UJIRSHIUGTOn, D.,[. noIEu

advertisement
VOL. HLII
UJIRSHIUGTOn, D.,[.
noIEu
BER, 1943
riO. 11
2/e'mY's a,&o or
Brother Marshall Leavitt of T>. . No. 124
ras been
*,,bittedin rvialn, /r.ms by others of ou,
memhership. Mr. leavitt says that the po.,
as here pated wan recently recited in its entirety at a union gotherisg, by Brother t. U.
electrician in Kansas Cit! in
Ly,'elyn, o ldest
point of union msmberahip. Brother Lern'
,ommittedit to memonrg at the time it was
pr~inted in I.e Et"CMICAL Woxkyas' JOtiaNAt
4ome
40 tyears ag.
sends us the ftllowiug poem whih
AT THE GOLDEN GATE
St. Peter stood guard at the golden gate
With solemn mien and heart sedate.
A shrewd figure came and stood
Beside St Peter so great and good.
"Oh thou who guardeat the gate," said he.
"I have come hither beseeching thee,
To let me enter the heavenly land
And play a harp In the angel band.
"Of me. St. Peter, there is no doubt,
There is nothing in heaven to bar me out;
I've been to servies twice a week
And almost always I rise and speak.
'I've told the sinners about the day
When they'd repent fron their evil way.
talked
to
I've talked to them loud ed I've
them long,
For my lungs are good and my voice is strong.
"You see I've always been content to live
On what the conipies agreed to give.
I've never grumbled, T'e never struck
Ive never mixed with union truck.
"Hlere s a compsay's letter of recommend,
Which I hope you'll read before you send
For the angel guide to the throne of grace
It might gain for mn a higher place.
"And I ought to have a large reward
For never owning a union card,
S.o open, St. Peter, and let me in
Out of this world of sorrow and sin."
I'lve heard of you and your gift of gaba
You're what is known on ear;h as a scab,"
Thereupon he rose to his stature tall
And pressed a button upon the wail,
And he said to the imp who answered the bell,
Eacort this fellow around to hell."
But say even the devil couldn't stand tho
meell
Of a cooking scab on a griddle in hell!
"It would caus a revolt, a strike. I know,
If I send you down to the imps below.
r
on earth and tell
Go back to you master
That They don't even want a scab in hell'"
TAi. q""p came to us a faw years back. It's
etU good&
CURRENT COMMENT
A woman in a drugstore looking at an
electric shaver asks the clerk, "Now will
this work an AD and BC current?"'
CHARLSS MAUNSELL,
L. U. No. 316
WHEN THE "OLD TIMER" LEARNED)
TO CLIMB
They didn't use safety belts, when the "ld
timer" learned to climb.
They didn't strap themselvesto poles they
couldn't take the time.
They carried the crass-arms up the poles and
lagged them in the gain.
The wires they carried up also, and burried
down again.
They didn't tarry on a pole when they hung
on, with one heel.
They dug the holes and raised the poles and
while resting bucked the reel.
Grnts didn't loaf
around the poles just to
send material up.
The lineman cheerfully did all that when"old
tinmer" was a pup.
They never heard of splicing sleeves and
gadgets we think nice.
They took the old connectors in hand and
served a Western Union splice.
The spurs they used were the western typr
that strapped outside the shin
rubber
for goods; they
They didnt go mnih
trusted to skill to win.
They slng the praise of the good old days,
when life was most sublime.
But we know there were no "good old days"
when "old tiner" learned to climb.
E. L. HAPPEN,
L. U. No. 77.
*
*
*
Linen,,,, Lonnie of I.. fl. No. r*oe sent Is
this reflection on Election Day several yars
ago. TV, 'na bmlsh it lp and apply it aprin
Pay no heed to ballyhoo
But help, Lthe nb who have helped you,
And so this fall. let's vote our thanks.,
friends of Labor's ranks.
To the proven
THE SERVICE STAR
Cv/wa
Brother 0. Gardner, press seretrary /or
L. U. No. 34R, Calgay, Alta., Canada, sent us.
theofollnig son, "The Alask. Highway." It
i a parody on one entitled "Working on the
Railway.," whibh tnan.y
n.
our members probably know.
THE ALASKA HIGHWAY
In nineteen hundred and forty-ore,
The Alaska Highway was begun,
The Alaska Highway was hegan,
The great Alaska Highway.
Chores:
Patal - sats - ori - a,
patal - atsi - or - a,
- a,
ti -o
Patsi
Working on the highway.
Tn nineteen hunireu
I found myself with
I found myself with
Working on the
and forty-two,
nothing to do,
aothing to do,
highway.
In nineteen hundred and forty-three,
The overseer said to me,
The overseer said to ae,
Go work upon the highway.
In nineteen hundred and forty-four,
My hands were red and my feet were sore,
My hands were red and mly feet were sore,
Working on the highway.
In nineteen hundred and fortyfve,
I found myself more dead than olive,
I found myself mnre dead than alive,
Working on the highway.
In nineteen hundred and forty-six.
I jumped upon some dynamite sticks.,
I jumped upon some dynamite sticks,
Laying beside the highway,
Tn nineteen hundred and forty-seven,
I found myself on the way to heaven,
I found myself on the way to heaven,
Working on the highway.
In nineteen hundred and forty-eight,
I found myself at the pearly gate,
I found myself at the pearly gate,
Working on the highway.
A symbol oT the prestL hlue,
o'field
white,
Engraved on red-edged
It stands for warriors bravo and true,
Who gave their utmost in the fight!
In nineteen hundred and forty-uin,
I got my harp ard my wings divine,
I got my harp ard my wings divine,
Working on the highway.
A symbol of thye purest gold,
Engraved on rededged field of white,
It stands for heroic feats untold
By those who gave all in the fightt
In nlneteen hundred and forty-ton,
If you like this song I'll sing it again,
If you like this song I'1I sing it again,
Working nn the highway.
And[ Father Time In our hearts shall
In golden letters all their sacrifies
Their precious lives lost for a cause so
Forever in mankind's memory shall
engrave
spell,
brave
dwell!
A Bit o' Luck,
ADS CLICK,
L. U. No. a.
Where, oh where, are all the folks
Who used to send us clever jokes?
"Lnnhie" and "fDuke" and "Sleepy Steve'
And others from whom we did receive
Poesi and quips and other joys.
So cone, nn now how's about It, bnys?
0j4Jhx4
o'4At.
Otfaf
InTEnnRTIlnnH
ELECTRICAL WORKERS
nd OPERATORS
PUBLISHED MONTHLY
Q.M Aaq",aia
,e4 dda
Frontispiece-Ihdustry
1~200 4294
teen4 Si., AV.
Ownership vs. Control of Manpower
Slowly A. T. & T. Tolls Are Whittled D)own
A. F. of L. Sees Economic Changes in United States
Brown's Broadcast Cements South American Friendship
Cartels Are Super-Governments Rulirg Trade
L. U. 110 Maintains Fine Apprentice Program
-
-
_
397
398
400
401
. 402
403
406
_ 408
409
421
424
426
429
1. E.E. W. Dominates Electric Utility Field
-
Woman's Work
Correspondence
-
Official Business
-
-
II Memoriam
Death Claims Paid
-
Official Receipts
396
-
Formulae Developed for Estimating Labor on Jobs
Inspectors See Value of Maintenance Work Brotherhood Votes to Aid Military Membership
Necessity for Proposed Assessment
-
389
390
391
392
394
395
The Yanks Are Coming, East, West, South, North
Editorials
t" 5, Lb. e.
Page
386
387
The Second Front
Local Union Sees Research Basis for Planning If We Don't Plan, Unemployment Inevitable
*4/ .
-
....
* This Journal will .... t hI held responsible or iews expressed by correspondents.
Tho first of each montL is the dosing date; all elp3 must he in our honds on or before.
Chato
We are always glad to hear. frotn
o)lr members oln the firing line. A
V-nail letter ha recently come froII.
anmhembe of L. 1L Nt. 226, George E.
from sote Sout h Pacifitc
iplan,
place ting flwII, I
writes us
he is in charge of the electrical work
o, this island nl bas
I
all, membeas
of the BrothrIhood under his directio.
All of ther
ate zealous for the
halrtt,
welfare of the union ill fatU,'e years.
Alldrew
J.
"Amog
labo, can
Icitt-rnaitkrpna] tprel, i
1201 ]5th Sr., S. n..
'l. E~iW ARY, A. thOL,
IVIign
5 T. (
bllternullioy'al
TrifisLhlr.
VW
. A
souIth Sixth Ae., MI. Vern...
VICI',
PlRESIIMENTS
First Diztrklt
E.
rhlrk
Disttric
It
WILLAM Di W l.ER
...... 102. Iity
prll{,
n
Bld.I. 121 N rtrh
Rroad St , P'hiamlelphia 7. Pa.
];earth Di Iistrict
Rltgo 15 T17,
N.H.(
Fifth Ttistrict
(Hi W iodward
Sixth Diitrict
1301 LEnk Sh.,i
ATU, I]
Ilhl,
t..NNE.I
14, (hit
Ch.(Itllnd
C. X. BaTtKE
{IrII. l. a-IiimghII . Ala
M .1. IoyI
Dl'm I hiawo 13, III
Tdvtl
Ditliet
!
W.
L, INGaM,
11641 [,,ightoril St.i f
Eighth District
511 Deliver Ihbllre
Wiortlh4, TIe,
II W. lKI,
lidgif
...
r.. .I 2, (,)oI
NOith J)istrict
J4 S'OTl ~]iINt;
910( f(etlral Tu.er,. SLL F.ra'.cisco 3 Calio
S10
a.uth WVells St.i Il,,I.
oI.. f hI
. III
1;oi
N. y.
the sthimulatig voice and infuenee of the labor press- sta r.d high.
U'nhmn papers, pubIishld by and for
(FIAJa RS .1l. N'AIY-,EN.
i'h b. ......
isttrsit
F. L,
K,.r,
95 BeatoL St., }lyrh PIlki 3$1.Mss
Ihird Disitrict
WiiA~lllJA C( I;TI
21014 5 Laix & linire Blbci.
Fourth District
' },. pRati2iD
St , N. E, Wiishingba 21 ). C,
Fifih District
DlN MAlNIN.;
1:1mm
No, Wells St. O'hiciilg, C, T1].
Si xh Dist ridt
I. W T ,LA(:,
Ž025 2id
lCdtI'mtoite ArparnhltrnlI
S evertLb
istrijet
arid
the
th
len.
Call
atrousIl
wotrki-s' awareness
ef the u1nremitting ailll ever-ifitreasilgticed
forp irodut-thti
for
more
snti
production until the final great
day of the Axis' uner.mlitional surrIfrr.
TI seemIlclS
...iy
to add thatI
the labr presshasI...
g ben doing it
4!!37 W, (uyle, Ave,, (Chiam,41. Ill.
first Dlistrict
IIAR¥ VAN AnIIS.A...,II.
130I E. 25th St., New York II), N Y.
S'egold
s
mole
G0 7
INTERNATIONAL
EXECUTIVECOUNtIL
.'r,I;,E
R. R. 3, [,IIio
(
t,
Canada
See ri.dI litrict
Jo."N J. RIAN
lira. 239. Park SI.Lu.,r BLr. l
Bostint
lIIIa
11O[AN.
special
SIIIghlt,
anri tmaintain
Ititertiiitio iil Secretary I; M . [i (,1iAZ T.
