Major Selection Guide

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2015-2016 Major Selection Guide
An Introduction to Undergraduate Programs @ Bentley
Office of Academic Services – Academic Advising Center:: 021 Lindsay Hall :: 781.891.2803
Resources
Parts of this Majors Guide were adapted from and taken from the following sources:
University of Tennessee
US Labor of Statistics
www.careers-in-business.com
Career Services Office
Departmental Guides/ resources

Please note: The Major Selection Guide is a packet designed to provide general information on the different majors offered at
Bentley. For in-depth exploration of different majors, please seek the counsel of the department and the career services office.
Academic programs @ Bentley
Bachelor of Science Majors
Accountancy
Actuarial Science
Computer Information Systems
Corporate Finance and Accounting
Creative Industries
Economics-Finance
Finance
Information Design and Corporate Communication
Information Systems Audit & Control
Management
Managerial Economics
Marketing
Mathematical Sciences
Professional Sales
Bachelor of Arts Majors
English
Global Studies
Health Studies
History
Liberal Arts*
Media and Culture
Philosophy
Public Policy
Spanish Studies
Sustainability Sciences
*This major does not require a business minor or major
Liberal Studies Majors (LSM)
American Perspectives
Diversity and Society
Earth, Environment, and Global Sustainability
Ethics and Social Responsibility
Global Perspectives
Health and Industry
Media Arts and Culture
Quantitative Perspectives
Business Studies Major (BSM)
Accountancy
Founded in 1917 as the Bentley School of Accounting and Finance, Bentley has a respected tradition of preparing students for accounting careers in the public and private sectors. State-of-the-art
facilities and an innovative curriculum challenge students to learn how to integrate technology into current and developing accounting practices and apply it to management situations. The major
in Accountancy program prepares students for diverse careers in public accounting firms, corporations, small businesses, nonprofit organizations and government. Graduates pursue careers as
internal and external auditors, financial managers, tax experts, consultants in CPA or consulting firms, forensic accountants in federal criminal investigative agencies, and more.
Accounting: Skills and Talents
Accounting offers superb career opportunities in many different contexts. The field is normally divided into three broad areas: auditing, financial/tax and management
accounting. The skills required in these areas differ as follows:
Key Skill Area
Audit Accounting
Tax & Financial
Management Accounting
People skills
Sales skills
Communication skills
Analytical skills
Ability to synthesize
Creative ability
Initiative
Computer skills
Medium
Medium
Medium
High
Medium
Low
Medium
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Very High
Low
Medium
Medium
High
Medium
Low
High
High
High
Medium
Medium
Very High
Work hours
40-70/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
.
CAREER OPTIONS:
Public Accountants: Public accountants perform a broad range of accounting, auditing, tax, and consulting activities for their clients, who may be corporations, governments,
nonprofit organizations, or individuals.
Consultants: Consultants offer advice in areas such as compensation or employee health care benefits; the design of accounting and data processing systems; and the selection
of controls to safeguard assets.
Forensic Accountants: Forensic accountants investigate and interpret bankruptcies and other complex financial transactions.
Management Accountants: Management accountants record and analyze a corporation's financial information in addition to budgeting, performance evaluation, cost
management, and asset management.
Public Sector Accountants: Government accountants and auditors maintain and examine the records of government agencies and audit private businesses and individuals
whose activities are subject to government regulations or taxation.
4
CURRICULUM
The Accountancy major provides students with an understanding of the underlying principles of accounting and how they are applied in management situations. All accountancy majors
acquire a core of technical knowledge, including required courses in financial reporting, accounting information systems, and cost management. During the senior year, students can select
courses that will provide more depth in a particular area of interest, such as cost management, financial reporting, taxation, internal auditing, or information technology auditing.
In the Master’s Candidate Program, students can earn a bachelor’s degree and, within one additional year, complete a master’s degree in accounting. Students may apply to the program any
time before the end of the second semester of their junior year. Program course work also can be used to fulfill the 150-hour requirement for CPA licensing in Massachusetts and many other
states.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
AC 311
Financial Accounting and Reporting I
AC 312
Financial Accounting and Reporting II
AC 310
Cost Management
AC 412
Advanced Accounting
AC 340
Accounting Information Systems
AC 350
Federal Taxation
AC 470
Financial Statement Auditing
OR AC 472 Internal Auditing
AC _____ AC elective
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisites:
GB 112 and 212
Required:
AC 311
Financial Accounting and Reporting I
Nine credits in other accounting courses for which the pre-requisites have been met
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: William Read
AAC 212 :: 781.891.2525
Minors: Laura Willett
AAC 287 :: 781.891.2152
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Karen Osterheld
AAC 282 :: 781.891.2724
What's the overall career outlook for Accounting Majors?

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of accountants and auditors is expected to grow by 22 percent between 2008 and 2018. Accountants and
auditors who have professional certifications, especially CPA’s, should have the best prospects. As the economy grows, more accountants and auditors will be needed
to set up books, prepare taxes, and provide management advice.

An increased need for accountants and auditors also will arise from a greater emphasis on accountability, transparency, and controls in financial reporting. Increased
scrutiny of company finances and accounting procedures will create opportunities for accountants and auditors, particularly CPAs, to audit financial records more
thoroughly and completely. Management accountants and internal auditors increasingly will be needed to discover and eliminate fraud before audits, and ensure that
important processes and procedures are documented accurately and thoroughly. Forensic accountants also will be needed to detect illegal financial activity by
individuals, companies, and organized crime rings.

The continued globalization of business also will lead to more demand for accounting expertise and services related to international trade and accounting rules and
international mergers and acquisitions. Additionally, there is a growing movement towards International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), which uses a judgmentbased system to determine the fair-market value of assets and liabilities, which should increase demand for accountants and auditors because of their specialized
expertise.
5
Actuarial Science
A major in Actuarial Science prepares students for a career in the actuarial field. Actuaries are in great demand by the insurance, financial services and consulting industries and our graduates are
often recruited for leadership development opportunities in these industries. An Actuarial Science major provides extensive preparation for up to four actuarial exams (Exams P/1, FM/2, MLC and
MFE/3F) and all of the necessary VEE (Validation by Educational Experience) credits. In addition, qualified students will have the opportunity to pursue one or more actuarial internships.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Research Analyst
Actuary
Consultant
Financial Services
Market Researcher
Statistician
People skills:
High
High
High
Medium
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Integrity:
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
Leadership skills:
Medium
Very High
High
Very High
High
Very High
Communication skills:
High
High
High
Low
High
Low
Analytical skills:
Medium
Extremely High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Tech skills:
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
Very High
High
Very High
High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty. They use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to assess the risk that an event will occur and to help businesses and clients
develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk. Most actuaries work full time in an office setting. Actuaries who work as consultants often work longer hours and frequently travel to meet with
clients. Actuaries need a bachelor’s degree and must pass a series of exams to become certified professionals. They must have a strong background in mathematics, statistics, and business.
Actuary: Through their knowledge of statistics, finance, and business, actuaries assess the risk of events occurring and help create policies that minimize risk and its financial impact
on companies and clients. One of the main functions of actuaries is to help businesses assess the risk of certain events occurring and formulate policies that minimize the cost of
that risk. For this reason, actuaries are essential to the insurance industry.
Statistician: Statisticians apply their mathematical and statistical knowledge to the design of surveys and experiments; the collection, processing, and analysis of data; and the
interpretation of the experiment and survey results. Statisticians may apply their knowledge of statistical methods to a variety of subject areas, such as biology, economics,
engineering, medicine, public health, psychology, marketing, education, and sports.
Mathematician: Mathematicians use mathematical theory, computational techniques, algorithms, and the latest computer technology to solve economic, scientific, engineering,
and business problems. The work of mathematicians falls into two broad classes: theoretical (pure) mathematics and applied mathematics. These classes, however, are not sharply
defined and often overlap.
Theoretical Mathematician: Theoretical mathematicians advance mathematical knowledge by developing new principles and recognizing previously unknown relationships
between existing principles of mathematics. Although these workers seek to increase basic knowledge without necessarily considering its practical use, such pure and abstract
knowledge has been instrumental in producing or furthering many scientific and engineering achievements.
Applied Mathematicians: Applied mathematicians use theories and techniques, such as mathematical modeling and computational methods, to formulate and solve practical
problems in business, government, engineering, and the physical, life, and social sciences.
6
CURRICULUM
Actuarial Science
Actuarial Science
Choose Three of the Following Focus Courses:
 MA243 Discrete Probability
 MA252 Mathematical Statistics
 MA263 Continuous Probability for Risk Management
 MA335 Financial Calculus
 MA343 Discrete Option Pricing
 MA310 Actuarial Topics in Probability and Risk Management
 MA357 Interest Theory
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
MA 233
Calculus III
MA 239
Linear Algebra
MA 252
Math Statistics
MA 263
Continuous Probability
MA ____ MA 310 or MA 357
MA ____ Focus Course
MA ____ Focus Course
MA ____ MA elective
*Actuarial Science majors must complete a Business Studies major or minor
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Emmy Roth
MOR 388 :: 781.891.2990
Minors: Emmy Roth
MOR 388 :: 781.891.2990
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Emmy Roth
MOR 388 :: 781.891.2990
What's the overall career outlook for Mathematical Science Majors?




Employment of actuaries is expected to grow by 27 percent between 2010 and 2020. Students with internship experience who have passed at least one actuarial exam
while in school should have the best prospects for entry-level positions.
Job seekers are likely to face competition because the number of job openings is expected to be less than the number of qualified applicants. College graduates who
have passed two of the initial exams and completed an internship should enjoy the best prospects. A solid foundation in mathematics, including the ability to compute
complex probability and statistics, is essential. Experience or skills in computer programming can also be important. In addition to job growth, a small number of jobs
will open up each year to replace actuaries who retire or transfer to new jobs.
Employment of statisticians is projected to grow 13 percent from 2008 to 2018. The demand for individuals with a background is statistics is projected to grow,
although some jobs will be in occupations with titles other than statistician. The use of statistics is widespread and growing. Statistical models aid in decision making in
both private industry and government. There will always be a demand for the skills statisticians provide. Technological advances are expected to spur demand for
statisticians. Ever-faster computer processing allows statisticians to analyze greater amounts of data much more quickly and to gather and sort through large amounts
of data that would not have been analyzed in the past. As data processing continues to become more efficient and less expensive, an increasing number of employers
will want to employ statisticians to take advantage of the new information available. Biostatisticians should experience employment growth, primarily because of the
growing pharmaceuticals business. As pharmaceutical companies develop new treatments and medical technologies, biostatisticians will be needed to do research and
clinical trials.
Employment of mathematicians is expected to increase by 22 percent during the 2008–18 decade, which is much faster than average for all occupations expertise.
7
Computer Information Systems
Effective use of information technology is the mark of a successful enterprise in the 21st century. Virtually every business-policy decision is intertwined with the application of information
technology to plan, produce, market, manage, and service business functions. The CIS program will equip you to understand the capabilities and implications of information technology. The
bachelor’s degree in CIS will prepare you for careers in the design, implementation and management of business information systems. Our graduates are prepared to excel in any of the emerging
and varied roles of the IT professional: business or systems analyst, application developer, systems integrator, IT liaison, end-user support, network manager, vendor representative or technical
support specialist.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area *
Systems
Analyst **
Business
Systems
Analyst
Systems
Developer
Database
Analyst/Developer
Networking
Systems Administrator
Analyst/Administrator
People skills
High
High
Medium
Medium
High
Very High
Client service/Sales skills High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Communication skills
Medium
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
High
Analytical skills
Very High
Very High
High
Very High
High
High
Problem solving skills
Very High
Very high
High
High
High
High
Creative ability
High
Medium
Medium
High
Medium
Medium
Initiative
High
High
High
High
High
High
Computer skills
Very High
Very High
Very High
Very High
Very High
High
*These skills are generalized for these positions. Skills required vary from company to company. Research on companies of interest to you will allow you to know specifically which skills and levels of that skill are necessary
for success in that role. Most IT roles a Bentley graduate accepts will require strong analytical abilities to solve problems, creativity to meet business challenges, good communication skills, ability to be a solid team player,
and leadership and motivation to take initiative to complete projects. A basic knowledge of software, programming, databases, systems or networking depending on desired role will be necessary. Many of these roles will
require flexibility in a successful candidate due to the dynamic nature of the technology department and its contribution to the overall corporate strategy. **These job titles generalize literally dozens of variations.
CAREER OPTIONS
Careers that rely on a broad understanding of information technology and expertise in the analysis, design and development of information systems will continue to grow in number and
importance. The bachelor’s degree in CIS will prepare you for careers in the design, implementation and management of business information systems.
Systems Analyst: Skilled at recognizing opportunities where IT can make organizational activities more effective, efficient, and reliable working as a critical member of business
planning and management teams. Systems analysis skills apply to any business challenge, but may be specialized to focus on business applications, database, and/or networks.
Systems analysis skills are value-added in any business graduate. Many systems analysts are also skilled in systems development and quality assurance.
Systems Developer: Designs and builds information systems and components combining computer hardware and software either through programming or systems
configuration. Systems developers are continuously exploring new and innovative technologies. They often combine their problem solving and creative skills with those of
systems analysis. They are key players creating information systems that reach out to interact with customers and partners across the country and around the world on the Web.
Systems Administrator: Coordinates and manages IT personnel and resources to maintain effective and efficient systems operations. Using a broad knowledge of IT and a clear
understanding of organizational goals and objectives the systems administrator often specializes to manage projects, computer systems, databases, networks and Internet
servers, user and technical support functions, and/or vendor relationship while monitoring systems performance and resolving problems using business management skills.
Web Designer: Works with design teams, marketing and developers to create a consistent and compelling visual style for a company’s website; design and format web
pages; test and trouble shoot web page features; creates artwork to appear on web pages.
8
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
CS 150
Introduction to Data and Information Management
CS 180
Programming Fundamentals
CS 240
Business Processing and Communications Infrastructure
CS 350
Database Management Systems
CS 360
CS_____
CS_____
CS_____
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Prerequisites:
IT 101
Information Technology
Required:
CS 150
CS 213
CS
CS
Business System Analysis & Modeling
CS elective*
CS elective*
CS elective*
Introduction to Data and Information Management
The World Wide Web
Elective
Elective
Note: CS 150 & CS 213 are Arts & Science courses
* Any 3 credit CIS course, not otherwise required, can fulfill the CIS elective requirement except CS 213
and CS 314. Major electives should be selected in consultation with a faculty mentor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Chair:
Jay Cooprider
SMI 415 :: 781.891. 2952
Majors/Minors:
Doug Robertson
SMI 420 :: 781.891.2974
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Dennis Anderson
SMI 402 :: 781.891.2238
What's the overall career outlook for Computer Information Systems majors?

