DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS II
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues direct current (DC) concepts and applications. Topics include: complex series/parallel circuits and DC theorems. Prerequisites: ELC 106 or IFC 101 and MAT 103 (diploma), or
MAT 191 (degree). Corequisites: None.
ELC 110 - ALTERNATING CURRENT II
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues development of AC concepts with emphasis on constructing, verifying, and troubleshooting reactive circuits using RLC theory and oscilloscopes. Topics include: reactive
components, simple RLC circuits, AC circuit resonance, passive filters, and non-sinusoidal
wave forms. Prerequisites: ELC 109 or IFC 102. Corequisites: None.
ELC 115 - SOLID STATE DEVICES II
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the exploration of the physical characteristics and applications of solid-state
devices. Topics include: bipolar junction theory, bipolar junction application, and field effect
transistors. Prerequisites: ELC 114 OR IFC 103. Corequisites: None.
ELC 117 - LINEAR INTERGRATED CIRCUITS
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides in-depth instruction on the characteristics and applications of linear integrated circuits. Topics include: operational amplifiers, timers, and three-terminal voltage regulators.
Prerequisites: ELC 115. Corequisites: None.
ELC 118 - DIGITAL ELECTRONICS I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the basic building blocks of digital circuits. Topics include: binary arithmetic, logic
gates and truth tables, Boolean algebra and minimization techniques, logic families, and digital test equipment. Prerequisites: ELC 114 or IFC 103. Corequisites: None.
ELC 119 - DIGITAL ELECTRONICS II
(4 credit/10 contact hours)
Uses the concepts developed in Digital Electronics I as a foundation for the study of more
advanced devices and circuits. Topics include: flip-flops, counters, multiplexers and demultiplexers, encoding and decoding, displays, and analog to digital and digital to analog conversions. Prerequisites: ELC 118. Corequisites: None.
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ELC 120 - MICROPROCESSORS I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of microprocessor
and microcontroller operation, programming, interfacing, interrupts, and troubleshooting. The
choice of microprocessor and microcontroller used in the lab experiences and illustration of
basic operation is not important. The main objective of the course is to give the student a basic
understanding of microprocessor operation and applications. Prerequisites: ELC 119.
Corequisites: None.
ELC 123 - COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONICS SURVEY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts and devices used in electronics communications. Topics
include: transmission, modulation and detection, receivers, transmitters, propagation, antennas, and deterioration. Prerequisites: ELC 115. Corequisites: None.
ELC 124 - INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS SURVEY
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts and technologies utilized in industrial electronics applications. Topics include: process controls, sensors, motor controls, programmed controls,
mechanical devices, fluid power, and robotics. Prerequisites: ELC 120. Corequisites: None.
ELC 211 - PROCESS CONTROL
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces industrial process control applications with an emphasis on sensors and signal
conditioning. Topics include: symbology and drawing standards, control techniques, sensors
and signal conditioning, and ISA and other relevant standards. Prerequisites: ELC 120.
Corequisites: None.
ELC 212 - MOTOR CONTROLS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces the application of motor controls in the industrial environment. Topics include:
AC/DC motors, AC/DC drives, MCC and contractors, NEC and NEMA standards, ladder diagrams, and power sources. Prerequisites: ELC 115. Corequisites: None.
ELC 213 - PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLERS
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides the basic skills and techniques used in industrial application of programmable controls. Topics include: controller hardware, programming, PC applications, and troubleshooting.
Prerequisites: ELC 120. Corequisites: None.
ELC 214 - MECHNICAL DEVICES
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops knowledge and skills necessary to transmit mechanical power using common industrial linkage types. Emphasis is placed on use of mechanical devices in combination with electronic controls. Topics include: linkages, motion analysis, gear drives, and preventative maintenance. Prerequisites: MAT 104 or MAT 105. Corequisites: None.
ELC 215 - FLUID POWER
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an overview of fluid power operation as applied to industrial electronics. Emphasis
is placed on the interfacing of electronic and fluidic systems. Topics include: safety, fluid
dynamics, hydraulics, pneumatics, air logic, and electrical interfacing. Prerequisites: MAT 104
or MAT 105 . Corequisites: None.
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ELC 216 - ROBOTICS
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Explores robotic concepts, terminology, and basic applications. Emphasis is placed on programming in robotic languages and robot/human interfacing safety practices. Topics include:
safety, terminology, languages, and programming. Prerequisites: ELC 213, ELC 214, ELC
215. Corequisites: None.
ELC 217 - COMPUTER HARDWARE
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of installing, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, and repairing microcomputer systems. Topics include installation, configuration,
upgrading, diagnosing, troubleshooting, preventive maintenance, basic hardware, printers,
and basic networking. Prerequisites: ELC 120. Corequisites: None.
ELC 218 - OPERATING SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Command Line Prompt, Windows 9x,
Windows 2000, and future operating systems. Topics include Operating system fundamentals;
installing, configuration, and upgrading; diagnosing and troubleshooting; and networks.
Prerequisites: ELC 217. Corequisites: None.
ELC 260 - TELECOMMUNICATION AND DATA CABLING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the basic of cable installation from the initial site survey to splicing cable and making connections. Through laboratory activities, students perform the basic tasks of a cable
installer. Topics include: basic standards and practices, cable rating and performance, cable
installation and management, testing and troubleshooting, industry standards, pulling cable,
and understanding blueprints. Prerequisites: ELC 119 for degree/diploma, advisor approval
for TCC's. Corequisites: None.
ELC 261 - TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS INSTALLATION AND
PROGRAMMING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Teaches the installation, programming, testing, and repair of simple and complex telephone
systems. Laboratory activities give practical hands-on experience with various telephone systems. Topics include multi-line system installation, system programming, peripheral devices,
and customer relations. Prerequisites: ELC 260. Corequisites: None.
ELC 262 - TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND DATA TRANSMISSION
CONCEPTS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to basic concepts on telecommunication and data transmission.
Topics include introduction to frequency and bandwidth, delineation of signal types and characteristics, methods of modulation and detection, transmission modes, characteristics of
transmission media, measuring transmission signals, noise and distortion levels, multiplexing
and emerging technologies Prerequisites: ELC 261. Corequisites: None.
ELC 270 - INTRODUCTION AND WORKPLACE PRACTICES
FOR THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY
(2 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the telecommunications network, which includes the central office,
interoffice facilities and customer premises equipment. The course also covers the regulatory
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
environment and its effect on the industry. It includes an introduction to the Services
Technician job and a review of the skills, job characteristics, employment opportunities available and a review of workplace practices such as Listening Skills, Positive Work Ethics,
Problem Solving, Personal Wellness and Customer Service Skills. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 272 - SERVICE TECHNICIAN PC SKILLS
(2 credit/30 contact hours)
This course covers the basic PC skills needed for the Services Technician job. It includes a
brief history of computers, a description of hardware components, file structures and an introduction to software packages such as Word, Excel and Access. It also provides an overview
of networking and PC security. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 274 - INTRODUCTION TO BASIC TELEPHONY
(3 credit/30 contact hours)
This course includes a module on Basic Electricity along with an overview of analog and digital transmission and transmission mediums such as cable, coax and fiber. It includes a
description of the components that make up the telephone network and how they are interrelated. It also covers business telecommunications systems, wireless telecommunications and
evolving architectures and digitals services such as frame relay, ISDN, ADSL and Internet
service providers. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 276 - SAFETY FOR THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIANS
(4 credit/40 contact hours)
This course includes a certification in First Aid and CPR along with an overview of hazardous
materials, Right-to-Know Laws and MSDS. It also covers vehicle safety, worksite safety, personal protective equipment, fire extinguishers and ladder safety. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 278 - FUNDAMENTALS OF INSTALLATION & MAINTENANCE FOR
SERVICE TECHNICIANS
(2 credit/40 contact hours)
This course covers the proper use of hand tools and power tools along with a discussion of
electrical and environmental hazards and electrical safety testing equipment. It also covers the
basic installation of telephone service, which includes reading service orders, placing aerial
and buried service wires, connecting the network interface, and installing jacks. Prerequisites:
Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
ELC 280 - CLIMBING SKILLS FOR SERVICE TECHNICIANS
(2 credit/40 contact hours)
This course covers safe pole climbing and ladder handling required for the Services
Technician job. The student will be trained in the proper method of climbing and working from
ladders and poles at a height of 18 feet. The course also covers electrical and physical hazards that may be encountered in the performance of the Services Technician job.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
EMP 100 - INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS & PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides a study of human relations and professional development in today's rapidly changing world that prepares students for living and working in a complex society. Topics include:
human relations skills, job acquisition skills, job retention skills, job advancement skills, and
professional image skills. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
EMS 120 - EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 1-BASIC
(8 credit/130 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the Emergency Medical Technician profession. This course covers
the first half of the U.S. Department of Transportation Basic EMT Program. Topics include:
introduction to emergency care, EMS systems, well-being of the EMT, medical-legal aspects
of emergency care, hazardous materials, blood and airborne pathogens infectious diseases,
ambulance operations and emergency vehicle operations, the human body, patient assessment, communications and documentation, lifting and moving patients, gaining access, airway, basic life support-CPR and automatic external defibrillation. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
EMS 121 - EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY II-BASIC
(7 credit/88 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the Emergency Medical Technician profession. This course covers
the second half of the U.S. Department of Transportation Basic EMT Program. Topics include:
general pharmacology, respiratory emergencies, cardiology, diabetes, altered mental status,
seizures, allergies, poisonings, environmental emergencies, behavioral emergencies, bleeding and shock, PASG, soft tissue injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, head and spinal injuries,
OB/GYN, infants and children, and special needs patients. Prerequisites: EMS 120.
Corequisites: None.
EMS 122 - EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY III- INTERMEDIATE
(9 credit/134 contact hours)
This course covers the U.S. Department of Transportation 1985 Emergency Medical
Technician- Intermediate Curriculum and the U.S. D.O.T. Training Guidelines for Hazardous
Material Awareness Level - I. The EMT-I course is designed to provide additional training and
increased knowledge and skills in specific aspects of advanced life support. This course is for
individuals who have successfully completed the EMT-Basic course as a prerequisite. Topics
include: roles and responsibilities, EMS systems, medical legal, communications, documentation, medical terminology, body systems, patient assessment, advanced airway, shock, trauma, shock management, IV administration, intraosseous infusion, medical emergencies I,
medical emergencies II, diabetic emergencies and dextrose 50% administration, hazardous
material awareness, patient handling, and extrication. Prerequisites: EMS 120, EMS 121 or
National Registry EMT-Basic Certificate. Corequisites: None.
EMS 126 - INTRODUCTION TO THE PARAMEDIC PROFESSION
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the paramedic profession. Discussion centers on functions that
extend beyond the EMT scope of practice. Topics include: the EMS system/roles and responsibilities, well-being of the paramedic, illness and injury prevention, medical/legal considerations, ethics, ambulance operations, medical incident command, rescue awareness/operations, hazardous materials incidents and crime scene awareness. This course provides
instruction on topics in Division 1, Sections 1-5, Division 7, Section 1 and Division 8 sections
1-5 of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: ENG 101, MAT 101, AHS 101, SCT 100.
EMS 127 - PATIENT ASSESSMENT
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental principles and skills involved in assessing the pre-hospital patient.
Emphasis is on the systematic approach to patient assessment, with adaptations for the medical versus the trauma patient. Topics include: therapeutic communications, history taking,
techniques of physical exam, patient assessment, clinical decision-making, EMS communications, and documentation. This course provides instruction on topics in Division 1, Section 9
and Division 3, Sections 1-9 of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard Curriculum.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: AHS 101, EMS 128.
EMS 128 - APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY & PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
This course introduces the concepts of pathophysiology as it correlates to disease processes.
This course will enable caregivers to enhance their overall assessment and management
skills. Disease-specific pathophysiology is covered in each related section of the curriculum.
This course covers a review of cellular composition and function, including cellular environment as it relates to fluid and acid-base balances. Content on genetics and familial diseases
are discussed. Hypoperfusion, including various forms of shock, multiple organ dysfunction
syndrome and cellular metabolism impairment are integral components of this course. The
next portion of this section provides information on the body's self-defense mechanisms, the
inflammatory response, and variances in immunity. The last topic covered is stress and disease, which includes stress responses and the interrelationships among stress, coping, and
disease. Prerequisites: AHS 101. Corequisites: None.
EMS 129 - PHARMACOLOGY
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
This unit is designed to help the paramedic implement a patient management plan based on
principles and applications of pharmacology. Discussion of pharmacology includes: identification of drugs, drug calculations, drug administration techniques and procedures and drug safety and standards. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: ENG 101, MAT 101, SCT
100, EMS 200.
EMS 130 - RESPIRATORY FUNCTION AND MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
This unit is designed to help the Paramedic assess and treat a wide variety of respiratory related illnesses in the pediatric and adult patient. Topics include a review of anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology of foreign body airway obstruction, recognition of respiratory compromise, use of airway adjunctive equipment and procedures, current therapeutic modalities for
bronchial asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, spontaneous pneumothorax, and hyperventilation syndromes. This section also provides expanded information for adult respiratory
distress syndrome, pulmonary thromboembolism, neoplasms of the lung, pneumonia, emphysema, pulmonary edema, and respiratory infections. This course provides instruction on topics in Division 2 (Airway), Section 1 (Airway Management and Ventilation) and Division 5
(Medical), Section 1 (Respiratory) of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard
Curriculum. Prerequisites: AHS 104, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129. Corequisites:
None.
EMS 131 - TRAUMA
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
This unit is designed to introduce the student to assessment and management of the trauma
patient, to include: systematic approach to the assessment and management of trauma,
demonstration of the assessment and management of certain types of trauma patients and
bodily injuries. Student should complete the requirements for the Basic Trauma Life Support
Course or the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support Course. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites:
None.
EMS 132 - CARDIOLOGY I
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes the study of the cardiovascular system. Cardiology I will introduce and explore
cardiovascular epidemiology, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, and electrophysiology. This course will also provide instruction on initial cardiovascular assessment, focused his233
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
tory, detailed physical examination, and electrocardiographic monitoring. Management of the
cardiovascular patient will be taught in Cardiology II. At the completion of this unit, the paramedic student will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles and assessment findings
to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the patient with cardiovascular disease. This course provides instruction on topics in Division 5 (Medical), Section 2
(Cardiology) of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. Prerequisites:
EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129. Corequisites: ENG 101, SCT 101, EMS 132, EMS
200.
EMS 133 - CARDIOLOGY II
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
This course expounds on the objectives in Cardiology I emphasizing advanced patient
assessment and management of the cardiac patient. Topics will include advanced cardiovascular assessment, pharmacological intervention, electrical intervention, and emergency resuscitative treatment utilizing the American Heart Association’s Advanced Cardiac Life Support
(ACLS) Providers course. This course provides instruction on topics in Division 5 (Medical),
Section 2 (Cardiology) of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard Curriculum.
Prerequisites: EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129. Corequisites: ENG 101, SCT 101,
EMS 132, EMS 200.
EMS 134 - MEDICAL EMERGENCIES
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an in-depth study of the nervous, endocrine, gastrointestinal, renal, hematopoietic,
and immune systems. Topics include epidemiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and management of specific injuries/illnesses. Emphasis is placed on allergies/anaphylaxis, toxicology, environmental emergencies, and infectious and communicable diseases. General/specific
pathophysiology assessment and management are discussed in detail for environmental
emergencies. Infectious and communicable disease topics include public health principles,
public health agencies, infection, pathogenicity, infectious agents, and specific infectious disease processes and their management. This course provides instruction on topics in Division
5 (Medical), Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 of the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National
Standard Curriculum. Prerequisites: AHS 101, EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129.
Corequisites: None.
EMS 135 - MATERNAL/PEDIATRIC
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes the study of gynecological, obstetrical, pediatric and neonatal emergencies.
Maternal/Child combines the unique relationships and situations encountered with mother and
child. Provides a detailed understanding of anatomy/physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and treatment priorities for the OB/GYN patient. Pediatric and neonatal growth and
development, anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, assessment and treatment specifics
are covered in detail. Successful completion of a PLS/PALS course is required. This course
provides instruction on topics in Division's 5 (Medical), Sections 13 (Obstetrics) & 14
(Gynecology) and 6 (Special Considerations), Sections 1 (Neonatology) and 2 (Pediatrics) of
the USDOT/NHTSA Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. Prerequisites: EMS 126, EMS
127, EMS 128, EMS 129. Corequisites: None.
EMS 136 - SPECIAL PATIENTS
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the assessment and management of behavioral emergencies as they
pertain to prehospital care. Topics include: communication skills and crisis intervention,
assessment and management of the adult and adolescent patient with behavioral emergencies, management of the violent patient, management of the suicidal patient, medical/legal
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
considerations, and stress management. Life span, geriatrics, abuse, special challenges, and
chronic care patients are included. Prerequisites: EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129.
Corequisites: None.
EMS 200 - CLINICAL APPLICATION OF ADVANCED EMERGENCY CARE
(10 credit/300 contact hours)
This course provides a range of clinical experiences for the student paramedic to include clinical application of advanced emergency care. Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: AHS 101, EMS, 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129, EMS 130, EMS 131, EMS
132, EMS 133, EMS 134, EMS 135, EMS 136.
EMS 201 - SUMMATIVE EVALUATION
(5 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides supervised clinical experience in the hospital and prehospital advanced life support
settings to include: EMS leadership, summative case evaluations and EKG interpretation. This
course also includes a: comprehensive paramedic program examination and a board examination review. Prerequisites: EMS 126, EMS 127, EMS 128, EMS 129, EMS 130, EMS 131,
EMS 132, EMS 133, EMS 134, EMS 136 . Corequisites: EMS 200.
EMSW BTL01 - BASIC TRAUMA LIFE SUPPORT
(16 credit/ contact hours)
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
ENG 096 - ENGLISH II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes standard English usage. Topics include: capitalization, subjects and predicates,
punctuation, sentence structure, correct verb tenses, standard spelling, and basic paragraph
development. Prerequisites: ENG 095, or entrance English score in accordance with
approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours
on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
ENG 097 - ENGLISH III
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the rules of grammar, punctuation, and spelling in order to ensure a smooth transition into communicating orally and in writing. Topics include: basic grammar review, use of
punctuation, use of capitalization, recognition of clauses and phrases, spelling, writing sentences, and writing simple paragraphs. Prerequisites: ENG 096, or entrance English score in
accordance with approved DATE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2 -to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
ENG 098 - ENGLISH IV
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the ability to communicate using written and oral methods. Topics include: basic
paragraph construction, proofreading, written reports, and oral reports. Prerequisites: ENG
097, or entrance English score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels.
*Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
ENG 101 - ENGLISH
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities.
Topics include: analysis of writing techniques used in selected readings, writing practice, editing and proofreading, research skills, and oral presentation skills. Homework assignments
reinforce classroom learning. score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score lev235
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
els Prerequisites: ENG 097, or entrance English score in accordance with approved DTAE
admission score levels: and RDG 097, or entrance reading score in accordance with approved
DTAE admission score levels. Corequisites: None.
ENG 102 - TECHNICAL WRITING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communication techniques, procedures, and
reporting formats used in industry and business. Topics include: composition/grammar review,
technical communications, construction of informal reports, business letters, oral reports,
graphics use, information collection, and production of technical reports. Homework assignments reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisites: ENG 101, ENG 098, or entrance English
score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels; and RDG 098, or entrance
reading score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels. Corequisites: None.
ENG 111- BUSINESS ENGLISH
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes a functional and comprehensive review of English usage. Topics include: English
grammar, sentence structure, and composition fundamentals. Prerequisites: ENG 097 or
entrance English score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels; and RDG
097, or entrance reading score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels.
Corequisites: None.
ENG 112 - BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides knowledge and application of written and oral communications found in business situations. Topics include: writing fundamentals and speaking fundamentals. Prerequisites: BUS
101, ENG 111. Corequisites: None.
ENG 191 - COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society.
Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research.
Topics include: writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Prerequisites: Program
Admission level language competency or ENG 098. Corequisites: None.
ENG 193 - COMPOSITION & RHETORIC II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the student's ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature and practice various
modes of writing. Topics include: reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research;
and writing about literature. Prerequisites: ENG 191 with a C or better. Corequisites: None.
ENG 195 - TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communications techniques, procedures, and
reporting formats used in industry and business. Topics include: reference use and research,
device and process description, formal technical report writing, business correspondence, and
oral technical report presentation. Prerequisites: ENG 191 with a C or better. Corequisites:
None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
EST 100 - INTRODUCTION TO ESTHETIC THEORY
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts and procedures necessary for the safe and efficient use
of esthetics products and equipment. Topics include: sterilization, disinfection, and sanitation;
EPA/OSHA requirements; professional image and ethics; esthetics career opportunities; and
professional vocabulary. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
EST 101 - ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN
(5 credit/11 contact hours)
Focuses on normal structure, texture, and function of the skin. Topics include: morphology,
histology of skin and glands, and medical terms for describing skin conditions. Prerequisites:
EST 100. Corequisites: None.
EST 102 - SKIN CARE PROCEDURES
(6 credit/13 contact hours)
Focuses on the history of skin care and cosmetics and the use of body treatments. Topics
include: aromatherapy, wraps, basic facial treatments, hair removal, waxing, client records,
and male grooming. Prerequisites: EST 101. Corequisites: None.
EST 103 - ELECTRICITY AND FACIAL TREATMENTS WITH MACHINES
(7 credit/14 contact hours)
Focuses on the use of machines for aiding in skin rejuvenation and correction. Topics include:
galvanic, high frequency, brushing, vacuum, vaporizers, and microdermabrasion.
Prerequisites: EST 102. Corequisites: None.
EST 104 - ADVANCED SKIN CARE
(5 credit/12 contact hours)
Continues the study of skin care and body treatments with emphasis on medical implications.
Topics include: conditions and disorders of the skin, advanced skin analysis, cellulite, massage, reflexology, pre-op and post-op skin care, medical charting and record keeping, patient
psychology, and cosmetic surgery. Prerequisites: EST 102. Corequisites: None.
EST 105 - COLOR THEORY AND MAKE-UP
(4 credit/9 contact hours)
Provides instruction on and application of techniques and theory in the treatment of the skin.
Topics include: morphology of hair, hair removal, sanitation, eyebrow shaping, waxing,
ingrown hair service, color theory, face proportions and shape, choosing and using makeup
products, makeup tools, basic makeup application, camouflage therapy, and medical application Prerequisites: EST 102. Corequisites: EST 103, EST 104.
EST 106 - PRACTICUM I
(6 credit/18 contact hours)
Practicum focuses on skin care procedures, color and make-up and salon management.
Topics include: customer service, sanitation and sterilization, camouflage make-up, grooming,
nutrition and herbal healing arts, and image consulting. Prerequisites: All program courses
except EST 107. Corequisites: None.
EST 107 - PRACTICUM II
(6 credit/18 contact hours)
Practicum continues to focus on skin care and salon management with emphasis on
advanced skills. Topics include: medical charting and record keeping, electrical facial treatments, male grooming, and advanced skin care. Prerequisites: EST 106. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
EXL2 ADV03 - EXCEL 2000 ADVANCED
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Data filters for sorting, analyze data with PivotTables and PivotCharts, protect and audit workbooks, macros and HTLM files, use Solver, merge and link workbooks, custom and conditional
formatting, import and export data. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 ID204 - EXCEL 2000 INTERMEDIATE
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Advanced chart functions; logical, financial, and date functions; work with web pages, freeze
and unfreeze rows and columns; use sorting and autocorrect; insert 3-D references; use auto
formatting; use and customize templates. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 ID205 - EXCEL 2000 INTERMEDIATE
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Advanced chart functions; logical, financial and date functions; work with web pages; freeze
and unfreeze rows and columns; use sorting and autocorrect; insert 3-D references; use auto
formatting; use and customize templates. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 IMD06 - EXCEL 2000 INTERMEDIATE
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Advanced chart functions; logical, financial and date functions; work with web pages; freeze
and unfreeze rows and columns; use sorting and autocorrect; insert 3-D references; use auto
formatting; use and customize templates Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 IT101 - EXCEL 2000 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Create, edit, and format worksheets; create and copy formulas and functions; create and modify charts; work with borders and shading; create relative, absolute, and mixed references;
create headers and footers; adjust page set-up, print area, and print titles. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 IT207 - EXCEL 2000 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Create, edit and format worksheets; create and copy formulas and functions; create and modify charts; work with borders and shading; create relative, absolute, and mixed references;
create headers and footers; adjust page set-up, print area, and print titles. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 IT208 - EXCEL 2000 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Create, edit and format worksheets; create and copy formulas and functions; create and modify charts; work with borders and shading; create relative, absolute, and mixed references;
create headers and footers; adjust page set-up, print area, and print titles. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
EXL2 IT220 - EXCEL 2000 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Create, edit and format worksheets; create and copy formulas and functions; create and modify charts; work with borders and shading; create relative, absolute, and mixed references;
create headers and footers; adjust page setup, print area, and print titles Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
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EXL9 IM102 - EXCEL 97 INTERMEDIATE
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Creating templates, renaming worksheets, moving worksheets; building lists; managing lists;
using 3-D references; manipulating data; creating macros; using timesavers. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
EXL9 IT101 - EXCEL 97 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Navigating workbooks, entering and editing data, widening columns; using formulas and functions; relocating and reusing data; exploring formula construction; formatting worksheet
appearance; printing worksheets; working with charts, using help. Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
EXL9 IT203 - EXCEL 97 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Navigating workbooks, entering and editing data, widening columns; using formulas and functions; relocating and reusing data; exploring formula construction; formatting worksheet
appearance; printing worksheets; working with charts, using help. Prerequisites: None.
Corequisites: None.
FIN 191 - INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to financial markets, institutions, and management in contemporary
society. Emphasis is placed on developing and understanding of the financial markets in which
funds are traded, the financial institutions participating in facilitating the trade of such funds,
and the financial principles and concepts behind sound financial management. Topics include:
financial systems of the United States, business finance management, and financing other
sectors of the economy. Prerequisites: ACC 191. Corequisites: None.
FMT 100 - FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces types of facilities, the scope of the facilities manager’s responsibility,
and techniques for managing various facilities. Focus is on the diversity of facilities and managers’ styles. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
FMT 101 - FACILITIES MANAGEMENT PLANNING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course presents an overview of the role and methods of facilities management as it supports an organization’s objectives. It focuses on strategic facility planning to ensure that facilities are appropriately planned to meet the needs and changing requirement of building users
over time. Prerequisites: FMT 100. Corequisites: None.
FMT 102 - RISK MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces some of the more common risk factors in various facilities. It focuses
on management of risks and implementation of risk treatments. Prerequisites: FMT 100.
Corequisites: None.
FSC 101 - INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SCIENCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Includes introductions to the history of the fire service, fire safety for people and property, fire
behavior, fire hazards of materials, fire investigation and data collection, fire protection through
building construction and design, water-based and non-water based fire protection systems,
alarm and detection systems and devices, municipal fire defenses, fire department organization, codes and standards, fire service organizations and fire service careers. National
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Standards Met: NFPA 1021, Fire Officer Professional Qualifications, 1992 edition 4-4.2, 4-4.3.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 102 - EMERGENCY SERVICE FUNDAMENTALS
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Emergency Service Fundamentals Includes: Fire Department Orientation, Fire Department
Communication, Infection Control, First Aid, CPR, and Hazardous Materials First Responder
Awareness Level. The emergency medical care capabilities are entrance requirements for
other basic fire fighter training in NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional
Qualifications, 1997 edition. Students will receive: CPR Certification, First Aid Certificate,
Infection Control Certificate, Haz Mat Awareness Certification. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 103 - BASIC FIREFIGHTER MODULE I
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
The first course for basic fire fighting skills. Physically demanding with practical fire fighting
activities throughout. Meets or exceeds the objectives of the standard Georgia Fire Academy
Module I course including: Fire Fighter Orientation and Safety; Protective Clothing; Fire
Behavior; Building Construction; Breathing Apparatus; Ropes, Knots and Hoisting; Ladders;
Forcible Entry; Ventilation; Fire Streams; Hose and Appliances; Water Supply; Introduction to
Fire Control; Fire Rescue; Safety Review and Work Stations; Salvage; Overhaul; Structural
Fire Simulations; Physical Training/Skill Review (daily); Practical Testing/Study Groups and
Written Testing. A final written test will be administered by Georgia Fire Academy with equivalent credit and a Georgia Fire Academy Module I Certificate issued to successful candidates.
Students possessing equivalent training and credentials and meeting the Fire Fighter I
Entrance Requirements may challenge an exemption test for FSC 103/Basic Fire Fighter
Module I. Prerequisites: Fire Fighter I Certificate Program Entrance Requirements.
Corequisites: None.
FSC 104 - BASIC FIREFIGHTER MODULE II
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
When combined with FSC 103/Basic Fire Fighter Module I, FSC 104 meets or exceeds the
Georgia Fire Academy Module II. This class contains hands-on, live fire training and other
physically demanding firefighting activities. Topics include: Life Safety Ropes and Equipment,
Portable Fire Extinguishers, Sprinkler Operations, Water Supplies, Alarm and Detection
Systems, Fire Tactics and Safety, Foam Fire Streams, Ground Cover/Wildland Fires, Class A
Fires, Dumpster Fires, Vehicle Fires, Structural Fires, Emergency Response to Fires, Practical
Testing/Study Groups and Written Testing. A final written test will be administered by Georgia
Fire Academy with equivalent credit and a Georgia Fire Academy Module II Certificate issued
to successful candidates. Prerequisites: Fire Fighter I Certificate Program Entrance
Requirements, FSC 102, FSC 103. Corequisites: None.
FSC 105 - FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR I
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Most structural fires, fire deaths and fire injuries occur in the home. This course addresses
some of the most important responsibilities of the modern fire service; teaching the public to
prevent or if needed, escape fires and related emergencies. We have adopted the approach
that we must learn from each incident then put the information to work to prevent fires and fire
losses through public fire and life safety education. Topics include: The fire fighter's responsibility for fire investigation, fire reporting, introduction to the use of fire data, home fire safety
inspections, introduction to fire and life safety education, fire and life safety fundamentals, fire
and life safety resources, planning fire and life safety education, evaluating and selecting educational materials, working with the media, preparing instruction, teaching techniques, fire and
life safety education presentation, presentation evaluation and written testing. Final written
and performance tests may be administered by Georgia Fire Fighter Standards and Training
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
or Georgia Fire Academy for NFPA 1035, Professional Qualifications for Public Fire and Safety
Educator I Certification (depending on student eligibility). Prerequisites: Fire Fighter I
Certificate Program Entrance Requirements or admission to the Fire Science Technology
diploma/degree program. Corequisites: None.
FSC 106 - FIRE PREVENTION, PREPAREDNESS, AND MAINTENANCE
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
This course expands upon knowledge from FSC 102, 103, 104 and will emphasize pre-incident survey, maintenance and testing of various fire service tools and equipment, service testing of fire hose, and testing of fire hydrants for operability and flow. This is one of three courses designed to give the Fire Fighter 1 the knowledge and skills for testing at the NPQ FF-2
Level. Prerequisites: FSC 104 Basic Fire Fighter (Mod 2). Corequisites: .
FSC 110 - FIRE SERVICE SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces common supervision and leadership theories and practices with emphasis on the
unique supervisory requirements created by the nature of the fire department shift work and
change from emergency to non-emergency situations. Topics include: management styles and
types, leading effectively, stress management, time management, group dynamics, communication, motivation, counseling, conflict resolution and total quality management principles.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 121 - FIRE FIGHTING STRATEGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents principles of applying fire department resources to mitigate a fire or related emergency. General topics include principles of fire fighting size up, engine company operations,
hose line selection and placement, water supply, standpipe and sprinkler operations, ladder
company operations, forcible entry, ventilations, and search and rescue. Specific fires
reviewed will include private dwellings, multiple dwellings, commercial buildings, high-rise
structures, buildings under construction, structural collapse, flammable liquid and gas fires,
and waterfront fires. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 132 - FIRE SERVICE INSTRUCTOR
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Students will learn to analyze jobs and information, then prepare and present related training.
Emphasis is placed on planning, organizing, presenting, and testing using methodologies
appropriate to the subject. Topics include orientation to emergency services instruction, communication, planning and analysis, objectives, learning, assessment, methods of instruction,
instructor materials, media, training related group dynamics, classroom management, and the
legal environment. Students will have numerous hands-on opportunities to apply what they
learn. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 141 - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Study of basic fundamentals of chemistry used in fire science, types of chemical and processes; study of laws pertaining to use storage and transportation of chemicals - specifically hazardous chemicals. Emphasis is placed on emergency service in combating, controlling and
coordinating a hazardous materials incident. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites:
None.
FSC 151 - FIRE PREVENTION AND INSPECTION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
Emphasis is placed on the shared responsibility of all fire service personnel to prevent fires
and fire losses. Topics include survey of fire prevention inspections, life safety issues, review
of local and state laws regarding fire inspection and review of applicable codes and standards.
Meets NFPA 1021 (1997 edition) Fire Officer Professional Qualifications #3-3.1, 3-5.1.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 161 - FIRE SERVICE SAFETY & LOSS CTR
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
A proactive approach to fire service injury and loss prevention. Topics include a survey of fire
deaths and injuries, physical fitness, training, station activities, emergency scene activities,
post-incident activities, accident/loss analysis, safety officers, employee assistance programs,
protective clothing and equipment, insurance, and a review of applicable laws and standards
including NFPA 1500. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 201 - FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents an introduction to fire service management. Management theories, responsibilities
and concepts are discussed beginning from a historical perspective and leading to practical
modern methods. Topics include organization and management, planning for and evaluating
community fire protection, program management, managing innovation, financial management, personnel management, training, emergency management, emergency medical systems, community relations, public fire safety education, alternative delivery systems, equipment and buildings, special operations and legal aspects of fire service management.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 210 - FIRE SERVICE HYDRAULICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Begins with history and theories of use of water for fire extinguishment. Then moves to practical application of principles of hydraulics in water systems and on the fire ground. Topics
include water at rest and in motion, velocity and discharge, water distribution systems, fire
service pumps, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressure, fire streams, stand pipe systems,
automatic sprinkler systems, fire fighting foams and the Clip Board Friction Loss System.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 220 - FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
A review of fire detection and protection systems including automatic sprinkler systems,
portable fire extinguishers, restaurant kitchen systems, special hazard systems, detection systems and control systems. Applicable laws, codes and standards will be introduced along with
regulatory and support agencies. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 230 - FIRE SERVICE BUILDING CONTRUCTION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents building construction features from the perspective of fire service with emphasis
placed on the use of building construction information to prevent and reduce fire fighter and
civilian deaths and injuries. Includes principles of construction, wood construction, ordinary
construction, garden apartments, principles of fire resistance, steel construction, concrete
construction, fire growth, smoke containment, high rise construction, trusses, automatic sprinklers, rack storage, buildings under construction and pre-fire planning. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
FSC 241 - INCIDENT COMMAND
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Addresses the area of emergency scene management. Begins with a review of programs and
processes, which are the basis for a successful command system. Then moves into functions
of command. Initial response and extended as well as small and large incidents will be covered. The student will become familiar with "ICS", "Fire Command", and other successful incident management concepts and will make extensive use of fire simulation to practice new
skills. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 260 - FIRE SERVICE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Begins with fundamentals of information gathering and report writing as they apply to the fire
service then narrows its scope to include specific types of record keeping. Topics include narrative reports; personnel records; training records; vehicle and physical maintenance records;
incident reports using the national fire incident reporting system; incident investigation reports;
inspection reports; budget documentation; news releases and applicable laws, standards, procedures and recommendations. A review of use of computers for each operation will be
included as topics are covered. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
FSC 270 - FIRE INVESTIGATION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Includes introduction to the crime of arson, fire fighters responsibilities in fire cause determination, building construction, fire behavior, fire causes, point of origin determination, fire scene
investigation, field equipment, evidence collection and preservation, fire related deaths, forensic lab services and equipment, arson motives, arson for profit, information sources, insurance
and vehicle fires. Also included are statutes relevant to arson; defenses to arson; laws of
arrest, search and seizure; administrative inspections and searches; evidence rules; trial
preparation and judicial proceedings. Students will investigate prepared fire to practice their
skills. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
HMT 100 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY FOR HEALTHCARE MANAGERS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces prefixes, suffixes and word roots used in the language of medicine.
Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through the knowledge of wood
roots, prefixes and suffixes. Topics include medical vocabulary, abbreviations and terms that
relate to the anatomy, physiology, pathological conditions and treatment of each body system.
Upon completion of the course, students should be able to pronounce, spell and define medical terms related to each body system and their pathological disorders, read medical orders
and reports and use medical abbreviations and symbols correctly. Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: None.
HMT 100 - MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the basic spelling and pronunciation of medical terms and the use of these terms
as they relate to anatomy, treatment, surgery and drugs. Topics include: word analysis, word
elements, spelling, pronunciation and semantics. Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: None.