I-h
S201St., N. W- Washin.rgt on 5, D. (
iler,
the coti hirhulhios wh ih
matke,II
these cays
df
uibOd men
EXEC LTIVE OFFICERS
hien
sistaIt to vice 'hra
oIItin
if the lahor
production oilice, V'PH. has this to say
about the labor pess:
1Vaglhh,
(:1II
211fGue..rrero St. San
Ir:drhmh Ilistriet
.J
~.h --'.L iii ~
1
tlOn 5. I)
(
fime job i, that dihection.
"But the laor press and the o,gla...at cns fol which it speaks ]ansi
he eVeir nore}zeabout in irdei that our
c(untry
may ie ablh Io meet the in(](!iug
dernan&- forl tlal',itioT.s. ma.11
nl~
terial and eqlp.enl.nt which the quick(tIllig tempo lmd theexjIaidiing scope
or the fight aguimct irut ",ne
,ie,rake
Illie vit.al every day.
S 4. P4otH N
3rnlio
2. (Ilfii
L MOlI
T~lpe
(hi
(over
phlItgrnlph,
can 'ur flontispiece
ibis
iil
,cr- hc .... tr
I-S- of tlhe It. S. ItMiea- of Re.lania-
386
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalots
INDUSTRY. THE SECONlD FRONT, HAS ALWAYS HAD ASPECTS OF THEI fATTLE LINE
THE JOURNAL OF
ELECTRICAL WORHERS And
OPERATORS
OFFICIAL PUDLICATIO
aM
rt
Wn ,4o
VO)L. XLMI
^
RANGE
-Alen
at Work'
yThis fain is vritten Inage a1hove
the poliies and activities of the
War Mi..n..power CoTimission. This agency
ha. been in operation for mire than a
year Ind has failed to nnly ze the labor
supply question honestly ai.d fully, and
IDilia
s
has failed to bring forth policies tiat fit
into the factual picture of available
workers inl this c.untry. Sch uniskiiled
performance is destinedd to brine disaster
upon the handling of ranpowe
a r
1d grief
to the labo
.mo
een
in the United
States.
Hey nleans of a series of bludering
elforts the War Mlanlpower (oul mission
has finally adopted policies that look very
much like coercive and dictatmIal eontro]
of the working force in this country. It
is true that there is a labo managment
..advisory committee at the top levwl but
there is no i..licatibn that labor's advice
has ever been taken. It is true hlso that
In ..r .. anage.n/. t committees are supposed to ,pe ate at the regional and diis
triet levels of the national structure of
the Wur Manpower Comm ission, hut except for two or three cities, there is little
evidunce
that Ia .o.s
D. ce a
the
ellunsels.
op leadership of the War Man-
power{ o..mmissionl headed by Lawrence
A. Apple, a former
bi
ortant oji industry ~xerutjv e, goes
.
strongly for eooig administrative activities and
usually all that labor -n.anagenent groups
have is a veto after' the fact.
'AUL McNUTT BIEADS ('M MISSION
The War Manpower Corm
ission
is
headed by Paul V. MeNutt, former gove-nor
of Ih..diaa.
Whether M,. MeNtitt
does any more than act Ilon the policies
created by the Coinmission, ev ilence iS
not cler. Mr. McN1utt certainly does not
strike one as in adminstrative control of
his agency. Then too, the Army, through
its rep.res
etatives on the War Manpower
('on.mision, appear.s to have inrpe than
its
OF
.Cta.
NENTOA
I-Ll
I
~
V ,,
clt~
RTEHO bHOF ELECTRICAL W0RIAtRS
1
A~ .ptnc
.. ,
-
. rd 4, .i.
m
d
v1
"rO
4
.,
ri
WASH INBnTON. I). C.. NOVEMBER. 1943
OwneAhq2 aSe
The
I
weighted influence on policies.
Only recently there was a hitter battle
behind the scenes in Washington between
the administrative group in the War Man-
eMaNPWE
4 MANPOWER
Government
policies on manpower moving toward head-on crash
against labor's main interests
NO. It
None of these things tok Pa.. in this
country. The War Manpower Coamission
has by a series of edicts and mandates
virtually set up a National Service Act
without any safeguards for labor save for
the specious and
tenuous
attachnment of
labor - ianageruet
committees sute
whe,, along the administrative line.
Three outstanding policies of the Wan
Manpower CoInl issbio
drive directly
against labors vesteId interests ,i
Trspect
to
1. appienticmship training
2. wage strueture
3. job control.
Without the contr.l of apprenticeship
Production Division. headed by doseph 1}.
training, without the preservation of the
50-year-old wage strutuet
and withea
job control. the labor union passes from
the senei. as nItbiig, mlore than a wrkingtanIs club or Iraternity.
Keelan
APPFENTICE TRtA IN ING
[O....
(C
.ml.issin
Production Board.
and groups In the War
including the Labor
Al, order issued by Bawrence
Appley promulgating a new administra-
tive plia would havevirtually elinated
the Labor Production Division of the War
P rod.u ction Boar-d fior.a y control or
infltenIe oni m,,anpower problems in the
shipyards and airplane factories il California and the West. That tangle was
resolved by an order by Jame Byrnes,.
stahbiliatio
director.
Mr, Byrnes institutded .
o-ca ole
dt BllufTad
'an on tile
California roast. The Buffalo plan is a
pln. instituting priorities Oil labor, pretty
rn"ci,as priorities were placed in materias in the early stages of the
,ar.The
Buiffah
Idlall sets up a priorities co"mittee which places labor in any givei industry on a weekly priority list and
coIntol~s the ingress of wokers inPto re
speaetive ndustles on an essentinlity
basis,
CRISIS P'ROMPTEI) BY
ANTI-LARIBORTES
The ;j,,s,,ti
tcris/s
isS toth i[/ no. .th,,e
¢ I
thlo
of . lo,g
seriesof ?i.neutel.trflagn
w hich /abor belien
trc,
prompted tot by war eme yealey bil by
the anyliay
adil
sio, to get
When the
Army
,t
of
rlti-labor peo pie hi the
r (.. mis,odb'lof the labor ferc',
War Manpower Comissio'
the IIIr ManwIe
wag allthrizod it was done in lieu of :1
National Service Act. Labor opposed the
National Service Act on the ground that
labor was patriotic and could handle the
manpowr question on a voluntary basis.
Gr-eat Britain had a National Service
Act. but Gloeat Dritain had aninvasion
to goaud peoipe to prompt action., It also
had built the labor movement into the top
ranking positions of the government.
Apprenticeship taininjg now ill eftet
is under the Fedecral Committee oI Aiprenticeship. The federal apprenticeship
service was set up by in act of ( Oigrles.
It functioned originally in the U. S. Labo
Department ,id thin vas transferred 1o
the War Manpower Commission, It is I
going concern, operating effectively z...
with full coojeiati,
of labor unins., It
is staffed by about 200 feld melt who aid
hl'al joint lnbornanageinent cotmaiitto
to function in the Ipprenticeship trainiig
field. Neatly all of these staff members
are former
,o o.n 1n. ohers. When the
President transferred the Federal Co..
mittee on Apprenticeship to the Wa
Manpower (o...iss.ii,
.
he nad"e
d
n exception and plaed in his executive ordr
the decree that the federal apprenticeship sei-eie 'should n-main an organizational entity."
Labor unionists took this toIne
thJt
the integrity if this service as it developed over the last,
decade should remain intact and shold not be broken
down by the administrators of the War
Manpower
But
Bommissio.,
this last fear
has mateializd. Administrator Appley
has continuously .oved to get control of
the Apprentiee T'raining Service aT.dIha
recently sought to take over the right if
appointing fiel men and in allocating
funds-two functions of the federal alIprentice.hip service that W. I_, Patterson
says are .ssen.iali,
and fundamenwlly
a part of the or anization set up,
WAGE ST'RtUTURF
The wage structure laboriously
up by collective b.rgaining in this
built
,uIl
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
the Atlantic Chantc, and the clains it
infalibi] ity of the State Departnleit. this
great nation, whose r.. volutionary
.
clfLion kindled the minds and hearts of the
masses in Europe at the end of the eigh.
teenth century with the ideal.
,f .i..'s
le.not'...tic f-et'dom. and rekindled them
toward the end of the last -ar. has at
this mreat j uneule iF history
.alas.
nath.
lag really to say to them.
"The
masssof Eulrope have hrcon
distrustful of us
"Not one Am~rtill in ten tihlusar,
probably realizes it bul this youtlhfi
tpubu lic, 'Iei"
the ¢o;mmm man
, is fill
the backbone of the nation . is eornll U r
represent to the mass of the peoples of
the outside wojrd
a sterile and black
reaction, frightened to death of the great
popular forces which this ,ar-like all
world wvars-has unleashed, insisting
only that the haff-starved, brutalized peopie 0f the continent maintain 'law and
order,' and prepared to .o ilo almost any
lengths, prepared to tramffi with a miserable little Italian king or his reactionary
henchman. Badogila. or the fascist Franico
as it once trafficked with a Petsin, a
D~arlan, Peyrolton, to
avoid revolt' or
'tro ble.'
WORLD LEAlDERSlHIP'
PAUl, V. MeNUTT
Is he aloilnS
a100
r;ent Job on
mnalpowei,
CLASH OVER AI'PRENTICESHIP
TRAINING
(lashes between bibor and the War
Manpower Conmission. have already been
apparent in the field of federal apIprenLi.eship training. That clash is imnliien,
over both the incentive plan and the con.
trol of the indivduaI workerl by the ne,
L. S Employment Service. This is a
serious situatin.
Labor expresses itself r essimisti:ally
ahout this situation i
erever it .. eets.
Labor takes the position it is part of the
black reaction that is enveloping this
country. Labor believes there is a ,,elIformulated, strategic plan influencing the
W.*ar ManLaowe. C .. L.isson ill the ditwcJOR CONTROL
tioa of anti -labor poities. Labor believes
also that the President of the United
The thirl traditional right of labor has
tdowith, job contrlt.
A labor union L; States is tot aware of how this stiategic
plan is deliberat
ely
at work to afIront
a job control agency, traditionally so.
labor, and labor belieyesa
thatthisstrategic
Many strikes have resulted from inplan is only a part of a general plan on
fiingceant of the powers of the hining
a wider basin to move. democratic U1rited
hall. The United States Emnphlynlenl
States
nearer
to ftscism than to
Service, when it xas operating under the
fi ILoa
.e.
y.
Social Security lba]d. duly recognized
EUROPEANS HAVE JOST
this traditional Inthority of the labor
FAITH IN US
anion over job Ip..or..ent. The War ManLabor heard re,,ntly a statement by
power Comnission has been incl..Id to
William L. Shimre,
author of "Berlik
ignore or
to
openly affront this tight.
Diary,'' for
striy ijaltirths b oaldcaster
The War Manpower Commission has
Berlin, who warned this country
placed this machinery in the control of from
that the United States is beginning t.
another youtng mianItrea. the oil industry,
blse all of its former influence with the
Albert L. Nickelson. Mr Nickerson lImlirds and hearts of the masses nlJt,
Emliape.
lieves that the
individual worker exists
Mr. Shirer sai[:
for the state and has not recognizel
"Despite all the brave wards of the
President, the glitterinig generalities of
labor's traditional right to job pont Ili.
try has developed over a period of 50
'ears. It has been built lar'gely on hourly
and day rates. Traditionally, organized
labor has opposed piece rates on the
grounds that any system of piece rtes
becomes unintelligible to a working man,
and the woiking man as a ,esult can
Lever figure what is possibly due him, for..
his service. The WXlr Manpower Co.nmisson has moved against this waite
structure now by appointing eon.ittees
to get what they call incentive waste
plans acceptld. When incentive wage
plans are analyzed, they appear to be
nothing more than piece and speed tilt
systems of the old Bedaux variety,
THRUST fPPN IS
"At the moment when the fate of history has thrust world leadership uip.on u.s
(whether Colonel McCormick and the
rest of us like it or not), We Larat in oul
foreign afraIs like
fossil, dead to
change or to progress.'