Employment of computer and information systems managers is expected to grow 17 percent over the 2008-2018 decade, which is faster than the average for all
occupations. New applications of technology in the workplace will continue to drive demand for workers, fueling the need for more managers. To remain competitive,
firms will continue to install sophisticated computer networks and set up more complex intranets and websites. They will need to adopt the most efficient software and
systems and troubleshoot problems when they occur. Computer and information systems managers will be needed to oversee these functions.

Because so much business is carried out over computer networks, security will continue to be an important issue for businesses and other organizations, and will lead to
strong growth for computer managers. Firms will increasingly hire security experts to fill key leadership roles in their information technology departments because the
integrity of their computing environments is of utmost importance.

Employment of network systems and data communications analysts is projected to increase by 53 percent from 2008 to 2018, which is much faster than the average and
places it among the fastest growing of all occupations. This occupational category includes network architects and engineers, as well as Web Administrators and
Developers. The growing reliance on wireless networks will result in a need for many more of these workers. Workers with knowledge of information security also will be
in demand, as computer networks transmit an increasing amount of sensitive data.

Employment of database administrators is expected to grow by 20 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average. Demand for these workers is expected to
increase as organizations need to store, organize, and analyze increasing amounts of data. In addition, as more databases are connected to the Internet, and as data
security becomes increasingly important, a growing number of these workers will be needed to protect databases from attack.
9
Corporate Finance and Accounting
Leveraging long-respected traditions in accounting and finance, the corporate finance and accounting program at Bentley offers students the opportunity to learn how to integrate technology into
corporate finance and accounting practices. The major in Corporate Finance and Accounting is a ten-course major jointly offered and jointly delivered by the Departments of Accountancy and
Finance. It aims to help students develop the key skills required of finance professionals, namely: accounting skills, finance skills, business analysis skills, communication skills, team skills, and
business process skills. The combination of courses in accountancy and finance offers students a unique academic background with which to enter the business world. In conjunction with an
appropriate master’s degree, this major can prepare the student for the CPA exam as well.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Business Analyst
Corporate Treasury
Credit
Management
Investor
Relations
Accounts Payable
Financial Reporting
People skills:
High
High
High
High
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Low
Low
High
Low
Low
Integrity:
High
High
High
High
High
Extremely High
Leadership skills:
Medium
High
High
High
Low
Low
Communication skills:
Very High
High
High
Very High
Medium
Low
Analytical skills:
Very High
Extremely High
Medium
High
High
High
Tech skills:
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
Very High
High
Medium
Very High
CAREER OPTIONS
Corporate finance specialists are frequently needed to work with professionals from other departments in order to enhance and improve their firm’s business activities.
This means that the finance professional must have not only a solid background in accounting and finance, but also the ability to communicate this understanding to
colleagues and external parties such as investors.
One early career option for this sort of professional is business analyst. Other appropriate positions are in accounts payable and credit departments, case management,
and corporate treasury.
Business Analyst: An analyst looks at business problems from a finance perspective with concern for costs, profitability and value-creating activities. There are plenty of
career opportunities in this area, especially as more businesses develop their Internet, intranet, and extranet presence . A business analyst is responsible for analyzing the
business needs of clients to help identify business problems and propose solutions. Within the systems development life cycle domain, the business analyst typically
performs a liaison function between the business side of an enterprise and the providers of services to the enterprise.
Investment Management: Investment management involves a client who gives money to an asset manager, who then invests it to meet the client’s financial objectives.
Commercial Credit Analyst: These individuals, like a loan officer, review credit data to evaluate commercial loan requests in order to approve or deny applications. They
analyze sources of financial information, such as reporting services, credit bureaus, other companies, main office files, and branches to determine profitability of loan.
Financial Representative/Planner/Advisor: Financial Planners and Advisors strive to meet their client’s financial planning needs. Financial planners market their business
and build a client base. They identify and set financial goals, develop plans of investment, and assess a client’s net worth.
Investment Analyst: This position will involve analysis of investment activities. There will also be evaluation of short-term debt securities, investment projects and
objectives. Reports on investment opportunities and recommendations regarding investments are then prepared. It is also helpful if you are familiar with standard
concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field.
10
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
AC 311
Financial Accounting and Reporting I
AC 312
Financial Accounting and Reporting II
AC 310
Cost Management
FI 305
Principles of Accounting and Finance
FI 351
International Finance
FI 307
Advanced Managerial Finance
AC or FI _____ AC or FI elective*
AC or FI _____ AC or FI elective*
AF 450
Performance Management and Evaluation
IDCC 320
Managerial Communication
* Any AC or FI courses, not otherwise required, can fulfill the elective requirements
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Accounting: William Read
AAC 212 :: 781.891.2525
Finance: Kartik Raman
AAC 215 :: 781.891.2781
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
What's the overall career outlook for Corporate Finance and Accounting majors?





Employment of financial analysts and personal financial advisors is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. Despite strong job growth, keen
competition will continue for these well-paid jobs, especially for new entrants. As the level of investment increases, overall employment of financial analysts is expected
to increase by 20 percent during the 2008–2018 decade. Primary factors for this growth are increasing complexity and global diversification of investments and growth in
the overall amount of assets under management. As the number and type of mutual and hedge funds and the amount of assets invested in these funds increase,
companies will need more financial analysts to research and recommend investments. As the international investment increases, companies will need more analysts to
cover the global range of investment options.
Employment of financial managers over the 2008–2018 decade is expected to grow by 8 percent. Regulatory reforms and the expansion and globalization of the
economy will increase the need for financial expertise and drive job growth. As the economy expands, both the growth of established companies and the creation of new
businesses will spur demand for financial managers. Employment of bank branch managers is expected to increase because banks are creating new branches. However,
mergers, acquisitions, and corporate downsizing are likely to restrict the employment growth of financial managers to some extent.
Long-run demand for financial managers in the securities and commodities industry will continue to be driven by the need to handle increasingly complex financial
transactions and manage a growing amount of investments. Financial managers also will be needed to handle mergers and acquisitions, raise capital, and assess global
financial transactions. Employment of risk managers, who assess risks for insurance and investment purposes, also will grow.
The increasing number of retired baby boomers should have a beneficial effect on total employment in the banking industry. They are more likely than younger age
groups to hold bank deposits and visit branches to do their banking. Many also may need help in retirement planning and investing wealth inherited from their parents
and so may seek the services of the various financial professionals in banking, such as financial managers, and securities, commodities, and financial services sales
agents. Demand for "personal bankers" to advise and manage the assets of wealthy clients, as well as the aging baby-boom generation, also will grow.
Deregulation of the industry allows banks to offer a variety of financial and insurance products that they were once prohibited from selling. Managing and selling these
services will spur demand for financial analysts and personal financial advisors. However, banks will continue to face considerable competition in financial services from
nonbank establishments, such as insurance companies and independent financial advisor firms.
11
Creative Industries
Creative Industries majors learn how historical and technological changes drive demand for new culture, and dissect how innovators build content, platforms or services for market success.
The courses immerse you in the specialized techniques creative industries need in film, music, mobile gaming, television, advertising, user interface design, packaging, promotion, information
architecture, and sports or entertainment public relations. This highly interactive major offers flexibility and customization — a hallmark of all successful creative industries. A variety of
offerings and open elective slots help you tailor your academic experience to your interests and your future
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Music Industry
Promotion
Media
Advertising
Game
Digital
Creation/Design Publishing
Entertainment/Sports
Public Relations
People skills
High
Medium
Medium
High
High
Sales skills
High
Medium
Medium
High
High
Communication skills
Very High
Medium
High
High
Very High
Analytical skills
Low
Very High
High
Low
Low
Ability to synthesize
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Creative ability
High
High
Medium
Medium
High
Initiative
Medium
Medium
High
High
Medium
CAREER OPTIONS
Public Relations: PR professionals are called upon for their writing and speaking skills, ability to persuade and network, to strategize and, above all, to be flexible and
creative in how to adapt a message within an ever-changing communications landscape. They manage corporate reputations across a range of audiences and publicize
products and events via a variety of non-euphonious media. They can work in agencies or in a company's in-house communications office.
Advertising: Advertising typically involves the development or the overseeing of materials and activities aimed at persuading customers to purchase a product. Generally
this is done through vehicles like the Internet, billboards, print, TV, etc.
Game Creation/Design: A video game designer develops the layout, concept and gameplay of a video game. This may include playfield design, specification writing, and
entry of numeric properties that balance and tune the gameplay. A game designer works for a developer (which may additionally be the game's video game publisher). This
person's primary job function is writing, so the more experience they have with that activity, the better. Some art and programming skills are also helpful for this job, but
are not strictly necessary. In larger companies entry level game designers will typically be given simpler tasks such as level design and object placement, while the role of
lead designer will be reserved for a designer with more experience and a history of successful titles.
Music Industry Promotion: More than often than not, one is responsible for purchasing the merchandise for a client or retail organization. This merchandise can be
anything from furniture to clothing. The buyer is responsible for negotiating prices and delivering contracts. Buyers must analyze markets, project trends, and deftly
understand the spending habits of the consumer. Increasingly, buyers are using statistical and computerized data analyses in order to do so.
Digital Publishing: Publishers may publish works originally created by others for which they have obtained the rights and/or works that they have created in-house.
Software publishing is included here because the activity, creation of a copyrighted product and bringing it to market, is equivalent to the creation process for other types
of intellectual products.
Music/Film Producer: Producers make the business and financial decisions for a motion picture, TV show, or stage production. They raise money for the project and hire the
director and crew. The crew may include set and costume designers, a musical director, a choreographer, and other workers. They make sure that the production is completed
on time, and they are responsible for the way the finished project turns out.
Web Developer: Web developers design and create websites. They are responsible for the look of the site. They are also responsible for the site’s technical aspects, such as
performance and capacity, which are measures of a website’s speed and how much traffic the site can handle. They also may create content for the site.
12
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
IDCC 370
Web Design I
IDCC 240
Fundamentals of Visual Communication
MC _____
MC 250, 260, 342, 345, 350
MC 341
Cr. Industries & Prod. Cultures/Studios Net. & Media Convergence
IDCC ____
IDCC elective*
IDCC ____
IDCC elective
_____
EMS elective **
_____
EMS elective **
Elective Requirements
* IDCC Elective can be filled by IDCC 250, 255, 340, 350, 360, 380, 385, 390 (“Web 3.0 and
Beyond” and “Environmental Graphic Design” only), 421.
** EMS elective can be filled by COM 321,324, 328, LIT 312, LIT 313, 314, MC 200, 220,
250, 260, 300, 321, 323, 342, 345, 350, 421, or other course with approval of English &
Media Studies Chair.
*** Only one internship may be used to apply to the major.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Major:
Simon Moore
SMI 312 :: 781.891. 2151
Majors:
Jennifer Gillan
AAC 093 :: 781.891.2816
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Simon Moore
SMI 312 :: 781.891. 2151
What's the overall career outlook for Creative Industries Majors?