HMT 101 - INTRODUCTION TO HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces the functions, practices, organizational structures and professional
issues in healthcare management. Emphasis is placed on planning, controlling, directing and
communicating within health and human service organizations. Upon completion, students
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
should be able to apply the concepts of management within a healthcare services environment. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
HMT 102 - ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES FOR HEALTHCARE
MANAGEMENT
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
This course emphasizes the essential administrative skills required for healthcare managers.
Topics include receptionist duties, telephone techniques, appointment scheduling and time
management, computers in the medical environment, mail procedures, medical filing, professional fees and credit arrangements, managing practice finances, banking services and procedures, billing and collecting procedures, payroll procedures, and health information management. Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to perform administrative procedures in a healthcare environment. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
HMT 103 - MEDICAL LAW & ETHICS FOR HEALTHCARE PERSONNEL
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
This course covers the legal relationships of physicians and patients, contractual agreements,
professional liability, malpractice, medical practice acts, informed consent, and bioethical
issues. Emphasis is placed upon legal terms, professional attitudes, and the principles and
basic concepts of ethics and laws involved in providing medical services. Upon completion,
the student should be able to meet the legal and ethical responsibilities of a healthcare manager. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
HMT 104 - HEALTHCARE STATISTICS FOR MANAGERS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course covers maintenance, compilation, analysis and presentation of healthcare statistics. Topics include basic statistical principles, morbidity and mortality, commonly computed in
hospital rates, uniform reporting requirements and construction of data displays. Upon completion, students should be able to calculate morbidity, mortality and commonly computed hospital rates, comply with information reporting requirements and analyze/present statistical
data. Prerequisites: MAT 196. Corequisites: None.
HMT 110 - MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
This course covers the basic concepts and techniques for managing and maintaining health
record systems in a variety of healthcare settings. Topics include health record content, qualitative analysis, format, record control, storage, retention, forms, indices and registers, numbering and filing systems. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of health record systems, including their maintenance and control. Prerequisites:
HMT 102. Corequisites: None.
HMT 111 - MEDICAL CODING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course provides a foundation in coding and classification systems in a variety of healthcare settings. Topics include classification and coding systems, emphasizing ICD-9-CM,
HCPCS/CPT coding. Upon completion, students should be able to apply coding principles to
correctly assign ICD-9-CM, HCPCS/CPT codes and apply systems to optimize reimbursement. Prerequisites: HMT 100, BIO 193, BIO 194. Corequisites: None.
HMT 112 - MEDICAL INSURANCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces the concept of medical insurance. Topics include the types and characteristics of third-party payers, carrier requirements, state and federal regulations, payment
systems, and manual/electronic claim form preparation. Upon completion of this course, stu244
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
dents should be able to process third-party claims forms for all types of third-party payers.
Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194, HMT 100. Corequisites: None.
HMT 113 - ADVANCED CODING
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
This is an advanced coding class that provides both a review of the concepts of CPT/HCPCS
and ICD coding as well as advanced instruction in ICD and CPT/HCPCS coding. Codes will
be applied to workbook exercises, case studies, patient hospital records and outpatient charts.
Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Ambulatory Patient Groups (APGs) will be introduced.
Prerequisites: HMT 111. Corequisites: None.
HMT 200 - MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course will examine current issues that affect the management of healthcare delivery systems. Emphasis is placed on acquiring a systematic understanding of organizational principles, practices and insights pertinent to the management of health services organizations.
Topics include current problems, changes and challenges in the healthcare environment.
Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to identify current healthcare issues
and to understand their impact on healthcare management. Prerequisites: HMT 101.
Corequisites: None.
HMT 201 - HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course covers the methods and techniques utilized in the financial management of
healthcare programs. Topics include cost determination, pricing of services, financial statements and analysis, forecasting/projections, third-party billing, reimbursement, Medicare,
Medicaid and budgeting. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret and apply
principles of financial management in a healthcare environment. Prerequisites: MAT 196, HMT
101, HMT 104, HMT 200. Corequisites: None.
HMT 202 - LONG-TERM CARE ADMINSTRATION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces the administration of long-term care facilities and services. Emphasis
is placed upon nursing home care, home health care, hospice, skilled nursing facilities and
other long-term care services. Upon completion, students should be able to administer state
and national standards as they apply to long-term care. Prerequisites: HMT 101, HMT 200.
Corequisites: None.
HMT 203 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course introduces the functions of personnel/human resource management within an
organization. Topics include equal opportunity and the legal environment, recruitment and
selection, performance appraisal, employee development, compensation planning and
employee relations. Upon completion, students should be able to anticipate and resolve
human resource concerns. Prerequisites: HMT 101, HMT 200. Corequisites: None.
HMT 204 - CURRENT TRENDS IN MANAGED CARE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course is an introduction to the history, structure, concepts and management issues
associated with healthcare maintenance organizations (HMO's), preferred provider organiza245
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
tions (PPO's) and other managed care options. Upon completion of this course, the student
will be able to understand the impact of managed care on various health care environments.
Prerequisites: HMT 101. Corequisites: None.
HMT 205 - HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP
(10 credit/30 contact hours)
This course provides supervised clinical experience in healthcare settings. Emphasis is
placed on practical application of curriculum concepts to the healthcare setting. Upon completion, students should be able to apply healthcare management theory to healthcare facility
practices. Prerequisites: All Healthcare Management courses except HMT 204. Corequisites:
HMT 204.
HUM 191 - INTRO TO HUMANITIES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities are presented as a source of
subjective insights for the understanding of people and society. Topics include: historical and
cultural developments, and contributions of the humanities. Prerequisites: ENG 191 with C or
better. Corequisites: None.
IDS 101 - INDUSTRIAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
(5 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides a foundation in industrial computers and computer systems with a focus in linking
computers to the plant floor process. Topics include: hardware, software, boot sequence, configuration, troubleshooting, and communication platforms. Prerequisites: FC 103 , SCT 100.
Corequisites: None.
IDS 103 - INDUSTRIAL WIRING
(6 credit/12 contact hours)
Teaches the fundamental concepts of industrial wiring with an emphasis on installation procedures. Topics include: grounding, raceways, three-phase systems, transformers (threephase and single-phase), wire sizing, overcurrent protection, NEC requirements, industrial
lighting systems, and switches, receptacles, and cord connectors. Prerequisites: IFC 101, IFC
102. Corequisites: None.
IDS 105 - DC & AC MOTORS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theories and applications of single-phase and three-phase
motors. Topics include: motor theory and operating principles, motor terminology, motor identification, NEMA standards, AC motors, DC motors, scheduled preventive maintenance, and
troubleshooting and failure analysis. Prerequisites: IFC 101, IFC 102, MAT 103. Corequisites:
None.
IDS 110 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MOTOR CONTROLS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts, principles, and devices involved in industrial motor control. Emphasis is placed on developing a theoretical foundation of industrial motor control
devices. Topics include: principles of motor control, control devices, symbols and schematic
diagrams, and Article 430 NEC. Prerequisites: IDS 105. Corequisites: None.
IDS 113 - MAGNETIC STARTERS AND BRAKING
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides instruction in wiring motor control circuits. Emphasis is placed on designing and
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
installing magnetic starters in across-the-line, reversing, jogging circuits, and motor braking.
Topics include: control transformers, full voltage starters, reversing circuits, jogging circuits,
and braking. Prerequisites: IDS 110. Corequisites: None.
IDS 115 - TWO-WIRE CONTROL CIRCUITS
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in two-wire motor control circuits using relays, contactors, and motor
starters with application sensing devices. Topics include: wiring limit switches, wiring pressure
switches, wiring float switches, wiring temperature switches, wiring proximity switches, and
wiring photo switches. Prerequisites: IDS 110. Corequisites: None.
IDS 121 - ADVANCED MOTOR CONTROLS
(2 credit/4 contact hours)
Continues the study and application of motor control circuits with emphasis on sequencing circuits, complex circuits, and motor control centers. Topics include: sequencing circuits,
reduced voltage starting, motor control centers and troubleshooting. Prerequisites: IDS 115.
Corequisites: None.
IDS 131 - VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR CONTROL
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the fundamentals of variable speed drives, industrial motors, and other
applications of variable speed drives. Topics include: fundamentals of variable speed control,
AC frequency drives, DC variable speed drives, installation procedures, and ranges.
Prerequisites: IDS 121. Corequisites: None.
IDS 141 - BASIC INDUSTRIAL PLCs
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces operational theory, systems terminology, plc installations, and programming procedures for programmable logic controls. Emphasis is placed on plc programming, connections, installations, and start-up procedures. Topics include: plc hardware and software, plc
functions and terminology, introductory numbering systems, plc installation and set up, plc
programming basics, relay logic instructions, timers and counters, connecting field devices to
I/O cards, and plc safety procedures. Prerequisites: ICS 103-ICS 108. Corequisites: None.
IDS 142 - INDUSTRIAL PLCs
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides for hands-on development of operational skills in the maintenance and troubleshooting of industrial control systems and automated industrial equipment. Emphasis is
placed on applying skills developed in previous courses in programmable logic controls
(PLC’s) in an industrial setting. This course includes advanced skills necessary to complete
the student's knowledge and skills to understand and work with PLC’s in an industrial plant.
Prerequisites: IDS 141. Corequisites: None.
IDS 209 - INDUSTRIAL INSTRUMENTATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the principles and practices of instrumentation for industrial process
control systems with an emphasis on industrial maintenance techniques for production equipment. Topics include: Instrument Tags, Process Documentation, Sensing Pressure, Flow,
Level, and Temperature, Instrument Calibration, and Loop Tuning. Prerequisites: MAT 103,
IFC 101, IFC 102, IFC 103, ICS 103. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
IDS 215 - INDUSTRIAL MECHANICS
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in two-wire motor control circuits using relays, contactors, and motor
starters with application sensing devices. Topics include: wiring limit switches, wiring pressure
switches, wiring float switches, wiring temperature switches, wiring proximity switches, and
wiring photo switches. Prerequisites: Program Admission level math achievement.
Corequisites: None.
IDS 221 - INDUSTRIAL FLUIDPOWER
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in fundamental concepts and theories for safely operating hydraulic components and pneumatic systems. Topics include: hydraulic theory, suction side of pumps,
actuators, valves, pumps/motors, accumulators, symbols and circuitry, fluids, filters, pneumatic theory, compressors, pneumatic valves, air motors and cylinders, and safety.
Prerequisites: Program Admission level math achievement. Corequisites: None.
IDS 231 - PUMPS & PIPING SYSTEMS
(2 credit/5 contact hours)
Studies the fundamental concepts of industrial pumps and piping systems. Topics include:
pump identification; pump operation; pump installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting;
piping systems; and installation of piping systems. Prerequisites: Program Admission level
math achievement. Corequisites: None.
IDS 241 - MAINTENANCE FOR RELIABILITY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Applied advanced instrumentation in conjunction with principles of mechanical physics, vibration and particulate analysis, thermography, and advanced reliability concepts relative to precision/predictive maintenance of industrial equipment. Prerequisites: IDS 221, IFC 101, IFC
102. Corequisites: None.
IDS 270 - ADVANCED PLCs II
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides for hands-on development of operational skills in Programming/Troubleshooting
industrial control systems and automated industrial equipment. Emphasis is placed on applying skills developed in previous courses in programmable logic controls (PLC’s) in an industrial setting. This course includes advanced skills & techniques the students can apply to actual control applications in an industrial environment. Prerequisites: IDS 142. Corequisites:
None.
IDS 271 - INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE INTERNSHIP
(4 credit/9 contact hours)
Provides occupation-based instruction that applies learned skills to actual work experience.
Emphasizes students' opportunities to practice Industrial Systems Technology skills and troubleshooting techniques on industrial equipment. Topics include: application of industrial maintenance skills, appropriate employability skills, problem solving, adaptability to job equipment
and technology, progressive productivity, and acceptable job performance. Prerequisites: All
non-elective courses required for completion. Corequisites: None.
IDS 275 - HUMAN-MACHINE INTERFACE
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides hand-on development of Programming skills for industrial HMI components used
automated industrial systems. Emphasis is placed on applying skills developed in previous
courses in programmable logic controls (PLC’s) in an industrial setting. This course includes
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
advanced skills & techniques the student can apply to HMI applications in an industrial environment. Prerequisites: IDS 273. Corequisites: None.
IDS 280 - ADVANCED PROCESS CONTROL
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Teaches advanced process control skills to include Process control drawings, PID control,
advanced loops and tuning, Process controllers, DCS systems, and SCADA systems. The student will be introduced to the fundamentals, devices and methods use in today’s advanced
process systems. Prerequisites: IDS 275. Corequisites: None.
IDS 283 - NETWORKING INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides communication and networking skills needed for cabling and connection to PLC/HMI
Devices. Prerequisites: IDS 280. Corequisites: None.
IDS 285 - WONDER WARE/GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides hands on experience in the development and implementation of graphical computer
based HMI (Human-Machine Interfaces) for control of automated machines and industrial
manufacturing systems. This course is built on the user’s knowledge/familiarity of programmable logic controls (PLC’s) and demonstrates the capabilities and economic impact of PC
based controls systems. The manufacturing industry’s demand for low cost automated solutions has pushed the desktop PC into the plant floor. Areas such as front end creation, I/O
assignments and communications, alarming, and acknowledgement, data trending and more
are covered and explored throughout the course. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
IFC 100 - INDUSTRIAL SAFETY PROCEDURES
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides an in-depth study of the health and safety practices required for maintenance of
industrial, commercial, and home electrically operated equipment. Topics include: introduction
to OSHA regulations; safety tools, equipment, and procedures; and first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
IFC 101 - DIRECT CURRENTS CIRCUITS I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces direct current (DC) concepts and applications. Topics include: electrical principles
and laws; batteries; DC test equipment; series, parallel, and simple combination circuits; and
laboratory procedures and safety practices. Prerequisites: MAT 103 (diploma) or MAT 191
(degree) for Electronics Program students. Corequisites: None.
IFC 102 - ALTERNATING CURRENT I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the theory and application of varying sine wave voltages and current. Topics
include: magnetism, AC wave generation, AC test equipment, inductance, capacitance, and
basic transformers. Prerequisites: IFC 101 . Corequisites: None.
IFC 103 - SOLID STATES DEVICES I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the physical characteristics and applications of solid-state devices. Topics include:
introduction to semiconductor fundamentals, diode applications, basic transistor fundamentals, basic amplifiers, and semiconductor switching devices. Prerequisites: IFC 102 .
Corequisites: None.
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IMT 102 - PROBLEM SOLVING IN TECHNOLOGY
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces problem solving techniques as practiced in an industrial maintenance setting.
Topics include: technology, problem solving process, problems and opportunities, investigation and research, and generating and developing ideas. Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: None.
IMT 126 - PROGRAMMABLE LOGIC CONTROL PRA
(4 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides for hands-on development of operational skills in the maintenance and troubleshooting of automated industrial machinery. Emphasis is placed on applying skills developed in previous courses in programmable logic control (PLC) in an industrial setting. Topics
include: hard-wiring PLC equipment, writing and executing programs, and troubleshooting
PLC circuits. Prerequisites: ELT 114. Corequisites: None.
INT 100 - INTERIOR DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the fundamentals of design as applied to room composition. Topics include: interior planning concepts, space planning, traffic patterns utilization, elements of design, and
principles of design. Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 102 - FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES I
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasis is on historical foundations of furniture, accent pieces, and accessories from the
Egyptian through the Classical Revival period. Topics include: materials usage; historical
design development; quality; appropriate use of furnishings, accent pieces, and accessories;
and antiques, collectibles, and reproductions identification. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 103 - FURNITURE AND ACCESSORIES II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes historical foundations of furniture, accent pieces, and accessories from the
Classical Revival period to the present. Topics include: materials usage; historical design
development; quality; appropriate use of furnishings, accent pieces, and accessories; and
antiques, collectibles, and reproductions identification. Prerequisites: INT 102. Corequisites:
None.
INT 104 - ARCHITECTURE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Studies decorations of the past with application to contemporary interiors. Topics include: historical architecture concepts and classical orders, and contemporary architecture.
Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 105 - BLUEPRINT READING FOR INTERIORS
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Emphasizes familiarization with drafting and blueprint techniques. Topics include: basic
mechanical drawing techniques, symbol and abbreviation identification (including basic electrical; plumbing; furniture; reading and understanding specifications; estimating for carpeting,
paint and wallpaper), floor and space planning, blueprint reading and reading scales.
Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
INT 106 - BUILDING AND TECHNICAL SERVICES FOR INTERIORS
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Emphasizes familiarization with interior construction and service systems for interiors. Topics
include: interior and exterior construction systems, building materials (traditional, current,
future), construction documents, and communication with architects and construction industry. Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 107 - LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY FOR INTERIORS
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides basic knowledge of vision as affected by light, color, texture, and form. Introduces
the basic principles of lighting design including criteria, calculations, planning, and layout.
Topics include: lighting technology, lighting analysis, residential and contract lighting, lighting
design, and lighting applications Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 108 - COLOR THEORY
(2 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces the use of color in interior design. Emphasizes color theories, the psychology of
colors, and the application of colors in designing interior environments. Topics include: color
perception, color vocabulary, psychological effects, color and interior design, and color systems. Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 109 - DESIGN STUDIO I
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides students with long and short term projects which address real-life design situations
and begins to develop competence in solving design problems. Topics include: technical and
conceptual concerns, color, light, scale, technology, materials selection, and creative design
articulation. Prerequisites: INT 100, INT 110, INT 111. Corequisites: None.
INT 110 - MATERIAL AND RESOURSES I
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
Emphasizes the background knowledge necessary for selection of interior finishes and materials needed in interior environments. Topics include: technical criteria, selection and resourcing for interiors, and architectural finishes (such as molding, flooring, wall treatments, cabinets, sinks, and carpets). Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 111 - MATERIAL AND RESOURCES II
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
Emphasizes the background knowledge necessary for selection of interior finishes and materials needed in interior environments. Topics include: technical criteria, selection and resourcing for interiors, and architectural finishes (such as textiles, window treatments, bedspreads,
fabric treatments, and upholstery). Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 112 - BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT
(8 credit/9 contact hours)
Emphasizes knowledge and techniques required for successful business practices in interior
design. Topics include: client contact, packaging a presentation, resource development, personal portfolio development, presentation skills, and business management of interior design.
Prerequisites: INT 109, INT 111. Corequisites: None.
INT 113 - DESIGN STUDIO II
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides students with long and short term projects which address real-life design situations
and begins to develop competence in solving design problems. This course continues the stu251
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
dio experiences of INT 109, Design Studio I. Topics include: technical and conceptual concerns, color, light, scale, technology, materials selection, and creative design articulation.