Ruben
Levin
, writing
in
LABOR,
leading Washingtoil weekily, organ of the
railroad unions, recalls that one of the
reasons that th,.re is a stringecy of
manpower in this country is due to th.
oversized army that has been
developed
against labor's advice to the govern ment,
Mr. Levin says:
Manpower
sontinue!
to be about Itle
,wessiest probtie, facing adr.ia sitraifn
officials in Washington. The clamor fo,
mor, w'orkers has risen to a din and
drastic moves are il the making to
dredge up enough men and wo..nn. to
meet the den.ands.
Between no.. and next
dl
uly at beasi
,t600.,000Q
re tolers
mt ithe fblnnl
officials deciared. T1no million,t- ale
quired to
replace
men
going
into
he
a rmed forces end 1.600fl000 to ke,' 1, lrot
ductinn up to goals,
Schedules call for boosting onutput ,f
var supplies to 700 per cent ibove the
levels of November, 1941. War agencies
said only a 593 per ten t advance
,a~
been scored so far.
LIBOR WAS RIG;r
Paul V. McNutt, chief of the \Vat- Mv,
power Commission, contended -cccoj Ny
that the only way to reach the quotas
will be to foIrce several millition workers
out of n nn-essential
i ndusties
in
war plants, vital eivilian occupations
and transportation. Eil declared.. Jo, thail
employment inretaiil trade wilf have to
be stripped to 1940 figures.
fcontirued on Lagc 418}
NOVEMOER,
1943
383
iSlou 4*4.
HT
.&T .LETl
4t. WHITTLED
HE latest in the lone list of redluuiotI.S in telephone tolls whieh
welh
ordered by the New York Public
Sevicie ((.mn.is.ion
oi September 2,
194;, will ... stilt ill estin aoted sa[vigs or
approxim.ately $2,200,000 annually in tlhe
I itriastate rates If the N,, i Y.o..k TLhphone Cor,,lap.Y At the sae
time the
(oninzs~k]n arnlil uonIced changes in the i,trustate toll ultes of ilidel'rtndtnt Cin-.
patlies givJr g hong-distacel
srvice by
connection with the New York Telephoriu
Cronpany
atuuranting to $128.000 an
Itually.
These zeidttctiolns
er eorth,
red h, the
Public Service
,
ommission l oder to
eluiminate So.l.e of the ditte
ie...'.snow
existing bethwoel
i tratstate lind inteistate rates for the same distaLnces, and
are in line with the Federal Conumneatilns Ce..... isshion
policy or bring ing
Ill intristat, ates in line with the existin rates of the Boll sy sten.
AMERI(C
N PEOPILE
EAR BRUNT
On April 20. 1943, the hIdins Public
Service C
ommission snli the Iludiana Bell
Telephonm Company, ann ltbor subsidiary
of A. T. & T., anunolunced that as aI e
"lit of confeli.ac.s, rerilductins in certain
ttlephltne
tts would
..
be
ut into effect May l. which would result in total
savings
t,
subscribers
estii ated at
$175,000 a Near
Theste retidoufls were
also in the hag-rlstance rates. These arto nly the
latest esults of tile effrts of
the FCC aIu.. the various si t( coliitssoais to ,rdtl(!e the
charges which the
A. T. & T. hae, been cle.tbtig rojn thte
Ae rican pteople. The grcat profits which
this nonoipoly has been
realping at the,
expense
of th, Aniercan peop h, were discussed in in earlier series of articles in
th(e JOUIINAL.
In 1934 (Coltes passed the tomnninaleri...s Act trarisferring the rgulatory
juris dictioni of all comni. .mications ft(I-on
the
Irtleus tate
toni meace (Jlon iniission ta)
the Federl
(tInn.ti..ieations
(pa lmission. The Act graIlted to tho cofl0issiorI
poler tt) investigate the various ctnl
parileS con~trolling the. l.n.......
icatio r$,
systems and instructedtthe ./.n.ssion
[o report th
rst, i of ILs. iavestiga.
tions to Ce¥g es As a reslIta of the nlifolrl
yshin of accounts
whiih the
cnllnisstio
orereid the Varhns
,:((nlt,ni.ations rorttiuni-s to adopt, it becanl.
possible foi the tilst tinn, to rnake ae,,orate coin I
aiisltnbetwteen
aruOth opt
elating ttltiyanlies Iatld tO nliT
at holiest estiinate
of thl
profits they wt'
nottling.
A study of IhI' t'ports If the Federal
(om.ianunIIatiaa
Commisioll inveitig, ,
tions into the' lie''
s iystem
ala(ttiolos re.
v~Ils the fat tihit sinee these it,, etiga-
reductions of tlht M
lun taut St[ars Telephone and Telerrplph Company, the $178,000 reduced rate! of the Northwestern
iell Company, id th.e reduction by the
Pacific Tehlphone and Telegrapb CoILpany, the total ann Un savirngs would be
.. ueh
~5ui
State commissions
under leadership of Federal
Government attempt to recover profits for public
tiun's ,ic- instituted, substantial ate reductiens have b-en effcted in evreIy yeat
since 196. Thie following tthid ation lists
the anmount of rLte redctbions by years
frio< 1986 to 1948:
Rate Rtedtctions by Years
..
.. $3:5.000,000
.......
- - ___
22.000,000
1940
I -,500,000
4.000,000
1938 .....
---- 1
4,500,000
t937
22,000,000
1936
--- - ....
__
24,000,000
1941
The list totals $125,000000, These figrares do not includh reductionls ordered by
the State Public Servbice Co missions
such as those discussed at the beginning
of this artide but are only rductions
In aftts which were made by the An.eri carn Telephone
s.
id TelegaLph
larent
eompany. If the table we'e expatdedi
to include all of the rate rdluetiols in
itr'astate rate'
which were ngotiated
as a coollary to the red uctions made by
the parent ompally such as thy $250,000
,ut initiated by ihe New Engla rid Telephone and Telegraph Company, $:,16.500
shown
greater
than the
$125,000,000
inthe table.
"WE'RE PATRIOTI('"
Invariably wln, of o
this, an Ihotilceatflets of toll reductions
is trade the telephone co. pan heads. when
.
( i n.ilnig
the (stablishnent of the new rate,- de
cOaute that the redu'diotis ire un waltranted
hut that they Ife actepted bcatlse the
company does itot wish to diverit its !fforts from serving the public to fightilg
th, 'ommishl¥1s.
Forin
in anunotcng the $2,200,000 a v'al iedldtion
in New York state rates. John W, Hubbell.
president of the New York Telephone
Company, stated that thie Ied uetios were
tilwarranted utll that they were being
accepted because the company could not
divert any of its effort or its technica
staff fro
imnportant wrll jobs ill order
to continue ara tr ton tOro v
In like nlarlner. Wiltber F. Giff rtd, piesidenit of A. T. & T., il omnmenting on the
agreement between A. T. & T. and the
Ffudeial
CI Inr...nications
Co0n ission
which ended thte tat ease which resulted
in a $35.000000
edLuction to the public
for Iong-dstance telephone calls inl i94d
stated:
"The extraorinary
volumen of long
distaunce business Indl the overlawtded con
ditions of thie lng-liu's plant have isuited, in all ptobahility only temporaIily,
in a ate of eal'ltbigS fot the long-lines
department of the coL.ipany wlhil
is in
excessof
the avelage for the Beldl teh.
phoe system as a whoIe,.
'4The long liins department intes are
rulder the excl usive Jur sdicti .r. of the
ocootllnatd Ot ...
l.. ]I4)
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
390
4.
#o/CR.
Sea ECONOMIC
There is a complete analys, of the
Wagner-Murray-Dingell Bill showing the
need and easons for the int]odtiction of
someial security C.as..i.. The
hi
ltpojl says:
ded Sl
CHANGES , ,
d i
1It 1 .. .et.tiiOi .. fletsa l thR s con
yeal of our paI.tiipation in World
War' U drais to a close, while for
Europe the fifth year of "ar began Sellternbee 1. While the American ountlios
that most
have thus far been ,pared
of our
grilling ordeal of war, bombing
cI hrove
eitjes and civilian populations
with ail other nations experienc'ed the
nutg
tiler aind women
saceride (If oura y
as well as the discipline that cones from
,ubordlmating personal choice and coin fort
to cO....o.n need and dangerl. Necessities
of war already are controlling our habits
of life and work with each continued
will assume greater
month of war
propo ii ...il.
WORTH EVERY SAt RIFICE
"We inl the labor movement have been
oclose to the happenings to hSbor in
countries ruled by dictators that we know
the preservation of personal freedom is
worth every sacrifice that war demands.
The Unted States has been mobilizing
its resources without reservation, and
realizing that global war necessitates
inenalIllaal cooperation and pooling of
resources, we have stood solidly behind
the President of the United States and
isresponsible assistants for the winning of this war,.l While we are devoted
n
as our way of life, we
to trade unioni
owe a prior allegiance to our country
which assures us an oppirtinity fodemocratic way of life.
Executive officials of the American
Federation of Labor have Continued to
O[II I$ STATION.
BOS[ON, WEIER
Executive council
report is document which all
American citizens could read
with profit
give majpt
eons idation to those prob-
lems of war goveqrnnlent which vitally
concerned labor It.d inl connection with
which we were rquipped to make an especial eontmibutin of experience and in
formation. We believe progress has been
made in the mlminiistration of war pro-
duction on which we report. As to the
the COnitstt'ation,
war manalpower ad
operati)n of labor has not yet been fully
recognized aid accepted as essential to
the program.
In addition to loepeots on our relations
to war adIlnbstratiuzi 'Te submit a record
of efforts to unify the labor movement
and to meet internal labor difficulties.
"With all the difficulties of a complex
situation, however, it is our responsibility
to keep the faith and honestly maintain
principles cf democracy for war in order
to have them fot' pcace'"
SOUND DOCUMENT
With this stirring introduction the Executive Couneil of the American Federation of Labor launches its report for
1943. For a period of many years this
report has been one of the soundest docuissued by ay organizationl in
ments
America. This year the report is of
special interest.
MAJORITY OF A, Fr OF L, DKrOGATES ARRIVED
" tidet the stress of wIr needs. for
bhefirst imn in our history there a e
jobs for all able to work, anid oulr national
incotrse has reached a new high of $140.
4tofoodm0r00. The citizens of this detnteracvy ill not be patient with ess ifter
In xaL. We shall insist upon jobs for
all. WI kcow also that no tuain stittu
Cu n is perfect, so there wvil he eh,
usulting in loss of jobs a n.I
gnemtie
~
interference with individual workers
e
JireiTl. ta,
ings,
temporarily
or per
manently. While we have jobs we want
to be able to invest iN instranee to
Under
provid, against the emergencies.
Security Act all
Siesent
Socia
the
workers cannot carry insuran-Ce for in
come aifter retirement at 65 or fur
pendrents at the time of their death, and
for ineome during limited unempioyilent
It is the right of all citizens to h""'
.. Ii
opp)oJrtllity to invest in retir'ese..t
sa ranee or to provide for their depelldents
ill case of their death, This ,pportunitY
is just as much needed by agricultural
wkers and by nmaIl busins
a.d..I
workers who
lless operators as by the
niw enjoy this protectioli. It is essenltihd
to that dignity of living which aeotitThe insulance
panies self-dependene,.
benefits paid should be adequate to roM ataint the self dependence which the per
earn, d noring the years when hr was
.Irk,"
able to
DRIFT TOWARD FASCISM
One of the astounding indications of the
drift toward fascism in the United States
is a list of the anti-labor bills introduced
in the United States Congress. The nun>
ber is 61.