Producers and directors face intense competition for jobs because there are many more people who want to work in this field than there are jobs available. In film, directors who
have experience on film sets should have the best job prospects. Producers who have good business skills will likely have the best prospects.
Employment of advertising and promotions managers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022. Job growth will be spurred by competition for a growing number of
goods and services, both foreign and domestic, and the need to make one’s product or service stand out in the crowd. In addition, as the influence of traditional advertising in
newspapers, radio, and network television wanes, marketing professionals are being asked to develop new and different ways to advertise and promote products and services to
better reach potential customers.
Employment of public relations specialists is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022 as organizations increasingly emphasize community outreach and customer
relations as a way to enhance their reputation and visibility. Especially among the growing number of nonprofit organizations, such as education services, business and
professional associations, and hospitals, where many of these workers are employed, public relations managers will be charged with promoting the mission of the organization
and encouraging membership or use of the organization’s services. The need for good public relations in an increasingly competitive and global business environment should spur
demand for these workers, especially those with specialized knowledge or international experience. Employees who possess additional language capabilities also are in great
demand.
Employment of web developers is projected to grow 20 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment of web developers is
projected to grow as ecommerce continues to expand. Online purchasing is expected to grow faster than the overall retail industry. As retail firms expand their online
offerings, demand for web developers will increase. Additionally, an increase in the use of mobile devices to search the web will also lead to an increase in employment
of web developers. Instead of designing a website for a desktop computer, developers will have to create sites that work on mobile devices with many different screen
sizes, leading to more work.
13
Economics-Finance
Economics proves an understanding of the environment in which all businesses operate. The study of economics also provides students with an analytical skill set necessary to make sound business
decisions.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Economic Analyst
Research Economist
Economic/Policy
Consultant
Financial
Analyst
Credit Analyst
Investment Banking
People skills:
High
High
High
Medium
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Medium
Medium
Medium
Low
Medium
Integrity:
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
Leadership skills:
Medium
Very High
High
Very High
High
Very High
Communication skills:
High
High
High
Low
High
Low
Analytical skills:
Medium
Extremely High
Extremely High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Tech skills:
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
High
High
Very High
High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
50-90/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
The breadth of the economics-finance major provides a wide variety of career opportunities. Many students embark on careers at financial institutions including banks,
insurance companies and investment brokerage firms. Others choose to work for manufacturing or service industry firms, often beginning their career in company run
management training programs. Still others have obtained positions working for local, state or national government or used their knowledge as a launching point for
graduate study in economics, business, or law.
Clearly, a key advantage of this major is the versatility it affords in selecting from a wide variety of careers and advanced degrees.
Research Economist: Economists study how society distributes resources, such as land, labor, raw materials, and machinery, to produce goods and services. They may conduct
research, collect and analyze data, monitor economic trends, or develop forecasts. Economists research a wide variety of issues including energy costs, inflation, interest rates,
exchange rates, business cycles, taxes, and employment levels, among others.
Investment Management: Investment management involves a client who gives money to an asset manager, who then invests it to meet the client’s financial objectives.
Investment Analyst: This position will involve analysis of investment activities. There will also be evaluation of short-term debt securities, investment projects and
objectives. Reports on investment opportunities and recommendations regarding investments are then prepared. It is also helpful if you are familiar with standard
concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field.
Commercial Credit Analyst: These individuals, like a loan officers, review credit data to evaluate commercial loan requests in order to approve or deny applications. They
analyze sources of financial information, such as reporting services, credit bureaus, other companies, main office files, and branches to determine profitability of loan.
14
CURRICULUM
To complete the economics-finance major, students must take nine courses, five of which are required. The remaining four courses- two in economics and two in finance- may be selected
from the two departments’ offerings. By choosing electives carefully with the guidance of their mentor, majors can customize their program of study in specialized topics such as
international economics, health economics, environmental economics, corporate finance, international finance, managerial economics, and portfolio analysis.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
EC 224
Intermediate Price Theory
EC 225
Intermediate Macroeconomics
EC 391
Monetary Economics
EC _____ EC elective*
EC _____ EC elective*
FI 305
Principles of Accounting and Finance
FI 306
Financial Markets and Investments
FI _____
FI elective*
FI _____
FI elective*
* Any EC courses not otherwise required can fulfill the EC elective requirements and any FI course not
otherwise required can fulfill the FI requirement. Students are advised, but not required, to take FI 351
as one of their FI electives. Major electives should be selected in consultation with a faculty mentor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Steve Grubaugh
AAC 197 :: 781.891.2539
Majors: Bill Clarke
Career Services: Career Services Center
AAC 191 :: [email protected]
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Jeffery Livingston
AAC 171 :: 781.891.2538
What's the overall career outlook for Economics-Finance majors?



Employment of economists is expected to grow 6 percent from 2008 to 2018, which is slower than the average for all occupations. Demand for economic analysis should grow,
but the increase in the number of economist jobs will be tempered as firms hire workers for niche areas with specialized titles. Many workers with economic backgrounds will
work in related fields with more specific job titles, such as financial analyst, market analyst, public policy consultant, researcher or research assistant, purchasing manager, or a
variety of positions in business and the insurance industry. Overall employment growth also will be slowed because of the relatively high number of economists—about 53
percent—employed in declining government sectors.
Employment growth should be fastest in private industry, especially in management, scientific, and technical consulting services. Rising demand for economic analysis in virtually
every industry should stem from the growing complexity of the global economy, the effects of competition on businesses, and increased reliance on quantitative methods for
analyzing and forecasting business, sales, and other economic trends. Some corporations choose to hire economic consultants to fill these needs, rather than keeping an
economist on staff. This practice should result in more economists being employed in consulting services.
Employment of financial analysts and personal financial advisors is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. As the level of investment increases,
overall employment of financial analysts is expected to increase by 20 percent during the 2008–18 decade, which is much faster than the average for all occupations. Primary
factors for this growth are increasing complexity and global diversification of investments and growth in the overall amount of assets under management. As the number and
type of mutual and hedge funds and the amount of assets invested in these funds increase, companies will need more financial analysts to research and recommend investments.
As the international investment increases, companies will need more analysts to cover the global range of investment options. Keen competition will continue for these well-paid
jobs, especially for new entrants.
15
Finance
Bentley University is recognized throughout the world as a provider of outstanding professional education in finance. Finance students at Bentley acquire a solid background in financial principles
and practices that ultimately enables them to interact with a full range of business professionals. They also develop a broad array of analytical skills, gain a thorough understanding of the finance
function in different types of organizations, and sharpen their awareness of how financial institutions and markets function in a global environment. Required finance courses introduce students to
the financial environment of business, the key principles underlying the investment process, the financial decision-making process of corporations, and the expanding international context of
financial analysis and decision making. The broad range of electives offered allows finance majors to specialize in corporate finance, financial institutions, or financial services, including financial
planning, real estate, insurance and investments.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Commercial
Banking
Insurance
Financial
Planning
Investment
Banking
Real Estate
Money
Management
Sales skills
High
Medium
Low
Medium
Very High
Medium
Communication skills
High
High
High
High
High
Medium
Analytical skills
Medium
Medium
High
High
Medium
High
Ability to synthesize
Medium
Low
High
High
Low
High
Creative ability
Medium
Medium
Medium
High
Medium
Medium
Initiative
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
High
Medium
Work hours
40-60/week
35-55/week
4050/week
50120/week
20-70/week
55-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
Finance majors often have their pick from among a wide variety of career choices in commercial banking, corporate finance, financial planning, insurance, money
management and more. Career opportunities exist in the advanced management training programs of major corporations; credit, trust and operations departments of
financial services firms; in financial analysis and investment brokerage; and in insurance and financial planning.
Financial Representative/Planner/Advisor: Financial Planners and Advisors strive to meet their client’s financial planning needs. Financial planners market their business
and build a client base. They identify and set financial goals, develop plans of investment, and assess a client’s net worth.
Commercial Banking: Commercial Banks differ from Investment Banks because generally speaking, they are known for their retail banking services (that is the local bank
on the corner). You deposit money into a bank and the bank loans that money to consumers and/or companies in need. However, with the rapid disintegration of the
Glass-Steagall Act, the distinction between Commercial Banks and Investment Banks has become less obvious. Well known Commercial Banks include Bank of America,
and more locally Citizens or Sovereign Bank.
Insurance Industry: The insurance industry provides protection against financial losses resulting from a variety of perils. By purchasing insurance policies, individuals and
businesses can receive reimbursement for losses due to car accidents, theft of property, and fire and storm damage; medical expenses; and loss of income due to disability
or death.
Cash Management: This group ensures that its company has enough cash on hand to meet its daily needs. They make sure any excess cash is invested overnight by picking
the best short-term investment options. Finally, they negotiate with local banks to get regional business units the banking services they need at the best possible price.
16
CURRICULUM
Finance is the study of the purchase and sale of assets by individuals and institutions and the methods uses to fund these transactions; the markets in which these transactions occur and the
pricing of the financial instruments are integral to the study of finance. Finance majors develop a broad array of analytical skills, attain a thorough understanding of the finance function in
different kinds of organizations and gain a global perspective of the institutions and markets in which finance operates. Required finance courses focus on the financial environment of
business, the decision-making process of corporations, the key principles underlying the investment process, and the expanding international context of financial analysis, portfolio
construction, and trading.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
FI 305
Principles of Accounting and Finance
FI 306
Financial Markets and Investments
FI 307
Advanced Managerial Finance
FI 351
International Finance
FI _____
FI elective
FI _____
FI elective
FI _____
FI elective
FI _____
FI elective
CONCENTRATIONS AVAILABLE
Traditional (Any 4 FI electives)
Financial Planning
Corporate Finance
Capital Markets
* Any FI courses, not otherwise required, can fulfill the FI elective requirements. Students may use
* Please see the Academic Services website for more information on concentrations available and advisors for
either FI 421 (Internship) or FI 401 (Directed Study) as one of their FI electives, but not both.
each concentration.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Chair:
Kartik Raman
AAC 215 :: 781.891.2781
Majors/Minors:
Jerry Leabman
MOR 357 :: 781.891.2879
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Candy Bianco
AAC 270 :: 781.891.2445
What's the overall career outlook for Finance majors?