Prerequisites: INT 109. Corequisites: None.
INT 115 - INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS
(3 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces the application of drawing techniques used in interior design. Topics include: alphabet of lines, architectural style, geometric shapes, floor plan layouts, interior elevations, and
interior pictorials. Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 116 - INTRODUCTORY COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING SURVEY
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces basic computer language and application of computers to the field of interior
design. Topics include: introduction to CAD language and applications; writing specifications;
project schedules; and techniques of executing orthographic views, plans, and elevations.
Prerequisites: Program admission, MAT 191 or MAT 196 (degree) or MAT 111 (diploma), INT
115, and . Corequisites: None.
INT 140 - INTERIOR SEMINAR
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes professional development through career resources and artistic exploration.
Topics include: informational interviewing, networking, cultural development, and artistic
exploration. Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 142 - INTERIORS INTERNSHIP I
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides students with in-depth application and reinforcement of interiors and employability
principles in an actual job setting. This internship allows the student to become involved in
intensive on-the-job interiors applications that require full-time concentration, practice, and follow through. The interiors internship is implemented through the use of written individualized
training plans, written performance evaluations, required seminars, a required student project,
and lab activities. Topics include: application of interiors principles; problem solving; adaptability to job setting; use of proper interpersonal skills; development of constructive work
habits and appropriate work ethic, with consideration of factors such as confidentiality; and
concentrated development of productivity and quality job performance through practice.
Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
INT 143 - INTERIORS INTERNSHIP II
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides students with in-depth application and reinforcement of interiors and employability
principles in an actual job setting. This internship allows the student to become involved in
intensive on-the-job interiors applications that require full-time concentration, practice, and follow through. The interiors internship is implemented through the use of written individualized
training plans, written performance evaluations, required seminars, a required student project,
and lab activities. Topics include: application of interiors principles; problem solving; adaptability to job setting; use of proper interpersonal skills; development of constructive work
habits and appropriate work ethic, with consideration of factors such as confidentiality; and
concentrated development of productivity and quality job performance through practice.
Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites: None.
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ITNT IT202 - INTERNET INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Fundamentals of the World Wide Web; Learn E-Mail; Use bookmarks; Understand search
engines. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
MAS 101 - LEGAL ASPECTS OF THE MEDICAL OFFICE
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Introduces the basic concept of medical assisting and its relationship to the other health fields.
Emphasizes medical ethics, legal aspects of medicine, and the medical assistant's role as an
agent of the physician. Provides the student with knowledge of medical jurisprudence and the
essentials of professional behavior. Topics include: introduction to medical assisting, introduction to medical law, physician-patient-assistant relationship, medical office in litigation,
ethics and bioethical issues. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MAS 103 - PHARMACOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces drug therapy with emphasis on safety, classification of drugs, their action, side
effects, and/or adverse reactions. Also introduces the basic concept of mathematics used in
the administration of drugs. Topics include: introduction to pharmacology, calculation of
dosages, sources and forms of drugs, drug classification, and drug effects on the body systems. Principles of infusion therapy and laboratory application of infusion are optional.
Prerequisites: AHS 101, AHS 109, MAT 101. Corequisites: None.
MAS 106 - MEDICAL OFFICES PROCEDURES
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes essential skills required for the typical business office. Topics include: office protocol, time management, telephone techniques, office equipment, mail services, references,
filing, correspondence, and travel and meeting arrangements Prerequisites: Program
Admission. Corequisites: BUS 101.
MAS 108 - MEDICAL ASSISTING SKILLS I
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the skills necessary for assisting the physician with a complete history and physical in all types of practices. The course includes skills necessary for sterilizing instruments and
equipment and setting-up sterile trays. The student also explores the theory and practice of
electrocardiography. Topics include: infection control and related OSHA guidelines, prepare
patients/assist physician with examinations and diagnostic procedures, vital signs/mensuration, minor office surgical procedures, and electrocardiograms. Prerequisites: Program
Admission, AHS 101, AHS 109. Corequisites: AHS 104.
MAS 109 - MEDICAL ASSISTING SKILLS II
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Furthers the student knowledge of the more complex activities in a physician's office. Topics
include: collection/examination of specimens and CLIA regulations; urinalysis; venipuncture,
hematology and chemistry evaluations; advanced reagent testing (Strept Test, HcG , etc),
administration of medications; emergency procedures of the medical office, respiratory evaluations, rehabilitative therapy procedures; principles of radiology safety and emergency procedures of the medical office. Prerequisites: MAS 101, MAS 103, MAS 108, AHS 104 .
Corequisites: MAS 101.
MAS 112 - HUMAN DISEASES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides clear, succinct, and basic information about common medical conditions. Taking
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
each body system, the disease condition is highlighted following a logical formation consisting of: description, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. Topics include: Introduction to disease and diseases of body systems.
Prerequisites: AHS 101, AHS 109. Corequisites: None.
MAS 113 - MATERNAL AND CHILD CARE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on the reproductive system, care of the mother in all stages of pregnancy, the normal and emotional growth of the healthy child, and care of the sick child. Topics include: introduction to obstetrics, female reproductive system, male reproductive system, intrauterine
development, prenatal care, principles of specialized testing, labor and delivery, postpartum
care, patient education, and methods of contraception. Child development and common
pathophysiology from newborn through adolescence. Prerequisites: AHS 101, AHS 109, MAS
103. Corequisites: None.
MAS 114 - MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES I
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes essential skills required for the typical medical office in the areas of computers
and medical transcription. Topics include: introduction to the computer and medical transcription Prerequisites: MAS 103, MAS 104. Corequisites: None.
MAS 115 - MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES II
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes essential skills required for the typical medical office. Topics include: accounting
procedures and insurance preparation and coding. Prerequisites: Program Admission, AHS
101, AHS 109, BUS 101. Corequisites: None.
MAS 117 - MEDICAL ASSISTING SEMINAR
(8 credit/24 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of principles
and techniques in a medical office job setting. This clinical practicum allows the student to
become involved in a work situation at a professional level of technical application and
requires concentration, practice, and follow-through. Topics include: application of classroom
knowledge and skills, functioning in the work environment, listening, and following directions.
Prerequisites: Completion of all required courses except MAS 118. Corequisites: MAS 118.
MAS 118 - MEDICAL ASSISTING SEMINAR
(4 credit/4 contact hours)
Seminar focuses on job preparation and maintenance skills and review for the certification
examination. Topics include: letters of application, resumes, completing a job application, job
interviews, follow-up letter/call, letters of resignation and review of program competencies for
employment and certification. Prerequisites: Completion of all required courses except MAS
117. Corequisites: MAS 117.
MAT 096 - MATH II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Teaches the student basic arithmetic skills needed for the study of mathematics related to specific occupational programs. Topics include: number theory, whole numbers, fractions, decimals, measurement, and word problems. Homework assignments reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisites: MAT 95 or entrance arithmetic score in accordance with approved DTAE
admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis.
Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
MAT 097 - MATH III
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes in-depth arithmetic skills needed for the study of mathematics related to specific
occupational programs and for the study of basic algebra. Topics include: number theory, fractions, decimals, ratio/proportion, percent, measurement/geometric formulas, and word problems. Homework assignments reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisites: MAT 096, or
entrance arithmetic score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab
may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
MAT 098 - PRE-ALGEBRA
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces pre-algebra concepts and operations, which will be applied to the study of beginning algebra. Topics include: number theory, signed numbers, order of operations, simplifying
algebraic expressions, factoring, equations, and algebra word problems. Homework assignments reinforce classroom learning. Prerequisites: MAT 097 or entrance arithmetic score in
accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
MAT 100 - BASIC MATHEMATICS
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Emphasizes basic mathematical concepts. Topics include: mathematical operations, fractions,
decimals, percents, ratio and proportion, and measurement and conversion. Class includes
lecture, applications, and homework to reinforce learning. Prerequisites: MAT 096, or entrance
arithmetic score in accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
MAT 101 - GENERAL MATHEMATICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes mathematical skills that can be applied to the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include: properties of numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and
proportion, measurement and conversion, exponents and radicals, and geometric and technical formulas. Class includes lectures, applications, and homework to reinforce learning.
Prerequisites: MAT 097 or entrance arithmetic score in accordance with approved DTAE
admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis.
Corequisites: None.
MAT 103 - ALGEBRAIC CONCEPTS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces concepts and operations, which can be applied to the study of algebra. Course
content emphasizes: basic mathematical concepts, basic algebraic concepts, and intermediate algebraic concepts. Class includes lecture, applications, and homework to reinforce learning. Prerequisites: MAT 098 or entrance approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be
substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
MAT 104 - GEOMETRY AND TRIGONOMETRY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces and develops basic geometric and trigonometric concepts. Course content
emphasizes: geometric concepts and trigonometric concepts. Prerequisites: MAT 103 with a
grade of C or better. Corequisites: None.
MAT 105 - TRIGONOMETRY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes trigonometric concepts. Introduces logarithms and exponential functions. Topics
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
include: geometric formulas, trigonometric concepts, and logarithms and exponentials.
Prerequisites: MAT 103 with a grade of C or better. Corequisites: None.
MAT 111 - BUSINESS MATH
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes mathematical concepts found in business situations. Topics include: basic mathematical skills, mathematical skills in business-related problem solving, mathematical information for documents, graphs, and mathematical problems using electronic calculators (not to
include the touch method). Prerequisites: MAT 097 or entrance arithmetic score in accordance
with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class
hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
MAT 152 - INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course is designed for students who require additional skills in algebra prior to taking
College Algebra. The major topics include: operations with algebraic expressions; linear and
quadratic equations, inequalities, and functions; graphing techniques; rational expressions
and equations; exponents, radicals, and complex numbers; and simultaneous equations
Prerequisites: Elementary Algebra ASSET score of 39 or MAT 103 with a grade of C or better. Corequisites: None.
MAT 190 - MATHEMATICAL MODELING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course is designed as an alternative to College Algebra for those students who will not
take Trigonometry, Pre-Calculus, or Calculus. It is an applications-driven course that introduces functions using real-world phenomena as models. The major topics include: fundamental concepts of algebra; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models of real-world phenomena; systems of equations; and additional topics in
algebra. Prerequisites: Program admission level math achievement. Corequisites: None.
MAT 191 - COLLEGE ALGEBRA
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include: algebraic concepts and operations, linear and quadratic equations and functions, simultaneous
equations, inequalities, exponents and powers, graphing techniques, and analytic geometry.
Prerequisites: Elementary Algebra ASSET score of 42 or equivalent, or MAT 152 and
Elementary Algebra ASSET score of 39 or equivalent. Corequisites: None.
MAT 193 - COLLEGE TRIGONOMETRY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using trigonometric concepts. Topics include:
trigonometric functions, properties of trigonometric functions, vectors and triangles, inverse of
trigonometric functions/graphing, logarithmic and exponential functions, and complex numbers. Prerequisites: MAT 191 with a grade of C or better. Corequisites: None.
MAT 196 - CONTEMPORARY MATHEMATICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Overview course covering algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include: fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, and mathematics of
finance. Prerequisites: ASSET Score of 42 or MAT 098. Corequisites: None.
MCA 201 - ADVANCED MILLING I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced techniques of milling machine operations. Emphasis is
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
placed on skill development through laboratory practice. Topics include: vertical milling, horizontal milling, compound angles, and gear cutting. Prerequisites: MCH 115, MCH 116.
Corequisites: None.
MCA 203 - ADVANCED MILLING II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced techniques of milling machine operations. Emphasis is
placed on skill development through laboratory practice. Topics include: indexing; rotary table;
boring, facing, and turning; and straddle milling. Prerequisites: MCA 201. Corequisites: None.
MCA 205 - ADVANCED LATHE OPERATION I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced lathe operations and procedures. Emphasis is placed on skill
development through laboratory experience. Topics include: thread cutting, precision boring,
precision knurling, and tapers. Prerequisites: MCH 109, MCH 110. Corequisites: None.
MCA 207 - ADVANCED LATHE OPERATIONS II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced lathe operations and procedures. Emphasis is placed on skill
development through laboratory experiences. Topics include: eccentric turning, special setups, and tolerance turning. Prerequisites: MCA 205. Corequisites: None.
MCA 208 - ADVANCED GRINDING I
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in advanced grinding operations and procedures. Emphasis is placed on
skill development through laboratory experiences. Topics include: surface grinding, cylindrical
grinding, tool and cutter grinding, and grinding theory. Prerequisites: MCH 112. Corequisites:
None.
MCA 209 - ADVANCED GRINDING II
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Not available at this time. Prerequisites: MCA 208. Corequisites: None.
MCA 211 - CNC FUNDAMENTALS
(7 credit/9 contact hours)
Provides a comprehensive introduction to computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining
processes. Topics include: math review, safety, jigs and fixtures, tooling and tool holders, reference points, tool offset, and program loading and editing. Prerequisites: MCH 118.
Corequisites: None.
MCA 213 - CNC MILL MANUAL PROGRAMMING
(8 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides instruction for the safe operation and manual programming of computer numerical
controlled (CNC) milling machines. Topics include: machine safety, command codes, program
loading, machine set-up, process control, and practical application. Prerequisites: MCA 211.
Corequisites: None.
MCA 215 - CNC LATHE MANUAL PROGRAMMING
(8 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction for the safe operation and manual programming of computer numerical
controlled (CNC) lathes. Topics include: machine safety, command codes, program loading,
machine set-up, process control, and practical application Prerequisites: MCA 211.
Corequisites: None.
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MCA 217 - CNC PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in specialty tooling and multi-axis machining. Students will also gain experience in process control. Topics include: specialty tooling, EDM/ECM, multi-axis machining,
process control, and laboratory practice. Prerequisites: MCA 211, MCA 213, MCA 216.
Corequisites: None.
MCA 219 - CAD/CAM PROGRAMMING
(7 credit/11 contact hours)
Emphasizes the development of skills in computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided
manufacturing (CAM). The student will design and program parts to be machined on computer numerical controlled machines. Topics include: hardware and software, digitizer, pen plotter, drawing manipulations, tool path generation, and program uploading and downloading.
Prerequisites: MCA 211. Corequisites: None.
MCA 228 - CHARAC OF METALS/HEAT TREAT II
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Emphasizes selection of proper tool steel for specific tooling operations, and proper heat treating procedure of tool steels. Topics include: effects of alloy components in tool steel, identification of tool steel alloys, identification of tool steel by classification, and correct heat treatment procedures. Prerequisites: MCH 107. Corequisites: None.
MCH 101 - INTRODUCTION TO MACHINE TOOL
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts and procedures necessary for the safe and efficient use
of basic machine tools. Topics include: use of hand and bench tools, use of power tools, analysis of measurements, saw and blade selection, feed and speeds determination, use of
coolants, saw and blade maintenance, sawing operations, drilling setup and operation, ISO
9000, Deming's quality theory, quality goals and objectives, and coordinate measurement
machines (CMM). Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 102 - BLUEPRINT READING I
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts necessary to interpret drawings and produce sketches
for machine tool applications. Topics include: interpretation of blueprints and sketching.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 104 - MACHINE TOOL MATH I
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops mathematic competencies as applied to machine tool technology. This course
emphasizes manipulation and use of machining formulas and the discussion of machining
geometry. Topics include: machining algebra and machining geometry. Prerequisites: MAT
101. Corequisites: None.
MCH 105 - MACHINE TOOL MATH II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the development of mathematics competencies as applied to machine tool technology. Emphasis is placed on the uses of geometric and trigonometric principles in machining. Topics include: advanced applied geometry and applied trigonometry. Prerequisites: MCH
104. Corequisites: None.
MCH 107 - CHARACTERISTICS OF METAL
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the properties of various metals, production methods, and identification of ferrous
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
and non-ferrous metals. Topics include: metallurgy and heat treatment. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 109 - LATHE OPERATIONS I
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides opportunities for students to develop skill in the use of bench grinders and lathes.
Topics include: lathes, bench grinders, bench grinder operations, lathe calculations, lathe setup, and lathe operations. Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 110 - LATHE OPERATIONS II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides further instruction for students to develop skill in the use of lathes. Topics include:
lathes, lathe set-up, and operations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites:
None.
MCH 112 - SURFACE GRINDER OPERATIONS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the set-up, operations, maintenance, and assembly operations of surface grinders. Topics include: surface grinders and surface grinder maintenance, surface
grinder set-up, and surface grinder operations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
MCH 114 - BLUEPRINT READING II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Continues the development of blueprint reading competencies as applied to Machine Tool
Technology. Topics include: advanced sectioning, geometric dimensioning, geometric tolerancing, and assembly drawings. Prerequisites: MCH 104. Corequisites: None.
MCH 115 - MILL OPERATIONS I
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the set-up and use of the milling machine. Topics include: milling
machines, milling machine calculations, milling machine set-up, and milling machine operations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 116 - MILL OPERATIONS II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides further instruction for students to develop skills in the use of milling machines. Topics
include: vertical and horizontal mill calculations, vertical and horizontal mill setup, and vertical
and horizontal mill operations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MCH 118 - COMPUTER/CNC LITERACY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the terminology and application of microcomputers and terminology associated with computer numerical controlled (CNC) equipment. Students will become
familiar with the basic operations of computers and the capabilities and limitations of CNC
machinery. Topics include: introduction to microcomputer concepts, basic microcomputer
operations, functions and subroutines, machine tool applications, Cartesian coordinates,
absolute and incremental programming, and capabilities and limitations of CNC.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
MCH 152 - INDUSTRIAL MACHINE APPLICATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an opportunity to perform creative and critical thinking skills needed to fabricate,
modify, and maintain complex machine assemblies. Emphasis is placed on bench work, lathe,
mill, and grinder operations; tool selection; and sequencing fabrication operations. Topics
include: job planning, preparation for machining operations, and machining operations.
Prerequisites: MCH 110, MCH 112, MCH 116. Corequisites: None.
MKT 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MARKETING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops skills and behaviors necessary for successful supervision of people and job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on personnel management, the basic supervisory functions,
supervisory skills and techniques, and the special challenges and demands of supervising
employees. Topics include: management theories, including total quality management; motivation, supervision, and evaluation of employees; recruitment, screening, and selection of
employees; supervision techniques; and functions of management. Prerequisites: ENG 111
(diploma), or ENG 191 (degree). Corequisites: None.
MKT 101 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops skills and behaviors necessary for successful supervision of people and job responsibilities. Emphasis will be placed on personnel management, the basic supervisory functions,
supervisory skills and techniques, and the special challenges and demands of supervising
employees. Topics include: management theories, including total quality management; motivation, supervision, and evaluation of employees; recruitment, screening, and selection of
employees; supervision techniques; and functions of management. Prerequisites: ENG
11(diploma), ENG 191(degree). Corequisites: None.