The report points out:
"When this war ends the return of the
filliies in the armed forces and the
adJustnent of industry from a war to a
consumer basis will create an unemploy
nent problem never previously kimown."
A sharp attack is leveled against the
acts enacted by state legislatures Crippiing labor. The counnil rightly points
out that the "wave of anti-labor propa
ganda ill the daily press assumed dangerouIs proportions it, the past year."
There is a strong section on the need
apprenticeship training
ued
foy contin
under peace-time standards. The Harvard
trIde union policy plan is supported
The mismanagement of the war man
poae, program by the War Manpower
Comamission is excoriated. The Internation Labor Office is given continued
support. Price control and rationuig are
discussed. The plans of the Amerilan
(noaLieued oil
Iage4281
NOVEMBER, 1943
Mt1
'IAjtuolocer: This is Santiag., Chile,
speaking, ad}I transcribing our ~]eciaJ
greeting to the workers
of the United
States y the Mut ual Ne work.
Three fo.....ost }adilrs of organized
labt.
of the UniteI
States of NotLh
Ai..n. a ha,
hbavp b
on a tour of Voarious
American" reptd±.s. They are the first
,eglatiowi to lt
IIIsentlth
unaitd inteAgSt Of hIlat l "f thei eoIi. try in lvelno{
g aBc <
aI aqlutao
n
,,I
..nt I
sianding willt the ptIrtpi,
of the /ller
A nwib tTn rep ublicSJ liia SI la 'otz' ...
1
ir ,
ter-Aller'icall (&i(}leItinhI
They tie( he~t'
ill ( dile aSk I111g'cstof thel C(u ftd r:l, ti..I
of Chilean W, oe!,
whose leatdel, Ir
iiasdoi Jbann~, W£s hit.in.eif a gutst of the
IT. S. labor moe ment lamt sba
pin.
Ou..
United Stat's. labor
teklation is coI
lItIsl iof Ed,,itld J. Br wnt, presidenl of
the hNlernatiol] [.rotherhood of Ilectrcal W\rkels. wlho was appointed to 1h'
derfiation hy William (ieel, prekL$!t
of the Anerican FealeratioI of Labor:
David J. M'Donald. seUietalyireaauteI
of the
nited Steel Wnokers. who was
dcsiginated by ]'rbsiuin. Philip Murray
of lip' C ongr']s of 1,/duistiial Organ..za
tit~ms;and
.S.auel
Phillips, vice presidentIt
the ]llthehal
df
loocoimotiv
Firemen
...
Ti.d
i.ie..e.
tdh. wag askd
to s rve as i mijn blhr of Lti, d*IekIt;ati
by
javki
Ro, ltrtst.., priasilde't of thal
th, Raiload UJ
,a
t ioit.
Messrs.
el)i~nJiris(,
Executivte'
...
(ileelh
\l1111ty
t,
f j
j{P]-js dtlt [
t(}
Assoeia
anld R~ohertson
vIt'V[]Ls
Vi to iv
Luh....
nintittI'e and they are directly
,epcsetiteld hel, by M, McDonald, M,.
hoig In, and M.. Phillips,
respectively.
Hvi
mll{he studio, in Santiago are
;......
MIA lod tt) ..... '.l.tlItiVet s of V. S.
labor an, ofdcials of IIhe Chilean Confedg'ration of
Worke', headed hy its
presileint
lernim
Io lba, ez.
O..t first
speaker will lIe S,. lian'z. who will ad
drhs, you pfollptly in Spardsh a.d whost}
addtlress w~ill Le iimmed. Iiately tranislat l..d
[]ow
pi)est/1 I
r.
A&aw4
A4aadcad CEMENTS
South Atneaicn FRIENDSHIP
American delegation
to sister republics heard inl
United States. Friendly poliey
stated
tiht tLLUs hf jtii ie ..l.d IdIer[ 3 ired aey
, ill be.
he, th ,y iIUh
to1i) [ti p I it, I
S tates, th' lo'sL ]I/Litiilettls of ih, dt
Amit of th, worli'it
(.laiss itt Chile Iw
mi le clos 'ly the ir fuateijugl
hila thi lls
a Iddesire tif ooI
... le] ign with hIeworkers of North Amgrkca. ThbouhI
these
reilre: ntalivet, I salu e la better futu.r
If. the Aii.t'.Iwos ati t] world.d"
I now priesnt
idwirId B-twi'g. whig
I{ ep...... 0, [lie A i
eritanF niedt,irgi
of
Labor.
.11I.
t/Ite 2I
: lla¥ hi g
I t-th ll, t hi
it, Chile
fto} ,ore that, a wek. I have had ail oD
pIr.u.i.ty Ic observe something of the
1
oii it izcd a tI d unorganiz, ed ty.iglIt
of
('hit. As I
representative
of thl Arie,iconI Fedratin
of labor ald pIrsident
of the Jnter-atinnal l'othm'hood i f l~lec
triel WXurkers, ] have been jnt''tcl
ill
the efforts naali by the (hilea,,
workers
iat
titIeir wary of life, while at
thl,
sai
...
gu
. Ie
t cib liai g II
tIle w a r
Ith
In visit
a tiienld
Ip(ople. sati'iftc if;l i
Idiouing so that
all forems of diwtatlaslhg. f
ascism,itoz
ism, and Jatiat-ism will li, h,:±t11is d f mlil
Lhe earth,
South Aneric;t
gid Ngorth Amli'i,;i.
havilg baen joined together LI the r(eatr, the
tpICs of he Americas shoultd
;dso he,
u.nited jrgJ] Jr
bLh
benefit of
both. "ih ii £tei-e t II{ hieA ngg'riemi F]ed
era~ton o£ Labao
ll
Ig [h wt(,ktil> If ho...
tidle labor. .rga hizat
tets of tine AtneI c'at
republics in not ni . It date, hack to th,
preside~ncy o~f81
S+aelP] u...rs.
pt
WIh kneui
that the iigIrest II tho unietied torkrs
of the United StAtes should riot be iso
lated from those f the
.f githI,
.tbrks
ng the
I'ft trd Natioins,.
ships aTd far....,. I fit
drllnocrlat ic<(Ott n ries,
Oui belief ix that iL a g('r tiite legigi
d ni
.ot..
ttie tvi'd
niiot{ ItDvcamt....
is a byw old of 1Wige l
'acy.
W, ar Vt')
pl.eased to know that the Chilean Confeldi-ali.. of WX.rkers was in the forefront
t'Ii Y,
(If the I llement in this coun.1tr-y to brea k
relatitnship1s with the Axis atd thus (1,able Chiti
LI
' I naort, diret co>tihbu pon to tlhe gi~t. t -rIi tad, gainst
I Lava
ati, IIhp, agi nstuJ,
d
a.n....
. Bilii i]isni.
t[,Iai tmItg d I'l oaso'
411
Jbantz,
Sr. ira fez: (Speech il Span ih.)
A........ e.;: M,. lba,,, has just said
-It is a glent hnoir for ite to greet yot
fton. Chile, whose o-rgi.. zed workers I
represent, inl
1n
,vhOS
,m I salUte yOU.
Ilinfg the last fIw days an [mp[.rtanlt
delMation of organized labor of your
great country has viAtled the insIitiatiobs
of our (onfederlation of Workers in (bile.
inl PHri ipal centers of econ.omi act vi ties
iI oir tounty the coal mines of Lot.
copper' m ines ot RI aiiec ,ag dcl Sa, r
dt'
factories in Santiago }and Vlp)araiso.
Ohi
fi.end.s Idward Br own, of til,
Aelican Federationl
of Labor; David
Mcl)onal d, of lbh Constress of Industrial
Orlzanizations, titl Raliroadman Samuel
PhillipP
are in these mines in Chile, reei vi rg the honla,. t that the workers
of aUa coutanly wish to express to the
12,000,000, organized workers of the
Uaitb.d Stabts whom they rep.es.nt.
They are in this way also paying tribute
to the gigatt i effort that th, people
If the
n.or.th {ie
suathlw
to defeat the
Axis. in their
Aese to izi1 a jiSt rd
p eiitia n{t!]l
](lt- !t~ 1'O l
gld iir'rlp lt s.
Sic(?
Birwn,. m Donald.
..
anit Phillips will It'll
you of the samfiies of our workers for
dig,
Ittt'irel rla ir vgl Pr side tl
wilt,
<otiter
I
aode .L tig.. IepJest... .. a ,es
rt',adj
to
I
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
392
SUPER-
IO"e.a
GOVERNMENTS
HENEVER Anericans
inentofa
bnd'~a;:?
look across
they
see
defnes a cartel as
telnatiornal dictlly
binnation among mnanufaeif (
It fornl
tures by which the ide pendent films
and establishmnitts in a pasrticuia tiade
or process, contract to regulate thenr
output and, in certain cases, their prices.
When two or more industrialists in
different countries agree to exchange
technical information and to restrict the
crcumstances under which the nfo.rn.atilon each gives to the other may be used
and exploited, a "cartel" or "international
contract" is created. The word cartel hIs
acquired a sinister meaning because it
is plain that cartels are bad as a result
of at least three factors:
I1) Restrictions on raw material pro
duction contrary to the public interest.
12) Conditions or restrictions imposed
on the use or exploitation of the infermatrion
(3) A long listory of opprcssion and
exploitation of labor.
I"ak4
Ie
Dual citizenship
basis created with divided
allegiance. Dividends paid during war. New arrangement
seeks labor endorsement
mnet. These transactions were of a global
character before the word global was
commonly used. While the aun, total of
such corporations an individuals was
relatively small, they exerted enormous
power. This power is still increasing.
DUAL-CITIZEN STATUS
The prime motive of the participants
in these deals was transaction of business
and trade. Since 1920, as international
relations of this character became closer,
the carte] managers found themselves
in a position where their paramount
interest lay in the maintenance of the
connectioa. These individinternational
uals, whether they knew it or not, had
entereld into a dual-citizenship status.
For instance, a man might be a citizen
INTERNATIONAL TRADE WARS
of the United States, but simultaneously
Internatonal cartels are the result of
he was a citizen of a small international
community of business men.
the efforts of business men to circumvent
In an article in the September issue of
the estrictions imposed upol trade since
the last war, by nations ill the grip of Harpers Magazine, W. V. Archawski disthe fever of nationalism. They are. ill cusses cartels. As executive director of
the Bank Transatlantique, he has had an
etlect, private, econiroic super-govern.
ments ruling over whole segments of intimate experience with these organizations, The article entitled "Switzeland:
our economy. Originally, these cartels
Foster Mother of Cartels" describes in
were organized ~ithin national boundadetail the efforts of the members of this
ries and, in the event of war, the trust
small international community of business
went to war on the side of its own nation.
