RSC Bulletin 1974 v 3-1 - The Rhododendron Society of Canada

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Bulletin1974
Volume3 Number1
\. .\
Rhododendron
Society
of
Canada
Soci6t6
Canadienne
du
Rhododendron
CANADA'S
M(IST
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TREES,
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EVERGREENS,
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C(IVERS,
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ilSHERIDAN
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4 G A R D E NC E N T R E SI N M E T R OT O R O N T O
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IREES: Flowering Dogwood o Birch o Seryiceberry t G& o Pine. Spruce o Hemlock
SHRUBS; Fothergilla o Chokeberry . Summersweef . Dogwood
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7OO
EVANS
AVENUE,
ETOBICOKE,
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NURSERIES
SHERIDAN
Rhododendron
Society
of
Canada
rA
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l-
; *'q")l;r
' :it','t''aJi:n
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Soci6t6
Canadienne
du
Rhododendron
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OFFICERS
HonoraryPresident
President
VicePresident
BulletinEditor
AssistantEditor
PublicRelationsOfficer
Research
Consultant
SecretaryTreasurer
Dr. L. Laking
K. Duncan
P.A.Fisher
L. Hancock
M.VanAlstyne
Mrs.P. Waxer
K. Begg
Dr. H.G.Hedges
DIRECTORS
R. Behring
MissA. Glark
A.P.Craig
Dr. D.L.Craig
Mrs.J. Cohoe
R.R.Forster
R.E.Halward
Dr. H.G.Hedges
Dr. R.J.Hilton
Prof.J. Ronsley
Capt.R.M.Steele
Mrs. P. Waxer
Published by the Rhododendron Society of Canada
3 Shadwell Place, Don Mills, Ontario, which
is the address for general Society information.
Membershipsubscriptionsshould be sent to
the Treasurer,Dr. H.G. Hedges, 4271 Lakeshore
Road, Burlington, Ontario. The Bulletin of
the Rhododendron Society of Canada is included
as a benefit of membershiD.Permissionto
reprint any portion of this volume must be
obtained in writing.
Page 2
Page
3
4
7
8
12
14
15
16
20
22
22
23
24
28
Editorial Comments
Helpful Hints for HarrassedHybridists D.G. Leach
A c q u i r i n gR h o d o d e n d r o n s ? R . M .S t e e l e
Why Micronutrientsfor Rhododendron? F.R. Davis
R h o d o d e n d r o nY a k u s i m a n u m R . M . S t e e l e
Book Review
P.J.M.
When The Bee Doesn't Get There First W. Wildfong
The Challengeof Competition M. Van Alstyne
T h i r d A n n u a l M e e t i n ga n d F l o w e rS h o w - ' 1 9 7 4
In Memoriam
Observationsof RhododendronYakusimanumand lts Hybrids
A.M.Shammarello
RegionalNotes Toronto. Ontario
Toronto, Ontario O'KeefeShow 1974
B u r l i n g t o n ,O n t a r i o
North Vancouver.B.C.
New Members
ILLUSTRATIONS
Page15
P.J.M.in Colour
Our FrontCover RhodoSocietyGarden,O'KeefeCentre1974
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Ont.
Page 3
EDITORIAL
COMMENT
The Rhododendronsociety of canada has now reached a stage of stable growth,
b o t h i n t e r m s o f n e w m e m b e r s h i pa n d i n g e n e r o u sv o l u n t a r yf i n a n c i a ls u p p o r t .
A n o t h e r m o s t e n c o u r a g i n gs i g n o f g r o w t h s t r e n g t h i s t h e b e g i n n i n go f r e g i o n a l
group activity. Understandably,our two major metropolitan centres in Eastern
Canada are taking the first steps in this direction. Under the aegis of President
Duncan and other Toronto members,the first distinctivelylocal, organizedgroup
meeting in that city was held at the civic Garden centre in EdwardsGardens on
March 25th, with an attendanceequal to that of the founding meeting at the Royal
B o t a n i c aG
l a r d e n sH
, a m i l t o n i,n o c t o b e r 1 9 7 1 A
. s e c o n dr o r o n t o m e e t i n gi s p l a n n e d
f o r J u n e 9 t h ( o n e w e e k a f t e r o u r A n n u a l M e e t i n ga n d F l o w e rs h o w i n G r i m s b yo n
J u n e 1 s t . ) A n i n i t i a l m o d e s t f l o w e r s h o w o f l o c a l m e m b e r s ' b l o s s o m sw i l l b e
attempted,againto be at EdwardsGardens.And this is not all. Ken Duncan is actively
campaigningfor as complete a collection of the rhododendron genus as can be
demonstratedto be hardy in the area.
In Montrealour very active Directorsthere are also planning their regionalmeeting
on June 8th,which your editor is expectingto attendas a guest.Furtherdevelopment
is being pursued in Montreal by Rudy Behring,to encouragethe Montreal Botanic
Gardento establisha similar collection of speciesand cultivars as can be proven
hardy in that great city.
s o m u c h f o r o u r p u r e l yc a n a d i a ng r o w t h .o u r w i d e r a i m o f s e r v i n gr h o d o d e n d r o n
enthusiastsin other landswho haveto overcomesimilarharshclimaticconditionsis
receivingsupport in the form of many new membershipsfrom the more northeasterlyUnited States.Plantand seedexchangehavealso beenmadewith members
of the also newly formed JapaneseRhododendronSociety.
A l l i n a l l , t h e s e d e v e l o p m e n t ss h o w t h a t t h e l a u n c h i n go f o u r S o c i e t yw a s m o s t
t i m e l y .B u t w e c a n o n l y g r o w i n d i r e c tp r o p o r t i o na s w e a r ea b l et h r o u g ho u r B u l l e t i n
a n d o t h e r a c t i v i t i e st o s u p p l y o u r m e m b e r sw i t h t h e p o s i t i v e i n f o r m a t i o na n d
encouragementthat they need and are hungry for. Conversely,the Bulletinwill only
f u l l y a c h i e v et h i s s e r v i c eb y p u b l i s h i n gt h e c u m u l a t i v ee x p e r i e n c eo f t h e m e m b e r s
themselvesin their various localities.
With this brief resume of the Society's progresswe would be remiss if we did not
mention the time and devotion of two of our leading off icers. For the first eighteen
m o n t h so f i t s e x i s t e n c et,h e w o r k o f o u r F i r s tP r e s i d e nW
t . J .( B i l l ) B r e n d e ra B r a n d i s
was outstanding.He spared no effort in keeping every inquirer informed, and for
much of the time worked as generalsecretaryas well. To our efficientTreasurer,Dr.
H . G .( H a n k )H e d g e s w
, e o w e a d e b t o f g r a t i t u d ef o r w a t c h i n go v e r o u r f i n a n c i n ga n d
bringing the Society to its presentstage of stability.
I n t h i s s p i r i to f o p t i m i s ma s w e l l a s d e v e l o p i n gr e g i o n a la c t i v i t y ,w e c a n b e w o r k i n g
a n d w a i t i n g w i t h e a g e r n e s st o t u r n t h e n e x t p a g e i n t h e h i s t o r y o f o u r y o u n g
organization.