MKT 103 - BUSINESS LAW
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the study of contracts and other business obligations in the legal environment.
Topics include: creation and evolution of laws, court decision processes, sales contracts,
commercial papers, risk-bearing devices, and Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 104 - PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a study of micro and macro economic principles, policies, and applications. Topics
include: supply and demand, money and the banking system, business cycle, and economic
systems. Prerequisites: Program Admission level math achievement. Corequisites: None.
MKT 105 - ACCOUNTING FOR MARKETING APPLICATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops an awareness of the financial aspects of business. Topics include forecasting and
budgeting, stock records, costs of overtime and job improvements, basic accounting principles
(bookkeeping, ledger, and journal), basic accounting cycle, financial statements such as balance sheets and income statements, and financial ratios. Prerequisites: MAT 111.
Corequisites: None.
MKT 106 - FUNDMENTALS OF SELLIING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes sales strategies and techniques to assist the student in the sales process. Topics
include: customer relations, professional image, product/service knowledge, selling tech260
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
niques and procedures, sales presentations, and ethics of selling. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 107 - BUYING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental principles of buying, merchandising, and accounting for products
and services. Topics include: assortment planning; locating resources; ordering merchandise;
just-in-time or quick response inventory control; pricing for profit; and financial statements,
ratios, and accounting vocabulary. Prerequisites: Program admission level math achievement.
Corequisites: None.
MKT 108 - ADVERTISING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental principles and practices associated with advertising activities.
Topics include: purposes of advertising; principles of advertising; budgeting; marketing and
advertising plans; regulations and controls; media evaluation, target marketing, and selection;
campaign planning; and trends in advertising. Prerequisites: Program Admission.
Corequisites: None.
MKT 109 - VISUAL MERCHANDISING
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on the components of display necessary for the effective visual presentation of goods
and services. Opportunities will be provided to utilize the principles and techniques that are
common to display work in various types of businesses. Emphasis will be placed on design,
color, tools, and materials, and installation of displays. Topics include: design principles, color
principles, tools and materials of the trade, props and fixtures, lighting and signing, installation
of displays, store planning, and safety. Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites:
None.
MKT 110 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the activities that are involved in planning, establishing, and managing a small business enterprise. Topics include: planning, location analysis, financing, and
development of a business plan. Prerequisites: Program admission level math achievement.
Corequisites: None.
MKT 125 - RETAIL OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the planning, organizing, and managing of retail firms. Topics include: organizational development, strategic planning, short-term planning, human resource management,
inventory controls, analysis of profit and loss statements and balance sheets, and entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 130 - MARKETING O.B.I. I
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the application and reinforcement of marketing administration and employability
principles in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with
occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights
into marketing administration applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of marketing administration techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, required weekly seminar, and required practicum or on-the-job training. Prerequisites:
Program Admission, MKT 101, ENG 111 (diploma), or ENG 191 (degree). Corequisites: None.
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MKT 131 - MARKETING O.B.I. II
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on the application and reinforcement of marketing administration and employability
principles in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with
occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights
into marketing administration applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of marketing administration techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, required weekly seminar, and required practicum or on-the-job training. Prerequisites:
MKT 130. Corequisites: None.
MKT 141 - SUPERVISION AND LEADERSHIP I
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides the student with an introduction to the skills and attitudes necessary for successful
supervision of people and job responsibilities. Topics include: personnel management, the
basic supervisory functions, supervisory skills and techniques, and special challenges and
demands of supervision. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 152 - LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT II
(1 credit/3 contact hours)
Develops knowledge and skills in leadership appropriate for the managerial career field.
Topics include: program/meeting planning, project coordination-fund raising, presentations of
fund raising project reports, and parliamentary procedures. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites:
None.
MKT 156 - LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT IV
(1 credit/3 contact hours)
Develops knowledge and skills in leadership appropriate for the managerial career field.
Topics include: project coordination-social event and presentations of social event project
reports. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
MKT 161 - SERVICE INDUSTRY BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
(2 credit/24 contact hours)
This course introduces the service industry. Participants understand the requirements to be
life long learners, the work ethic required for exceptional customer service, the value that each
worker adds to the work team and are introduced to the principles of quality service and business. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 162 - CUSTOMER CONTACT SKILLS
(6 credit/60 contact hours)
Customer Contact Skills provides an understanding of the environment and skill training in
communications with customers and managing that relationship in both a telephone and faceto-face situations. Information sharing skills, telephone communications, managing difficult
and multicultural customer skills are presented and provided with simulated practice sessions.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 163 - COMPUTER SKILLS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
(3 credit/30 contact hours)
Basic computer skills are presented. This includes skills for word processing, spreadsheets,
databases and E-Mail. Prerequisites: Provisional Admissions. Corequisites: None.
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MKT 164 - BUSINESS SKILLS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT
(3 credit/30 contact hours)
Business skills provides training in creating, logical, easy to read correspondences. Basic
business math, managing change and problem solving are topics covered to provide tools that
focus on achieving excellence in the service environment. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MKT 165 - PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS IN CUSTOMER SERVICE
(1 credit/10 contact hours)
This course focuses on presenting a positive image to coworkers as well as customers.
Personal wellness, encourages and presents methods of maintaining optimal mental and
physical health. Through discussion and role-play, learners prepare and practice skills
required when interviewing for a job. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites:
None.
MLT 101 - INTRO TO MEDICAL LAB TECH
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces students to the terms, concepts, procedures, and equipment used in a professional medical laboratory. Topics include: professional ethics and regulatory agencies; basic laboratory safety, equipment, and techniques; phlebotomy/specimen processing; quality control
concepts; process improvement; documentation; and point of care testing. Practical experience in phlebotomy will be provided in the institution laboratory and/or the clinical setting.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
MLT 103 - URINALYSIS/BODY FLUIDS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides theory and techniques required to conduct tests on urine and various body fluids.
Theory and tests are related to disease states and diagnosis. Topics include: theory of urinalysis; physical, chemical, and microscopic urinalysis; urinalysis and disease state correlation;
special urinalysis and related testing; body fluids tests; and safety and quality control
Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194, AHS 104, MLT 101. Corequisites: None.
MLT 104 - HEMATOLOGY/COAGULATION
(8 credit/12 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental formation, function, and degradation of blood cells. Topics include:
reticuloendothelial system and blood cell formation, complete blood count and differential,
other related blood tests, correlation of test results to disease states, coagulation and fibrinolysis, instrumentation for hematology and coagulation, critical values and blood cell dycrasias,
safety and quality control, and process improvement. Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194, AHS
104, MAT 101, MLT 101. Corequisites: None.
MLT 105 - SEROLOGY/IMMUNOLOGY
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theory and techniques applicable to serology and immunology
practice in the medical laboratory. Topics include: immune system, antigen and antibody reactions, immunological diseases, common serological techniques, safety and quality control,
and process improvement. Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194, AHS 104, MAT 191, MLT 101.
Corequisites: None.
MLT 106 - IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides an in-depth study of immunohematology principles and practices as applicable to
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
medical laboratory technology. Topics include: genetic theory and clinical applications,
immunology, donor unit collection, pre-transfusion testing, management of disease states and
transfusion reactions, safety, documentation/quality control, and process improvement.
Prerequisites: MLT 105. Corequisites: None.
MLT 107 - CLINICAL CHEMISTRY
(7 credit/10 contact hours)
Develops concepts and techniques of clinical chemistry applicable to medical laboratory technology. Topics include: carbohydrates, electrolytes and acid-base balance, nitrogenous compounds, enzymes and endocrinology, liver functions, lipids, toxicology and therapeutic drug
monitoring, safety and quality control, correlation of disease states, process improvement
(team approach), and critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194; AHS 104, CHM
191, CHM 192; MAT 191, MLT 101. Corequisites: None.
MLT 108 - MICROBIOLOGY
(8 credit/12 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental microbiology and parasitology theory and techniques applicable to
disease state identification. Topics include: microbiology fundamentals; basic techniques; clinical microbiology; anti-microbial sensitivity; safety and quality control; parasitology; mycology,
mycobacteriology, and virology; correlation of disease states; and process improvement.
Prerequisites: BIO 193, BIO 194, AHS 104, CHM 191, CHM 192, MLT 101, MAT 191.
Corequisites: None.
MLT 109 - CLIN PHLEB,URIN, & SERO PRACT
(4 credit/12 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of principles
and techniques in a medical laboratory job setting. This clinical practicum allows the student
to become involved in a work situation at a professional level of technical application and
requires concentration, practice, and follow through. Topics include: basic and specialized urinalysis tests, serological tests and techniques, blood and specimen processing, correlation of
test results to disease states, safety and quality control, and quality assurance. The clinical
practicum is implemented through the use of written training plans, written performance evaluation, and coordinated supervision. Prerequisites: MLT 101, MLT 103, MLT 105.
Corequisites: None.
MLT 110 - CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY PRACTICUM
(6 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of immunohematology principles and techniques in a medical laboratory job setting. This clinical
practicum allows the student to become involved in a work situation at a professional level of
technical application and requires concentration, practice, and follow through. Topics include:
specimen processing; slide and tube immunological techniques; criteria for special techniques; component and therapy practices; management of disease states; transfusion complications; safety; documentation/quality control; and process improvement. The clinical
practicum is implemented through the use of written training plans, written performance evaluation, and coordinated supervision. Prerequisites: MLT 106. Corequisites: None.
MLT 111 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY/COAGULATION PRACTICUM
(6 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of hematology/coagulation principles and techniques in a medical laboratory job setting. This clinical
practicum allows the student to become involved in a work situation at a professional level of
technical application and requires concentration, practice, and follow through. Topics include:
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
complete blood count and differentials; other related blood tests; coagulation and fibrinolysis
tests; correlation of test results to disease states and critical values; instrumentation; safety;
documentation/quality control; and process improvement. The clinical practicum is implemented through the use of written training plans, written performance evaluation, and coordinated supervision. Prerequisites: MLT 104. Corequisites: None.
MLT 112 - CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY PRACTICUM
(6 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of principles
and techniques in a medical laboratory job setting. This clinical practicum allows the student
to become involved in a work situation at a professional level of technical application and
requires concentration, practice, and follow through. Topics include: specimen inoculations;
stains; culture work-ups; bacterial identification; anti-microbial sensitivity; media preparation;
special areas; safety; documentation/quality control; and process improvement. The clinical
practicum is implemented through the use of written training plans, written performance evaluation, and coordinated supervision. Prerequisites: MLT 108. Corequisites: None.
MLT 113 - CLINICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICUM
(6 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides students with an opportunity for in-depth application and reinforcement of chemistry
principles and techniques in a medical laboratory job setting. This clinical practicum allows the
student to become involved in a work situation at a professional level of technical application
and requires concentration, practice, and follow through. Topics include: therapeutic drugs
and toxicology; automated and manual chemistry; immuno chemistry; special chemistry; safety; correlation of test results to disease states and critical values; instrumentation; documentation/quality control; and process improvement. The clinical practicum is implemented
through the use of written training plans, written performance evaluation, and coordinated
supervision. Prerequisites: MLT 107. Corequisites: None.
MSD 101 - INTERPERSONAL EMP RELATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a general knowledge of the human relations aspects of the senior-subordinate workplace environment. Topics include: employee relations principles, problem solving and decision making, leadership techniques to develop employee morale, human values and attitudes,
organizational communications, interpersonal communications, and employee conflict.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 102 - EMPLOYMENT LAW
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops a working knowledge of the legal environment of business necessary for management and leadership. Topics include: the legal system and public policy making, Civil Rights
Law, The Influence of Law on Human Resource Management, Alternative Dispute Resolution
(ADR), Legal Selection/Hiring Practices, Accommodation for Religion and Physical Handicap,
Gender Discrimination and Harassment, Affirmative Action, and employee protective laws.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 103 - LEADERSHIP
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Familiarizes the student with the principles and techniques of sound leadership practices.
Topics include: Characteristics of Effective Leadership Styles, History of Leadership,
Leadership Models, The Relationship of Power and Leadership, Team Leadership, The Role
of Leadership in Effecting Change. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
MSD 104 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course is designed as an overview of the Human Resource Management (HRM) function
and the manager and supervisor’s role in managing the career cycle from organizational entry
to exit. It acquaints the student with the authority, responsibility, functions, and problems of the
human resource manager, with an emphasis on developing familiarity with the real world
applications required of employers and managers who increasingly are in partnership with
HRM generalists and specialists in their organizations. Topics include: Topics include: strategic human resource management, contemporary issues in HRM: ethics, diversity and globalization; the human resource/supervisor partnership; human resource planning and productivity; job description analysis, development, and design: recruiting, interviewing, and selecting
employees; performance management and appraisal systems; employee training and development: disciplinary action and employee rights; employee compensation and benefits; labor
relations and employment law; and technology applications in HRM. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 105 - LABOR MANAGEMENT RELATIONS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a student with an overview of the relationship of rank and file employees to management in business organizations. The nature of the workplace, the economic foundations of
work organizations, and the history of the relationship between management and labor is
examined. The course acquaints the student with the principles of developing positive relationships between management and labor within the context of the legal environment governing labor relations. Topics include: the nature of the American workplace; the economic history of business organizations, the historical roots of labor-management relations; adversarial
and cooperative approaches to labor relations; the legal framework of labor relations; employee-employer rights; collective bargaining and union organizing processes; union and
nonunion grievance procedures; international labor relations; and the future of labor-management relations in a changing economy. Case studies, readings, and role-plays are used to simulate workplace applications in labor relations. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
MSD 106 - PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Develops an understanding of how fostering employer/employee relationships in the work setting improves work performance. Develops legal counseling and disciplinary techniques to
use in various workplace situations. Topics include: the definitions of coaching, counseling,
and discipline; importance of the coaching relationship; implementation of an effective counseling strategy; techniques of effective discipline; and performance evaluation techniques.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 107 - EMPLOYEE TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Addresses the challenges of improving the performance and career potential of employees,
while benefiting the student in their own preparation for success in the workplace. The focus
is on both training and career and personal development. Shows the student how to recognize when training and development is needed and how to plan, design, and deliver an effective program of training for employees. Opportunities are provided for the student to develop
their own career plans, assess their work-related skills, and practice a variety of skills desired
by employers. Topics include: developing a philosophy of training; having systems approach
to training and development; the context of training; conducting a needs analysis; critical success factors for employees: learning principles; designing and implementing training plans;
conducting and evaluating training; human resource development and careers; personal
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
career development planning; and applications in interpersonal relationships and communication. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 108 - MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISORY SEMINAR
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Encourages students to discuss their perception of management practices, which have been
studied during the Management/Supervisory Development program. Topics include: current
issues and problems in management and supervision and state of the art management and
supervision techniques. Guest speakers will contribute to the seminar. Prerequisites: MSD
103. Corequisites: None.
MSD 110 - MANAGEMENT & SUPERVISION OBI I
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Reinforcement of management, supervision, and employability principles in an actual job
placement or through a practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational
responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into management and supervisory applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to
the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of management and supervisory
techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented
through the use of a practicum or internship and all of the following: written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and a required weekly seminar. Prerequisites:
Program Admission/corequisite/prerequisite: ENG 111, MKT 101. Corequisites: None.
MSD 113 - ETHICAL MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides students with an overview of ethical management practices, with emphasis on the
axiology of contemporary managerial ethics. Topics include: the roots of ethics, traditional and
contemporary definitions of good, personal values, moral development, ethics in the workplace, the ethical orientation of organizations, ethics and society, managerial ethics and the
rule of law, managerial ethics and normative philosophy, managerial ethics and individual
decision making, and managerial ethics and organizational design. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 150 - PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course provides the student with an intensive study of the overall field of production management. Of particular interest is the field of manufacturing supervision. Topics include: role
of production management/production managers, production systems, capacity planning,
aggregate planning, inventory management, project management, and quality control/assurance. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 151 - PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR SUPERVISORS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course familiarizes the student with those factors that influence management, which are
in addition to those covered in management program courses. Topics include: ethical management, individual behavior, group behavior, employee protective laws, and techniques of
public speaking. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 152 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides a basic understanding of project management functions and processes. Topics
include: team selection and management; project planning, definition and scheduling of tasks;
resource negotiation, allocation, and leveling; project control, monitoring, and reporting; com267
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
puter tools for project planning and scheduling; managing complex relationships between project team and other organizations; critical path methodology; and total quality management.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 154 - ORGANIZATION COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course focuses on communication, supervision, and organizations in the age of technology. It builds on the basic computer skills introduced in SCT 100 using computer-based technology to develop skills in applying information technology. The student will create written, verbal, and electronic communication applied to supervisory functions in the work place. Topics
include: internet applications, word processing applications; spreadsheet applications; database applications; presentation technology and applications; graphical interface applications;
interpersonal communications; group communications and team building; organizational
communications; and global, intercultural, and ethical issues in communicating. Prerequisites:
Provisional admission, SCT 100 or equivalent. Corequisites: None.
MSD 156 - SUPERVISION IN A SERVICE ENVIRONMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course focuses on supervision in the service sector with special emphasis on team building, quality management, and developing a customer focus. The challenge of providing worldclass customer service is addressed through sections on principles of service industry supervision, career development, problem solving, stress management, and conflict resolution.
Topics include: principles of service industry supervision, team building, customer service
operations, TQM in a service environment, business software applications, communication in
the service sector, introduction to information systems, selling principles and sales management, retail management, and legal issues in the service sector. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 157 - TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Familiarizes the student with the principles and methods of Total Quality Management (TQM).
Topics include the history of quality control, quality control leaders, quality tools, TQM implementation, team building for TQM, and future quality trends. Prerequisites: MAT 111 or MAT
191. Corequisites: None.
MSD 160 - BUSINESS PLAN DEVELOPMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides students with knowledge and skills necessary for a manager or entrepreneur to
develop and implement a business plan. Topics include: business/community compatibility,
introduction to cash flow and break even analysis, development of product/service idea, determination of market feasibility, determination of financial feasibility, development of marketing
strategy, development of operations outline, and application of financial concepts.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
MSD 175 - BUSINESS SPANISH
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces the vocabulary, sentence structure and conversational skills needed to communicate in Spanish with co-workers in a business setting. Topics include the following: parts of
speech, vocabulary, sentence structure, and common phrases in the workplace.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
MST 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MOTORSPORTS TECHNOLOGY
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to the motorsports industry, team motorsports, and support industries. Also provides an introduction to shop safety and basics. Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission. Corequisites: None.