During periods of peace great corpotamen, who are members of the director
management of international busibess, to
tions of separate nations fought trade
profit by experience which taught them
wats of their own. One of the most
that there must be at least one "neutral'*
memorable was the fight in the 1920's
spot on the globe where cartels could tI
between the Standard Oil Company and
business in tihte of war. "Switzerland,
the Royal Dutch Shell Oil Company for
adopting a long tradition (of neutrality)
foreign markets and sources of petrle[u.l
to the necessities of the period, proved
BDat in time it was perceived that the
to be tile ideal ground where internaidea that agreement and a high price
investment
tio.afly owned holdings,
were more profitable than a trade war,
funds, patent pools, license agreements,
and price cutting had just as much appli
and multiple contracts grew and proscation internationally as it hall had in
other days inside of national frontiers.
prerd," says Mr, Archawshi. "['he most
International price-fixing agreements bestrenuous efforts were made by cartel
managers in Europe and America. to
came comlon, Gernmany was the headdesign the organization of the cartels
quarters for experiment and discovery
so that, in the v.ent of warn, the colnparticularly in chemistry and metalorgy-,which resulted in the enormous
po.ent parts of each cartel could go oil
expansum of the applied sciences o..vr ia functioning aed be easily .eassembled
when the war was over. Nothing could
period of years. Along with this expan.ere
be more natural than for these mneagers
int.r..atbmIal corporations
sitn.
being set up in Europa with citizens if
to utilize the facilities of a leutral nation
the various nations on the boards of like Switzerland."
directors. Simltaneously a cross-]icens
DIFFICULT TO TRACE CO'URiSE
ing of patents was going on, the jegFor purposes if concea.lent, where
istration of processes and the cutting up
owieslhip of patents, processes and coneternatlional market by agreeof the
celnter of eoopelilles,
Beatiliftl Stockhol,
match
I, e.
aItels
,eaeaped
no'
has
n/aufeelurin.g
tro shoutd not be made public, it has
been possible for such ownership to pass
from one corporation through several
changes of ownership, making it almost
impossible to trace the course from, the
original owners. The article points out
that this has gone on until at the present
time Switz.erland has become an enormous
cartel of interna.tinal interests of all
descriptions, and that the stockholders
of these cor-porations-- American, British,
German, French-Araw dividends from
the world conflagration. This is an internationalism of a sort which the protagonists of cartels do not discuss.
An an example of how this irterie
tionalisin operates. authorizations and
licenses have been granted by cermlans
to Sohiss inustries for the sale to the
British of machine tools without which
certain parts for planes could not have
been manufactured in England. But these
sales were Iiade with the express condition that the British would pay in efined
copper. This illustrates how a neutral
timefor collusion
can be used in war
between belligerents when suih collusion
their
mutual advantage, but for
is to
obvious reasons cannot ocur inl plain
sight.
The international carfel in other w.ords.
is all expression of the effort to escape
from the restraints which political
nationalism imposed upon expanding industry. They represent an effort to
restrict production or parcel it out among
the domains of the great trusts. Of
course, the sponsors of the cartels wanted
to make maney, or. in the ease of the
German cartels, to prepare for war. But
the basic explanmtion of caitels is that
political nationalism prevented the worlwide distribution of the products of the
great industries. and the industrialists
NOVEMBER,
1943
attenpted to defeat ptlitical
by stealth.
m
.t.i..;di.l..
CARTELS ARE DANGEROUS
whigh had a veto power tin American
hritiction udrit
the aitel agi......nt.
d u
Piro~ll
ed 19t110 hinSt or 'In.ost half the
wIrld suipply i9l0;
n
the United States
I"rlt le e d only 5{{O tons, Or 14 p er
cent.
N,;O
tiLgzl`1UTI
t, first p.rodc.d corn
nItleld/{ In [hnhtiled States, adl the
),Ov('icujal Ii qnllanx eglt,.ll..lheftm-
Cartels solve nothing because Iher
purey
e.on.oImic fuInti(ms are te ..ftc,
suboldinated to nati .a..list
i..t.
.
as in the ,ase of (}erin...
. Bc aigise ef
the iat
lhat nulneprotLi Auerin, lsiIit t(I....en
It tpim int
I
(;(if
patents.
heSS nell andil eorl)1[tiors hai heIr
iii
'
I?1
this
reaagln the l)(r/X
n
tlalny
Wais
vowved ii
Jl.
elaies
ith
nry F~lc
llt1
ni Ie,,
lthe
t0i, t'ln,nItthl
tl~i(nt
toInk,ewII8agin,
bt,ll
ii
nih the
(leranini itItlyat y tll
t thiest etqaiona.
(;l'lntriS. AI,('(,LCO
italrd
}lenl
pi
suit
in m1anly istialices. inlved the use and
[ii ftroco Dliw it'', line. Ili,
tit wag
control of attiles and processes vitally
dropped afttei agtiettieiitzl
irBe xvorked
essential tLo ainatuin 'atwar, the altti.. rlust
)rlt ili
l[ lotrJ
12ii&.tI(
I/I
(,ditlet!oi
divisi.n of Inl! DqI2'ttentt o, Jugdee O11t
and farhication A, a I ilt if tis ea !N
during the past two o three
II
[rs
calitrl,
o
fIenay IVs ;be to li p .. .ost
If
edoninvfjgttitni
pxteisive
inlb the
the p
.odiei.n
.f rhis vital meial in that
operati.ns ..f internat ifhlal carels, Thes,
cuntry, and thei [Unit,l Stltes enteled
investigathins bruhght out fats whch
lhe war
ith a critical shitag& in tINs
appeared
.
to e...I.l....I(
the let].ia';tin,'
vital
totalh,,
], . ......
s It Of this
if not ine loYalty, If
Atel,AUIT,,'OS
str~intget eontii)] (If }nvclr~d ign, Ihe g')v.eans. Tfh
itivestigitttiis, res.lt(d(I i] in
i'nInct, through ius Ic'enso plart.
dlictnts
rmi
volath
oif the Shjalaii
potitilbi-~,
Wrls flog[ed to invest $:250(h.Act being blought agminst such conpanies
10(0 in all Off.. t to piodhe the IeeeisIa
as DOpolt.
..
ationl
l.ad
('ltfI.jtmyL
nlagnleghi..
TPhi, was the
,ice
the
Standard Oil. Alunti..un. (n'C{po rtjia of
United States paid
i..
.i.I.
as al
Anmerica
dllI many thems, The Assistant
rtsu 'of the cartel with I. (. Farben.
Attrmney General
t, te' United St,,es
presenetd ..
S.n .tIwal testhinorly in these
IN FAVOR OF lATENT SI STEM
eases and ;leo at hleari
n
s hell by the
Senate Patents C....i. tee cancerm..ln
In eontrast to [he pictue paint..edI hly
the
ThutmanAl ..rl.old( or colltIl, f idipit tes t
elation of irvt i.n
... anld
'y
latiels Io
American fOir eeoi.n. Y. both dfllnstie
inteIrn titinal cartels as a 1alult of shap
ing and eontiIhilz domestic tnld in t er.
and international.ie painted
aI
praer
of p"atents s an ii.ti Ulelnt of i.....stic
atilmal t)1odtctioit and pines i,,el
i]s
distribution, I)I. Lawrence L.ngner, dean
and interntinal business policy
IIher by
of the Ilnited States Patent Bat, presents
economically pI...e.f.l (t'g.anizations
IcasI
i favor of the patent system. IIis
the Unitvd States ind
].oveabroad
,nthesi is thin cartels are intruments of
trolled antl exploited the iatent gI..nt to
,ebdilency
whereby
discveries
public disad.vantageg TII has charged that
and
teahings of fmi,' i}1 sclen ti.s, an.d artiimlt..lationial cartels }.ave
donitlated
1
Sanls [LI{ 5ee[t'ed for u'w it the United
markets at home an abtr.oad, and have
been usId as a weapj.n to cIr at, and
States. He mainmtains that only by such
enforice
a Tkiy of scarcity and to destry lgiepil, etsIt e}ai, we· ]tsure the. i pirta tion
ilto the Uniteud States of such
or discourage indep~endent enterpri se.
inventions
conc eived abroad. i anenc points out
The alti-trust divis.i,
has
presented
that the long list of war products such
case histories which, if accepted at thei
face valt.
betnotistrate that an.y
.eces- as teol'aizne, pilex.ias. cambolny. Bu.,
u~bhr. synthetic totuoh
atebrimt, 161sities of life. basic
tetrials required irl
war and even medical supplies anld drugs,
have beell curtailed irn fdnotion or have
been denied to the A, my, Navy. or
.ubl
i
by unlawful tonti-ol divices.
etalne gLIllgite.
ntagnsium now being
utilized in winning the war wud not
have been awvalable to America if the
far-sighted el teL m.n..gert
had iot
tirlded this information
it of I;<t.n...y
Itllher satellIite powl i
However, in this euTimhetionl it Is peltileln to paot out [hat
hlwaus
e of the
caretels An...rican [1d ue i in of several
of the articles istt, b hr
D, Lanzmner.
particularly l!/agsiunil anlnd Iuna ulihb,.
'was so spy.
ylvrestrited that not til
the government seized all foreign patents
when the Irdted States entered the wa,
was this eturitly able to take full advanrage of ]latnts arid ln"ledze olbtained
by the agX,,e1noit, tinny
wiI
U,doubtedly lihh il resOt Lt ptieti.t..
inll
these alId nOi(1' [iodulcs o, Ieu dlist[int
military advatageg.
ARE CARTEI.S A MENAtCE
TO LAIHOR ?
All ambitious planl has heen l[aullehod in
Lonldon to hitti wrltid industry an c,d
meree after th, war
the ctrol'
of a griant systeni of uterlurq~k~ing cartels.
hich v
eotito
,iuhl
the otpult and u'lce
of both W:.t
l mateials
and n
danwt , Oetl
goods. This ;wopl"l la,
ittl dulllance
extend the p .- -.. a.' S.YStn of cartels to
the broadest ptsshble eXel.t. CItiltla.
tins in the United Stales are searehing
for loopholes iI, the anti-tust laws ,hieh
would })(..'ll.it their
participaton, in this
lan. ALtOA and others have found that
they cal get airound the law by forng
,eW carnpatnies in Canada and doing bhusi
ness with the cartels through these, oinpanics. The allice is headed by Sir
Edgar R. J(o.s. chlajinmn of the international Tin Plate Cartel.
The pIn defends cartels as "essential
to keep productlon equitably allocated
between c..un.ties a id. enD)panies
..
inTt O
with the n.t.xin.uni denand attainable."
The British mmanfaetn..eis who are }interested iI the alliance "do not deny that
it is theoretically possiblie that these
IOjinIhluerl oalt
426)
CARTELS CAUSE SHORTAGES
Wh
enthe United States entired the
war, ser..Iu shortaies of
essential jllteri-Is such as rubher, m'agnesiun,
hm inl
and o.thers ;re
ilisoveredI. Thege
shortagLepSvt wIIaI...
on eartel agreemelits. For exallie, the Aluminutm (Orporation of A....ric-a had enjoyedl ;gleemnerts to pI"elet its. enoh..p.ly
p
,intl
Iol of
the rich llU..l..
m indus.l.y. Magnesiun,
a metal one-thhud lighter than alu mi... ...,
is mltade frI,
sea Wiitel Inl i d l
avail
able ,oes.By virtue or .no.iopol.
agree
nients with the Dol Ilhimnical Cnnllipanv
and 1. B. Palhenildust'ip, the Geimnn
chemical rust AILOA, kept the pric,
of Iagnesium at a lev]el
inbird hinher
thian alumial..n.I...thus p'ielntilig (,ertli
lion between th* t,,,o iii'tal£s.agHesjna]
Was vitally ineded itlile
0
new ald ri'pidly
expanding
ltie
elaft indlstry. Ge","ny,
SWITZEIRLAND)
IS NOW CALLED MOTiE, OF CAT-ELS"OGENEVA I OOKING
LOWARD OLD CITY,
The Journal ot ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
394
2.. V
110
Af4daia
qln APPRENTICE P
INETEEN apprentice eletrliaI wir,men, the first group to finish their
training under the provisions of the
joint apprenticeship agreement of L. U
No. 110, I. B. E. W., of St. Paul, and the
St. Paul Electrica Contractors Associaawarded thei' certilltiob, were recIetly
"ates by Frank G. Musla+ statedirectoe
of apprenticeship.