Page +
HELPFULHINTS FOR HARRASSEDHYBRIDISTS
David G. Leach
North
Ohio
more than 30 yearsago I soon disWhen I startedhybridizingrhododendrons
coveredthat there is no instructionmanualfor the novice breeder'Veteran
hybridistsJosephB. Gableand Guy G. Nearinghelpedme in everypossibleway'
for adviceon homely
Out tney were hundredsof miles away and unavailable
problemsas they arose.
fromthe questionsposedto me in 1973,thatthesituationis not much
I concluded,
which I hopewill be helpfulto others
differentnow,so I offersomeobservations
who arejust startingdownthe primrosepathwith the brightpromiseof a dazzling
hybridsat the end.
seriesof new rhododendron
of pollenso thatit
withthe manipulation
Nearlyeverybeginninghybridiststruggles
Pollendecaysin
plants
season.
at
another
bloom
preserved
that
on
for use
can be
storageunderexactlythe sameconditionsas do seeds:moistureand warmth.A
peanutbutterjar
it for severalweeksis to usea commercial
simplewayto preserve
anhydrous
four-mesh
inexpensive
half
of
An inch anda
desicator.
as a homemade
perforated
cardboard
pharmacist,
with
is
covered
from
a
ordered
calciumchloride,
to hold it in place.The lid shouldsealtightly.The calciumchlorideabsorbsthe
moisturefromantherscontainingthe pollen,or fromfreepollen,so thatviabilityis
should
prolonged.
lf the pollenis to bestoredmorethanthreeweeks,thedesicator
pollen
with
refrigerated
My
experience
at
34o.
ideally
plaCed
refrigerator,
in
a
be
despitepublishedadviceto thecontrary.Theperiodof
hasbeenentirelyfavorable,
preservation
can be extendedtwo monthsor more.
lf pollenof a latebloomingplantis to be savedfor useon one whichbloomsat an
at about0' F. lt will be stillviablefor
earlierseason,it canbef rozenin a deep-freeze
year.
following
the
the
cross
making
Most breedersuse gelatincapsuleswith ribbon-likepaperstripsinsertedwhich
identify the pollen they contain.Small glassinecoin envelopesalso provide
visibilityof the contents.They can be labeledwith a nylon-tippedpen; the
asthecapsulesandtheyarefar moreconvenient.
arejustassatisfactory
envelopes
Anthersdo not alwaysreadilyyieldtheir pollen.lf the groupof stamensis heldin
one handandthe heelof the handis thenstrucksharplyagainstthe knuckleof the
other,sufficientpollenmay be jarredout to makea crosswith a cultivarwhich is
presumednot to producepollenat all.
Antherswith only tracesof pollenwhich havebeenin a desicatoruntil they are
with tweezerson the palmof the handand the
thoroughlydry can be macerated
to
anthersand pollencan oftenbe usedsuccesstully
entiremixtureof pulverized
pollen
germinates
on
Enough
impossible.
be
makea crosswhichwouldotherwise
the stigmato produceseeds,althoughtheir numberis usuallyreduced'
usuallymaturelongbeforethecapsulesappearto be ready
Seedsof rhododendron
growthif they
and theycan be sownmuchsoonerfor accelerated
for harvesting,
'1971,
for example,I gatheredseedsfrom the earlyblooming
are gatheredearly.ln
alpine,R. tastigiatumon July 25th that would ordinarilynot
fittfeblue-flowered
perfectly.
As with most
Theygerminated
beforemid-October.
harvested
havebeen
new methods,a cautioustrial is desirableunderotherconditionsbeforea total
commitmentof a valuableseedlotis risked.
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sassorc lo lsll uauu/'AP ur papJocar se eoeluared eql selectpul silolp lo les puocos
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Page 6
precautions other than
numbers almost to the exclusionof other insects, no
honey bees are conwhere
emasculation are needed. In northeastern ohio,
regularly produce
flowers
test
plantings,
emasculated
spicuous in rhododendron
someseeds.Presumably,thesmaller,moreagilehoneybeesroamoverthe
receptivestigma.
, i l l e ds p h a g n u mm o s s i s t h e
F o r s u c h s l o w g r o w i n gs e e d l i n g sa s r h o d o d e n d r o n sm
preferredgerminating mediurn-forall but the most sophisticatedof growers' lt is
antii n e x p e n s i v l l, i g h t i n w e i g h t ,a n d e a s i l yh a n d l e d .T h e m o s s c o n t a i n sa n i n b u i l t
dampof
scourge
the
ever-threatening
eliminates
tunjiciOat "g"-nt *fti"n Jirtually
of
i;g:off root rots, Phytophthoia and Pythium. The United States Department
growth
inhibits
moss
Ajriculture's ResearchServicehas evidencethat sphagnum
for
to-somedegree,but most old-time breederswill swap this modestdisadvantage
disease.
seedlingsfree of
is to
The most common mistake of novice breeders in pricking out seedlings
just
taken
be
should
they
Instead,
sturdiest.
and
strongest
the
are
that
choosethose
of
or
average
weak,
as they occur in the germinating medium, whether they are
are
characteristics
ornamental
of
exceptional vigor. ThL desired combinations
with average
often not associatedwith extraordinaryvigor.They may be associated
growth'
of
rate
a
slow
with
even
or
stature
insect pests'
Sooner or later small seedlingswill be attacked by fungus diseaseor
to
control.The
once established,the most common diseasesare extremelydifficult
produce
their first
they
when
sensibleprecautionis to start spraying the seedlings
weeks
two
every
repeat
to
and
medium,
germinating
set of true leaves in the
is a
discovered
prophylaxis
have
I
The
best
growing
season.
first
the
throughout
-ot
half
a
and
one
one tablespoon of 500/ocaptan,
spray solution composeo
teasioons of 500/obehomyl ("tsenlate")and two tablespoons of an all-purpose
5oloMeta-systox-R,and 20loKelthane("lsotox")'
insecticidecontaining 5o/o-Seven,
plus 15 drops of a spreader-sticker,per gallon of water.A spray solutionconsisting
penof four teaspoons ol captan and one and a half teaspoons of
gallon of water
a
in
plus
a
spreader-sticker,
("Terrachlor"),
tachloronitrobenzene
has effectivelyforestalledmildew on small seedlings placed in frost-free winter
storage.
At the end of the first season, rhododendron seedlingswhich have had suppleand a
mentalfluorescentlight to produce a sixteen-hourgrowing day are about two
growth
of
day
dawn-to-dusk
natural
a
had
have
half times larger than those which
f o l l o w i n gg e r m i n a t i o n .
500/o
As a rule of thumb, rhododendronsrespond best to fertilizationat a rate about
as
be
available
should
genera.
nitrogen
The
for
other
recommended
of the amount
potassium,
the
ammonium nitrogen rather than nitrate nitrogen, and, to supply
s u l p h a t ei s m o r e c o n g e n i a lt h a n t h e c h l o r i d e '
first
It is commonplace for novices (and old hands too) to over-fertilize'At the
with
be
flooded
should
they
indication of the browning of leaf tips on seedlings,
A
water equal to about eightiolumnar inchesto leachout the excessfertilizersalts.
saved'
be
thus
can
ruined
be
otherwise
would
which
crop
Page 7
A C O U I R I N GR H O D O D E N D R O N S ?
R.M.Steele EastLahave.NovaScotia
P l a n n e dp a r e n t h o o da, w o n d e r f u l l ys o u n d p r i n c i p l es, o m e t i m e sd i s a p p e a r si n t o t h e
s w i r l i n gm i s t so f t h e r a p t u r eo f a n o c c a s i o n .S i m i l a r l yt h e r a p t u r eg e n e r a t e db y t h e
s i g h to f a b r i l l i a n t l ys t i m u l a t i n gt r u s so f a r h o d o d e n d r o nc a n l e a dt o t h e a c q u i s i t i o n
o f a p l a n t ,u n p l a n n e df o r a n d u n s u i t e dt o y o u r g a r d e n .
T h i n k a h e a db e f o r ea c q u i r i n gn e w r h o d o d e n d r o n sa n d s e l e c tp l a n t sw h i c h w i l l l i v e
c o m f o r t a b l ya n d i n h a r m o n yw i t h y o u r h o m e .
lf you have a small arealor your garden - you may well be able to haveone or two
very large rhododendrons,but, they must be placedwith a f ull appreciationof their
m a t u r es i z e .T h e y m u s t b e p l a n t sw h i c h w i l l p r o s p e ri n t h a t l o c a t i o n T
. h a t i s :i f i t i s a
f u l l s u n s i t u a t i o nt h e n t h e y m u s t b e p l a n t st h a t w i l l p e r f o r mw e l l i n f u l l s u n , o r , i f
s h a d y ,t h e n a p l a n t w h i c h w i l l p e r f o r mp r o p e r l yi n t h e l i g h t t h a t i t w i l l r e c e i v e .
The vast majority of our presentday gardensare small in area and thereforethere
a r e c o n s t r a i n t so n t h e n u m b e r o f r h o d o d e n d r o n sw h i c h c a n b e g r o w n , o r o n t h e
s i z eo f t h e p l a n t s .
There are other factors which should be considered,such as the view from inside
y o u r h o m e- A r e t h e p l a n t si n s i t e sw h i c h c a n b e e n j o y e dw h i l ey o u a r e i n s i d e .( B u t
r e m e m b e r i n gt h a t p l a n t s t h a t g r o w t o o l a r g e c l o s e u p i n f r o n t o f y o u r w i n d o w
b e c o m ea n i r r i t a t i n gn u i s a n c e ) .