Wage and salary employment in banking is projected to grow 8 percent between 2008 and 2018, compared with the 11 percent growth projected for wage and salary
employment across all industries. Banks compete strongly to attract new customers. Because convenience of local branches is one of the most important factors for
customers selecting a bank, the number of local branches will continue to increase. New branches frequently will be located in nontraditional locations, such as inside
grocery stores. A growing number of branches will increase employment of branch managers and tellers.
Wage and salary employment in the insurance industry is projected to grow about 3 percent between 2008 and 2018, compared to the 11 percent growth projected for
wage and salary employment in all industries combined. While demand for insurance is expected to rise, job growth will be limited by industry consolidation, corporate
downsizing, productivity increases due to new technology, and increasing use of direct mail, telephone, and Internet sales. Additionally, the recent financial crisis has
resulted in large losses for the insurance industry, phenomena that will result in more prudent risk management and lower revenues. However, insurers should rebuild
their capital and continue to expand into the broader financial services field, resulting in some job growth.
Employment of real estate brokers and sales agents is expected to grow 14 percent during the 2008-2018 decade. A growing population, particularly young adults who
will be forming households in greater numbers, will require the services of real estate agents and brokers to buy their homes. Home sales will be sparked by the
continuing desire for people to own their own homes and their perception that real estate will be a good investment over the long run. However, job growth will be
somewhat limited by the increasing use of the Internet, which is improving the productivity of agents and brokers, and transforming the way they do business. For
example, prospective customers often can perform their own searches for properties that meet their criteria by accessing real estate information on the Internet.
17
Information Design and Corporate Communication
In today’s global market place, business is communication. The Information Design and Corporate Communication (IDCC) program examines the critical role of communication in the world of
business- and in people’s lives in general. The IDCC curriculum hones students' abilities to shape technical, managerial and corporate information using written, oral and visual media. Students
learn how to craft the messages that define an organization's image and reputation, manage a crisis, expand a business overseas, bring new products to market, or explain the interactions of
software and other high-tech products. Built on the understanding that communication is multifaceted, IDCC course work integrates various aspects of marketing, management, computer
information systems, and a host of other disciplines, including general business and the arts and sciences. IDCC majors choose one of three major course concentrations — information design,
public relations or web design — to best develop core competencies that will differentiate their skills in the marketplace
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Public Relations
Copy Editor/Writer Event Planner
Media Planner
Web Design
Technical Writer
People skills:
High
High
High
Medium
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Integrity:
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
Leadership skills:
Medium
Very High
High
Very High
High
Very High
Communication skills:
High
High
High
Low
High
Low
Analytical skills:
Medium
Extremely High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Tech skills:
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
Very High
High
Very High
High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
As companies become increasingly aware of the central role effective communications play in success of business, they are hiring professional communicators in record
numbers. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in business communication is expected to grow 23 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average
for all occupations. Growth will be driven by the need for organizations to maintain their public image in a high-information age and with the growth of social media.
Career opportunities in information design and corporate communication can best be broken down into the three areas of concentration: Information design, public
relations, and web design.
Information Design: According to U.S. News & World Report, information design, also called technical communication, is one of the top 20 professions to consider in the
coming decade. Employers' demand for people who can write clearly about technical subjects exceeds the supply of qualified candidates. Demand is especially strong in
the high-tech, telecommunications, medical technology, and e-commerce industries.
Public Relations: PR professionals are called upon for their writing and speaking skills, ability to persuade and network, to strategize and, above all, to be flexible and
creative in how to adapt a message within an ever-changing communications landscape. They manage corporate reputations across a range of audiences and publicize
products and events via a variety of non-euphonious media. They can work in agencies or in a company's in-house communications office.
Web Design: Web design teams are made up of writers, graphic artists, computer programmers, HTML experts, database designers, information architects, usability
designers, quality controllers, network specialists and system administrators. Working closely together, web design team members develop satisfying and effective user
experiences in both static and dynamic virtual environments.
18
CURRICULUM
All IDCC majors must take speech, professional communication, web design courses, and communication theory to build their verbal skills before choosing electives in applied communication theory and
supporting subject areas. This curriculum, structured to allow maximum flexibility to suit individual interests and goals while ensuring a solid base of knowledge in business and the liberal arts, has
become a model for similar programs offered in schools through the country. Top students can enhance their academic experience with a three-credit honors internship with a Boston-area firm. Student
interns generally work 15 hours per week for a semester in an area related to their studies.
IDCC MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
COM 210 Effective Speaking
IDCC ___
IDCC Restricted elective (see Department Chair or DRS for options)
IDCC ___
IDCC course (choose 1: IDCC 230, IDCC 255, IDCC 330, IDCC 350)
IDCC 370 Web Design I
IDCC ___
IDCC elective
IDCC ___
IDCC elective
_____
IDCC or IDCC-related elective
_____
IDCC or IDCC-related elective
IDCC with Business Information Communication Technology (ICT) concentration
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS:
COM 210 Effective Speaking
IDCC 370
IDCC 230
IPM 140
IPM____
IPM____
IDCC____
IDCC____
Web Design I
Fundamentals of Content Development
Adding Value with Information Processes
IPM elective
IPM elective
IDCC Elective: IDCC 375 or IDCC 385
IDCC 360 or COM 323 or IDCC 390 (Effective Business
Presentations only)
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors/Minors:
Simon Moore
SMI 312 :: 781.891.2151
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Terry Skelton
SMI 308 :: 781.891.3482
What's the overall career outlook for Information Design and Corporate Communication majors?




Overall employment of advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers is expected to increase by 13 percent through 2018. Job growth will be spurred
by competition for a growing number of goods and services, both foreign and domestic, and the need to make one’s product or service stand out in the crowd. In addition, as the
influence of traditional advertising in newspapers, radio, and network television wanes, marketing professionals are being asked to develop new and different ways to advertise
and promote products and services to better reach potential customers.
Employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 24 percent from 2008 to 2018. The need for good public relations in an increasingly competitive and global
business environment should spur demand for these workers, especially those with specialized knowledge or international experience. Employees who possess additional
language capabilities also are in great demand.
Public relations managers are expected to see an increase in employment of 13 percent between 2008 and 2018, as organizations increasingly emphasize community outreach
and customer relations as a way to enhance their reputation and visibility. Especially among the growing number of nonprofit organizations, such as education services, business
and professional associations, and hospitals, where many of these workers are employed, public relations managers will be charged with promoting the mission of the
organization and encouraging membership or use of the organization’s services.
Employment of authors, writers, and editors is expected to grow 8 percent from 2008 to 2018. Employment in salaried writing and editing positions is expected to increase
slightly as jobs become more prevalent throughout the economy. Companies in a wide array of industries are using newer multimedia technologies and online media to reach a
more technology friendly consumer and meet the growing demand for Web-based information. Online publications and services are growing in number and sophistication,
spurring the demand for authors, writers, and editors, especially those with Web or multimedia experience.
19
Information Systems Audit and Control
The Information Systems Audit and Control major joins together the skill sets of two areas experiencing rapid growth and change: accounting and information technology. Technology-intensive
innovations have created new challenges and opportunities for accountants who also have expertise in information systems and business process management.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
IT Audit
Fraud
Risk Advisory Enterprise Risk
Examiner/Forensic
Services
Services
Accounting
Data Administrator
Systems & Process
Assurance Associate
People skills
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Sales skills
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Medium
Medium
Communication skills
Medium
Medium
High
High
Medium
Medium
Analytical skills
High
Very High
High
Very High
Very High
Very High
Creative ability
Low
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Initiative
Low
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Computer skills
High
High
Very High
High
High
High
Work hours
40-70/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
40-70/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
The major in Information Systems Audit and Control prepares students for challenges and opportunities as accountants who also have expertise in information systems and
business process management. Until recently, firms have not hired directly into some specialty practices, preferring to hire only those with at least a few years of
experience. Currently, they do hire directly, and students who major in ISAC major will have an advantage over other areas. Specialty practices include: IT Audit (internal
and external), Forensics and Business/Risk Advisory practices. Some firms are paying a $2000-$5000 premium for hires into these specialty practices.
Fraud Examiner/Forensic Accounting: Some public accountants specialize in forensic accounting—investigating and interpreting white-collar crimes such as securities fraud and
embezzlement, bankruptcies and contract disputes, and other complex and possibly criminal financial transactions, including money laundering by organized criminals. Forensic
accountants combine their knowledge of accounting, computer information systems and finance with law and investigative techniques to determine whether an activity is
illegal. Many forensic accountants work closely with law enforcement personnel and lawyers during investigations and often appear as expert witnesses during trials.
Systems Analyst: The systems analyst is the middleman, assessing the needs of the end-user and translating them into programming or working with other departments to
develop the programming.
Data Administrator: Database administrators work with database management systems software and determine ways to organize and store data. They identify user needs and
set up new computer databases. In many cases, database administrators must integrate data from outdated systems into a new system. They also test and coordinate
modifications to the system when needed, and troubleshoot problems when they occur. An organization’s database administrator ensures the performance of the system,
understands the platform on which the database runs, and adds new users to the system. Because many databases are connected to the Internet, database administrators also
must plan and coordinate security measures with network administrators. With the growing volume of sensitive data and the increasing interconnectedness of computer
networks, data integrity, backup systems, and database security have become increasingly important aspects of the job of database administrators.
20
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
AC 311
Financial Accounting and Reporting I
AC 312
Financial Accounting and Reporting II
AC 340
Accounting Information Systems
AC 470
Financial Statement Auditing
or 472
Internal Audit
AC 475
Information Technology Auditing
AC 440
Design and Control of Enterprise Systems
IPM 210
Information Security and Computer Forensics
IPM 450
Business Systems Analysis and Modeling
_____
AC, CS, or IPM elective*
_____
AC, CS, or IPM elective*
* Students may select from the following courses (or other courses with the approval of the AC
Department Chair) : AC 421, AC 332, MG 343, CS 150, CS 180, CS 350, CS 440
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: William Read
AAC 212 :: 781.891.2525
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
AC Internships: Karen Osterheld
AAC 282 :: 781.891.2724
What's the overall career outlook for Information Systems Audit and Control Majors?





Overall employment of computer network, systems, and database administrators is projected to increase by 30 percent from 2008 to 2018. In addition, this occupation will add
286,600 new jobs over that period. Growth, however, will vary by specialty. Employment of database administrators is expected to grow by 20 percent from 2008 to 2018.
Demand for these workers is expected to increase as organizations need to store, organize, and analyze increasing amounts of data. In addition, as more databases are connected
to the Internet, and as data security becomes increasingly important, a growing number of these workers will be needed to protect databases from attack.
Employment of claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators is expected to grow by 7 percent over the 2008-2018 decade. Employment growth of adjusters and
claims examiners will primarily stem from the growth of the health insurance industry. Rising healthcare premiums and attempts by large insurance carriers to minimize costs will
result in a greater need for claims examiners to more scrupulously review a growing number of medical claims.
Employment of computer support specialists is expected to increase by 14 percent from 2008 to 2018. Demand for these workers will result as organizations and individuals
continue to adopt the newest forms of technology. As technology becomes more complex and widespread, support specialists will be needed in greater numbers to resolve the
technical problems that arise. Businesses, especially, will demand greater levels of support, as information technology has become essential in the business environment.
Job growth will be fastest in several industries that rely heavily on technology. These include the computer systems design and related services industry; the data processing,
hosting and related services industry; the software publishing industry; and the management, scientific, and technical consulting industry. These industries will employ a growing
number of support specialists as they utilize and provide an increasing array of IT services. Healthcare and related establishments, in addition, may see substantial growth as
these organizations look to improve their efficiency and patient care through the use of information systems and other technology.
Employment of private detectives and investigators is expected to grow 22 percent over the 2008–18 decade. Increased demand for investigators will result from heightened
security concerns, increased litigation, and the need to protect confidential information and property of all kinds. The proliferation of criminal activity on the Internet, such as
identity theft, spamming, e-mail harassment, and illegal downloading of copyrighted materials, also will increase the demand for private investigators. Growing financial activity
worldwide will increase the demand for investigators to control internal and external financial losses, to monitor competitors, and to prevent industrial spying.
21
Management
Hands-on experience is a vital piece of a Bentley degree in management. As a student, you will use case studies, team projects, computer simulations, experiential exercises and internships to
apply class work to real issues from today's business environment. The management major provides a generalist orientation, with the opportunity to develop a specialized focus in areas such
as human resources management, entrepreneurship, global business management, and technology management. As part of your course work, you will develop a portfolio of critical workrelated skills, such as how to:
 negotiate a deal
 write a business plan
 lead a high-performance team
 work effectively with diverse people
 use qualitative and quantitative data to diagnose and solve organizational problems
 develop a strategy for a successful global company
 use information technology effectively at all levels of analysis and decision making
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Human Resources
Management Consulting
Manager
People skills:
Sales skills:
Integrity:
Leadership skills:
Communication skills:
Analytical skills:
Tech skills:
Writing ability:
High
Low
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
High
High
Medium
Medium
Very High
High
Extremely High
Medium
High
High
Low
High
High
High
Medium
Medium
Very High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
40-50/week
CAREER OPTIONS
Bentley management graduates work locally, nationally and internationally as leaders, managers, consultants and entrepreneurs. They pursue careers in human resources, project
management, operations management, as managers in a variety of industries, or as heads of their own businesses.
Human Resources: There are many types of human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists. In a small organization, a human resources generalist
may handle all aspects of human resources work, and thus require an extensive range of knowledge. The responsibilities of human resources generalists can vary widely,
depending on their employer’s needs.
Management Consulting: Management consulting firms influence how businesses, governments, and institutions make decisions. Often working behind the scenes, these firms
offer technical expertise, information, contacts, and tools that clients cannot provide themselves. They then work with their clients to provide a service or solve a problem.
Sales: Sales agents provide customers/clients with goods and services, thereby earning money for the company.
22
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
MG 240
Interpersonal Relations in Management
MG 345
Organization & Environment
MG _____ Restricted MG elective (fulfill by choosing 1 Global MG course)
MG _____ MG elective*
MG _____ MG elective*
MG _____ MG elective*
_____
MG-related elective*
_____
MG-related elective
CONCENTRATIONS AVAILABLE
Entrepreneurship
Global Management
Human Resources Management
Leadership
Supply-Chain Operations Management
* Please see the Academic Services website for more information on concentrations available and advisors for
each concentration.
* Any MG course, not otherwise required, can fulfill the MG elective requirement.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Duncan Spelman
AAC 327 :: 781.891.2217
Minors: Jim Salsbury
AAC 329 :: 781.891.2693
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships/ENT Minor: Fred Tuffile
AAC 286 :: 781.891.2431
What's the overall career outlook for Management majors?