MST 101 - RACING VEHICLE SYSTEMS
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces racing vehicle systems, placing emphasis on chassis design, suspension and
steering, engine systems, ignition systems, cooling systems, lubrication systems, clutch systems, transmissions, drive axles, and brakes. Discussion and practical work will involved
these systems as found on racing vehicles. Prerequisites: MST 100. Corequisites: None.
MST 102 - SUSPENSION & FRAME DESIGN
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces students to the fundamentals of vehicle chassis types and components. Topics
include introduction to steering and suspension systems, tires and wheels, chassis lubrication,
and steering and suspension alignment. Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites:
None.
MST 103 - SUSPENSION & CHASSIS SET-UP
(3 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces chassis set-up based on vehicle purpose. Involves frame measurement, corner
weights, weight bias, ride height, chassis preload, chassis geometry, frame and component
alignment and adjustments. Prerequisites: MST 101. Corequisites: None.
MST 104 - BRAKE SYSTEMS
(3 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental hydraulics and braking system theory and its application to automotive drum disc and power assist units. Topics include fundamentals of brake systems operation, hydraulics systems, disc brakes, power assist units and related components.
Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites: None.
MST 106 - ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
(3 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces electrical theory and its application to racing vehicle systems. Topics include:
meters, Ohm's law, components, electromagnetic theory, and power sources. Prerequisites:
MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites: None.
MST 107 - IGNITION & ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS
(3 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theory, diagnosis, repair and service of conventional and electronic automotive ignition systems. Topics include ignition systems principles, diagnostic procedures, repair/replacement procedures, and performance analysis. Prerequisites: MST 100,
MST 101. Corequisites: None.
MST 108 - FUEL SYSTEM & EXHAUST SYSTEM
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces fuel and exhaust system theory, diagnosis, repair and service for vehicles with carburetion and fuel injection systems. Topics include fundamentals of fuel and exhaust systems,
malfunction diagnosis, inspection procedures, adjustment procedures, removal and replacement, and automotive diesel service. Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites: None.
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MST 109 - LUBRICATION & COOLING SYSTEMS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces basics of wet and dry sump lubrication systems, oil delivery and filtration systems,
oil chemical design and specific function. Discusses cooling system design, components and
types of coolants used in racing vehicles. Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites:
None.
MST 110 - ENGINE BLUEPRINTING
(4 credit/14 contact hours)
Introduces gasoline internal combustion engine, design, components and function. Also introduces disassembly, reassembly and dyno testing. Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101.
Corequisites: None.
MST 111 - RACING FABRICATION TECHNIQUES
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces basic welding, machining and composite fabrication techniques used daily in the
racing shop. Prerequisites: MST 100, MST 101. Corequisites: None.
MST 112 - FULL-TIME INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides students with general on-site experience at a motorsports facility. Prerequisites:
Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
MST 114 - INTERNSHIP II
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides students with advanced skills and specialized on-site experience at a motorsports
facility. Prerequisites: MST 112. Corequisites: None.
NPT 112 - MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING PRACTICUM I
(7 credit/21 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; client care,
treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, NSG 110. Corequisites: NSG 112.
NPT 113 - MEDICAL SURGICAL PRACTICUM II
(7 credit/21 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental health, and
oncology; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy
related to the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental
health, and oncology; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, AHS 109,
NSG 110. Corequisites: NSG 113.
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NPT 212 - PEDIATRIC NURSING PRACTICUM
(2 credit/6 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
family as a whole, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health.
The definition of client care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments,
using critical thinking, and providing client education. Topics include: health management and
maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the child as a whole, and deviations from the
normal state of health in the pediatric client; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication
administration, and diet therapy of the pediatric client; growth and development; and standard
precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, AHS 109, NSG 110. Corequisites: NPT 213,
NSG 213, NSG 212.
NPT 213 - OBSTETRIC NURSING PRACTICUM
(3 credit/9 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness; care of the individual as a whole; and deviations from the normal state of health
in the reproductive system, obstetric clients, and the newborn; client care, treatment, pharmacology, medication administration, and diet therapy related to the reproductive system,
obstetric clients, and the newborn; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS
103, NSG 110. Corequisites: NPT 212, NSG 213, NSG 212.
NPT 215 - NURSING LEADERSHIP PRACTICUM
(2 credit/7 contact hours)
Builds on the concepts presented in prior nursing courses and develops the skills necessary
for successful performance in the job market. Topics include: application of the nursing
process, critical thinking, supervisory skills, client education methods, group and other TQM
processes, and conflict. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, NSG 110. Corequisites: NSG 215.
NSG 110 - NURSING FUNDAMENTALS
(10 credit/17 contact hours)
An introduction to the nursing process. Topics include: orientation to the profession; ethics and
law; community health; client care which is defined as using the nursing process, using critical thinking, and providing client education and includes principles and skills of nursing practice, documentation, and an introduction to physical assessment; geriatrics; customer/client
relationships; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 101, AHS 104, ENG 101, MAT
101, PSY 101. Corequisites: None.
NSG 112 - MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING I
(9 credit/9 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; client care,
treatment, pharmacology, and diet therapy related to the cardiovascular respiratory,
endocrine, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems; and standard precautions. Prerequisites:
AHS 102, AHS 103, NSG 110. Corequisites: NPT 112.
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
NSG 113 - MEDICAL SURGICAL NURSING II
(9 credit/9 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental health, and
oncology; client care, treatment, pharmacology, and diet therapy related to the musculoskeletal, neurological, integumentary, and sensory systems, mental health, and oncology; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, AHS 109, NSG 110. Corequisites: NPT
113.
NSG 212 - PEDIATRIC NURSING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the pediatric client; client care, treatments, pharmacology, and diet therapy of the pediatric
client; growth and development; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103,
NSG 110. Corequisites: NPT 213, NPT 212, NSG 212.
NSG 213 - OBSTETRIC NURSING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Focuses on health management and maintenance and the prevention of illness, care of the
individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health. The definition of client
care includes using the nursing process, performing assessments, using critical thinking, and
providing client education. Topics include: health management and maintenance and prevention of illness, care of the individual as a whole, and deviations from the normal state of health
in the reproductive system, obstetric clients, and the newborn; client care, treatments, pharmacology, and diet therapy related to the reproductive system, obstetric clients, and the newborn; and standard precautions. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, NSG 110. Corequisites:
NPT 213, NPT 212, NSG 213.
NSG 215 - NURSING LEADERSHIP
(2 credit/2 contact hours)
Builds on the concepts presented in prior nursing courses and develops the skills necessary
for successful performance in the job market. Topics include: application of the nursing
process, critical thinking, supervisory skills, client education methods, group and other TQM
processes, and conflict resolution. Prerequisites: AHS 102, AHS 103, NSG 110. Corequisites:
NPT 215.
OHS 100 - GENERAL INDUSTRY STANDARDS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides an in-depth study of general industry OSHA standards. Topics include: OSHA 29
CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910 standards as they apply to facility construction. Prerequisites:
None. Corequisites: None.
OHS 101 - SAFETY PROGRAM PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces practical application methods used in developing, implementing, administering,
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and evaluating a safety and health/accident prevention plan. Topics include: prevention of
threats of violence and other behavior, substance abuse prevention, and team building and
ownership. Prerequisites: OHS 100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 102 - WORKERS’ COMPENSATION COST CONTAINMENT
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Provides students with an understanding of the workers’ compensation system from the safety and health professional’s point of view. Topics include: history of workers’ compensation
system, types of injuries covered, determination of eligibility, company responsibilities, and
controlling costs. Prerequisites: OHS 100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 103 - ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND HAZARD RECOGNITION
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides students with techniques for hazard recognition and elimination through knowledge
of accident prevention controls. Topics include: loss control programs; safety, health, and environmental auditing; hazard identification; accident investigation, job safety analysis, and
costs; motivating employees; and training. Prerequisites: OHS 100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 104 - ERGONOMICS
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Introduces concepts and applications of ergonomic theory. Topics include: work physiology,
engineering anthropometry, biomechanics, workstation design, controls, and successful application of ergonomic design through improved acceptance of resultant system. Prerequisites:
AHS 101. Corequisites: None.
OHS 105 - INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces general concepts of industrial hygiene. Topics include: biological hazards; ventilation; noise and instrumentation; identification, evaluation, and control. Prerequisites: OHS
100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 106 - HEALTH AND SAFETY LEGAL RIGHTS AND
RESPONSIBILITIES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces laws and regulations which set out the rights and responsibilities of employers and
employees for occupational health and safety. Topics include: legislative and legal processes.
Prerequisites: OHS 100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 107 - SAFETY TRAINING METHODS
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces students to current safety training methods. Topics include: organization, preparation, and delivery of methods. Prerequisites: OHS 100. Corequisites: None.
OHS 108 - FACILITY SAFETY AND SECURITY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces students to building design and construction for a safe working environment, arson,
and procedures for identifying and eliminating safety hazards. Also includes instruction on
proper security of internal, external, and perimeters of property and methods of providing
security of property Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
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PGT 101 - INTRO TO PRINTING INDUSTRY
(8 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the beginning student to overview and the fundamentals of the printing industry.
Emphasizes the overview of graphic design. Topics include: first aid and safety, graphic
design, electronic imaging, reproduction photography/digital reproduction, image assembly,
offset duplication, bindery, measurement, industry overview, and printers math. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
PGT 102 - BASIC PUBLICATIONS DESIGN
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces beginning students to basics and principles of publications design. Topics include:
safety, design principles, basic desktop publishing, software, file management, typography,
measurement, page layout, and quality issues. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission.
Corequisites: None.
PGT 103 - ADVANCED PUBLICATIONS DESIGN
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on the advanced study of publications design. Topics include: safety, page layout,
basic scanning, graphics, file formats, font management, color theory, and quality issues.
Prerequisites: PGT 102. Corequisites: None.
PGT 107 - SCANNING
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Emphasizes the overview and the fundamentals of color photo manipulation and scanning.
Topics include: safety, color theory, color scanning techniques, color correction, duotone and
multitone, color separation techniques, special effects and filters, Process control, and industry standards/quality control (SWOP- standard web offset practices). Prerequisites: PGT 128.
Corequisites: None.
PGT 109 - COLOR DIGITAL PRODUCTION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on color digital production process. Topics include: first aid and safety, process color
assembly, color separation production, trapping operations, color proofing operations, process
color production, press proof/inspection, densitometry/color, industry overview, and printers
math. Prerequisites: PGT 128. Corequisites: None.
PGT 110 - DIGITAL IMAGING INTERNSHIP
(12 credit/36 contact hours)
Provides an approved industry like setting where the student develops and sharpens skills.
Emphasis is placed on production standards achievement and quality control. Topics include
one or more of the following: process black and white and color assembly, black and white
and color separation production, digital manipulation, and industry production techniques.
Prerequisites: PGT 109. Corequisites: None.
PGT 111 - BASIC PROCESS OPERATIONS I
(8 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces students to the basics of press operations. Topics include: safety, plating making,
press operations, paper handling, chemistry, printing methods, press and bindery equipment,
ink technology, and control devices. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
PGT 115 - IMAGE OUTPUT & PREFLIGHT
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the students to the study of image output and assembly. Topics include: safety,
basic film assembly, film processing/chemistry, basic multicolor assembly, outputting files, film
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
composition and contacting, proofing and plate making, registration methods, and output control (preflighting), imposition, trapping, color proofing and calibration/quality control.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
PGT 128 - BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO MANIPULATION
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Focuses on the overview and fundamentals of black and white photo manipulation and scanning. Topics include: safety, scanning operations, resolution, sizing/scaling, file formats, photo
manipulation software, halftone gray scale theory, gray scale, and quality control and calibration. OCR software, file conversion, digital input, digital manipulation, digital output, multitasking, industry production techniques and industry standards/quality control. Prerequisites:
Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
PGT 151 - HALF-TIME PRINTING INTERNSHIP
(6 credit/18 contact hours)
Provides an approved industry like setting where the student develops and sharpens skills.
Emphasis is placed on production standards achievement and quality control. Topics include
one or more of the following: process black and white and color assembly, black and white
and color separation production, digital manipulation, and industry production techniques.
Prerequisites: All courses in Basic Printing Technician program. Corequisites: None.
PHL 103 - INTRO TO VENIPUNCTURE
(4 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces blood collecting and handling techniques. Topics include: presentation of blood collecting and handling techniques employed in the hospital laboratory and a study of equipment
necessary for performing each technique. Prerequisites: Program admission. Corequisites:
None.
PHL 105 - CLINICAL PRACTICE
(6 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides the opportunity for students to apply the theoretical knowledge learned during the
program to actual “on-the-job” situations. Prerequisites: All other program courses.
Corequisites: None.
PHR 101 - PHARMACY TECH FUNDAMENTALS
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the pharmacy technology field and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation in the pharmacy field. Topics
include: safety, orientation to the pharmacy technology field, cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR), drug addiction and abuse, ethics and laws, definitions and terms, and reference
sources. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
PHR 102 - PRINCIPLES OF DISPENSING MEDICATIONS
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces the student to principles of receiving, storing, and dispensing medications. Topics
include: purchasing, packaging, and labeling drugs; pharmacy policies and procedures; distribution systems; documentation; inventory and filing systems; specific drugs; compounding;
contamination control; storage and control; pharmacy equipment; and health care organizational structure. This course provides laboratory and clinical practice. Prerequisites: AHS 102.
Corequisites: None.
PHY 190 - INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Introduces the student to the basic laws of physics. Topics include: Newtonian mechanics, flu275
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
ids, heat, light and optics, sound, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.
Prerequisites: MAT 191 OR MAT 196. Corequisites: None.
PSC 150 - APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
A survey of the concepts and applications of physical sciences. Emphasis is placed on developing a vocabulary of the terminology and the ability to identify examples, Topics include:
properties of matter, measurement, mechanics, and fluids, heat and temperature, and electricity and magnetism. Prerequisites: MAT 103, MAT 104. Corequisites: None.
PSY 101 - BASIC PSYCHOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents the basic principles of human behavior and their application to everyday life and
work. Topics include: introduction to psychology; social environments; communications and
group processes; personality; emotions and motives; conflicts, stress, and anxiety; perception
and learning; and life span development. Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites:
None.
PSY 191 - INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the basics of psychology. Topics include: science of psychology; social environments; life stages; physiology and behavior; personality; emotions and motives; conflicts,
stress, and anxiety; abnormal behavior; and perception, learning, and intelligence.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
PWC 100 - PUBLIC WORKS INFRASTRUCTURE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces methods of maintaining the most common public works infrastructures with emphasis on the different aspects of roadway maintenance, utility maintenance, and fleet management. Topics include: maintenance of pavement and shoulders, bridges, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, drainage areas, sewer and water mains; public utilities; shop functions and parts
acquisitions; preventative maintenance of fleet equipment; and equipment used in public
works. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
PWC 105 - CONSTRUCTION METHODS AND COST ESTIMATING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces initial, pavement, and bridge construction methods, and cost estimation methods
for roadway project or project components. Topics include: clearing and grubbing; earthwork
and grading; drainage; pavement types and construction; bridge substructure, superstructure,
and layout; estimating quantities and costs; and project estimating Prerequisites: CET 190.
Corequisites: None.
PWC 110 - PLAN READING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces reading and interpretation of construction drawings. Topics include right-of-way
plans, construction plans, bridge plans, shop drawings, scales, plan notation and symbols,
and plan specifications. Prerequisites: MAT 103. Corequisites: None.
PWC 115 - HIGHWAY DESIGN
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides student with a basic understanding of design and construction of roadway and highway systems. Topics include: geometric design, drainage design and computation, erosion
control, and storm water management. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
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PWC 120 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces basic concepts and procedures used in managing a highway construction project
with emphasis on administrating the contract and ensuring that construction is completed
according to the contract. Topics include: contracts, amendments, contract diaries, claims,
and contract provisions; pay items; specifications; standards and construction details; ethics;
utilities; staging; environmental responsibilities; traffic management; and scheduling.
Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
PWC 140 - INTERNSHIP
(10 credit/20 contact hours)
Provides student work experience in a professional environment. Topics include: CAD, construction materials, surveying, route location and design, infrastructure, plan reading, highway
design, and project management. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required coursework. Corequisites: None.
RAD 101 - INTRODUCTION TO RADIOGRAPHY
(5 credit/6 contact hours)
Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with
consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Topics include: ethics, medical
and legal considerations, "Right to Know Law," professionalism, basic principles of radiation
protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems,
hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical institution/college affiliation,
medical emergencies, contrast agents/media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation,
death and dying, and body mechanics/transportation. Prerequisites: Program admission level
reading and math competency. Corequisites: None.
RAD 107 - PRINCIPLES OF RADIOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE I
(4 credit/6 contact hours)
Introduces knowledge of the factors that govern and influence the production of the radiographic image on radiographic film. Laboratory experiences will demonstrate applications of
theoretical principles and concepts. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge and techniques
required to process radiographic film. Topics include: radiographic density, radiographic contrast, recorded detail, distortion, exposure latitude, film holders and intensifying screens, processing area considerations, chemicals, handling and storage of film, characteristics of films
utilized in radiographic procedures, automatic processor, artifacts, silver recovery, processing
quality assurance concepts, and state and federal regulations. Prerequisites: RAD 101.
Corequisites: None.
RAD 123 - RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the concepts of basic physics and emphasizes the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment. Topics include: atomic structure, structure of matter, magnetism and electromagnetism, electrodynamics, and control of high voltage and rectification, x-ray tubes, x-ray
circuits, and production and characteristics of radiation. Prerequisites: MAT 103 (diploma);
MAT 191 or MAT 190 (degree). Corequisites: None.
RDG 096 - READING II
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes the strengthening of fundamental reading competencies. Topics include: vocabulary development, comprehension skills, study skills, and occupational/survival reading.
Prerequisites: RDG 095, or entrance reading score in accordance with approved DTAE admis277
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
sion score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis.
Corequisites: None.
RDG 097 - READING III
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes basic vocabulary and comprehension skills development. Topics include: vocabulary development, comprehension skills development, study skills, test-taking techniques,
and occupational reading. Prerequisites: RGD 096, or entrance reading score in accordance
with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class
hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
RDG 098 - READING IV
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in vocabulary and comprehension skills with emphasis on occupational
applications. Topics include: vocabulary development, comprehension skills development,
critical reading skills, and study skills. Prerequisites: RDG 097, or entrance reading score in
accordance with approved DTAE admission score levels. *Lab may be substituted, as needed, for class hours on a 2-to-1 basis. Corequisites: None.
SCT 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROCOMPUTERS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental concepts and operations necessary to use microcomputers.
Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include: computer terminology, introduction to the Windows environment, introduction to networking, introduction to word processing, introduction to spreadsheets, and introduction to databases.
Prerequisites: Provisional admission. Corequisites: None.
SCT 102 - INTERMEDIATE COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces advanced computer applications and technologies. Emphasis is placed on program integration, use of presentation software and Web page design. Topics include:
Integration between word processing, spreadsheet, and database software, introduction to
presentation software, advanced internet applications and introduction Web page design software. Prerequisites: SCT 100. Corequisites: None.
SOC 191 - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented
as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics
include: basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups
and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, and social change.
Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
SPC 191 - FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include: selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, and analysis
of ideas presented by others. Prerequisites: Program admission level language competency
or ENG 098. Corequisites: None.
SUR 101 - INTRODUCTION TO SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
(6 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides an overview of the surgical technology profession and develops the fundamental
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
concepts and principles necessary to successfully participate on a surgical team. Topics
include: orientation to surgical technology, asepsis and the surgical environment, basic instrumentation and equipment, principles of the sterilization process, and application of sterilization principles. Prerequisites: Program Admission. Corequisites: None.
SUR 102 - PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides continued study of surgical team participation by introducing basic case preparation/procedures and creation/maintenance of the sterile field. Topics include: basic case
preparation and procedures, creation and maintenance of the sterile field, surgical supplies
and accessory equipment, wound management, principles of surgery, minimal invasive surgery, and outpatient surgical procedures. Prerequisites: SUR 101, SUR 108 (diploma), SUR
109 and PSY 101 (diploma), or PSY 191 (degree), BIO 197 (degree). Corequisites: None.
SUR 108 - SURGICAL MICROBIOLOGY
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamentals of surgical microbiology. Topics include: historical development
of microbiology, cell structure and theory, microbial function, human and pathogen relationships, infectious process, bloodborne and airborne pathogens, defense microorganisms,
infection control, and principles of microbial control and destruction. Prerequisites: Program
Admission: AHS 104; AHS 109; BIO 193; SCT 100; and ENG 101 and MAT 101 (diploma), or
ENG 191 and MAT 191 (degree). Corequisites: SUR 101; and PSY 101 (diploma), or PSY 191
(degree).
SUR 109 - SURGICAL PATIENT CARE
(3 credit/4 contact hours)
Introduces a complex diversity of surgical patients. Topics include: physiological diversities
and needs, special patient needs, preoperative routine, intraoperative patient care, surgical
emergencies, documentation and assessment skills, postoperative patient care, and care of
the caregiver. Prerequisites: SUR 101; SUR 108; and PSY 101 (diploma), or PSY 191
(degree). Corequisites: None.
SUR 110 - SURGICAL PHARMACOLOGY
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamentals of intraoperative pharmacology, and emphasizes concepts of
anesthesia administration. Topics include: weights and measurements, drug conversions,
interpretation of drug orders, legal aspects of drug administration, intraoperative pharmacologic agents, and anesthesia fundamentals. Prerequisites: SUR 101; SUR 108; and PSY 101
(diploma), or PSY 191 (degree). Corequisites: SUR 102, SUR 109.
SUR 112 - INTRODUCTORY SURGICAL PRACTICUM
(7 credit/21 contact hours)
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping;
assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; basic instrumentation; and environmental sanitation. Prerequisites: Program
Admission, BIO 193 and SUR 101 (taken no longer than 6 months prior to enrollment in SUR
112. Corequisites: SUR 102.
SUR 203 - SURGICAL PROCEDURES I
(6 credit/7 contact hours)
Continues introduction to surgical procedures, incisions, wound closure, operative pathology,
and common complications as applied to general and specialty surgery. Topics include: gen279
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
eral surgery and special techniques, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, gastrointestinal
surgery, genitourinary surgery, head and neck surgery, and plastic and reconstructive surgery
Prerequisites: SUR 102, SUR 109, SUR 110, SUR 112. Corequisites: SUR 213.
SUR204 - SURGICAL PROCEDURES II
(6 credit/7 contact hours)
Continues development of student knowledge and skills applicable to specialty surgery areas.
Topics include: ophthalmic surgery, orthopedic surgery, thoracic surgery, vascular surgery,
cardiovascular surgery, and neurosurgery. Prerequisites: SUR 203, SUR 213 . Corequisites:
SUR 214.
SUR 213 - SPECIALTY SURGICAL PRACTICUM
(8 credit/24 contact hours)
Continues development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis
is placed on observation/participation in routine procedures and procedures for general and
specialty surgery. Topics include: participation in and/or observation of general surgery, gastrointestinal surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, genitourinary surgery, head and
neck surgery, and plastic and reconstructive surgery. Prerequisites: SUR 102, SUR 109, SUR
110, SUR 112, SUR 203. Corequisites: None.
SUR 214 - ADV SPECIALTY SURGICAL PRACTICUM
(8 credit/24 contact hours)
Provides opportunity for students to complete all required Surgical Technology procedures
through active participation in surgery in the clinical setting. Topics include: primary scrub on
specialty surgical procedures; participation as a surgical team conducting ophthalmic, orthopedic, thoracic, vascular, cardiovascular, and neurosurgery procedures; independent case
preparation and implementation of intraoperative skills; and demonstration of employability
skills. Prerequisites: SUR 203, SUR 204, SUR 213. Corequisites: None.
SUR 224 - SEMINAR IN SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
(3 credit/3 contact hours)
Prepares students for entry into careers as surgical technologists and enables them to effectively review for the national certification examination. Topics include: professional preparation, certification review, and test-taking skills. Prerequisites: SUR 214. Corequisites: None.
SUR 301 - PRINCIPLES OF PERI-OPERATIVE NURSING
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
This course provides an overview of the peri-operative nurse profession and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary for successful participation on a surgical team.
Prerequisites: Graduate of baccalaureate, diploma, or associate degree nursing program and
current Registered Nurse License. Corequisites: None.
SUR 302 - FUNDAMENTALS OF PERI-OPERATIVE NURSING
(5 credit/13 contact hours)
This course introduces the student to patient care concepts and practices and provides continued study of surgical team participation. Topics include patient care concepts such as: preoperative routine, positioning, preparation, draping and related nursing procedures; introduction to pharmacology; and supplies and equipment. Prerequisites: Graduate of baccalaureate,
diploma, or associate degree nursing program and current Registered Nurse License.
Corequisites: SUR 301.
SUR 303 - INTRODUCTION TO PERI-OPERATIVE NURSING PRACTICUM
(8 credit/24 contact hours)
This course orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic
skills necessary to the circulator. Topics include: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping;
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Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; creation and maintenance of a sterile field; basic instrumentation; circulating duties and environmental sanitation.
Prerequisites: Graduate of baccalaureate, diploma, or associate degree nursing program and
current Registered Nurse License. Corequisites: None.
WLD 100 - INTRODUCTION TO WELDING TECH
(6 credit/8 contact hours)
Provides an introduction to welding technology with an emphasis on basic welding laboratory
principles and operating procedures. Topics include: industrial safety and health practices,
hand tool and power machine use, measurement, laboratory operating procedures, welding
power sources, welding career potentials, and introduction to welding codes and standards.
Prerequisites: Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
WLD 101 - OXYFUEL CUTTING
(4 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces fundamental principles, safety practices, equipment, and techniques necessary for
metal heating and oxyfuel cutting. Topics include: metal heating and cutting principles, safety
procedures, use of cutting torches and apparatus, metal heating techniques, metal cutting
techniques, manual and automatic oxyfuel cutting techniques, and oxyfuel pipe cutting.
Practice in the laboratory is provided. Prerequisites: WLD 100. Corequisites: None.
WLD 103 - BLUEPRINT READING I
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Introduces the knowledge and skills necessary for reading welding and related blueprints and
sketches. Topics include: basic lines; sketching; basic and sectional views; dimensions, notes,
and specifications; isometrics; and detail and assembly of prints. Prerequisites: MAT 101.
Corequisites: None.
WLD 104 - SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING I
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the fundamental theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for
shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) in the flat position. Qualification tests, flat position, are
used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics
include: SMAW safety and health practices, fundamental SMAW theory, basic electrical principles, SMAW machines and set-up, electrode identification and selection, materials selection
and preparation, and production of beads and joints in the flat position. Prerequisites: WLD
100. Corequisites: None.
WLD 105 - SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING II
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the major theory, safety practices, and techniques required for shielded metal arc
welding (SMAW) in the horizontal position. Qualification tests, horizontal position, are used in
the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics include:
horizontal SMAW safety and health practices, selection and applications of electrodes, selection and applications for horizontal SMAW, horizontal SMAW joints, and horizontal SMAW to
specification. Prerequisites: WLD 104. Corequisites: None.
WLD 106 - SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING III
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the major theory, safety practices, and techniques required for shielded metal arc
welding (SMAW) in the vertical position. Qualification tests, vertical position, are used in the
evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics include: vertical SMAW safety and health practices, selection and applications of electrodes for vertical
SMAW, vertical SMAW joints, and vertical SMAW to specification. Prerequisites: WLD 104.
Corequisites: None.
281
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
WLD 107- SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING IV
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Introduces the major theory, safety practices, and techniques required for shielded metal arc
welding (SMAW) in the overhead position. Qualification tests, overhead position, are used in
the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics include:
overhead SMAW safety and health practices, selection and applications of electrodes for
overhead SMAW, overhead SMAW joints, and overhead SMAW to specification.
Prerequisites: WLD 104. Corequisites: None.
WLD 108 - BLUEPRINT READING II
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Emphasizes welding symbols and definitions through which the engineer or designer communicates with the welder. Welding symbols are considered an integral part of blueprint reading for the welder. Topics include: welding symbols and abbreviations; basic joints for weldment fabrications; industrially used welds; surfacing back or backing, and melt-thru welds; and
structural shapes and joint design. Prerequisites: WLD 103. Corequisites: None.
WLD 109 - GAS METAL ARC WELDING
(6 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides knowledge of theory, safety practices, equipment and techniques required for successful gas metal arc welding. qualification tests, all positions, are used in the evaluation of
student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics include: GMAW safety and
health practices; GMAW theory, machines, and set up; transfer modes; wire selection; shielded gas selection; and GMAW joints in all positions. Prerequisites: WLD 100. Corequisites:
None.
WLD 110 - GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING
(4 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides knowledge of theory, safety practices, inert gas, equipment, and techniques required
for successful gas tungsten arc welding. Qualification tests, all positions, are used in the evaluating of student progress toward making industrial standard welds. Topics include: GTAW
safety and health practices; shielding gases; metal cleaning procedures; GTAW machines and
set-up; selection of filler rods; GTAW weld positions; and production of GTAW beads, bead
patterns, and joints. Prerequisites: WLD 100. Corequisites: None.
WLD 112 - PREPARATION FOR INDUSTRIAL QUALIFICATION
(4 credit/8 contact hours)
Introduces industrial qualification methods, procedures, and requirements. Students are prepared to meet the qualification criteria of selected national welding codes and standards.
Topics include: test methods and procedures, national industrial codes and standards, fillet
and groove weld specimens, and preparation for qualifications and job entry. Prerequisites:
WLD 101, WLD 105, WLD 106, WLD 107, WLD 108, WLD 109, WLD 110. Corequisites: None.
WLD 133 - METAL WELDING/CUTTING TECHNIQUES
(3 credit/5 contact hours)
Provides instruction in the fundamental use of the electric arc welder and the oxyacetylene
cutting outfit. Emphasis is placed on safe set-up and use of equipment. Topics include: arc
welding, flame cutting, safety practices, oxyfuel welding, and brazing. Prerequisites:
Provisional Admission. Corequisites: None.
WLD 150 - ADVANCED GAS TUNGSTEN ARC
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides knowledge of theory, safety practices, inert gas, equipment, and techniques required
282
Lanier Technical College - Course Descriptions
for successful advanced gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Qualification tests, all positions,
are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making advanced level industrial standard welds. Topics include: GTAW safety and health practices; shielding gases; metal cleaning procedures; GTAW machines and equipment set- up; selection of filler rods; GTAW weld
positions; and advanced production of GTAW beads, bead patterns, and joints. Prerequisites:
WLD 110. Corequisites: None.
WLD 151 - FABRICATION PROCESSES
(5 credit/5 contact hours)
Presents practices common in the welding and metal fabrication industry. Topics include:
metal fabrication safety and health practices and metal fabrication procedures. Prerequisites:
WLD 107, WLD 108, WLD 109. Corequisites: None.
WLD 152 - PIPE WELDING
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides the opportunity to apply skills to pipe welding operations. Topics include: pipe welding safety and health practices, pipe welding nomenclature, pipe layout and preparation, pipe
joint assembly, horizontal welds on pipe (2G), vertical welds on pipe (5G), and welds on 45
degree angle pipe (6G). Prerequisites: WLD 107, WLD 108. Corequisites: None.
WLD 153 - FLUX CORED ARC WELDING
(5 credit/10 contact hours)
Provides knowledge of theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for successful flux cored arc welding (FCAW). Qualification tests, all positions, are used in the evaluation of student progress toward making industrial standards welds. Topics include: FCAW
safety and health practices, FCAW theory, machine set-up and operation, shielded gas selection, and FCAW joints in all positions. Prerequisites: WLD 100. Corequisites: None.
WLD 154 - PLASMA CUTTING
(5 credit/7 contact hours)
Provides knowledge of theory, safety practices, equipment, and techniques required for plasma cutting. Topics include: safety practices; plasma torch and theory; plasma machine set-up
and operation; and plasma cutting techniques. Prerequisites: WLD 100, WLD 101.
Corequisites: None.
WLD 160 - WELDING AND JOINING TECHNOLOGY HALF-TIME
INTERNSHIP
(5 credit/15 contact hours)
Provides additional skills application in an industrial setting through a cooperative agreement
among industry, the Welding Joining Technology program, and the student to furnish employment in a variety of welding occupations. Emphasizes student opportunities to practice welding skills in a “hands on” situation and to work in an industrial environment under the supervision of a master welding technician. Supplements and complements the courses taught in the
Welding and Joining Technology program. Topics include: application of welding and joining
skills, appropriate employability skills, problem solving, adaptability to job equipment and technology, progressive productivity, and acceptable job performance. Prerequisites: Completion
of two full quarters with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Corequisites: None.
WRD2 IT205 - WORD 2000 INTRODUCTION
(.6 credit/6 contact hours)
Create, edit, save and print documents; apply character effects and numbers; use Microsoft's
wizards and templates; change and layout of a document; create graphics; use word's editing
tools. Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: None.
283
284
Lanier Technical College Course Descriptions
Faculty
&
Staff
285
Lanier Technical College - Faculty and Staff
Faculty and Staff
Office of the President
Dr. Mike Moye, President
Jackie Smallwood, Administrative Assistant
Carol Spires, Executive Director, Foundation
Pamela Juarez, Foundation Secretary
Mary Ann Miller, Marketing Assistant
Richard Strickland, Director of Institutional Effectiveness
Mari Lynn Burdeshaw, Secretary to Director of Institutional Effectiveness
Office of Forsyth Campus Operations
Dr. Joanne Tolleson, Vice President of Operations
Jean Norris, Instructional Services Secretary, Forysth Campus
Donna Brinson Director of Instruction, Forysth Campus
Martha Martin, Administrative Clerk,
Min Su, Media Specialist , Forysth Campus
Beth Hedrick, Director of Library Services
Nathan Wade, Library Assistant, Oakwood Campus
Office of Instructional Services
Dr. Linda Barrow, Vice President for Instruction
Brenda Mathis, Administrative Secretary
June McClain, Director of Instruction
Marynell Adams, Evening Programs Secretary
Lisa Maloof, Director of Winder/Barrow and Jackson County Campuses
Melba Daniels, Coordinator of Instruction, Lanier Career Center
Brenda Thomas, Director of Adult Literacy
Flo Smith, Coordinator, Workplace Literacy and Community Outreach (p/t)
Dorothea Holder, Secretary, Adult Literacy
Maria Bond, Data Entry Specialist, Adult Literacy
Bill Cathey, Computer Technology Specialist
Robbie Vickers, Director of Computer Technology
Karl Suchanek, Computer Technology Specialist, Forsyth Campus
Deborah Pierce, Dental Hygiene Secretary
Paula Forrester, Accounts/Records Manager for Adult Literacy (p/t)
Chad Cathey, Computer Applications Technician
Angelia Olson, Coordinator of Online Learning
Elizabeth Murphy, Receptionist - Winder/Barrow Campus
Vacant, Coordinator of Instruction, Jackson County Campus
Office of Student Services
Lisa Wilson, Vice President for Student Services
Ruth Mancari, Administrative Secretary
Betzaida Green, Receptionist
Patsy Griffin, Director of Financial Aid
Kathy Neal, Financial Aid Specialist
Kimberly Wilson, Financial Aid Technician
Georgia Harmon, Coordinator of Financial Aid
Kathy Suchanek, Financial Aid Technician-Forsyth Campus
Mike Marlowe, Director of Admissions
286
Lanier Technical College - Faculty and Staff
Barbara Holt, Admissions Secretary
Kate Marshall, Admissions Secretary-Forsyth Campus
vacant, Recruiter
Sandi Baker, Registrar
Billie Eisenman, Assistant Registrar
vacant, Records Management Secretary
Shane Sims, Student Development Assistant
Todd Powell, Coordinator of Special Services/Minority Affairs
Kenneth Orr, Coordinator of Georgia Fatherhood Program
Jennifer Pulliam, Coordinator of New Connections
Kathy Phagan, Career Transitions Specialist
Vacant, Director of Student Services/Placement-Forsyth Campus
Denell Dickinson, Receptionist-Forsyth Campus
Malissa Lawrence, Career Placement Specialist
Sherry Horn, Student Services Secretary, Winder/Barrow Campus
Mistti Cook, Receptionist, Jackson County Campus
Office of Economic Development
Russell Vandiver, Vice President of Economic Development
Royce Glenn, Director of Economic Development
Karen Minor, Administrative Secretary
Patti Kravitz, Workshops / Seminars / Quickstart Coordinator
John Sherrill, Ammonia Refrigeration Training
Jeffrey Sloan, Ammonia Instructor
Kathleen Sims, Safety Training
Office of Administrative Services
Lake Gibson, Vice President of Administrative Services
Paula Davidson, Administrative Secretary
Jill Cantrell, Director of Human Resources
Kathleen Esquivel, Payroll Technician
Betty Baker, Director of Administrative Services
Janet Bohannon, Accountant
Denise Freeman, Accounts Payable Technician
Bonnie Jones, Purchasing Technician
Judy Miller, Accounts Payable Technician
Shirley Rich, Accounting Technician
Charles Walls, Interim Director of Facilities Management
Bob Beals, Shipping & Receiving Technician
Jerry Goss, Custodian Supervisor
Sandy Irvin, Maintenance Assistant
Jean Lee, Custodian
Susan Edmondson, Custodian
Linda Stringer, Custodian
Ronald Rainey, Custodian
Jose Garcia, Custodian
Sarah Colbert, Custodian, Winder-Barrow Campus
Brenda Fouche, Custodian, Jackson County Campus
Troy Strickland, Grounds Maintenance Technician
Carl Pitts, Facilities/Maintenance Coordinator
Richard Hunter, Maintenance Assistant
Wayne Hammond, Shipping and Receiving Technician, Forsyth Campus
Flora Bailey, Custodian
Dorothy Huffman, Custodian
287
Lanier Technical College - Faculty and Staff
Faculty
Accounting
George Barbi
Christie Lee
Adult Literacy
Joyce Bates
Tina Schnepper
Elaine Glenn
Beth Magness
Robert Bates
Air Conditioning Technology
Crista Hill
Heather Mapp
Developmental Studies
Mellisa Dalton
Christine Harrison
Drafting
Darrell Fletcher
Kathleen Touton
Electronics Technology
Dianne Bowers
Freddie Williams
Automotive Collision Repair
English
James Lester
Carol Brown
Dianne Parker
Business and Office
Technology
Fire Science Technology
Gwen Belue
Joan Ivey,
Marge Warber
Marjory Wooten
Melissa Wallace
Vacant
Healthcare Management
Linda Scarborough
Industrial Systems
Technology
Early Childhood Care &
Education
Michael McCrosky
Bryan Sexton
Patti Reed
Beth Hefner
Interior Design
Computer Information
Systems
Machine Tool Technology
Steven Crumley
Hans Dukes,
Les Miller,
Dianne Kokotoff
Aura-Leigh Jenkins
Sheron Pass
Min Su
Cosmetology
Linda Haynes
Shirley Lipscomb
Criminal Justice
Harry Chapman
Dental Assisting
Liza Charlton
Dental Hygiene
Dr. David Byers
288
Judy Mills
Tim McDonald
Management & Supervisory
Development
Oscar Correia
Alton Bridges
Marketing Management
Bill Barton
Larry Cranford
Math
Paul Godfrey
Judy Connell
Medical Laboratory
Technology
Kim Randolph
Lanier Technical College - Faculty and Staff
Medical Assisting
Shannon Hintz
Susan Amos
Motorsports Vehicle
Technology
Bud Hughes
Paramedic Technology
Jeffery Clayton
Michael Gosnell
Sam Stone
Practical Nursing
Gail Adam
Jackie Bryant
Penny Robertson
Printing & Graphics
Technology
Larry Nix
Psychology
Stephanie Sloan
Surgical Technology
Jamey Watson
Welding and Joining
Technology
Tom Reiger
Staff Listing
Betty Baker
Administrative Services Director (1990)
B.B.A., M.P.A., Georgia State University;
Certified Public Accountant
Sandi Baker
Registrar (1979)
Technical Certificate of Credit,
Lanier Technical Institute
Diploma, Lanier Technical Institute
A.A.S., Gainesville College
Dr. Linda Barrow
Vice President, Instruction (1994)
B.S, M.A., East Carolina University;
M.S., Florida Institute of Technology;
Ed.D., University of Central Florida
Janet C. Bohannon
Accountant (2001)
B.B.A., North Georgia College
Donna Brinson
Director of Instruction-Forsyth Campus (1997)
B.S. Mathematics, North Georgia College
M.Ed. North Georgia College and State
University
Jill Cantrell
Director of Human Resources (2001)
B.S., Georgia State University
William Cathey
Computer Technology Specialist (1990)
A.S., B.S.EET., Southern College of
Technology
Melba Daniels
Lanier Career Center Coordinator
Instruction (1998)