The splash of salt f rom cars passingon the flooded street in winter can be deadly.
Rhododendronsplanted under maplescan starve,those under the drip of the eaves
can suffer in summer and sometimesbe broken by snow or ice slidesfrom the roof
in winter.
These are some of the factors to considerwhen thinking aheadto the purchaseof
r h o d o d e n d r o n sA. s u c c e s s f u rl h o d o d e n d r o ne n t h u s i a s it n y o u r a r e ac a n g i v e y o u
m a n y m o r e t i p s - a n d w i l l n o t m i n d y o u r q u e r i e s .Y o u r l o c a l N u r s e r y m a nc a n g i v e
y o u s o u n da d v i c ew h i c h m a n yo f t h e r e t a i lG a r d e n - C e n t r ecsa n n o tu s u a l l yp r o v i d e .
There is another area which is important to the enjoymentof our rhododendrons,
and that is considerationof the bloom period.
I t i s u s u a l l yd e s i r a b l et o h a v ea n y c o l l e c t i o no f r h o d o d e n d r o n s p r e a do u t a m o n g
early - middle - and late bloomers,in order that there is a progressionof bloom
so that each can be enjoyed in turn, rather than being mobbed by all of them at
once.
T h e m i d d l eg r o u p a r e p r e s e n t l yw e l l k n o w n ,s o l e t u s l o o k a t s o m eo f t h e e a r l yo n e s
a n d s o m eo f t h o s ew h i c h b l o o m m u c h l a t e r .
The first group in the Spring included; dauricum, mucronulatum, chrysanthum,
sutchuenense,schlippenbachi and others, and among the hybrids there are;
' P r a e c o x '',T e s s a ' ',C h i n k ' ,' S t r a w b e r r yS w i r l ' ,a n d G a b l e ' sl o v e l y g a y ' E a r l y B i r d ' ,
'Pioneer'.
and
T h e l a t e g r o u p a r e o u r b o n u s t o t h e u s u a l r h o d o d e n d r o ns e a s o na n d a r e u s u a l l y
quite separatedfrom the earlier bloom. These include auriculatum,maximum,
Page 8
azaleasof
bakeriandprunifotium.Thelasttwo of theseare nativeNorth American
size'
mature
a
reach
they
when
beauty
and
u"ry "on"iderabledignity
a starburstof excitingnewvarietiesof .rhododendrons
we areaboutto experience
theycanbringto
in the nextfewyears watchfor thembutthinkcriticallyon how
youenjoymentand|ong|astingp|easure'Askaboutthefactualdetai|softhe
your garden'
p".forr"n"", wherethei can OJstOeplacedand howthey canfit into
suited'
Thenacquirethosewhichare most
well placedand properlyplanted,canlast
Bearin mind,that a good rhododendron
bring joy to an almostunimaginable
can
years
and
for morethan two hundred
life
sPan'
its
in
numberof PeoPle
WHY MICRONUTRIENTSFOR RHODODENDRON?
FredR. Davis,Ph'D. Kent,Ohio
lntroduction
plant
are chemicalelementsneededin smallquantitiesfor norrnal
Micronutrients
a n O a n i m a f g r o w t h . T h e y g e n e r a l l y i n c l u d e i r o n ' b o r o n ' mhave
a n g microanese'zinc'm
lybdenumand copper-ioi"y, many of our fertilizerformulations chelated
Theseiupplementsare presentas solublesalts,
nutrientsupplements.
aregenerallymetal
for"por"oi or frittedtraceelements.The chelatedcompounds
acid'They
polyamine
caroboxylic
some
acid or
saltsof ethylenediaminetetraacetic
some
whereas
soils,
alkaline
and
acid
both
in
effective
n""" in" advantageof being
elements
trace
fritted
sirpfe metalsalti will not 6e effectivein alkalinesoils.The
zinc, iron maganese'
i'e.,
elements,
trace
the
combining
by
are.manufactured
"opp"r.,bordx,mo|ybdenum,etc.,withrawmateria|snecessarytoformg|ass.Th
thetracee|ements.
g|asscontaining
producinga homogeneous
mixtureis sme|ted,
particlesare
shattered
The
water.
in
iooling
rapid
6y
shattered
glass
then
is
The
micronutrients
fritted
product.
These
calledfrit,whichis groundinio tne finished
to reduceleachinglossandminimizetoxicityhazards'
providecontrolled.otuoitity
in plant nutrition'
some peopleare skepiicalabout micronutrientsupplements
muchevidence
but
measurable,"
not
and
unimportant
effectis iatner
saying',,their
arebeneficial
micronutrients
that
shown
have
testing
ti"to
"no
frombothlaboratory
toptantgrowthandreproduction.lt'ayolunexperienceingrowingrhododend
and chronic
has borne out the need for micronutrientsto correct chlorotic
micronutrient
that
here
point
out
me
let
but
exist,
conditionsthat sometimes
are not the panaceato all plantnutritionproblems'
supplements
in
micronutrients
The objectiveol this articleis to focus attentionon the role of
are
symptoms
culture.The functionsand deficiency
azaleaand rhododendron
discussed,
'uJnqdlt ttttm
asoLlloJB{cuarcr;apladdoc;o stuoldul{s pezlu6ocel{;tsealsout eql
.to 6uqlanglqs
ut sllnsal {;lensn {cua;c;;apleddo3
6uo1esenee;oql lo uollpurJollpuJ
'slueld
.re/u\ol
'suol :eddoc
or.lllo euros Jol sep!c!qJaqsp pesn elP slles laddoc lo suotlnlos
;o
uolleJluecuocaql ol allllsues &an ete slueld lsofrl r'1ue;daq1;o leddoc eql lo lsotlJ
'a;dtuexoJol 's;saqlulsoloqd
urgluooJanolglo slsBldololqoaql leql punol sern11
'eseplxoplce clqlocsPpue sese
ur uollcunl ^euJ.reddoclBtll pelse66nsusaq seq ll
-loueqd se qcns su:als{s oullzue uleuac;o luauodutogP se slce :eddog reddog
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elqnlos
eql
aseue6uBrx
lo auo 6u;sn {q palcelloc lsaq
ol llnclglp uego
sr {cuercgap asouebu?rueq1 '{cua;c;lap uoll aql u.lollqs;nOu;gs;p
{cue;cgep eseuebueursqt pull | 'so^eolloplo eql uo ueql Jaq}PJuolpuepopotp
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'{leleugurl.rcslpul
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seq ,uosqocep 'syedrelunoc rleLlluPtll uoll olotu uo^elo sP tlcnul se uleluoc {eu.t
'pueq reqlo eql uo ollLlrv\
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'sea:p crloJolqc aql uoel
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.sJaIJo/nlereles
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llr^ srsoJolr..lc
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^ ou eql 'a6e;1o1
aql u! slsoroltloonlsuolxssp so^lostuotlllsollueu solcuslcllapuoJl
'slsarlluls
;lIqdotolqc qll/r^oseerculIeur snql pue ugalo.td
'uteuaoun
crlseldo.rolr.lc
1osqseqlulsaql u! suollcunl uo:! lPtll lsal zslotllnelele^es
'lueld
s; 1;{qdoJolrlclo uolleper6ap pue spsaqlu{su! tlloq aloJ lec!u.totlcsll
11r1s
eq1se (7 + al) alels luele^tpeq1u; paldacce
I;;ecqloqplour
eql u! uor! lo turol en11ce
'1ue;d
{lle"rauebsl lnq '(Z + ol) olels luele^lJl aql ut dn ue1e1A;;ensnst uot;
eql lo llslloqplet! lleJanoeql u! suollcunl lueyodtu! lo Jaqunu e sa^tasuoll uorl
suroldurlgAcuap;;agpue suollcunJ:uol lelon oql
6 ebe4
Page 10
in a diseaseof fruit treescalledexanthema.