In spite of wartime complications. including entry of apprentices into the
armed services, L, U. No, i10 las maintaened its apprenticeship program ard
expects to have a sufficient number inrolled to permit coltinuance of its classes
in related trade instruction it St. Pauli
Vocational High School this fall. Guit
Brissman, president of Local 110, who is
also chairman of the joint apprenticeship
committee, points out that thei action
in fostering a continuance of apprenticeship is in line withthe directire to all
locals from Ed J. Brown, international
president.
BIRTH OF SYSTEM
local Union 110 established its apprenticeship system originally in 193f. It
was then known as the Union School in
which it was necessary for youngo mei
leari. ing the electrical wiring trade t.
attend classes in supplementary instruction. Classes were run by the St. Paul
school system and funds for the instrictors were supplied by the union. At that
time there were no written standards
of apprenticeship, and the related instru'ton provided in these classes consisted
of lcture courses and a discussion of genn the job.
.
erat problems encountered
These classes later came under the p'ovisiois of the Smith-Hughes and George
Despite war conditions
trained men are inducted into
skilled roles
Dean Act.s In that way federal and local
school funds became available for payof teachers.
n
the Minnesota VoIuntaly Appreniiceship Law which follows the pattern of
federal apprenticeship standards, wa.
passed April 21, 1939. In the fall of that
year Local Union 1It appointed its nmembers of a joint apprenticeship comittee
which, together with committee uenilhers
appointed by the St. Paul el'etrical
contractor, began a study of trnthing
standards for vremen apprentices,
After more than a year of study and
work by the joint committee, the set of
writtrn slandards which the, developed
received the approval of both Local Union
110, L. B. E. W., and the St, Paul Oeetrical contractors on April 20, 1941 The
Minnesota Apprenticeship Council added
is approval on May 5, 1941- About 40
apprentices were indentured under the
program. including those who were
new
already advanced in their class work and
under the old plan. These
experienc
job
latter were given p.roper credit in heour
to apply on finishing their apprenticeship
iilrier the new joint standards of the in lu st Y.
INDIVID)UAL REQUIREMENTS MET
Last year the joint committee le0t,
texts
nmined to adopt the instructionl
and material of the W.isconsin Schools of
\vcatittrial and Adult Education prepared
for the electrical wiring trade. This is
a supplementatary schonling progta, di,
U
ic.
veloped for a full four-year Ion 's.
hite d trade trabring, a ranged so that the
appre ntice can start in at the point where
bh ,,d s trahiirig and continue to the end
of the couIne. in this way it fits imdividual
equirenments regardless of whether one
eones. into the program with much or no
kriwledre of electrical work. This course
has proved so practical in the apprenticeship class that it is to be offered as a
regular part of the day classes at St. Pauli
Vocational High School.
Now the extension ofIpprunticeship
standards to the electrical shp rep airIlll iS under consideration. nd al delo
rical shop repairmlen in St. Paul have beconme m.embers of ,ocal 110. If this addition to the present program is successfully negotiated, it is believed it will be
the inst time in the history of the trade
indistry that training in both of
and
these branches has heen included under
one joint coremiite..
All) TO NATION
In line with the nation.s manpower
training needs and the best interests of
the electrical trade, the Joint Committee
on A pprlntices hip of Local Union Ilft.
1. B. E. W., and the St. Paul electrical
contractors, plans to continue its work
to prote apprenticeship training standands in that indusivis aciordingz to Conmittee Chairman Gust BRissman. The
committee is composed of six men, three
fronm the union and three fromI manage,niet. The secretary of the eanttee is
August E. Hansen, representing the St.
Paul Ekectrical Contractors' Association.
Consultants to the committee arc:
Frank G. Musala, state director of apprcnticeship; A. C. Taylor, vocational coordinator, St. Paul Vocational High
School; James Roach. instructor of day
school classes and night apprenticeship
supplenentary training classes; and Baldwin P. S.endsetn, field representative, Ap
Service. War Manpowprentice-Trainimn
cr ormmission. Both Mr. Roach and Mr
Svendsen are members of local Union
No. 11i.
('hAIRACTER OF THE ELECTRICAL
TRADE
The electrical trade, unlike some trades,
is mechanical, technical, and professional.
Nierkong the award of he filt cerlflea es n the elIctrical Oralen under the pinneotla
Volunteer App1,nticshtP Law me (Iort to right : GOuit BrigiIan. president F IF No. 110.
and chairman of St Pafel Sl;ctrical Indusiry Joint A pIrenotteshl p Crenrnlttee: RiNme[nd
SI, Piet Eii4
preident
...n Id Ketne.
I unifi n.r Igneic o preseno t y on coem en let:
mittl e Cliorles
Contractors ^Asoeiation: Paul C. qhorr. cmo tructjoni representatve o co
seretary, St paul Elenlrica]
U No 110: AUgUFt C HRnsonn,
teanagerF..
ri-t.fbussnes
of Joinl Apprentcee Commitee: Frank C MtJea,.
and s~ecllr"r
Coantractor<' AMitatlon
, oIII 0YI
rePresente
c1onstrutinni
r~ectior o..a..nentcehip,: I'illItm R Lindlierg.
II'il,
t
I S.I' it,,
P S'-endse . L X 110, fl rld ........ ci'.I. t,, A ,1 ,,1 reni,~Tce-rra
mittee: flalr"
It must draw men who have a natural
in
using tools and it must at the
aptitude
same time attract men who are gifted
enuounh tIo master the intricacies of eletrical science. Training must be given in
the intelligent selecting and handling of
measuring rules and scales; saws. drills,
and taps for various purposes and metals;
ropes aind blocks; and a ],actkal knowledge of the application of levers, gears,.
and pulleys, along with the ability to rig
efliciently for hoisting and ereting eenip,rent and materials, Moreover, mathe
na ties, as in most cra fts and professions,
is basic to full miastery. Ton frequently,
ilie electrical trade is regarded m.erely as
a mechanical art, whereas it is a combioation of tie mechlanical, technical and
professional, for it shades in at the top
engineer
relectrical
ork of the
to t
for
lean
dords
4
No \ial A,,re tilcelsip
hte -icr-)e(T;ast .. t.. o? Indu stry.
the
NOVEMBER, 1943
a9s
Th./ YANKS 44e C omen,
Cad,, */a4d StA'cvdh
rhe
bln,,rd
tyftd
rnr) ,hd
hiind. i,
Oht
tt. f
JDolt II~9,11rr
Il
I ftir>
f'h, t',
jor
x
)!'Ut, .Iihl. l
;rjnto, fh it,
of ki,
Atlol,
Ry THE PHILOSOPHER
",I,
T
HESE
mnlituatirls
statted
tellitlg to the! 'auiitr,
~hile
proil'alin o[t f(or ~lu1.1e i lonth. cal
"I I.ear America Singilg?' Ill, eaptiot
was taken fromi a.leld
by WitWhitrlal
X1II
Walt Whit .. an. is the
'irkes's poet.
He was a rngl'a[ut
carp e tr it1 his ay.
aid sai.g his sortg, lot of the lif, that h,
knew, the lif, of hte, .uhI...I ..
erpee
Strang, I thoughl, that a t[tl
'di,
piroglm
.ould bWsi it, tijlt'il oIna pIoet
tha
ott st ii
;,I
Iu Wits hltuiktd
.
Iti..... It
a k in ,>f hjo h:prtpr1 It oltll?;lL MItlye
this vtts'
.ignifiealt.
I [av1,e the Ait:.i ¢IcIp
feople
a''
CatacIrT
America, the
amalgam of many races, cemented closely by the bonds
of liberty
[is
[h n, hI s b e, a
lip
with
A
or tI' e
Here is wlt
TI .
Dit
' r !,.
. ftA
, '
i,
'i
ring
?h
. . A....: I
ir s ho(rt i*thtd',
ho0.ifd
ii.,ut'*t
Ke
I c K,
pi ,
,tn'orlunit,
r
ittltlO lt
t;IsL
t,
,
t)
~
dO~ pu i.
thu,itj/
p, jrtf blr ,
oP* o,.r,lo.t,#
ANOTUtER PEinIT OV
lt A,
I'. t/ ul , 4s
pro
onb
;
to /I e d. ,,¢
Fu:
x
.
iif,,ltt
A,e
i t(rx Sift
ll
,u,
u
I,
sthht a:
, rh. oIn,~?o
III,
t pp,,
o. ,,~
n/. I
e k r~ti ,rt t r
ti r~
r ,r[;
tj*-u
ft
fith,'
In
AMERICpro A
Aft It, tl t T]he
h'p, l
U,,' i S,tat
]1( , owlll~
to hi, toiet, :Illt] f . ...li I
..~Il... by
It B, Feftw(IL ,f LU
f r'.
Thiis,
uu97
,dard
g
I.i,
y
b
bth
th,
t...
, onop
rit.,(,inta
tse
t fi ct,
h
inll
,;
rirh.
I ,rt /
it llihtli-,
wit
tod
wilh11 hip~,
A et',
e is ]
th'e, If ru itl I'tiicI
it lo-nei
gI uo,h1
1w
l
itl
¥;bi1 htr
, dt
iT againl.
'l';
YANI(KS
'ktE (GOIINC
( r.1ltlt e,! frur,,r t
fightir. our!,'
riobt'
r
riO
i
t~(rr ?r,
gc .~....
.,>
qc]¢$rtg Det-;Ss
IN!...:
I*
urn Jtp[db'u
Il/purrl,
(flit,
.
K
jhttirt*)p~c;
IslfGtt , t frrk4
'.a[1
I,s :Xte II
i
('t
YohRvI
.t
Phd
I
0]" i,
r,,
I It...
. III t Is.rj
,rd
'!ltr
I .. T.. I tI,
Iputr llrt
,1 c I
o
t rues
~ ~o
,
&t,
et'
on,?
bIed sure,ipele
ruhse I the
races
i /[~
AMERRtA IlIMIF OF pAe
h;...
I h,
ratap
7hc,, ) / t'dr .. I, a ti, III,, (u,[
he. [ I.... rI
a lhl
- ,?
nlt tcut~s
y
?;¢h, ft,* r
-uI .hI
'uAppi'.,,"
t I, I ,J , r r or
I 1 e It. rIp
,dh
,
lsM '
rrri,b.
.. I. t.. r
7',
0, ,,dkrp
lp
,t I . I,I n I,
t-;, H/
n
A L i,tr
h..l
!f olIt
TIh
AII ''ri b
7'hr
IA
,.
A SINGS
Whimmn's Iloilo
I.....
iert
/o.ir
... I
-mid:
rl]n
1 i tub
:l~f
"l i,-ro
LISTEN: AMERUI
IthI (;I
m~l
t'hb cd
,ti Ipott
1 lit[ ,
Whiltlmalt
lecalt , WVhihit;.. .
usuu'cleul w pr¥k oitp
loved ~olkerg, adu
hi beliveId forthrightly in (l('m~rac,
Al .. , . ...
rr~
Shor.I td.,I"
A ...
ihr
AI'd "lnfi~ lItbr
I
(h..I
o yt!" P[~ it , k "ot
,I,
all,
I t
ct Igha
ttft .. ~...
I. I
t tott
, tit}I, I ve~I
-
ruin%f/to V re**~,tf-h($
,
irS
Ir
f ut
'T A r, 'u.....
K 11
Thus AnIe.