Wage and salary employment in the management, scientific, and technical consulting services industry is expected to grow by 83 percent between 2008 and 2018. All areas of
consulting should experience strong growth. Projected job growth can be attributed primarily to economic growth and to the continuing complexity of business. A growing
number of businesses mean increased demand for advice in all areas of business planning. Firms will look to management consultants to draft business plans and budgets,
develop strategy, and determine appropriate salaries and benefits for employees. The expansion of franchised restaurants and retail stores will spur demand for marketing
consultants to determine the best locations and develop marketing plans. The expansion of business also will create opportunities for logistics consulting firms in order to link
new suppliers with producers and to get the finished goods to consumers. Finally, businesses will continue to need advice on compliance with government workplace safety and
environmental laws.
Globalization, too, will continue to provide numerous opportunities for consulting firms wishing to expand their services, or help their clients expand, into foreign markets.
Consulting firms can advise clients on strategy, as well as foreign laws, regarding taxes, employment, worker safety, and the environment. The growth of international businesses
will create numerous opportunities for logistics consulting firms as businesses seek to improve coordination in the expanding network of suppliers and consumers.
Employment of management analysts is expected to grow by 24 percent, much faster than the average, over the 2008-2018 decade, as industry and government increasingly rely
on outside expertise to improve the performance of their organizations. Job growth is projected in very large consulting firms with international expertise and in smaller
consulting firms that specialize in specific areas, such as biotechnology, healthcare, information technology, human resources, engineering, and marketing. Growth in the number
of individual practitioners may be hindered by increasing use of consulting teams that are often more versatile.
Job growth for management analysts will be driven by a number of changes in the business environment that have forced firms to take a closer look at their operations. These
changes include regulatory changes, developments in information technology, and the growth of electronic commerce. In addition, as firms try to solve regulatory changes due to
the current economic credit and housing crisis, consultants will be hired to render advice on the recovery process.
Employment of marketing managers will grow 12 percent between 2008 and 2018, and that of sales managers will grow 15 percent over the same period. Sales and marketing
managers and their departments constitute some of the most important personnel in an organization and are less subject to downsizing or outsourcing than are other types of
managers, except in the case of companies that are consolidating. Employment of these managers, therefore, will vary primarily on the basis of the growth or contraction in the
industries that employ them.
23
Managerial Economics
Economics provides an understanding of the environment in which all businesses operate. It also equips students with the tools, skills and intuition necessary to make sound business
decisions. Students who enjoy economics and want to strengthen their background in another area may find one of these majors to be right for them.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Economic Analyst
Research Economist
Economic/Policy
Financial Analyst Credit Analyst
Consultant
Research Assistant
People skills:
High
High
High
Medium
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Integrity:
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
Leadership skills:
Medium
Very High
High
Very High
High
Very High
Communication skills:
High
High
High
Low
High
Low
Analytical skills:
Medium
Extremely High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Tech skills:
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
Very High
High
Very High
High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
A Bentley economics degree provides students with virtually limitless career opportunities. Students often begin their careers in their concentration area, such as
accounting or marketing. Their positions might be in the manufacturing, financial or service industries or with the government. An advantage of a Bentley economics
degree is the versatility it affords in selecting from a variety of careers.
Research Economist: Economists study how society distributes resources, such as land, labor, raw materials, and machinery, to produce goods and services. They may conduct
research, collect and analyze data, monitor economic trends, or develop forecasts. Economists research a wide variety of issues including energy costs, inflation, interest rates,
exchange rates, business cycles, taxes, and employment levels, among others.
Financial Representative/Planner/Advisor: Financial Planners and Advisors strive to meet their client’s financial planning needs. Financial planners market their business
and build a client base. They identify and set financial goals, develop plans of investment, and assess a client’s net worth.
Commercial Credit Analyst: These individuals, like a loan officer, review credit data to evaluate commercial loan requests in order to approve or deny applications. They
analyze sources of financial information, such as reporting services, credit bureaus, other companies, main office files, and branches to determine profitability of loan.
Policy Analyst: Policy analysts work to influence political and social decisions. Although their tasks vary, most policy analysts work in one or more of four areas: collecting
information, analyzing potential policies and making recommendations, evaluating the outcomes of existing policies, and sharing information with the public and government
officials.
Actuarial Analyst: These Individuals prepare actuarial valuations, reports and special studies; review data reconciliation; perform and review complex benefit calculations;
read plan documents to interpret plan provisions; complete and review government forms; prepare and review benefit statements reconciling data and assets for annual
valuations; update and run TRS liability and report programs; process annual valuation; and calculate retirement benefits.
24
CURRICULUM
The Managerial Economics major provides you with the flexibility to combine economics with a non-finance discipline. The common body of business core courses provides you with an
excellent foundation in all business areas, but more depth is needed for specialization.
The Managerial Economics major provides this much needed depth in an integrated manner by allowing you to concentrate in one of the following business areas. The flexibility achieved by
combining economics with another business discipline allows students to design a curriculum that meets their professional and personal educational objectives






Concentration Areas:

Accounting

Economic Analysis

Entrepreneurship

Human Resources

Information Design and Corporate Communication
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
EC 224
Intermediate Price Theory
EC 225
Intermediate Macroeconomics
EC 381
Research in Managerial Economics
EC _____ EC elective*
EC _____ EC elective*
_____
Concentration
_____
Concentration
_____
Concentration
Information Technology
International Business
Law
Management
Marketing
Quantitative Analysis
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Minor in Business Economics
EC 224
EC 224 Intermediate Price Theory
EC 225
Intermediate Macroeconomics
2 additional 200-level or higher EC courses
Minor in International Economics
EC 311
International Economics
3 of the following EC courses: EC 315; EC 321; EC 331; EC 333; FI 351
* Any 3 credit EC course, not otherwise required, can fulfill the EC elective requirement. Major electives
should be selected in consultation with a faculty mentor. Please see the Academic Services website for
more information about concentration options.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Bill Clarke
Minors: Bryan Snyder
Career Services: Career Services Center
AAC 191 :: [email protected]
AAC 274 :: [email protected]
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Jeff Livingston
AAC 171 :: [email protected]
What's the overall career outlook for Managerial Economics Majors?



Employment of economists is expected to grow 6 percent from 2008 to 2018. Demand for economic analysis should grow, but the increase in the number of economist jobs will
be tempered as firms hire workers for niche areas with specialized titles. Many workers with economic backgrounds will work in related fields with more specific job titles, such
as financial analyst, market analyst, public policy consultant, researcher or research assistant, purchasing manager, or a variety of positions in business and the insurance
industry. Overall employment growth also will be slowed because of the relatively high number of economists—about 53 percent—employed in declining government sectors.
Employment growth should be fastest in private industry, especially in management, scientific, and technical consulting services. This practice should result in more
economists being employed in consulting services.
Bachelor’s degree holders will face competition for the limited number of economist positions for which they qualify. However, they will qualify for a number of other
positions that can use their broad-based economic knowledge. Many graduates with bachelor’s degrees will find jobs in business, finance, insurance, or related fields.
25
Marketing
In offering a variety of products and services, every institution practices some form of marketing. Bentley's major in marketing will enable you to understand this vital area of business and
organizational activity. In helping you understand concepts and apply theory to practice, the marketing major delivers valuable insight on challenges, opportunities and risks facing today's
marketing professionals. By carefully selecting your courses, you can build a concentration around an area of individual interest. Thanks to a strong business foundation and hands-on
experience, Bentley marketing graduates have the knowledge to advance in careers in sales, advertising, product development, brand management, marketing research, database marketing
digital marketing and social media.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Advertising/Public
Market Research
Relations
Product
Management
Retailing
Non-Profit
People skills
High
Medium
Medium
High
High
Sales skills
High
Medium
Medium
High
High
Communication skills
Very High
Medium
High
High
Very High
Analytical skills
Low
Very High
High
Low
Low
Ability to synthesize
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Creative ability
High
High
Medium
Medium
High
Initiative
Medium
Medium
High
High
Medium
Work hours
40-70/week
35-65/week
45-65/week
35-65/week
35-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
Public Relations: PR professionals are called upon for their writing and speaking skills, ability to persuade and network, to strategize and, above all, to be flexible and
creative in how to adapt a message within an ever-changing communications landscape. They manage corporate reputations across a range of audiences and publicize
products and events via a variety of non-euphonious media. They can work in agencies or in a company's in-house communications office.
Market Research: a market researcher gathers and analyzes statistical data to determine market conditions in relation to a particular product or service. Responsibilities
can include designing surveys, overseeing focus groups and in depth interviews, interpreting statistical models and developing conclusions and implications for client
reports and presentations.
Advertising: Advertising typically involves the development or the overseeing of materials and activities aimed at persuading customers to purchase a product. Generally
this is done through vehicles like the Internet, billboards, print, TV, etc.
Marketing: Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers,
clients, partners, and society at large. It serves a crucial role in every company and in every industry. Areas in marketing include market research, product development,
promotions, brand management, direct marketing and e-marketing. Typical entry level positions include but are not limited to marketing coordinator, assistant or
associate.
Retailing: More than often than not, one is responsible for purchasing the merchandise for a client or retail organization. This merchandise can be anything from furniture
to clothing. The buyer is responsible for negotiating prices and delivering contracts. Buyers must analyze markets, project trends, and deftly understand the spending
habits of the consumer. Increasingly, buyers are using statistical and computerized data analyses in order to do so.
Event Planner/Conference Coordinator/Meeting Planner: Responsible for all aspects of planning a meeting or special event for an organization, company or client. This
individual manages all amenities and accommodations at the event as well as any associated contract negotiations.
Digital Marketing: Develops and implements the strategic on-line marketing plan for an organization. Stays abreast of changes in online marketing environment to best
serve objectives of the organization and adjusts plans accordingly; may be responsible for internet advertising and social media strategies.
26
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
MK 322
Marketing Research
MK 400
Marketing Management
MK ____
MK elective*
MK ____
MK elective*
MK ____
MK elective*
MK ____
MK elective*
_____
MK-related elective
_____
MK-related elective
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
The requirements for a MK minor depend on whether you are pursuing a Bachelor of
Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree.
For BS Majors:
Successful completion of 4 approved courses from a specified list (2 Foundation
course, 1 Applied Marketing courses, 1 arts & science elective or additional applied
marketing course)
See Minors website for most up-to-date information
* Any MK course, not otherwise required, can fulfill the MK elective requirement.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors/Minors:
Andy Aylesworth
MOR 216 :: 781.891.3149
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Ian Cross
MOR 238 :: 781.891.3188
What's the overall career outlook for Marketing Majors?