A copperdeficiencyin almondsmay
result in rougheningof bark, gummosisand shrivelingof the kernels.Copper
deficiencies
are correctedby usingsolublecopperchelates.
acid.
in the biosynthesis
of the plantauxinindole-3-acetic
Zlnc Zinc participates
This was provenby observingthat the contentof tryptophan,a precursorof the
auxin,parallelsthe contentof auxin in the plant,bothwhenzinc is deficientand
whenit is suppliedto deficientplants.lt hasbeenconcludedthatzinc reducesthe
in the synthesisof tryptophan.
auxincontentbecauseof its participation
of soluble
by the accumulation
as evidenced
Zinc playsa role in proteinsynthesis
nitrogencompoundssuchas aminoacidsandamides.Zinc is alsoinvolvedin the
wasthe
plantmetabolism
Carbonicanhydrase
as an activatorof severalenzymes.
first zinc containingenzymeto be discovered.lt is involvedin the catalytic
of carbonicacid into carbondioxideand water.
decomposition
"littleleafdisease."
lt is
Zincedeficiencyis sometimesreferredto as "rosette"or
mostevidentin older leavesas chlorosis,necrosisor mottlingof the leaves.The
The
interveinal
areasturn palegreento yellow;the leafmarginsbecomeirregular.
of the
absenceof zinc mayalso havea retardingetfecton growthand development
flower and fruit. The use of solublezinc chelatesin soil applicationsor foliar
will correctthe deficiency.
applications
havealludedthat boron is involvedin carbohydrate
Boron Gauchand DuggerT
transportwithin the plant.They believethat the borateion complexeswith the
sugar moleculeand this complexis transportedacrosscell membranesmore
are
thatsymptomsof borondeficiencies
readilythanthesugar.Theyalsoobserved
The first visiblesign of boron
with symptomsof sugardeficiencies.
associated
deficiencyin manyplantsis the deathof the shoottip. The leavesmayhavea thick
copperytexturewith curling;generallyflowersdo not form and root growth is
of internaltissuesresultingin
reduced.In fleshytissue,thereis a disintegration
cork formation.Borondeficienciesmay be correctedby usingsodiumtetraborate
or boricacid.
Molybdenum Molybdenumis involvedin nitrogentixationand nitrateassimihavefound that a molybdenumdeficiencyleadsto a
lation.Someinvestigators
Thereis someevidence
of ascorbicacidin theplant.s
decrease
in theconcentration
metabolism
of the plant,but the
is involvedin the phosphorous
that molybdenum
maybe correctedby
hasnot beenexplained.
Molybdenum
deficiencies
mechanism
saltsuchas sodiummolybdate.
usinga solublemolybdenum
Elfect of Soil pH
Theavailability
of plantnutrientsis highlyrelatedto soilpH.Manychartshavebeen
publishedillustrating
suchas thosepreparedby Lucasand Daviss
this relationship
for organicsoils.lt is importantto know the soil pH beforethe micronutrient
areapplied.
supplements
'Zgr-LLl:26'ocuarcs
lros ,.'sluorllnNlueld Zl Jo Alllqellenv
't961 'sl^PO 'l'l' "3'U 'secn'16
pue slros ctue6.rq lo senlen Hd uoe^log d1qsuot1elag,,
'zlg-Lg9:9L''lcs'uoH 'cos 'raurv leurnof '096t ''H'uospl^ec8
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'6uly '9'3'Iqyegcnl 'l'f ''1"'l 'uaares
'LW:gZl 'fu1sru-req3
lecr6olorglo leu.lnol'6tOt
'ullallng l1:apeng Ilatcog uorpuopopoqH ueorlaulv
'Z6l-OOl 'dd '(e)
lZ
'z26l "u'J 'sl^Poe
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'9t6l. '"'l 'uosqocef}
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uorl,,'0961
ul srsorolLlc
z
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'ursuocsrA
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s3cN3U3J3U
's1ue;dsnotlel to1 pellnbal suollelluocuoc luolJlnuolslul
;o a6uer aql MolJBu ol sn slqPua lll/'^ lBt{l elPp }o adfi aq1 lcedxa /nou uec e/u\
'sllos pue slueld u1slusUlnuolcltu sle^elrnol 6ululuualaplol spoqlau lec!illeue
lo
'pasn 6ulaq ole sluauols aoeJl pa$Ul
pup uollelueurnJlsul ut socue^pe ol an6
pus selelaqc lgleu oql qloq :quauelddns lueplnuoJc!uJaneq {l1uerlnc pelplnulJol
'e6esn peseelcut .tol sl uollezllluol luaglnuolcltu ul puell:o[eu eql
s.rez1lye;[uey1
puall
eJnlnl
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'1ue;d edfi qcee lol peleplsuoooq lsnu uOlsappue
uoJpuepopoqlpue seelezv
1o
aq1 's1ue|dJaulsluoc6ulnnol6s! ouo l! peJaplsuoc
ed&jeuleluoc'un!potu 6ulrno.rO
'eleqdsotule
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llos aql ;o uolllsodtuoc puB
'{llnllce
uolsn;;lp aql lcolls I1;suap llnq pue alnle:adulal
lelqoJc!tlrsP qcns sJolcel
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;o uolld.rosqeeql lleunc uec ue6lxo lo IcPl e lBql saulll lueul urnoqs ueaq seq ll
uollerev llos
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luolJlnuolclu.llca$e {llcellpul uec
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11 a6e6
Page 12
RHODODENDRON
YAKUSI
MANUM
R.M. Steele
East Lahave,Nova Scotia
This extraordinaryspecies rhododendron,
ls it the best of all the speciesfor us?
This very beautifulrhododendronfrom the mist shroudedand very windy mountain
top of an islandoff the south tip of Japan, is one of the most sought after and most
discussedrhododendronsin the world today.
It is probablyeven more importantand more valuablein Canadathan it is forthe rest
of the world. Let us look at this rhododendronand let us get to know it.
What are the good points of this plant?
1.
l t h a s a f i n e p l a n t h a b i t ,g r o w i n g s l o w l y i n t o a v e r y u n i f o r m m o u n d ,
eventuallyreachingabout four feet in height and f ive to six feet in width.
2.
lts foliage is a particularlyf ine feature,it is not only beautifulbut alsovery
strongand durable.lt hasa thick velvetyindumentumon the undersideof
the leaf and these leavesremainon the plantfor f iveyears,thus giving it a
very thickly clothed appearance.
3.
The flower truss is uniform, firm, very beautiful and in perfect balance
with all the other featuresof the plant.
4.
The plant is very hardy, stands up well to a great deal of wind, seems
unperturbgdby full sun, and seemsto perform well in dry locations.
5.
lt is a plant that can be used in all types of gardens Garden.
even the Rock
What are the bad points of this plant?
I can't think of any unless they are colour and slow growth. The colour varies in
ditferentplantsfrom rose-pinkto white. lt is a healthyclear and vibrantcolour,that I
find very pleasing,howeverI haveneverseenany signs of dark intensecolour in any
clone.
The slow growth I consideran asset,for evenwhen very small it is an attractiveplant.
It neveroutgrowsits location,and it givesa great deal of performanceat all stages.
How hardy is it? | have never seen it damagedby the cold, nor have I seen it fail to
open all of its buds. lt is hardy here to at least-20 F,and probablymore. I believethat
Dave Leach and Lanny Pride have had satisfactoryperformanceas low as -30 F.
(Editor's Note: David Leach lives in Madison, ohio and Lanny pride in Builer,
Pennsylvania.)
There is a good possibilitythat in areasof good snow cover through- out the winter,
this plant could surviveand perform well at very cold temperatures.
There are three significantclones of R. yakusimanumlhal are at presentavailable:
The F. C. C. form; The Exbury form; 'Mist Maiden'.