B.A. West Georgia College
M.Ed., State University of West Georgia
of
J. Lake Gibson, Jr.
Vice President of Administrative Services (1986)
A.A., Truett McConnell College
B.S., M.B.A., Brenau University
Certified Government Financial Manager
Certified Economic Developer Trainer
Royce C. Glenn
Director of Economic Development (2004)
B.S., Ed., University of Georgia
Certified Economic Developer Trainer
Patsy S. Griffin
Director of Financial Aid (1988)
B.B.A., North Georgia College
Georgia Harmon
Financial Aid Coordinator (1993)
Diploma, Lanier Technical Institute
A.A.T., Gwinnett Technical Institute
Beth Hedrick
Director, Library & Media Services (1996)
B.A., University of Georgia
M.L.I.S, University of South Carolina
Malissa Lawrence
Career Placement Specialist (2002)
B.B.A. Georgia Southwestern State
University
M.B.A. Georgia Southwestern State
University
Lisa Maloof
Director, Winder/Barrow and Jackson
County Campuses (2003)
B.S., M.Ed. University of Georgia
289
Lanier Technical College Faculty and Staff
Michael C. Marlowe
Admissions Director (1984)
B.A., Piedmont College
M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Georgia
Richard H. Strickland
Director of Institutional Effectiveness (2004)
B.A., University of Georgia
M.S., Valdosta State University
June McClain
Director of Instruction (1997)
B.B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S, University of Georgia
Karl Suchanek
Computer Technology Specialist (2000)
B.S., SPSE Olomouc
Dr. Michael D. Moye
President (2002)
A.S. Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College
B.S. Georgia Southwestern University
M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Georgia
Brenda Thomas
Director of Adult Literacy (2003)
B.A., Georgia College at Milledgeville
M.A.T., Georgia State University
M.Ed., Ed.S., Georgia State University
Angelia Olson
Coordinator of Online Learning (2000)
B.S., Brigham Young University
Dr. Joanne Tolleson
Vice President of OperationsForsyth Campus (1997)
B.A., M.Ed., North Georgia College
Ph.D., Georgia State University
Ken Orr
Coordinator of Georgia Fatherhood
Program (1999)
B.S., Morris Brown College
Carl Pitts
Facilities/Maintenance Coordinator-Forsyth
Campus (2001)
Kathy Phagan
Career Transitions Specialist (2002)
Diploma - CIS Microcomputer Specialist,
Lanier Technical College
Robert Todd Powell
Coordinator of Special Services and
Minority Affairs (2003)
B.S., M.A., Western Carolina University
Jennifer Pulliam
Coordinator of New Connections to Work (2001)
B.E., Brenau College
Carol Spires
Executive Director of Foundation (1997)
A.S., A.B.A. Middle Georgia College
Business Management Certificate
Mercer University
B.B.A., Mercer University
John Sherrill
Ammonia Refrigeration Training (2000)
A.A.S., Garden City Community College
Jeffrey Sloan
Ammonia Refrigeration Training (2003)
A.A., Coastline Community College
290
James Russell Vandiver
Vice President of Economic Development (1976)
B.A., West Georgia College
M.P.A., Brenau University
Ed.S., University of Georgia
Robbie Vickers
Director of Computer Technology (1996)
A.A., Gwinnett Technical Institute
Charles Walls
Director of Facilities and Maintenance (1998)
B.S. A., University of Georgia
Janet Lisa Wilson
Vice President for Student Services (1989)
A.A., Truett McConnell College
B.S., Brenau University
M.Ed., Brenau University
Faculty Listing
Gail K. Adam
Practical Nursing (1993)
B.S.N., Brenau College
M.Ed., University of Georgia
Susan Amos
Medical Assisting - Forsyth campus (2003)
B.S.N., Valdosta State University
Lanier Technical College Faculty and Staff
George Barbi
Accounting
Accounting-Forsyth Campus (1999)
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University
Diploma Financial Planning Fairfield Univ.
Diploma Personnel Administration Fairfield
Univ.
William F. Barton
Marketing Management and Management
and Supervisory Development (2003)
B.A., Lenoir Rhyne College
M.A., Central Michigan University
Joyce Bates
Adult Literacy (2001)
B.S., Mars Hill College
Robert Bates
Adult Literacy (2003)
B.A., Mars Hill College
Masters of Divinity, Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary
Gwen Belue
Business Office Technology (2003)
B.B.A., M.Ed., Ed.S., Valdosta State
University
Martha Dianne Bowers
Electronics Technology (1997)
Diploma, Lanier Technical Institute
A.A.S., Gainesville College
B.S., Mississippi State University
Henry Alton Bridges
Management & Supervisory Development (2002)
B.A., University of Georgia
M.B.A., Brenau University
Additional graduate studies, University of
Texas-Pan American
Carol Brown
English-Forsyth Campus (2001)
B.A., James Madison University
M.A.T., Quinnipiac University
Jacquelyn Bryant
Practical Nursing (1993)
A.S., Gainesville College
B.S.N., Brenau College
M.Ed., University of Georgia
Dr. David Byers
Dental Hygiene (2000)
A.S., Gainesville College
Doctorate of Medical Dentistry, Medical
College of Georgia
Harry Chapman
Criminal Justice
(2005)
B.S., Brenau College
A.A., Gainesville College
Liza Charlton
Dental Assisting (2000)
B.A., University of Georgia
Certified Dental Assistant
Jeffery Clayton
Paramedic Technology (2001)
Certified EMT, East Carolina University
School of Medicine
Judy Connell
Mathematics-Forsyth Campus (2002)
M.A.T. Georgia State University
B.S. Ed. Georgia State University
Oscar Correia
Management & Supervisory Development
Forsyth Campus (1997)
B.S., University of Massachusetts
Dartmouth
Larry Cranford
Marketing - Forsyth Campus
B.A.., Marywood University
M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Steven Crumley
Computer Information SystemsForsyth Campus (1998)
B.S., Southern College of Technology
Mellisa P. Dalton
Developmental Studies (2004)
B.S., Georgia State University
M.Ed., Ed.S., University of Georgia
Hans Dukes
Computer Information SystemsForsyth Campus (2000)
A.A., Dekalb College
B.S., North Georgia College
M.Ed., North Georgia College
Darrell W. Fletcher
Drafting (1993)
B.S.Ed., M.Ed., University of Georgia
Elaine Glenn
Adult Literacy (2002)
B.A., University of Tampa
Marymount Manhattan College, Certificate
of Paralegal Studies
291
Lanier Technical College Faculty and Staff
Paul Godfrey
Mathematics (2000)
B.S., University of Georgia
M.S., University of Central Oklahoma
M.S., Troy State University
Michael S. Gosnell
Paramedic Technology (2003)
Diploma, Paramedic Technology, Lanier
Technical College
A.S., Gainesville College
Christine Harrison
Developmental Studies-Forsyth Campus (1997)
B.S., M.Ed., North Georgia College &
State University
Linda A. Haynes
Cosmetology (1979)
Diploma, Whit & Bobbie’s Academy of Beauty
Diploma, Lanier Technical College
A.A.T., Gwinett Technical Institute
Beth G. Hefner
Early Childhood Care & Education (1990)
B.S., Mississippi University for Women
M.S., University of Georgia
Crista P. Hill
Dental Hygiene (1991)
B.S.D.H., University of Iowa, College of Dentistry
additional studies, University of Georgia
Shannon Hintz
Medical Assisting (2002)
Medical Assisting Diploma, Gwinnett
Technical College
B.A. Oglethorpe College
Bud Hughes
Motorsports Vehicle Technology (2002)
B.A., State University of New York at Geneseo
M.S., University of Georgia
Joan Ivey
Business and Office Technology and
Banking and Finance (2003)
B.B.A., M.Ed., North Georgia College
Aura-Leigh Jenkins
Computer Information Systems (2002)
B.S., Georgia College and State University
M.A., Information Technology, American
Intercontinental University
Dianne Kokotoff
Computer Information Systems (2004)
B.S., Louisiana State University
M.S., University of Southern California
Christy Lee
Accounting (1999)
B.B.A., North Georgia College & State
University
M.B.A., Brenau University
James Lester
Automotive Collision Repair (2002)
A.S., Gainesville Jr. College
Shirley R. Lipscomb
Cosmetology (1977)
Master License, Minosa School of Beauty &
Hair Design
A.A., Gainesville College
B.S., Brenau College
M.Ed., Georgia State University
Advanced Studies, Dale Strebel University
of Cosmetology
Beth Magness
Adult Literacy Instructor (2002)
B. S., Ed., University of Georgia
Heather O. Mapp
Dental Hygiene (1989)
A.A., Clayton Jr. College
B.A., North Georgia College
M.Ed., University of Georgia
Michael J. McCrosky
Industrial Systems Technology (1995)
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia
FCC General Class Radio Telephone License
Accredited Instructor, Nuclear Power Systems
Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO)
Timothy D. McDonald
Machine Tool Technology (1984)
Diploma, Lanier Technical Institute
A.S., Gainesville College
B.S., Southern Poly-Technical Institute
Les Miller
Computer Information Systems,
Forsyth Campus (2002)
B.S., University of Central Texas
M.S., University of Central Texas
Judy Mills
Interior Design, Forsyth Campus (2004)
B.S., University of Nebraska
292
Lanier Technical College Faculty and Staff
Larry Nix
Computer Graphics & Printing Technology
(2002)
B.A., M.A., Clemson University
Dianne Parker
English (2001)
A.A., Gainesville College
B.A., Georgia State University
M.S., Georgia State University
Sheron Pass
Computer Information Systems (1986)
Diploma, Lanier Technical College
A.A.T., Gwinnett Technical Institute
Kimberly Ann Randolph
Medical Laboratory Technology (1992)
B.S., North Dakota State University
M.S., Georgia State University
Patti Reed
Early Childhood Care & Education (1997)
B.S., North Georgia College
Tom Reiger
Welding and Joining Technology (2003)
Diploma - Gwinnett Technical Institute
Penny Robertson
Practical Nursing (1996)
B.S.N., Brenau University
B.S., M.Ed., North Georgia College
Linda C. Scarborough
Health Care Management (1990)
Diploma, R.N., Hall School of Nursing
Certified Medical Assistant
B.S.M., Shorter College
Tina Schnepper
Adult Literacy (1995)
B.S., Georgia State Unversity
Glenna Seeley
Adult Literacy (2003)
B.S.Ed., Ohio State University
M.Ed., Kent State University
Bryan Sexton
Industrial Systems Technology (1997)
A.S., Dekalb Community College
B.S., Southern College of Technology
M.S., Mercer University
Samuel Stone
Paramedic Technology (1984)
B.S., Appalachian State University
EMT-P, Athens General Hospital
graduate studies, University of Georgia
Min Su
Computer Information SystemsForsyth Campus (2001)
B.A., Anhui Normal University, Wuhu, China
M.S., Troy State University
M.L.S, University of Alabama
Kathleen Touton
Drafting, Forsyth Campus (2004)
B.S., Southern Polytechnic State University
Melissa Wallace
Business Office Technology (2002)
B.S., University of Georgia
M. Ed., University of Georgia
Margarete C. Warber
Business & Office TechnologyForsyth Campus (1997)
B.S., Kent State University
M.Ed. Georgia Southern University
Jamey Watson
Surgical Technology (1999)
Diploma, Athens Area Technical Institute
A.A.T., Athens Technical College
Certified Surgical Technologist
Freddie Williams
Air Conditioning Technology (2005)
Diploma, Air Conditioning Technology,
Athens Technical College
Diploma, Computer Information Systems,
Lanier Technical College
Degree, Management & Supervisory
Development, Gwinnett Technical College
Marjory R. Wooten
Business & Office TechnologyForsyth Campus (1997)
B.A., National University
M.B.A., National University
Stephanie Sloan
Psychology (2002)
B.A., University of Georgia
M.Ed., Georgia State University
293
Lanier Technical College
Telephone Directory
Telephone Directory
Campus
Oakwood
Main Number
Academic Matters
ADA Coordinator
Admissions
Advertising/PR
Adult Literacy
Business Office
Disabilities
Economic Development
Equity Coordinator
Evening Programs
Fatherhood Program
Financial Aid
GED Testing
HOPE Grant
Job Placement
Library/Media Center
New Connections
Personnel
President's Office
Recruitment
Student Activities
Student Records
Transcripts
TDD Relay Service
Tech Prep
Testing Services
Tours
Veterans Affairs
770.531.6300
770.531.6360
770.531.6330
770.531.6333
770.531.6396
770.531.6363
770.531.6310
770.531.6330
770.531.6340
770.531.2558
770.531.6415
770.531.6353
770.531.6326
770.531.6363
770.531.6327
770.531.2569
770.531.6090
770.531.6346
770.531.6303
770.531.6347
770.531.2569
770.531.6330
770.531.6408
770.531.6325
800.255.0056
770.531.6360
770.531.6333
770.531.6332
770.531.6326
Forsyth
770.781.6800
770.781.6950
770.531.6330
770.781.6944
770.531.6396
770.781.6987
770.531.6310
770.531.6330
770.531.6340
770.531.2558
770.781.6943
770.531.6353
770.781.6946
770.531.6363
770.781.6946
770.531.2569
770.781.6895
770.531.6346
770.531.6303
770.531.6347
770.531.2569
770.781.6330
770.531.6408
770.531.6325
800.255.0135
770.781.6950
770.781.6944
770.781.6770
770.781.6946
Winder
Barrow
770.868.4080
770.868.4080
770.531.6330
770.531.6333
770.531.6396
770.307.1190
770.531.6310
770.531.6330
770.531.6340
770.531.2558
770.868.4080
770.531.6353
770.307.1190
770.531.6363
770.868.4080
770.531.2569
770.868.4080
770.531.6346
770.531.6303
770.531.6347
770.531.2569
770.531.6330
770.531.6408
770.531.6325
800.255.0135
770.868.4080
770.868.4080
770.868.4080
770.531.6326
Jackson
County
706.355.1931
770.868.4080
770.531.6330
770.531.6333
770.531.6396
706.335.1931
770.531.6310
770.531.6330
770.531.6340
770.531.2558
706.335.1931
770.531.6353
770.531.6327
770.531.6363
770.531.2569
770.868.4080
770.531.6346
770.531.6346
770.531.6303
770.531.6347
770.531.2569
770.531.6330
770.531.6408
770.531.6325
800.255.0135
770.868.4080
770.531.6333
706.335.1931
770.531.6326
Equity Coordinator & Sexual Harassment Officer for Students
Lisa Wilson
770.531.2558
Equity Coordinator & Sexual Harassment Officer for Employees
Lake Gibson
770.531.6310
ADA Coordinator
Todd Powell
770.531.6330 (Hearing & TDD)
294
Location Maps
Oakwood
Campus
Forsyth
Campus
Winder-Barrow
Campus
Jackson
County
Campus
295
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