Overall employment of market and survey researchers is projected to grow 28 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. Market research
analysts, the larger specialty, will experience much faster than average job growth because competition between companies seeking to expand their market and sales of their
products will generate a growing need for marketing professionals. Marketing research provides organizations valuable feedback from purchasers, allowing companies to
evaluate consumer satisfaction and adjust their marketing strategies and plan more effectively for the future. Future locations of stores and shopping centers, for example, will be
determined by marketing research, as will consumer preference of virtually all products and services.
Overall employment of advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers is expected to increase by 13 percent through 2018. Job growth will be spurred
by competition for a growing number of goods and services, both foreign and domestic, and the need to make one’s product or service stand out in the crowd. In addition, as the
influence of traditional advertising in newspapers, radio, and network television wanes, marketing professionals are being asked to develop new and different ways to advertise
and promote products and services to better reach potential customers.
Public relations managers are expected to see an increase in employment of 13 percent between 2008 and 2018 as organizations increasingly emphasize community outreach
and customer relations as a way to enhance their reputation and visibility. Especially among the growing number of nonprofit organizations, such as education services, business
and professional associations, and hospitals, where many of these workers are employed, public relations managers will be charged with promoting the mission of the
organization and encouraging membership or use of the organization’s services.
Employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 24 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. The need for good public relations
in an increasingly competitive and global business environment should spur demand for these workers, especially those with specialized knowledge or international experience.
Employees who possess additional language capabilities also are in great demand.
Advertising and promotions managers are expected to experience little or no change in employment from 2008 to 2018. Because advertising is the primary source of revenue for
most media, advertising departments are less affected in a downturn. An expected increase in the number of television and radio stations and a sharp increase in the amount of
advertising in digital media, such as the Internet and wireless devices will generate a need for advertising managers to oversee new and innovative advertising programs. A
number of these advertising managers will be self-employed.
27
Mathematical Sciences
Bentley University’s Bachelor of Science degree in Math is an applied degree because students take both math and business courses. This combination, from one of the nation's top business
schools, provides a strong theoretical and practical background. The Mathematical Sciences Department offers a wide range of courses, most of which involve the fields of mathematics that are
heavily used in business, such as actuarial mathematics, statistics and management science.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Research Analyst
Actuary
Consultant
Financial Services
Market Researcher
Statistician
People skills:
High
High
High
Medium
High
Medium
Sales skills:
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Low
Medium
Integrity:
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
Leadership skills:
Medium
Very High
High
Very High
High
Very High
Communication skills:
High
High
High
Low
High
Low
Analytical skills:
Medium
Extremely High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Tech skills:
High
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Writing ability:
High
High
Very High
High
Very High
High
Work hours:
35-55/week
50-90/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
40-50/week
40-70/week
CAREER OPTIONS
College graduates with math degrees are in high demand. Knowledge of quantitative techniques, the ability to think analytically, and skills in building mathematical models to solve real-world
problems are important assets that can help shape a career in industry, government and nonprofit institutions alike. A major in mathematical sciences will prepare you for interesting, fastgrowing and high-paying careers in a number of industries. Math majors can be found working as consultants, operations research analysts and market researchers. Others choose to work as
mathematicians, actuaries or statisticians -- three consistently top-ranked jobs, according to Jobs Rated Almanac. While some graduates go directly to work for companies, others may decide
to pursue a graduate degree in mathematics or statistics, or in fields such as business, economics or law.
Actuary: Through their knowledge of statistics, finance, and business, actuaries assess the risk of events occurring and help create policies that minimize risk and its financial impact
on companies and clients. One of the main functions of actuaries is to help businesses assess the risk of certain events occurring and formulate policies that minimize the cost of
that risk. For this reason, actuaries are essential to the insurance industry.
Statistician: Statisticians apply their mathematical and statistical knowledge to the design of surveys and experiments; the collection, processing, and analysis of data; and the
interpretation of the experiment and survey results. Statisticians may apply their knowledge of statistical methods to a variety of subject areas, such as biology, economics,
engineering, medicine, public health, psychology, marketing, education, and sports.
Mathematician: Mathematicians use mathematical theory, computational techniques, algorithms, and the latest computer technology to solve economic, scientific, engineering,
and business problems. The work of mathematicians falls into two broad classes: theoretical (pure) mathematics and applied mathematics. These classes, however, are not sharply
defined and often overlap.
Theoretical Mathematician: Theoretical mathematicians advance mathematical knowledge by developing new principles and recognizing previously unknown relationships
between existing principles of mathematics. Although these workers seek to increase basic knowledge without necessarily considering its practical use, such pure and abstract
knowledge has been instrumental in producing or furthering many scientific and engineering achievements.
Applied Mathematicians: Applied mathematicians use theories and techniques, such as mathematical modeling and computational methods, to formulate and solve practical
problems in business, government, engineering, and the physical, life, and social sciences.
28
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
MA 233
Calculus III
MA 239
Linear Algebra
MA 252
Math Statistics
MA 263
Continuous Probability
MA ____ MA elective
MA ____ MA elective
MA ____ MA elective
MA ____ MA elective
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Four Approved mathematical sciences or statistics
courses numbered 200 or higher except GB 213.
A minor in Mathematical Sciences can be designed
to complement any major. Some students may
wish to select courses which will give them an
understanding of how problems are modeled and
solved in the financial and business world Courses
are selected, with the assistance of a faculty
advisor, to reflect the individual student’s interests
and career objectives.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Nathan Carter
MOR 394 :: 781.891.3171
Minors: Pete Ciccarelli
MOR 310 :: 781.891.2701
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 270 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Emmy Roth
MOR 388 :: 781.891.2990
What's the overall career outlook for Mathematical Science Majors?




Employment of actuaries is expected to increase by 21 percent over the 2008- 2018 period. While employment in the insurance industry—the largest employer of
actuaries—will experience some growth, greater job growth will occur in other industries, such as financial services and consulting.
Job seekers are likely to face competition because the number of job openings is expected to be less than the number of qualified applicants. College graduates who
have passed two of the initial exams and completed an internship should enjoy the best prospects. A solid foundation in mathematics, including the ability to compute
complex probability and statistics, is essential. Experience or skills in computer programming can also be important. In addition to job growth, a small number of jobs
will open up each year to replace actuaries who retire or transfer to new jobs.
Employment of statisticians is projected to grow 13 percent from 2008 to 2018. The demand for individuals with a background is statistics is projected to grow,
although some jobs will be in occupations with titles other than statistician. The use of statistics is widespread and growing. Statistical models aid in decision making in
both private industry and government. There will always be a demand for the skills statisticians provide. Technological advances are expected to spur demand for
statisticians. Ever-faster computer processing allows statisticians to analyze greater amounts of data much more quickly and to gather and sort through large amounts
of data that would not have been analyzed in the past. As data processing continues to become more efficient and less expensive, an increasing number of employers
will want to employ statisticians to take advantage of the new information available. Biostatisticians should experience employment growth, primarily because of the
growing pharmaceuticals business. As pharmaceutical companies develop new treatments and medical technologies, biostatisticians will be needed to do research and
clinical trials.
Employment of mathematicians is expected to increase by 22 percent during the 2008–18 decade, which is much faster than average for all occupations.
29
Professional Sales
The Professional Sales major develops critical knowledge and perspective in the fields of revenue generation, business development and sales management, while nurturing an understanding of the
role sales plays within an organization. This strategic mastery is coupled with pragmatic expertise, ultimately translating into success in the employment marketplace — professional sales skills are
highly transferrable across industries and can be applied in private and public companies, nonprofit organizations and social missions.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Key Skill Area
Account/Sales Manager Consultant
Sales Operations
Analyst
Sales
Representative
Development
Associate/Representative
People skills
High
Very High
Medium
Very High
Very High
Sales skills
High
Very High
Medium/Low
Very High
Very High
Communication skills
Very High
Very High
High
Very High
Very High
Analytical skills
Medium
High
Very High
Medium
Medium
Ability to synthesize
High
Very High
Very High
Medium
Medium
Creative ability
Medium
High
Low
Medium
Medium
Initiative
Very High
Very High
Medium
Very High
Medium
CAREER OPTIONS
Operations/Market Research Analyst: Market research analysts study market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand
what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price. Market research analysts perform research and gather data to help a company market its products or
services. They gather data on consumer demographics, preferences, needs, and buying habits. They collect data and information using a variety of methods, such as interviews,
questionnaires, focus groups, market analysis surveys, public opinion polls, and literature reviews.
Analysts help determine a company’s position in the marketplace by researching their competitors and analyzing their prices, sales, and marketing methods. Using this
information, they may determine potential markets, product demand, and pricing. Their knowledge of the targeted consumer enables them to develop advertising brochures
and commercials, sales plans, and product promotions. Market research analysts evaluate data using statistical techniques and software. They must interpret what the data
means for their client, and they may forecast future trends. They often make charts, graphs, and other visual aids to present the results of their research.
Consultant: Consulting firms influence how businesses, governments, and institutions make decisions. Often working behind the scenes, these firms offer technical expertise,
information, contacts, and tools that clients cannot provide themselves. They then work with their clients to provide a service or solve a problem.
Sales Representative: Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses, government agencies, and other
organizations. They contact customers, explain product features, answer any questions that their customers may have, and negotiate prices. Rather than selling goods directly to
consumers, wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives deal with businesses, government agencies, and other organizations. Some wholesale and manufacturing sales
representatives specialize in technical and scientific products, ranging from agricultural and mechanical equipment to computer and pharmaceutical goods. Other
representatives deal with nonscientific products such as food, office supplies, and clothing.
Sales Manager: Sales managers direct organizations' sales teams. They set sales goals, analyze data, and develop training programs for organizations’ sales representatives.
Sales managers typically prepare budgets and approve expenditures, analyze sales statistics, project sales and determine the profability of sales and services, and develop
plans to acquire new customers through direct sales techniques and business to business marketing visits.
30
CURRICULUM
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
MG 240
Interpersonal Relations in Management
MG 360
Negotiating
PRS 339
Effective Selling
PRS 343
Sales Organization Management
PRS 373
Sales Strategy and Technology
PRS 421
Internship in Professional Sales
_____
Professional Sales Elective*
_____
Professional Sales Elective*
* Professional Sales electives can be fulfilled by the following courses: COM 210, COM 322, EC 245,
IDCC 320, MG 337, SO 265 or course approved by Director.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Jim Pouliopilous
MOR 296 :: 781.891.2006
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Jim Pouliopilous
MOR 296:: 781.891.2006
What's the overall career outlook for Professional Sales Majors?