The F. C. C. clone receivedthis award when f irst shown at the ChelseaFlowerShow
in London,Englandin 1947.ltcreateda tremen-dous stir of interest.This plant was
o n e o f t w o s e n t b y M r . K . w a d a f r o m J a p a n t o L i o n e l d e R o t h s c h i l df o r h i s
'lt ,{oluaJaAaJoJ no{ :)VA e
lPals Jo
;1trvr
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orog
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luaut{olue
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'poued eu.lesoLll ur apr/v\ge pue q6;q saqcu;y7 urvrol0
seq raqloue isreeAual ul t.|6lqseqcutS ueql eJouJou s! poo^ Japlnog 1es6u;lpees
eql lo ouo 'I;mo1seJoulrlcnurrurol6pue lJemputetualselPal lleuJsqll^ltslue;deuog
'sercadss!ql ul so^salpue s1ue1d
qloq to ezlsotll ut uotletJB^elqeJeplsuocE sl alaql
('uorlereuebqcea
'ebe 6ultuoo1qbutJeeuale asaql /'^al 'apeul
rol sJpe^OL- I sn sslel {;lensn lt)
V
lo
uoeqaleLlsessorcuotlelaue6puocasaql lo laqunu pallullle,{1uopue'spllq{q eseql
slql lo sleblel lBeJaqf 'slueld au1;fuen
lo uolleJauobpuocas oql ut aJe 6u1paa.rq
'suolpuapopoqlleqlo {uttll
auos pacnpo.rd{peerle aneqsossolcasaqllo lequnu V
'oletu!lcuelpBuPC
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'a
splrq^q lo; lue,redeull e eq ot outnold st unueutrsn)te[
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llnl sl! paqcPoj
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fuan e seq pue
1sn[seq qyvror6lenuue ^ au oLllueqm ,{1te1nclyed
'1ue;dApleq fuan pue
I;1c1nberour tlcnursanol6'lsou ueql senea;le6le; sett tlclLl^
uanordE srll esnscaq{1uo 'eseq1lo1uect}1u6|s
lsot! oql se ol paJlalelsl ,ueplenlsll ,
'lnlrlneaq
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'n aql u! wnueutsuleA
lo.Iequnu olqeloplsuocP a.lea;olll
lo sauolc pauleu{1anau
'{lguecr;ruOeur
{11enbeulo;lad pue Ilrtto;s
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'plopleH aplslno
reUaq6u!uroyed esec qcea ut st ultol funqx3 eql'lncllsauuoC
lo
'lsaq aql
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eq
sl 'c 'c 'l oql sleol/'^ouoH - ra$aq aq1sdeq.redse/r^Llrlolftnqx3 oql leql 1q6noq1
'g '1 o6e slea,{aulog '{lptpualdslu.topad
lpql au plol'a;aql uleql matOoqrr'Ie1pu13
qloq r{aq1'pue16u3'JosputM'Ited leeJe eqJ-te laqlo qceeol lxau rtnol6{aq1 ejaqM
'ap;s Aq ap;s 6u1mot0ele {eq1 ueq/v\ua^a
'o^ esaql uee/uUeq
ocuoJoll!p qeal {ue eeso1llncrgrp fue^ sl l! pue slueldluacgluOBtu
l
qloq aJe ssaql 'rtnqx3 lP pauleuol leql lueld iaqlo eql sl auolc funqx3 eq1
'Aa1sr6
'S 'H 'H eql o} uelel
ruoJlu/v\oqsse/u\pue la6ueg stcuell {q {etstnn1eueple6 lP!}
Jelelsp/r^11'pueg6u3ul uoldueqlnos JeauesnoH funqx3 lB uep.leeuoJpuapopoqU
91 e6e6
Page 14
BOOKREVIEW
Rhododendron Information
Publisher:American RhododendronSociety 1967
I
I
This is a hard cover book of 250 pages and for the price contains much useful
i n f o r m a t i o na, s t h e n a m e i m p l i e s .T h e r ea r e s e c t i o n so n b a s i cc u l t u r e ,p r o p a g a t i o n ,
insectpestsand diseases,a specialarticle by DavidG. Leachon toxicity,and one on
the use of the genus for Bonsai.
A l i s to f 4 0 5g a r d e nh y b r i d si s i n c l u d e d g, l v i n gp a r e n t a g eq, u a l i t yr a t i n g ,h a r d i n e s si n
degrees F., size and season of bloom and a brief description of each. Separate
sectionsalso give this informationfor rhodo species,nativeAmerican azaleasand
evergreenazaleasA list of A.R.S.award winners is included.
There is a useful glossaryof botanicalterms and drawingsof leaf and flower shapes
t o a i d i n i d e n t i ifc a t i o n T
. h e b o o k i s i l l u s t r a t e d7, 1 b l a c ka n d w h i t ep h o t o sd e a l i n gw i t h
various aspectsof rhododendrongrowing.
Price: $5.00per copy.
Rhododendron Notebook
P u b l i s h e rA: m e r i c a nR h o d o d e n d r o nS o c i e t y1 9 6 8
I
*
T h e l i s t o f 4 0 5 n a m e d c u l t i v a r sa n d ' 1 8 6 s p e c i e sa s p u b l i s h e di n ' R h o d o d e n d r o n
Information'(describedabove)havebeen reprintedin handy paperbackform.Text is
printed on one side of the page only, allowing for further additionsor notationson
the blank facing page.An explanationof how the ratingswere made is included.This
book could proveusefulfor anyone who alreadyhas a fairly advancedcollection(or
for those who fully intend to have one!)
P r i c e :$ 1 . 7 5
Memberswishingto orderthesebooks or books previouslyreviewedshouldwrite to:
Dr. H.G. Hedges,Treasurer
RhododendronSociety of Canada
4271 LakeshoreRoad
BurlingtonO
, ntario
DavidsoniaVolume 4 - Number 2
T h i s p a r t i c u l a irs s u eo f t h e U . B . C .t s o t a n i c aGl a r d e nQ u a r t e r l yd e a l se x c l u s i v e l w
y ith
the genus Rhododendron.The Pacificcoast city will always be the locationfor the
fullest developmentand enjoyrnentof the genus and growers in the east must be
c a u t i o u sa b o u t s o m e h y b r i d sm e n t i o n e d N
. e v e r t h e l e s st h, e p u b l i c a t i o nh a s m u c h
usefulinformationthat is good anywhererhododendronsare grown.Thereare short
a r t i c l e so n p r o p a g a t i o nl,a b e l l i n ga n d d i s e a s eT
. h e p u b l i c a t i o ni s r i c h l y i l l u s t r a t e d .
S e n d $ 1 . 0 0t o B o t a n i c a lG a r d e n ,U n i v e r s i t yo f B r i t i s hC o l u m b i a
Vancouver,B.C. to obtain a copy of this booklet.
I
I
.S'U'V
'd
aL,ii'iq (lueld7remo11)
t/g,o 6urlel p peploosest puB J o0Z-ls€si lp ol dp.reqs! y! f
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u r s t u o o l qi l ' s a u r d l eJ a q l oa l r l ' s u o r l r p u o cd r p p u e u n s l o l u p J o l o ,l { l a n r l e l asrl ' U \ l ' fd
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a r e ms l u e ; d 6 u 1 1 1 n saaqr 1' s a m a d so A l L u o j is s o r c u o r i e r o u e 6l s r r i . r o 1 1 u e 6 u r e g
'696 u! pesnoojlur puP 'lirzan 'r ralad 'Jaqlelsil.]
1
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ue3uourv r-lyoNanrleu L!/soJno seA iua.redpoas aqf 'pu!r13r.ll.roN]o surelunouJ
e q l u r o r i ^ l r u i e l U r z s i 4a L l i o l l u a s s i u e ; d u o r ; p a l c e l a s ' u n c t l n e p ' U l o r . j r r o l
uaarOrane,{ran
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'uo1ur>1dog
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pJPl'AIBH'3 U :olor.ld
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Page 16
WHENTHE BEEDOESN'TGETTHEREFIRSTI
M i l t o nW i l d f o n g
M i s s i o n ,B ' C '
be a
Hybridizing rhododendronsis certainly not everyone'scup of tea but it can
hybridization
purpose
controlled
of
whole
The
ind rewardingendeavor.
,"tirtying
-Oea1
Mr. Bee to thL honeypot and carry out a planned mating betweentwo
is to
plants.The selectionof the parentsis of course all-importantto the future results'
results. Inopen pollination is all a random process and it produces random
A gardener
decisions'
of
a
series
entailing
matter
is
a
different
hybridizing
tentional
crosses'
two
or
one
only
make
who has only a lot-size back yard may want to
of
range
astonishing
an
achieve
parents
may
he
Depending upon his choice oi
group
siblings
of
a
parents
may
obtain
he
other
with
or
cross,
in
one
color variation
givesconsiderable
remarkablyuniform in habit,foliageand color. A wise hybridizer
with which he
creation
own
his
of
thought to the types of rhododendronchildren
garden'
expectsto embellish his
we soon found
In embarkingon a program of hybridizationat Silvercreek Gardens
a file card
we
established
Firstly,
procedures.
certain
it necessaryto organize
order'
in
alphabetic
maintained
is
which
of
each
divisions
main
four
with
system
own
Tie divisions are; species; Named Hybrids; Un-named Hybrids from our
sources'
crosses;and, Un-named Hybrids from other
geneology as is
The card for each hybrid contains as complete a listing of the
are brief,but
others
while
geneology,
involved
obtainable.Some hybrids have very
providesat
lt
reference'
convenient
provides
instant
an
information
in all casesthis
'family tree' of a plant. The accompanyingcard of 'Dream
a glance the complete
Girl' shows how a more elaborate hybrid is traced right back to the originating
speciesinvolved.