I,
II9rat
cdout'v
It
Cuvr.a
,u ti .....t arid h ... bors I,, its
itt-at
eey
wpCC race i I, 1hr
o
To
be, se, eIl euj
try to use IIIerace
(>fl~tlI"1I' tinpage4lq1
1
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
396
Reae~,h Aaaa
fr
PLANNING
By M. L. RATCLIFF, L. If. No. 569
[ILL time emplbyrent oler de1etrier
trades blnch
h
workers ill the buidinJg
or inside eletricians is a rar go)al tO
UNl
559 has [lit
Ibu Ini.o.
achieve, h
1¥(1,,'the ll,
the peait aned f'i,,i
the eni ioy ment leIn glant'bg ev
port fromtthe Itc.... ah IeDpartrloat ibl
my latest JOUIRNAL, I canI see where an/d
how our participation has and will be 'f
estimable value not only to Local 5fl,
but to the International Oliice for ILhAir
postwar planning in the southern Cali-
F
Research reports
basis for quick change from
one type of work to another
utilize the power from Boulder Dam. Bebig granted the jurisdiction of Imperial
County, we were success.ful in completing
negotiations with the con tractors for a
closed shop on imperial )am, and also
the rural electrification of the Imperial
Valley and the five subsequnt pnwer
fernin
area,
units that were to be built on the All
Starting back in 11K13 when I was
Americau
Canal. This work kept many of
elected business manager, I saw the umeed our old nmembers employed and hrought
of factual data with which to (equilie us many new ones SO that by July, 19319,
such records and was very luch in ft
when most of this work was completed
yet of the universal work card systenl
aind the early pre-war work was getting
which the International Office asked each
under way we had grown to a local with
o alequir this about 350 mnembers.
I
local union to put into use
data, and I get considerable satisfaction
In August, 1939, the war work took on
in looking over the reports I have sent
real significance, in that Cutup Callhn
in since the start of our ptrosral i I 1933,
was started and our problems really bearid lnoting the changes up to the pre*.c.it
gan in regard to securing members of
time.
the I. B. E. W. to handle this closed
shop job along with several other camp
DUES ON IPERCENTAGE BASIS
jobs, Camp Elliott, Camp Pendleton and
It was quite a problem to get the
Ca..p Loekett, which were being started
members into the swing of the program
in this area. We put out the 'alt for
of making out the work cards until I
union electriciais, and as we did no.
hit upon the idea of paying dues on the
basis of the amount of money earned
by the member. The dues of Local Union
No. 569 are $11.00 per month, and one
per cent of the member', earnings. Therefore, if the member does not work, say in
August, he will only pay the minimum
allowed by the International Office of
$3.00, when he pays his Septenbei due,.
as he pays the August earnings' percentage when paying his September dues, the
percentage being based on the previous
month's wages,
There have been meally arguments from
areawalltmembers who are now in this
Pig a flat rate per month for dues, but
all members who have become ae./uainted
with our system If dues do not want to
go back to the old system,. The percentage
is the big
system of dues collection
factor in getting the COOleratlen of the
members in turning in the worl cards
upon which the pelcentage is computed.
Ihnjow how hlog thest, .[ohs would last,
we worked all viiting brethLer5 oi a
clearance basis, oilless their cards were
fgvL year's old or ....
With Pearl I arebr, and our close
p roximi, ty Ito the wr activities, the defetse work in this :lies
reaill boo.med.
ataptd to increase the size
'bhe Navy
of the marine base, an old institution
in Sant D)ego, more than doubling the
size of the nlaval traininr station, and
taking in almost the entire bay waterfront
Ior the d.1estroyer lase. The naval hospital now occupies nearly ill of Balboa
site,
'ome
Paric (thie former expositio
1,400 acres
By July and August, 1942,
we reached .or peak with approximately
1,1500 non working out of our office, aid
peak continued antil the first of
tOits
1945 when the work in the construction
field began to wiand up and at the pres,ittin, we are working members of No.
569 only in this fiell, and our mew beiship is slightly over 700,
AIRCRAFT EXPANSION
IS 19135, the Consolidated Aircraft d,cided to eave Buffalo, New York, and
selected Sa nDilego as the city with
greatest possibilities for the ailcraft
ield with the result that they now have
One
of
tie largest air'plaii
factories in
the worhl ld ated here. All construetion
]00
tV
work fIr these plaIts was
rent
uiton
and soeni
of
,nh(brs
No.
569 have been employed on this job since
the start of the poject and many of
them have gone to work for the conpalty on maintenance. With the Consobidated Aircraft coming to San Diego,
it was the incentive for otherairplane
factories starti g to exlpand, and we
flow have ohr,, Solar, Ryan. and many
(Coilt,
pnur
OC
E... 41I
GROWTH OF LOCAL NO. 569
In 1933, Local Union No, 569 had shoit
16 members who had survived the lejtression. We started to organize in the coeastruction field andi in 19W4, the San Diego
Exposition was beginning to take shape
and we jumped to over 200 members with
this activity. In 1935. tile fair being con eluded, we had the 1936 fair which tided
us over anaotbh
year,. Tbhn cam
the cI c-
tribeation of San Itfieo hI..k eountry to
WELL EQUIPPED OFFICE OF I, 1. NO 599. SAN Dt)EO. flUSINESS MANAGER RATCLIFF
SElIN AT }Its TDSK
NOYEMBER, 1943
39T
TODAY
our armed forces are fighting
in thentots of oper.ation the worl
Tove. They arc fighting a long, hard,
bhtot habtte so that tomorrow the world
will be a botter' place to live iH. And what
about that tmorrow? Will it bring a
realization of peace and happiness that
those boys who are fighting today are
giving their lives for, or will it bring an
era of i enploy .. er;t and economic,]
hah
that will .onsign our returned heroes to
bIcadlines and apple stands on stret cor
nots? That is a question that cn..
ly
be answered by tho talks who am, l ft
at home and dlepends upo. their ability
to thint ahead and mnake plan s tow that
will prevent a reI.re..ntc of thu aft,math of World War 1.
Ol'gallized laboe is thinking ahead and
has taken a fteward step in the right
directio.
by
appointing
am
'"A nrrel'un
FerI,'ratibm of
labor Postwar Planning
Cuemiltee"' of whch Matthew Woll in
chaI.manla
&.nd the following ary nrobera:
David Dubinsly, Agnes Nestor, John
Childs, George M. Harrison, Richard
Gray,
Q. Lynch, RIOhe, St..e,Qeorge
stroc
and Milton P. Webster
At .heir
equest, John II. G. Pierson, Chh(f of
tht, Pestwru
Diviimon,
eureau
if Labor
Statisties of the U. S. Departlimnt. of
Labor,
has wviitten a significnt
anmphlet
called "Enphlvyrent After the Wa,."
This bookle. prenats in concise and ,p rehen
.iv
Fifn a picture of the Problem
whioh ipostwa, memploymort will
rato
and suggesls plans or pcLeis to be
adopted to I .event this problota fmai
arising or at least to keep it welI in
cheek and eliminate it at the first possible
WORST TIIREAT IN Tui'; WOuIlI)
The worst, threat on the postwa r or*i
zoll is the possible ret
of
i mncasIell-
ployiert sn,[h as existed in the tildies,
A job is a simpl/]e ncessity and many ave
haunted today by th fIalr that this i phe
necessity will be denied then.. BEshb
I9/ We .o'1
PlaMn,
UNEMPLOYMENT
Ynmeuta/de
A. F. of L.
and U. S. Lahor Department
cooperate in painting picture,
when peace arrives. Dismal if
planning fails
Just as some lesions will be affected
more than others by demobilization, so
will its effects on the different industrial
components of our economy differ in intensity. Manufacturing faces the largest
total decline. Contrsted with a war peak
employment around 18 million, a peacetcne level of 13 million is possible under
in munitions n.anaIictue. thoei
will be
expan.sion Ih i olthe lire, sine o/ which
is litely to occur c tlt/ nlatieally aid some
of which cail be ecumgnzld by costrue tive national policies.
wcve, for the
favorable eircuntStances. Gover
first six to iinc
.....lnths Ilmolr
orer s
will be laid off than can be biped in reguhTr lines of worh, no matte, how favorable conditions .a..y
he,,d it appears
inmprobable that the.
eneloy
ment problrem Can be ted .. d.t. simall dimensiona
illess than a year and a half.
UNEVEN DISTRIBUTION
The impact of demohltiiization will not be
distrbuted evenly over he country but
ill affect seine aras, nldustries and
occupatons mole svevly than others. In
some sectio ns of the eonrly
I, lihe Seattle,
Wash., and No `,lk, Va., the nu.n ber of
factory wage e...les has inreased mole
than 2W0 per cent. Naturally such cities
and they are
p'laid throughout the
United States Whever inuse aircraft,
ordnance aId explosive plaitis ar located,
will be hard-hit
hen the fovtqnment
stops bhlying products for War.
nment
em-
ploynent-swenecd to nearly six and a
half million will bear the second great,st reducifii, a cut-back of perhaps two
million. TPanspiortatinn and public utilities are likely to decline slightly, On the
other hand, trade a nd eonstructi.n should
expatnd cosideably and sole increases
should be expected in finallee and services, and agriuleture, whose manpower
the war has cut, will probably absorb a
million workers.
MANIIFACTIURING WILL BE
H AIDI)EST lilT
Theil,OSt speehacular decline in
,anufacturing will be found in the key war
industries. In aircraft production and
sh ipll ih ing the reduction wi Ill be dastic
Another large con traction will occur in
the nianp act ore of iacdnel'y and mac hl. ti...Is ['he ironz, steel, alumhinn , ind
other
metal industries are expected to
declhe.
As far Its ,cd pations are concerned,
Lhousa.nds of wddlers, rivetars, turrt
(Ctollnlallt (11opage 427)
this ditle
connection between his iob
ani his chance efo happiness, the workIer
recognizes that an unoloynietit situa-
titor, pt'luees cihllpetiti..n fr tihe scarce
existing: .iobs that tends to unIderine
baigaining power and wage rates. It will
be in tlc harrier to maintain u ion stn.I-
aids in the demobilizatio,
period if there
is no onrvictio. that the shortage l johs
in indusary at that time is only temporary.
Now
xyhal ale the litespee'US
jFbr
when th, war is ov(r?
At thie Io..e..nt wh.hen peace conics
w.
will probably have 1I million n..
innie
arims. A m..ch larger arned force will he
retained than that which we ha.I in the
pry-war period but it oill be ,afe ino ay
that between eight andinine milli.nl eservicemen wi. shortly be looking for
jobs or goinig hadc to school. Meanw.hil
ott war industries are. bound to release
millions.f working men and women, since
it lakes tine to change back to making
cars and hobses instead of tanks and
(lestroyers. This industrial denobillization
will probably d(isplace six million persons.
The brighter side of the pictue is that
at the same Rinle shrinkage is oaetldeil
DON'T LET THIS HAPPEN TO AMERICA
Wl
all
wks Ag.ecy rhoto
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
390
negoia
uture
Ihe process by whiih all f
tions shall b, onldetesd ad gnvernig the
sips betveel the
ing
basic work
rnt
i
of the I. H.
(los
to e
h
two.
e. s i,, the lectri-opeowe and
E.\WS ...
by sue uc ihtlighi. ndtry
ken agreenents.
in effct cOlitialu'bLh, contract rflunln
ldifid iii the uamnol
41uly, ot; nil ......
mutual
loy
ad,tld thereil. But gri.va.c..
iidd lispultc,
il/cluding iflter)lt'eoiont
lniI iJint uil
of existing
and [> 1}pf....
..
agtllnhts. hI:C] f~irontime to tne,.
.Leon
.,
k
la.
op
DiOet..ss. .ip.l bil..dicpity in disposirl
of such dif ferences a..e essen tial to mai-
tajiting industrial peace. Preferably they
td at the source where they
should
develop, iather thst by a decision hnoled
.. n.
town realona I.o...te spot by peOsn
familiar witblbeloral situation.