Employment of sales managers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Employment growth of these
managers will depend primarily on growth or contraction in the industries that employ them. Growth is expected to be stronger for sales managers involved in
business-to-business sales than in business-to-consumer sales, because the rise of online shopping will reduce the need for sales calls to individual consumers.
Sales managers and their departments are some of the most important personnel in an organization. Therefore, they are less likely to be let go or to have their jobs
contracted out than are other types of managers, except in the case of organizations that are merging and consolidating.
Offshoring of these workers is also unlikely. Although domestic companies may hire some sales managers in foreign countries, those workers will function largely to
support expansion into foreign markets rather than to replace domestic sales managers.
Employment of wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives is projected to grow 9 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all
occupations. Employment growth for wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives will largely follow growth of the overall economy.
In addition to the total volume of sales, a wider range of products and technologies will lead to increased demand for sales representatives.
Because the work of sales representatives requires a lot of face-to-face interaction with potential buyers, this type of work is not likely to be sent to other countries.
Employment growth is expected to be strongest for sales representatives working at independent sales agencies. Companies are increasingly giving their sales activities
to independent companies as a way to cut costs and boost revenue.
Employment of market research analysts is projected to grow 32 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.
Employment growth will be driven by an increased use of data and market research across all industries—to understand the needs and wants of customers and to
measure the effectiveness of marketing and business strategies. Companies increasingly use research on consumer behavior to develop improved marketing strategies.
By doing so, companies are better able to market directly to their target population. In addition, market research provides companies and organizations with an
opportunity to cut costs.
31
English
The English major by focuses primarily on the written word and introduces students to the importance of genre and to the variety of intellectual traditions through which literary works may be analyzed.
English majors also complete a Business Studies major or minor (BSM). A major in English designates that a student has been trained to read and write with proficiency.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
In addition to learning about literary form and theory, students will consider how literary works reflect and shape categories of “otherness” (such as race, ethnicity, and gender) and circulate within structures
of power in an increasingly globalized and diverse world. The English major includes a creative writing component that mirrors the production courses in the Media and Culture major. This requirement
ensures a deeper understanding of the literary genres that students will encounter and a greater mastery of the expressive potential of language.
CAREER OPTIONS
The English major prepares students for any career that requires excellence in oral and written communication, such as publishing, non-profits, the media industry, journalism, copywriting, editing, or
business writing. It also provides a solid foundation for graduate work in law, education, or literature. The employer market for English majors is endless.
CURRICULUM
The English major is designed to ground students in methods, philosophies, and practices of literary and cultural studies. The major is ideal for students who wish to refine their ability to
write and communicate effectively via the written word, images, and/or video and those interested in careers in editing, publishing, and communications. Courses in literary genres and
traditions, creative writing, cinema studies, cultural analysis, and creative production give students both hands-on experience and theoretical principles.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
EMS 200
Introduction to Literature, Film, and Media
EMS 201
Introduction to Cultural Studies
LIT 260, 262, 330, 333, 337, 365, 367, 370, 380,394, CIN 376 or CIN 377
LIT 310, 311, 312, 313, 314 or COM 328
English Related Elective *
English Related Elective *
English Related Elective *
English Related Elective *
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in English and Media Studies requires the successful completion of 4 approved
courses. In the following 4 concentrations:
Literature and Cinema
Communication
Creative Writing
Media and Culture
* English Related Elective can be fulfilled by any course in English and Media Studies Department
with a CIN, COM, EMS, LIT, or MC designation not otherwise required for the major
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence
Majors/Minors:
Wiley Davi
AAC 091 :: 781.891.2651
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Liz Ledoux
LIN 034 781.891.2961
32
in a modern language. Most students do so by completing an
Intermediate II course. You must meet with the Chair of Modern
Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your required
coursework.
Global Studies
In today’s global economy, change is fast paced and constant. College graduates must understand a broad range of cultural perspectives and economic issues to achieve personal and professional
success.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
The Global Studies major at Bentley provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the technology-driven globalization process with a focus on commercial, economic and social
interactions. Through Bentley's global studies program, the only such program in the nation with a required business minor, students gain an understanding of global cultures combined with
business skills, proficiency in modern language, and a required study abroad experience. Majors graduate with strong critical thinking skills, practical experiences and business skills that
translate into successful careers.
CAREER OPTIONS
Employers seek college graduates who can understand and evaluate the impact of economic and cultural events. Bentley's Global Studies major prepares students for careers with an
international dimension, including service with federal government agencies, international agencies, trade and professional organizations, the media, and private nonprofit organizations.
Global Studies is also a suitable major for law school preparation.
Global studies majors can combine a minor in business studies with major electives in international management, marketing, law or finance to create a program of study with a focus in
international business. Academically-qualified global studies students are encouraged to consider applying for the five-year BA/MBA program.
CURRICULUM*
Global Studies is an interdisciplinary arts and sciences major that focuses on contemporary international issues. The curriculum consists of eight courses. In addition, majors must complete a
business studies minor or business studies major, demonstrate oral proficiency in a modern language, and engage in an approved international experience.
Because many international problems contain complex economic components, the Global Studies major includes a strong orientation toward economics. The emphasis on economics is
consistent with Bentley’s mission, which identifies economics as part of an essential framework for analyzing and understanding business.
Students have the option of selecting from several career tracks within the Global Studies major: international business, government and international relations, and international aspects of
business communication.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
GLS 101
GLS 110-119
GLS 200 or above
GLS 200 or above
GLS Elective
GLS Elective
GLS Elective
EC Elective ____ EC Course (choose one: EC 311, 315, 321, 331, 333)
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in Global studies requires the successful completion of 4 approved courses.
Participation in a short term, semester, or summer international study experience is
strongly encouraged.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
* The Modern Language requirement is an important part of the GLS
Majors/Minors:
Joni Seager
MOR 204 :: 781.891.3151
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Joel Deichmann
MOR 208 781.891.2745
33
program. Students selecting French or Spanish must complete at least one
course at the 300 level. Students selecting other languages must complete
the intermediate sequence and are encouraged to take additional courses
if possible. All students should see the ML Department Chair to plan their
program of language studies.
Health Studies
The Health Studies major is an innovative program that integrates the Natural and Applied Sciences health and psychology curricula with our core programs in business. With this degree, you will
have a strong foundation in the laboratory sciences, as well as the flexibility to tailor your studies to a specific area of interest, such as policy, psychology, biotechnology, and global or
environmental health.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Health Studies students will enhance their health and psychological literacy and its application in business and personal decision. Students will also attain a solid basis for understanding the
determinants of human health and disease through active and problem-based learning. Students will be prepared to help individuals and organizations acquire, convert or translate scientific,
psychological and business perspectives into more effective healthcare delivery.
CAREER OPTIONS
Health Studies will prepare students for a wide variety of careers in professions related to or affected by human health, including health services, health care policy, health care management,
health information technology, health information management, biotechnology, public health and human resources. It will provide students with a solid basis for understanding the
determinants of human health and disease and how the institutions deliver or support health care function.
In the United States, the healthcare industry is big business, with annual expenditures of over two trillion dollars a year. Health also has a major impact on the productivity and profitability of
a multitude of companies worldwide. The career path for graduates of this program is very promising. Possibilities include becoming an analyst for a pharmaceutical related company,
managing within a medical or health maintenance organization, working in quality assurance, coordinating medical education and public outreach programs, developing health care
information technology, advocating for a medical association, producing media or electronic health education resources or researching public health matters for federal, state, regional or
local governments.
CURRICULUM*
Health Studies will be paired with the Business Studies Major or Minor. Please note that students must take either a Business Studies Major or Minor. Students may take a total of no more
than 30 credits in a business discipline.
Students will be able to integrate and apply scientific knowledge across multidisciplinary business/arts and sciences curricula and gain understanding of systems, institutions and/or
enterprises that provide and/or support health care.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
NASC 110 Human Biology or NASC 112 Honors
NASE 315 Health and Disease in Today’s World
PS 340
Health Psychology
Health/Psychology Elective
Health/Psychology Elective
Health/Psychology Elective
Health/Psychology Elective
NASE 415 Research in Natural & Applied Sciences or NASE 421 Internship
in Natural & Applied Sciences
Health Studies Tracks
Students may declare a health studies tracks from the list below.
Health Policy
Health Psychology
Biotechnology
Environmental Health
General Health Studies
*Students interested in Health Information Technology and Health Information Management are encouraged to
take courses focusing on those topics as offered by the CIS and IPM departments to satisfy two electives of the
Business Studies Major
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors/Minors:
Rick Oches
JEN 100C 781.891.2937
Career Services:
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
34
in a modern language. Most students do so by completing an
Intermediate II course. You must meet with the Chair of Modern
Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your required
coursework.
History
The study of history allows us to develop a broad range of knowledge and skills. It expands our understanding of other cultures and, in illuminating the ways that societies have dealt with
environmental and social challenges, allows us to see our own culture in perspective.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Studying history cultivates skills in critical thinking, analysis of data and communication. Today's top corporate employers increasingly seek well-rounded graduates with a strong grounding in
the liberal arts. Studying history will allow you to expand your point of view and approach professional challenges in broad global context.
Through the history major, students may participate in broadly based and globally oriented study through a concentration of American, European, Asian, Latin American/Caribbean, or a
thematic area in history. Professors encourage critical and analytical thinking, as well as reading, writing, and technology skills. By majoring in history and pursuing a business minor, students
can benefit from Bentley's integrated curriculum. Likewise, business majors can deepen their understanding of a particular region or thematic interest with a minor in history.
CAREER OPTIONS
The history major is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop a concentration in one region or theme in history as part of a broadly based, globally-oriented major. The
history major will equip students with the knowledge and skills required for either graduate study or direct entry into the world of work.
CURRICULUM*
The history major consists of 8 courses beyond those required for the General Education Core. These include:

Four 3-credit courses in your major field of concentration (American, European, Asian, Latin American, or a thematic concentration)