DREAM GIRL (Brandt)
Orange buff, throat blood red
+5 F.
x
Daydream
I
I
V
griersonianumx LadY Bessborough
I
V
x discolor
camPYlocarPum
c/72/AC
MargaretDunn
I
discolor x Fabia
I
t
dicroanthumx griersonianum
'lualed
uel;od
e
sp
osn
lol
aolnos luplslp oujos u,tolleuioq sleJoll 6ur6ur:qaJoleg
'ua;1od
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a
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a l u o q l l t d e u t a p u o l q c l r J n l c l p lco l l q v ' { r p 1 d e 1s r 1 1o u r p t n o l du o l l e : e 6 u 1 aJl o p u n
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acue^peaql ut pspnlsul osle s! os peulelqo
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slooq lsaq aql
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pue parrnbcesp/{\JB^rllncqcee ree{ pue aolnos aql :pelsllaq
s6ullet {1r|enb
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LL a5ed
Page 18
be sureto examinethe bloomsand selectthosewhichare well ladenwith pollen.
Nothingcan be morefrustratingthan to arrivehomeand prepareto hybridizeonly
to discoverthat, the pollen havingalreadybeenshed,the anthersare empty!
For eachcross,two or more stigmasshould be pollinated,preferablynot all from
the sametruss. An accidentmay befall one maturingseed pod but miss others
elsewhereon the plant. Each cross should be labelledwith the full parentage
recorded,the seed-bearing
or motherplantalwaysbeinglistedfirst. The notations
on the labelsshould be sun and water proof. We also maintaina registerof all
crosseswhich insuresnone will be overlookedat seed gatheringtime. The one
majorprecautionis to rememberthat lepidote(scalebearing)rhododendrons
must
be matedwith like kind, while the elepidote(withoutscales)type must be mated
with likekind.Thetwo classifications
havebeenhybridizedbut veryrarely.Someof
the alpinetypesof rhododendrons
developtheirseedat a rapidpaceand podsmay
ripenby mid-August.Mostof the clan howeverdelayuntil laterand usuallyOctober
is aboutrightfor collection.
Thousandsof rhododendronhybrids have already been produced,namedand
registered.
Why add to them?Can new hybridsof sufficientworth be producedto
justifythe time and effort involved?The answeris specific- yes!The presentand
the futurehold promiseof far greaterthings to come than the pasthasproduced.
Let us see why.
Firstly,sufficienthardinessis a prime factor lacking in the majority of hybrids
producedto date- a limitationwhich restrictsthemto smallareaswherethe climate
is mild.Our own locationis only aboutfifty milesfrom the PacificOceanbut this is
inlandsufficientlyto restrictus from growingmany plantswhich flourishright at
the coastline.
The attainmentof everlargerand moremagnificenttrusseshas beena majorgoal
in most of the breedingto date. Perhapswith awardsystemshavingbeen based
In any
upon exhibitof cut trussesalone,this objectivehasbeenover-emphasized.
casea considerablenumberof hybridsattainsplendidbloomssittingatop plants
which havelittle merit othenrise.A new recognitionseemsto be developingthat
hardiness,form, growth habits,qualityof foliage,etc. are extremelyimportantas
well as the floweringcharacteristics.
To us it seemshighlyappropriatethat the new
American'Award of Excellence'tor a rhododendronis bestowedonly after the
whole plant has been underobservationand test for severalyears.
lnterestin rhododendronshas developeda tremendousmomentumin thesepost
WorldWar ll years.Not only hasmuchnewknowledgebeengained,it is alsobeing
widely disseminated.
Publicationsand books of great merit haveappeared.New
propagatingtechniqueshave speededand eased production.The facility with
which pollen,seed and and scions can be zipped around the world providesall
sorts of imaginativeopportunities.Perhapsmost importantof all, literallythousandsof peoplehave becomerhododendronenthusiasts- happily includingan
increasing
numberof Canadians!
sra^ o8 'c luauolc - sBelPzvpue suoJpuapopot{u
xoc 'v ralad - suo.lpuapopot{H
IJBlv\o
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selcedg - | ued
-slooqpuPH uoJpuepopoquaq1
qcPe"l'0 p!^Po - puoM aql lo suorpuapoporlH
{lercog uorpuapopor.lHueoiJeuv aql - uolleurlolul uoJpuapopoqU
sacuaraloHlnlesn
apaloor{ {peerle l,uere no{ l! slupl
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o l q e J s p l s u o C ' s l l n s aerl q e q o r da q 1
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qcnu rol &!unyoddo ue seprnordg; Ilu1eya3 'etull eleds qltrvrauo{ue Jo, lellno
a^lleoJce eplno.rdupo y 'l! aleur ol 1uelanor{sP pellonu! se lsnl oq uee 6ulzlpttqlU
'lusue^or.lcP
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(11aeatnq
x elqeJ) x wnuewe,snrlef 'g auos
reqlo ul '6ugqslnel{gen;1;sod
oJBr{crtl/v\
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aJouJrllr/noslp pue 'dolenapol suolleleuo6ernln; Jol autll alout uant6lsql uteuac
a1lnbare aM 'lua.rede se ,1er{,:ood le polcorlp s6uqdun:6 pus slueuilutoddes;p
aql are Aueyl 'unlusuinpu! 1ce; 6uptdslto eql iauyed paluaunput-uou P tll!/n
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rood e se pauulepuocuseq uauo
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serl ll pup 6ulpaarq ro; s:eal luocor u; Ilengsuegxoposn ueaq seq unuewrsn>1el 'g
'uJnlusunpul urnleJ e pue lrJoolqrvrolla{qloq eplnord
lo
plnoqs 6ulteu: slql urorl 6u;rdsgoeq1 'e6et;o;poluerlnpu! {||n;lepuornpup Jalnoll
rvrolle^e qloq qlr/n uJol ourl e a^eq o^ L{clL{^,o tilqdw 'u qll/v\ tuaql ez;p;:q{q
ol asodo.rdann:BeA srql uoolq {eq1 ueq6 'ulnluauinpu! alqtst^ ou s^eq qo!q^
'zznl aceJl P
s1ueld(epnlar6 x lsarg) x unueutsutel 'A a^?q aM luauJouJaql lV
lo
lspellp seq oslp alpu rsqlo eqt ll {tuo Oul.tdsgoeql ul llqlsln 6uole &llenb sqqlssed
y 'a6etlol poo6 6u;u;e1qoJol uJacuoc
uec luered polueunpul ro porJnlI11n;11neaq
B 'eloq sessolc
eu:qrde qlr^ lno perJlpcugeq a^pq s6ulleu.rlo Jequnu 6u;s1.tdlns
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'suorpuapoporlJ
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'ry{ elel eql 6ulpnlcul 'ool sJaqlo^ueul eJe alaql lnq suoJpuepopoqlul sseulpleq
'Jalxoq 'ollaJeul
;o 6ulpaarqeql ur saueu u/v\oullsaq aql buoute aJEasaql :alqqoH
-Lupr1s'rjcee-1'lsBd arll lo uollcolas pelluJllaq1 ssedlns lel leql s.to;oc;o a6ue:
E Ul pue ocjoll alP sernleladutel lelu!/rAeJoq/v\sPalPesoql ol alnoluo ele s6u1q1rvrep
6L ebed
Page 20
THE CHALLENGE
OF COMPETITION
M.H.VanAlstyne Mississauga,
Ontario
A competitive
spiritlurkssomewhere
withinall of us,albeitmorehighlydeveloped
in some!Yet evenwherelatent,that gremlinin us is pleasedwhensomethingon
which we have lavishedtime and thought and effort achievesadmirationand
recognition.
So it is with our rhododendrons.
We striveto createthe bestconditionsso thatour
plantsare healthy,superiorexamplesof theirvariety.Perhapsat a laterstagethe
urgeto createnew and morebeautifulvarietiesplungesus into breeding.
Comparisonis the best way of assessing
our achievements
and so we plan our
AnnualFlowerShowand Competition.
The possibilityof winninga ribbonfor our
bloomsis an intriguingone.To win a trophyfor excellenceis a mostrewarding
experience.
Manymembers,I believe,hesitateto entertheirflowerson the theory
thattheyarenot worthyor too 'ordinary'and
thereforenoteligiblefor a trophy.But
activeparticipation
and manyentriesin a showgenerateenthusiasm
for advancementand are educatingfor membersand visitorsalike.
The enormousvarietyof forms in the rhododendron
genusnecessitates
a fairly
largenumberof classesin a competition
or it wouldbe a judges'nightmare.
Within
eachclassa fair judgmentcan be made,matchingsimilartypes,and the stringent
rulesof officialjudgingcan be applied,dealingwith flowersubstance,
absenceof
blemishand other requirements
of the class.Not so simpleis the awardingof
trophies;to haveto chosesometimesbetweena dainty,multi-blossomed
azalea
branchand a regal,largefloweredrhodotruss;or evenbetweenthe latterelepidote
and a lepidote,with its smallscalyleavesand smallperttrussesof bloom.
For our FirstAnnualShow and Competitionthe Societywas most fortunateto
receivethe generousdonationof three beautifuland appropriatetrophies.
Bestin Showspeaksfor itself.Usuallyone plantor trusswill standout as a superb
exampleof excellence,regardlessof classification.The John E. Brent Awardfor
Best in Show is a sterlingsilver bowl. This trophy is awardedto the most
outstanding
exhibitin the show.Any representative
of the genusrhododendron
is
eligibfe:fepidote,elepidoteor azalea,
speciesor hybrid,cut trussor wholeplant.
This is a rotatingaward.
The E. Frank PalmerAward is presentedfor the Best CanadianProducedHardy
HybridRhododendron
in the Show.Dr. Palmerwasa breederof note,producing
manyexcellentnewplantvarieties,
and it is mostfittingthathisnamewill continue
to be associated
with breedingachievement.
This pewterand brassvase,madeby a
Canadiancraftsman,is awardedfor excellenceand advancein rhododendron
hybridizing
in Canada.The criteriafor thistrophyarechiefly;increased
hardiness,
improvedcolour and development
of a broaderselectionof gardenhybridsfor
Canadiangardens.Cultivars,bred in Canada,in any classification,
shown as a
singletrussor wholeplant,are eligible.The awardis a rotatingone.
The BestSpeciesAwardcomesfrom an anonymous
donor.A sterlingsilverloving
cup is awardedfor thebestexampleof a rhododendron
species.
At the presenttime
it may be won by an entry of a lepidote,elepidoteor azalea.The genus is
represented
by a vastnumberof speciesandquitea fewareevolvedto suitdifficult
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y7 e6e4
At a recent Executivemeetingthe enlargementof the trophy selectionwas
and the questionof wherethesetrophiesbelongedwas raised.lt is my
discussed
personalfeelingthatso longas the FlowerShowand Competitionis stagedby the
of itsyearly
nationalbody,the trophiesshouldbeawardedat thatShow,regardless
formationof RegionalGroups
constitutional
location.At the time of the inevitable
the final homefor theirtrophy.
all donorsof awardsshouldbe askedto designate
Logically,furtherawardscould be madeto roundout the selectionso that each
suitablefor theirown area.
regionwouldhavetheirown set of awards,especially
and
Thisis,of couse,a projectionintothe future,but thatcan befun,andprogress
is whattheSocietyis all about.Furtherdialogueon thissubjectwould
development
be mostwelcome.
THIRDANNUALMEETINGAND FLOWERSHOW- 1974
Societyof CanadaThird AnnualMeeting,FlowerShowand
The Rhododendron
Competitionwill take place at the SeniorCitizensCentre,LivingstonAvenue,
Grimsby,Ontarioon Saturday,June1st.
TheGrimsbyGardenClubhasofferedto hosttheSocietythisyear,andhasbeenof
very greatassistancein helpingto plan what promisesto be our mostexciting
Societyeventto date.Mr. CharlesTausky,one of our own membersand an active
in takingcareof themanydetails
memberof the Grimsbygrouphasbeeninvaluable
one.Wewouldliketo express
whichgo to makinga functionsuchasthisa successful
GardenClub for their
the
Grimsby
members
of
our thanksto him and all the
hospitalityand cooPeration.
with this bulletin.Let'smakethisyear'sshowthe
Detailsof the Showareenclosed
biggestand bestever.Bring your flowers,bring your friends;seeyou there!
seeBulletin,VolumelEditor'sNote: Fortipson preparingbloomsfor competition
No. 1, page22.
IN MEMORIAI'
PaulFisher.
Withgreatregretwe haveto announcethedeathof our Vice-President,
garden
grew
his
Burlington
in
which
he
He had a keeninterestin rhododendrons
of WhiteOak
underthe beautifulold specimens
belowthe crestof the Escarpment
and
Trees.Soonafterthelormationof our Societyhe becameour f irstlife-member
He hadbeena Burlingtonresidentfor mostof his lifeand
laterour Vice-President.
withhisbrotherthe largestorchardin thearea.ThroughouttheyearsPaul
operated
Fisherhad beenactivein the communityand his effortshelpedto establishthe
arenowflowering
againstthe Escarpment
Burlingtonhospital.His rhododendrons
in memoryof his productivelife.
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97 eOeS
Page 24
Chelseaflower show where it receiveda First Class Certificateaward, and became
the sensationof the English horticulture world. lt and its hybrids have become
increasinglypopular in North America during recent years,and hopefullythey will
soon be more readily availablecommercially.
Editor'snote: Mr. Shammarellohas introducedin his cataloguefor the first time this
year his own royal family of yakusimanumhybrids:'Yaku King,''YakuQueen,"Yaku
Prince,''Yaku Princess,'and 'Yaku Duke.' All are hybrids of catawbiensehybrids
and yakusimanumF. C. C., the differenceappearingto be mainly in the density of
'Scarlet
'B
color. Two other new Shammarellohybrids are
Glow' and 46-R'which,
"are
Mr. Shammarello tells me,
from the same cross
derived from third
generation crosses ol red catawbiense seedlings x red catawbiense seedlings.The
"the fore parentRhododendron
cofor is unusual in respectto the parents,"he says,
arboreumhaving made its appearance."Both of these are of brilliantred, with little
or no trace of blue, and are at least of H-2 hardiness.Further informationon Mr.
Shammarello'shybrids can be obtained by writing for his catalogue:A. Shammarello & Son, Nursery,4508 Monticello Blvd., South Euclid, Ohio, USA 44143.
REGIONAL NOTES
Toronto, Ontario
Ken Duncan
On Monday, 25th of March, 1974,the members of the RhododendronSociety of
Canadawho live in the Toronto areawere invitedto an informaleveningat the Civic
GardenCentre,EdwardsGardens,Toronto. About 40 people attended,includinga
few non-members.
S e v e r a l s u b j e c t s w e r e d i s c u s s e d , i n c l u d i n g t h e p r o g r e s so f t h e p l a n t i n go f
rhododendronsand azaleasin EdwardsGardens.Last year severalof our members
d o n a t e dm o n e y o r p l a n t m a t e r i ailn, t h e n a m e o fR s C , t o w a r d t h e d e v e l o p m e n t ot hf i s
planting.Ken Duncan read a list of the hybrids and speciesnow establishedin the
Gardens.This is quite a respectablelist.
The Metro Parks Department has agreed to prepare more ground this Spring
adjacentto the presentplantings.They are also supplying some red oak and other
material. lt was suggested that another appeal be made to local members for
additionaldonationsfor the new area.A committeeof five was appointedto work
with the ParksDepartmenton this project.These are: Ken Duncan,chairman,Mrs.