at least one 3-credit course outside your major field of concentration

at least one 3-credit course in a non-Western history

History 402, history seminar
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
HI _____
Concentration course
HI _____
Concentration course
HI 3____ Concentration course
HI 3____ Concentration course
HI _____
Course outside of your concentration
HI _____
Course in a non-Western history
HI _____
HI 402
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in History requires the successful completion of 4 approved courses* to
constitute one of the following tracks: History of the Americas; European History
(Regional Concentration); History of Warfare; Economic History; Asian History
*Note: History courses for the minor cannot include the general education required
history course.
* Note: History majors must complete a business studies major or minor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Marc Stern
AAC 127 :: 781.891.2814
Minors: Bridie Andrews
AAC 113 :: 781.891.2424
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Marc Stern
AAC 127 :: 781.891.2814
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence in a modern
35
language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate II course. You must meet
with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your
required coursework.
Liberal Arts
In addition to arts and sciences majors in media and culture, history, global studies, and philosophy, a general major in liberal arts is available to students who wish to design:
1. A single concentration in disciplines such as economics, English, government, mathematical sciences, modern languages, natural sciences, and behavioral sciences; or
2. An interdisciplinary concentration in areas such as communication, environmental sciences, gender studies, interpersonal and social relations, and legal studies.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
A major in Liberal Arts provides students with strong oral and written communication skills, analytical problem solving skills, technical abilities and business knowledge. Students also become
exposed to different points of views and lifestyles, have a well-rounded background, and gain skills in being flexible and adaptable. These are all skills that employers in today’s marketplace
look for as they hire new employees.
CAREER OPTIONS
Liberal Arts students have jobs/careers in every industry imaginable. That is one of the most appealing qualities and one of the scariest things about majoring in Liberal Arts. They are CEO’s
of companies. They are graphic designers. They are investment bankers on Wall Street. They are working for non-profit organizations. These individuals, meaning YOU, are sought out by
employers because of their extensive portfolio of skills, as outlined above.
CURRICULUM*
Students have the opportunity to pursue a Liberal Arts major with a concentration. A single concentration consists of thirty credits in only one arts and sciences area, to be designed with and
authorized by faculty advisors. Single concentrations are available in behavioral sciences, government, economics, mathematical sciences, and natural sciences. There are specific guidelines
and regulations concerning the development of your arts and sciences concentration or major. Consult the Department Chair.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: David Curley
AAC 235 :: 781.891.3496
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence in a modern
36
language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate II course. You must meet
with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your
required coursework.
Media and Culture
The Bentley English and Media Studies department houses the Media & Culture major and offers the same wide range of courses – literature, film, creative writing, communication and expository
writing – that can be found at major liberal arts colleges. However, Bentley Media & Culture majors also gain practical business knowledge and experience.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Designed to prepare students for a career in media industries, the English and Media Studies department's media and culture major combines creative arts with business and information
technology. Students in the major take hands-on media production courses that focus on contemporary media, as well as classes that emphasize theory, analytical thinking and critical
reading skills, and the study of important literary, filmic, digital and other cultural texts in historical contexts.
CAREER OPTIONS
The media and culture major addresses the need for creative and business professionals to gain an understanding of the past, present and future of media forms and contents. Unlike media
studies programs at other institutions, this program requires a business minor and culminates in a media-related internship or capstone project.
The career options in the media industry are practically limitless. Today’s media-intensive world needs people with dual skills in creativity and business. The media and culture major at
Bentley prepares students to enter fields that require both creative and business skills.
Possible careers include: Advertising Executive, Art Director, Art Department Coordinator, Cinematographer, Client Executive, Conference Organizer, Development/Event Management,
Director, Editor, Events Organizer, Executive Producer, Film Distribution, Sales Agent, Finance Account Executive, First Assistant Director, Journalist, Marketing Professional, Marketing and
Publicity Manager, Music Agent, Music Producer, Operations Professional, Production Designer, Production Event Coordinator, Production Manager, Production Accountant, Public Relations
Professional, Researcher, Script Writer.
CURRICULUM*
Students in the major take hands-on courses focused on contemporary media alongside a choice from courses offered in the English and Media Studies department that develop analytical
and critical reading skills, as well as knowledge of important literary and cultural texts in an historical context. In the hands-on courses, multiple dimensions of creativity are emphasized,
practiced, and developed to support and reinforce theoretical principles presented in academic courses. Media and Culture majors must complete a business studies major or minor.
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
EMS 200
Introduction to Literature, Film and Media
_____
EMS 201, MC 200, CIN 375, or CIN 379
MC 220
Introduction to Media Production
MC ____ MC course (choose one: MC 222, MC 224, MC 320, MC 321, MC 322, MC 323)
_____
MC 222, 224, 321, 322, or 323
_____
MC-related elective*
_____
MC-related elective*
_____
MC-related elective*
_____
MC-related elective*
* A MC-related elective is any course in the English department with a CIN, COM, EMS, MC or LIT designation
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Liz Ledoux
LIN 34 :: 781.891.2961
Career Services: Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Internships: Liz Ledoux
LIN 34 :: 781.891.2961
37
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence in a modern
language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate II course. You must meet
with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your
required coursework.
Philosophy
In business and everywhere else in your life, you will make choices that help determine how you live and who you are. Studying philosophy at Bentley will help you develop the ability to make
these choices.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Philosophy is the study of some of the most fundamental questions faced by humanity, questions such as: What is truth? What is beauty? Do we know anything other than the contents of
our own consciousness? What is the nature of reality? Can we prove that God exists? Which actions are morally right and which are morally wrong? Does life have a meaning?
The application of philosophy to business is emphasized in Bentley's nationally recognized program in business ethics. Philosophy students at Bentley can take several different courses in
business ethics, and can participate in other activities the center sponsors. The center provides a unique setting for thinking through the practical business implications of ethical reasoning.
Studying philosophy at Bentley will help you develop the ability to make choices that help to determine how you live and who you are. As a philosophy student at Bentley, you'll learn to think
clearly and critically, to identify and respond to divergent viewpoints, to analyze the moral dimensions of complex situations, and to reason effectively to solve problems.
Bentley places an emphasis on the liberal arts that distinguishes the school from other business programs around the country. While Bentley offers traditional philosophy courses, we also
offer philosophy courses with a business slant. For instance, International Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, Philosophy of Work, and Ethical Issues in Banking and Finance are
among the more than 25 courses within the department's curriculum. Because Bentley is a business school, if you choose philosophy as your major, you'll also have ample opportunity to take
business courses through the mandatory business minor. You may choose to add an additional minor in a number of business disciplines, such as management, marketing, economics or
finance. You can gain a distinct competitive advantage in the job market by combining skills in critical thinking with in-depth exposure to the challenges and practice of business.
CAREER OPTIONS
The problem-solving and critical thinking skills you learn as a philosophy major are highly valued by employers, especially in the growing number of jobs where you are expected to learn as
you go and tackle projects that go beyond your specific training.
All philosophy majors at Bentley can graduate with additional competencies in business and information technology by pursuing a minor in business or enrolling in Bentley's Five-Year
BA/MBA program. The combination of in-depth exposure to business and training in philosophy also provides an excellent foundation for graduate-level training in law and business.
Philosophy students go on to serve as managers, ethics and compliance officers, lawyers, and executives within both government and nonprofit organizations.
CURRICULUM*
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
PH 111 or 305
PH 215 or 216
PH 251, 311 or 313
PH 252 or 253
PH ____
PH ____
PH ____
PH ____
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
A minor in Philosophy requires the successful completion of 4 approved courses beyond
PH 101.
Logic Requirement
Ancient & Medieval OR Modern Philosophy
Ethics Requirement
Theories of Knowledge OR Theories of Reality
PH Elective
PH elective
PH elective
PH elective
*Please note that philosophy majors must complete a business studies major or minor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors/Minors:
Jeff Moriarty
AAC 115 :: 781.891.2085
Career Services:
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence in a modern
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
38
language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate II course. You must meet
with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your
required coursework.
Public Policy
Bentley is the first university in Massachusetts to offer a public policy undergraduate major. The Bentley Public Policy major will help students to integrate a foundation in business principles, a
deep understanding of public policy, traditional liberal arts goals, methodological rigor, and practical experience in order to think creatively on how to address complex societal problems.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
The study of public policy is directed toward analysis and understanding of how problems are identified and placed on the public agenda, how policies are formulated and decisions are made,
and how decisions are implemented and formally evaluated. The realm of public policy encompasses virtually all aspects of contemporary life – including housing, transportation, urban
development, environment, public health policy, national security, foreign aid and international policy, among many other domains.
A public policy curriculum includes exposure to multiple disciplinary fields, including political science, geography, sociology, psychology, economics, law and statistics. The study of public
policy is distinct from political science, economics, and sociology by emphasizing the application of theory to practice and the goal of improving conditions in society; at the same time, its
distinctive feature is the core involvement of governments and governance at all levels from local to global. Thus this major is conceptualized as a multidisciplinary major, grounded by and
housed in the Global Studies department, an arrangement that reflects the global reach of public policy concerns as well as the central significance of governmental study.
A Bachelors of Arts in Public Policy is designed to provide undergraduate students the theoretical perspective, analytical skill, and substantive knowledge needed to make a difference in
complex domestic and global public problems of today. Together with the general education core and a foundation in business studies, a B.A. in thinking, problem-solving and technical
abilities to infuse a strong ethical foundation for decision-making, and to foster informed citizenship.
CAREER OPTIONS
A Public Policy undergraduate major will expand post-graduation opportunities for Bentley undergraduates: it is a logical gateway to MPP/MPA programs, doctoral studies, public sector work
of various kinds, or employment in the ‘government relations’ divisions of private companies. Nationwide, the demand for training in public affairs and public policy is on the increase.
Some of those with a bachelor’s degree in political science or public policy may find entry-level jobs as research assistants or analysts. Many will also find positions outside of politics and policy in
fields such as business and law.
CURRICULUM*
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
GLS 101
GLS 230
GLS 405
GLS ____1
GLS ____1
Elective____ 2
Elective____2
Elective ____2
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
1. Two courses from the following on domestic or global policy: GLS 205, 225, 226,
234, 243, 312, 316.
2. See advisor for complete list of Electives
Globalization
Politics in Public Policy
Seminar in Government
Policy or Political Institutions Elective
Policy or Political Institutions Elective
* Please note that philosophy majors must complete a business studies major or minor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors/Minors:
Jeff Gulati
MOR 182 :: 781.891.3177
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225:: 781.891.2375
Internships: Joel Deichmann
MOR 208:: 781.891.2745
39
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence
in a modern language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate
II course. You must meet with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss
your language proficiency and your required coursework.
Spanish Studies
Spanish Studies with a minor in business studies directly speaks to Bentley University's commitment to ensure its graduates are fully prepared for success in an increasingly
connected and globalizing world. The Spanish Studies major prepares students for living and working anywhere through their appreciation of the need for local sensitivity and
global relevance.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
The Spanish Studies major is constructed so that students acquire knowledge of multiple cultures and histories in the Spanish-speaking world. It is designed to be
interdisciplinary in content and specific in its objectives of honing Spanish language skills and cultural sensibility, thereby offering undergraduates a comprehensive
understanding of the similarities and differences that define the Spanish-speaking world, as well as exposing them to the importance of locality in building a framework for
critically examining the complex challenges of globalization.
The Spanish Studies curriculum combines the strong language skills with a profound understanding of the Spanish speaking world from multiple perspectives- history,
contemporary socio-political issues, culture of place and peoples-with a business foundation.
CAREER OPTIONS
The Spanish Studies majors syntheses Spanish and business skills, through a unique curriculum that integrates language, culture, history, and contemporary affairs of the Spanish
speaking world with general business skills that will expand career opportunities for students targeting an international career.
The combination of classroom and on-site learning is an essential feature of our program that prepares students for immediate entry in careers where such specialized skills and
knowledge are valued. We foresee our students benefiting from the wide range of employment opportunities, here and abroad, in which Spanish competency is highly valued,
including international business, tourism, healthcare, law, IT, and journalism.
CURRICULUM*
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Track I (Non-native speakers)
MLSP 202
Intermediate Spanish II
MLSP 203
Adv. Grammar & Composition
MLSP 300-lvl
MLSP 300-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
Non-MLSP
Thematic
Non-MLSP
Thematic
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Track II (Native speakers)
MLSP 305
Translation Course
MLSP 300-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
MLSP 400-lvl
Non-MLSP
Thematic
Non-MLSP
Thematic
*Applied learning experience required. Please note that Spanish Studies majors must complete a
business studies major or minor.
*Applied learning experience required. Please note that Spanish Studies majors must complete a business
studies major or minor.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Majors: Jane Griffin
MOR 382 :: 781.891.3187
Majors: Christian Rubio
MOR 127 :: 781.891.2694
Majors: Maritsa Melendez
MOR 329 :: 781.891.2437
40
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
Sustainability Sciences
Sustainability Science is an innovative degree program that integrates Bentley’s strengths in Earth and environmental sciences with its core programs in business to prepare students for careers in a
global economy where companies are increasingly motivated to reduce costs and improve efficiencies related to water resources, energy consumption, waste generation and disposal, natural
resource acquisition, and plan effectively for future climate change and other environmental challenges.
PORTFOLIO OF SKILLS
Sustainability Science will prepare students to analyze the impacts on, interactions with, and limitations of Earth’s environmental systems related to societal and business activities, and to act as
business and community leaders in ways that are sustainable in terms of environmental, economic and societal considerations. Students will have a strong foundation in laboratory sciences, field
experience in environmental science, and a capstone project or internship in which they apply their knowledge to an original research project or an approved workplace-based internship.
The Sustainability Science major has four broad learning goals
1. Enhance environmental science literacy and its application in business and personal decision making.
2. Promote active- and problem-based learning in Earth and environmental sciences by incorporating the use of field and laboratory technology.
3. Improve creative problem-solving and critical thinking skills.
4. Integrate and apply scientific knowledge across students’ multidisciplinary liberal arts & sciences + business curriculum.
CAREER OPTIONS
With a growing commitment to environmentally sustainable business development, there will be increased demand for employees with knowledge and skills in both the science and businesses of
sustainability to develop, implement, and manage environmentally sustainable practices for existing and future businesses in our increasingly technologically driven economy.
Efforts go far beyond “green marketing” and reputation management, which had been the emphasis in the past. Present and future sustainability planning by the responding companies emphasize
the reduction of energy use, water consumption, waste generation, emissions, mitigating climate change risk, responding to regulatory constraints, and leveraging sustainability to reach new
customers and markets.
CURRICULUM*
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
NASC 122
Environmental Chemistry
NASE 364
Science of Sustainability
NASE 380
Science in Environmental Policy
NASE
Field Experience
Elective____
Sustainability
Elective____
Sustainability
Elective____
Sustainability
NASE 415 or
Research in Natural & Applied Sciences
421
Internship in Natural & Applied Sciences
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
1. Two courses from the following on domestic or global policy: GLS 205, 225, 226,
234, 243, 312, 316.
2. See advisor for complete list of Electives
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT:
Major/Internships:
Rick Oches
JEN 100C :: 781.891.2937
Career Services:
Career Services Center
LAC 225 :: 781.891.2375
41
* Bachelor of Arts students must demonstrate intermediate competence in a modern
language. Most students do so by completing an Intermediate II course. You must meet
with the Chair of Modern Languages to discuss your language proficiency and your
required coursework.
Resources
Parts of this Majors Guide were adapted from and taken from the following sources:
University of Tennessee
US Labor of Statistics
www.careers-in-business.com
Career Services Office
Departmental Guides/ resources
http://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/sales-representative

Please note: The Major Selection Guide is a packet designed to provide general information on the different majors offered at
Bentley. For in-depth exploration of different majors, please seek the counsel of the department and the career services office.
42
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