Janeth Cooper,Mrs.HelenMacKenzie,Mrs.JesseWaxer,Mr. FredGallop.Mr. Leslie
Hancock has kindly consentedto act as consultant.
t a l k o n t h e r h o d o d e n d r o np l a n t i n gw h i c h h e a n d
M r . J . R o s sD e a ng a v ea n i l l u s t r a t e d
his family are establishingat Arden-on-Severn,90 miles north of Toronto. (SeeRSC
BulletinVol.2,No. 3, 1973)This appearsto be a very beautifulsettingand the plants
seem to be doing well in this northern garden. lmportant information should be
f o r t h c o m i n gf r o m t h i s p l a n t i n g i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e . M e m b e r sf o u n d t h i s t a l k v e r y
interestingand we hope to receiveprogressreportsfrom Mr. Deanf rom time to time.
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Page 26
Toronto,Onlario
O'KeefeCentre1974
once again - out of seasonand with the cold winds blowing outside,the foyer of the
o'Keefe centre in Toronto burst into bloom, the Annual spring Flowershow of the
Garden club of roronto, held this year March 6-10. At the western end of the main
floor a serenely beautiful planting of rhododendrons,azaleasand ground covers
brought commentsand complimentsfrom many of the 4g,000visitorsto the show.
woodland Nurseries again volunteered to stage the display for the society. A
believable (in the words of one visitor - honest!) backyard corner was created,
complete with brick house wall, stained board fence and mossy,random flag patio,
flanked by plants in various stages of bloom.
on view to skeptic and fan alike (yes, there were many of both!) were some of the
ironclads:Lee's Dark Purple,America,Roseum Elegansand Album Elegans.These
formed a background for such eyecatchersas the glowing red stewartstownian,
frothy white Dora Amateis and the early, light pink cheer. Two new Dutch hybrids
d r e w c o n s i d e r a b l e a t t e n t i o n ;c o s m o p o l i t a n ,a p r e t t y l a r g e f l o w e r e d p i n k , a n d
Rijnveld,a dwarfish loose trussedsalmon pink. These are as yet untestedhere but
are well rated in Holland.Twiggy deciduousazaleassuch as Persil,HortulanusWitte
and R.iaponicum varied the texture, along with Desireeand the obtusum hybrid
Purplesplendor. A weepingJapanesecherry, prunus shidare sakura gavea scaleto
the garden, providing a pink blossomedtracery overhead.
The corner met also with the judges' approval - the Rhodo society garden was
awarded First Prize in the Small Gardens class, the Sheridan NurseriesAward.
Mrs. Janeth cooper rallieda crew of membersto be on hand to talk to peopleabout
rhodos and we would like to thank Mrs. cooper herself, Mr. and Mrs. s.G. choles,
Mrs. Lovat Dickson, Ken Duncan, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gallop, Ray Halward, Les
Hancock, Mrs. Kathy Leishman,Mr. and Mrs. Ted Miller,Mrs. p. Nilson,Mrs. M. Van
Alstyne, Mrs. H.D. wilkins and Mrs. Mary cohoe, who not only took her turn at the
display but also helped to install it.
The space was donatedto the society by the Gardenclub and we wish to thank the
organizationfor helping us to introduce rhododendronsto many new people each
year. Our specialthanksto Mrs. HelenSkinnerfor making the arrangementsand for
her warm and friendly assistance.
Burlington, Ontario
April 25th markeda Red LetterDay for our Society.Our first PlantAuction was held
at the Royal BotanicalGarden, with an impressiveattendance,a large number of
donated plants of considerablevariety, and most enthusiastic bidding by those
present.
T h e e v e n i n g b e g a n w i t h a s h o r t 1 6 m m f i l m e n t i t l e d " M r . H a n c o c k ' sW o o d s " .
Colourful scenesof mature rhododendronsand azaleasin full bloom set the mood
f o r s p r i n g t i m eg a r d e n i n ge n t h u s i a s m .
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27, e5e1
Page 28
NEWMEMBERS
Barber, Dean E.
Route 1
Contoocook,
New Hampshire USA 03229
Belyea,Mr. & Mrs. V.L.
312 CentralAvenue
Beamsville(Lincoln) Ontario
Cameron,Ken
R.R.4,Oakhill Drive
Brantlord, Ontario
Dacey, Harry
1561 LeMarchant Street
Halilax, Nova Scotia
Dixon, Dr. & Mrs. G.D.
117 HighlandCrescent
Willowdale.Ontario M2L 1H2
Elstein,Alice
48 E. Main Street
Malone,NY USA 12953
Erdelan,Robert
Azalea Garden Nursery
6650 Matchette Road
Windsor, Ontario NgJ 2J9
Fitzwater.Richard E.
9841 Chestnut Lane
Indianapolis,Ind. USA 46239
Fleischer,T.
134 Ann Street
Ingersoll,Ontario N5C 2G2
Fulton, R.W.
7 Brookview Drive
Hamilton,NY USA 13346
German,EugeneR.
Box 454
Fort Bragg, California
usA 95437
Gordius, Edmund W.
51 - 207 Waterford Drive
Weston, Ontario
Olsen,V.R.
3 Devonshire Place
Toronto, Ontario MsS 2CB
H a l l ,H . J .
60 Queen Street
Dorchester, Ontario
Parker, David E.
4132 Merriweather Road
Toledo, Ohio USA 43623
Hum, Mrs. V.
13 HutchesonAvenue
Ottawa,Ontario K1Y 4A2
Peace,W.J.
322 Mt. Albion Road
Hamilton,Ontario L8K 5T2
Jackson,Mrs. PhiliPB.
27 Beechwood Avenue
Willowdale, Ontario M2L 1J2
Powell,G.G.
121 DonegallDrive
Toronto, Ontario M4G 3H1
Kenzie.Mrs. E.L.
495 DeloraineAvenue
Toronto, Ontario MSM 2C1
Rind, Richard D.
708 Rose Valley Road
Kelso, Wash. USA 98626
Kraayenbrink,Mrs. J.
Tulip GardensR.R.3
Ingersoll,Ontario
Serbin,Dr. A.F.
365 Simsberry Road
Bloomfield,Conn. USA 06002
Leach,David G.
1894 Hubbard Road
North Madison,Ohio
Toronto Bonsai Society
c/o Mrs. E.L. Kenzie
495 Deloraine Avenue
Toronto, Ontario MSM 2C1
usA 44057
Lumis,Dr. E.P.
of Horticultural
Department
Science
of GuelPh
University
Guelph,OntarioN1G2W1
Chapter
Massachusetts
AmericanRhododendron
Society
c/o Mrs.H.G.Clark,
BearSwampGardens
Ashfield,Mass.USA01330
Myronyk,Peter
R.R.3
Milton.OntarioL9T 2X7
Thomas, George K.
R.R.3.Third Avenue
St. Catherines,Ontario
Vermette, Claude
Ste. Adele
Quebec
Wearing,Joseph
98 Merino Road
Peterborough,Ontario
Winslow,R.M.
800 Hendry Avenue
North Vancouver,B.C. WL 4C9
CHANGE OF ADDRESS
have moveo'
Please note that two members of our Board of Directors
Captain R.M. Steele
East Lahave
Bridgewater,R.R.3
LunenburgCo.
Nova Scotia B4V 2W2
Mrs.P. Waxer
25 JamesFoxwaY
Willowdale,OntarioM2K 252
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Canadian
Grown
Rhododendrons
We offer for salethe largestvarietyof
h a r d yr h o d o d e n d r o nasn d a z a l e a s
p r o d u c e di n E a s t e r nC a n a d a .
Our research
work goesback thirty-five
y e a r sS
. o m eo f o u r f i r s t p l a n t i n g sa r e
now a healthysevenfeet in heightand
spreao.
O u r a n n u a pl r o d u c t i o no f y o u n gp l a n t s
i s f r o m c u t t i n g st a k e nf r o m p l a n t st h a t
h a v ea l r e a d yp r o v e nt h e i r w o r t h i n o u r
W o o d l a n dT r i a l G r o u n d s .
Connoisseurs
N e w a n d r a r ev a r i e t i e as r ed i f f i c u l t t o
o b t a i n .W r i t et o u s a b o u tt h e m .W e m a y
b e a b l et o s e c u r et h e m f o r y o u .
I n a d d i t i o nw e p r o d u c ea w i d e
assortmentof trees,shrubs,evergreens
plants.
and herbaceous
W R I T EF O R C A T A L O G U E
WOODLAND NURSERIES
2 1 5 1 C a m i l l aR o a d
M ississauga,
O ntario, Canada
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