Illy
=4
TOWERS CARtYING POWER ACROSS CONTlINN'[NS
2.Et W Ybwnisa4 a
9lchwIcUTILITY Oidd
But if thre is lo possibility of .. o..I
ing a dflicualty di ret.y. some mu chinerv
i,-eviisly agreed ofpn n-must be aaiable to each party as an impartial corut
of ultimat appeal.
tnes, in the settlement of dis.
Pron
..
ptrtes suid grievances is another fundamental tene of good labor relations:; fl
if allowed to rmiahn unadjusted the digaatI
my
furhr
if...menr...
t ull. bt
mode,
cover. finally breaking out with violoa
and unfortunate lostilts.
It is i ...portant. therelafre, that tine
limitations be applied at each sh.ccessive
step in the grievance machinery, in o,-de
that the proceedings nay not drag out
indefinitely,
(Seeo..d ii; a series of airelee il Mlh
private electric atility field.)
AST month we discussed in these pares
the tremendous growth of the private
electric powe.r industry between the
first and second World Wars, We noted
the manner in which the utility company,
the employees who work on its properties
and the comieanity which it serves all
have mrtnal stakes in each other.
We observed briefly sonm of the changes
in economic
structure and internal or-
ganization which have occurred in the inoldding Condustry as a result of the
pany Act of 1935, then turned to an examintwion of the working relationships betweeun an operating electric company and
its employees, as exemplified in a typical
labor agreement.
In the electric power and light industry
the INTERNATIONAL BROT H E R HIOO D OF
ELECTRICAL WORKERS is by far and away
the largest employee organization. The
Brotherhood embraces every phase of the
power industry, from the erection of lines
equipment, through
and installation of
the generation, transmission and distribution of current to the final billing and
crediting of customers.
In addition to its size and its all-e,bracing coverage, the 1. B. E. W,, because of its age (dating back almost to
inception of the industry itself)Col
the
of its long eperience in dealing with labor relations, is also the most stable or
ganization of workers in the electric utility field,
This month we wish to turn our attertion to the roles played in utility employer-employee relationships by three topics
Brotherhood
has long record of good contract relations with great
power systems
.
t
of vital con.ern
.y.ievlabor, namley
arie..machinery, seniority rules aniid upprenticeship t-ilning.
[low has theunion been abl, to imliltWil its recognized position of stability for
well over half a century without sacrifieing its principles or the interests of its
members? Primarily it has been through
the steadfast piursuit of the policy that
tiere are other and better methods of attaining objectives than by resort to midiof
e.onomic
demo
nstrations
tancey,
strength andi violence.
This does not mean that there his been
a lack if shap and acid dis.greement.
between the union and its power.e..pany
eli) ployerns. Far from it. It .. ai. natur.
being as it is, no emplnyernaiployte* relationship, however crdal, is ent irely and
forever free fioul dfiff,.e.ees of ophnion,
It does nlean that the union alid its ln,ployers h}ave, for the must pll', been sti.csssfuI in working out mluLua ly [ict'otable machinery fir hiandling any disputes
Pr grieva nces wbich may arise between
table
thln, by Ihr alhlphln if ,,on'eel
methodsand itrue clletive bargain ig.
UNION AGREEMENT INSURES
AMICABLE RELATIONS
rets
The enibodIi..[t If this proced.l..I
executed
duly
in the uni,,, agreement, a
tehwen
he parties klelie.catJng
cuntract
HOW 1. B. E. W. SETTLES DISPUTES
The L B. E. W. has a wide variety of
pans in effect in the
dispute settlement
ecicrio utility industry. One of the conmmanest forns provides that when a presmed in justice or aOl argument cannot be
solved directly by the worker involved ant
superv.ior,
.
.
immediate
his foreman
then the matter shall be taken up between
the business manager of his local union
(who may or may not be accompanied by
nembers of grievance committee of the
person
(or persons) desiglocal) and a
hated to repr'oent the company.
In the event of continued failure to
resolve the difficulty, the matter may be
referred., upon the request of either party,
to a six-alan ( occasionally two mIllS
board, members being selected in equal
nu, bers by the union and the company.
; fhis board cannot reach a maorilty
decision within the agreed time limit (as
within 10 days or 30 dlays) they must
procedI . le d iateily to select a seventh
ineilber to serve with them.
If, however, the six are. unable to ninteaully aree upon a seventh member withIb10 days, the iss, is automatically ie-
forred ixt the p residents of the I. B. E. W.
and of the compfany, or their designated
represen/tat iyes, whow,,H then seek t, ...
he, natter. Failing to do so
ciliato in
tie
the two must select
violhi a lbsitedtCbo
a thbir, disitemrested member to serve
a three-uia Ifboard of a.rib
with thel ei
t ratkm
if unable to select such third meeber in
t0 days, then he aIllleement provides that
the third moember shall be appointed by
the dire.tor ol conciliation of the U S.
NOVEMBER, 1943
399
Department of trbor, by the chief iL~tic I
Of t e su prenie eouthd of that 1tao. by he
feldenl judge of the IT. S. distlict cuiti't
.uch ITathaving juIiisrlitiorn. or by s....
...aj.rity decikien If ithe
''le
I I...ity.
ll parties.
..
I...aidis iiiial and bimljrtig eirl
RTHY
PRAISEWO
SYSTEM
\A
IFI'RATION
At.nu. ng th ,Ilany Lttilitel Icivin ' :i'lhi
,-ystemcis 1 hitol t aitt- thiese I. L
tr'itiUi
..
e might ..yt'itiTll ;I [&Iv
,tal lines
plyed /Mkbii a giwL
dirlIxc11 t~tLt"
,
h
thcIp..si.io. That
d
off and re' Iilat
f iat IIi
[l
injui't 1ii[~
l11( 'It That ij(i
IT Itl,
Lt, mlloyp[Hi
it hkl 1 t/ lI
M1 NY 'CRIFEMl2E8
RULS
hIIllulA. KL
tiIaii
Mn
il
[
"
I
f, OTt).
IiiVV[l
,/okoLl
si
~
~
Xl)CtatI
...
e
a
ot o nly s uf IeI
loses sec ir it,
f
o ntillue tI~
II\MI<
. ..I
~ )(i Ill~litV
il.'
II~~~~~ltl
~o qe iIi3B
the,
cnlploy,,
~'ueouh
o~IT
pl rd
ult h~kiI
lI'l
la: wffihi
,
taki,
laid
Il
Public Sei'' ic
(%.
Heat. Lih.ht an.. Iater
N)orthen Indianlat
priod
......
zIe .1 I.w.r. yeal,.,..
, i~ Ill[:lh
(
[ndidbma Ill& ,)th'
Northern
Public Sn vice C(. (of Indh/ar
(ary
et
lahi) sttillda 'ds
e tis
iB
r e¥ ial
ijII'(a...
l iDts
"Ir
If~il
[1ll 'ijo
ixwa
ifro. bhil job
.
e c Tls
II oJr
ill-
eCritith.
co tit mll , Ito
SHR " e ioriiy
hsetce. ,ir .o. IIlliteld
hi,
Ile Illilg
'tells;
b 4't% teiI
i
lt e TI tUlUttt
the
o t'ti1.ti
ntI th, fornlation If
4f th, dispute!
tatbiI
rying the
eam
arbitaian bml]v. by
Imm'uciiate supe'
su...essively frolm thk
visLr to the co[ptily's lOCal or elistni(:t
h,;
miantager. then to its division nyanag(ll.
~
Itsop1 r atintg vice ]Iresident Ut' dif ctIir
p.'so)nItel and finally to it, p}'esiduht
SUCh a procedure has bbth advaniallia
and disadvanltages. It probably ice
the opportunity for settICft....t by lI
familiar with lhe local cI'iu."sla...'fs. but
it a ls o ci ter.
s
g r' att'i'
,liI o i'tt iti t
P re
enlded delay in rea, hing the ulthiale Tll/
1 i I i'lt, u h a~ fo, :ix Duiqljths
aaaaV
1g
1
he applied oIn the
Seiioritvy rti r
le('pihc (i)eratitig di(*i t
o
th. CO
h . Fip;il
(lastia particubir o(uiapti o
Iiddlh
hiUl actually
Ipirpeihts
fe~alill Till is
I i{t
,. I wi thin a
%L itii
ill
U. it
c
motspnIolty s)11l
prlacii,
IItl'lns
iI... (Hlf
I[ B. E. W\ utility enhlpoyees
Ieo....lhii
t .... ..if t
leptesent a
fl '. two baset s , yV pij vid
that seliorhmy shall bh crnputed
girIull withtti~hin a spweific wceupazitnri
giihplf[VtI'
I
I. . I....
"ISbI
r4I1{*fIII
41 , l.
tPI,
I A leat
' pi,,Ia,'itv
pa.
a i I t paeIueITIVP
,wmma divisaion of lhe, e"npby,'
inr
Fa
rllll
-I/hiTlity ) il'S lI~q~lk [bat
[,Ita
iroblem should dither side dtkhIttL , totets withilt given ulat-ii'
sh'e to prolonglf the case,..A few algretnr~en t
,
eel
b <dij
pl'ovie for i.... ne.. ti ii'*,'etddlh e tU :)thi ,. tie~a }leL(t g,'(t I) ...tIt [ e
l 't;.tivP(''i
oCf la k of wolk, p.r.'n
. .
In~t i.... tpth rit chiibl the lil t iImlmS
illosz libhild Mml be fir~t klitil of;those
cent]> laidi off shall, wb'n foir es aT. .
SEN(IOITY UI( LFS
eI, firs I'-eCploy d.
('elias11 agai.n,
,seui, a hilt al' t
By
ftRules of :en ir]ily
arll available and ulIip it'vidtig' tthe
hnrg;uintng. Thles
fo.' genuine collctive
e x .ii W'etd for thil
a n,{Hl
t'ially !u1ified
a
eist il justic! : oLd
Lit' fot dedI I.po.. ii
roipally hisists That
J
Fi'q, nlv th,
the feeling of "right t¢, one's job'' which
dlvelol. thl'ugh yelts ,f faithf'ul ser
i< lb
ic. Ised as, the basis for pT./nit...
tall'e and rehiring niattc, tmeiiorly ll}y
4
]'OU
pr'oviSilI fulfill
offs, senioit'yyuntu..us
uplLI]1OSt We shall lIailtin, oLly a N.I.
First, they preve]t t.njuistifiable h......
tins Dr' transfers with ]/s, of status. cir
'eftsils of 11}1o
t' Itsist'itll
C uitLV 1
tlins, and protct avrat]st ilisvrlinlillatlu Y
hi)l ledtie 'offs or . T..-r ei{Is tl )lt t
lay
worki,,g roi ts.
,mentingof
tioi, or au
Second, they act as I bar to the £Illi[try
LS hlo]
if im 'xpriTree'td Woitke.
I.. at
ats ex,),ipte, tedI .l.. , a', loki.. g for job,.
eltmde tbt> $och]
Third, they nmtely :whow
ii 1k.
necessity for shieldin, the older
who, btcause ,I
with a long ser.vicereo'I
his axe, ,ill have reataer lifficult than
. le
I iTl findilng, iw empllhy mIIt.
at} l ;nger
Fiinallvy, em ioyeis }ave ge. .'Ially .. i....
co n/ .. .lio of fillitfmh
to pelt VI> Tlhat
er loyalty l,,
1, l 'lt 9 me1tl
MehyI(,T 1is ei
lhe pa t tit' I w or'ker. I(ioxt ,hle t hat hi
rtpr ;l- d f ind [h lt he door is tflleit
is a plll
to him to pI o rss, as far ns hi, ahility
toik,
reluctant
hln
will perrail, makes
swer to the
The
rb
sehll
1)III CnI[ fIIItes'
It holdIbe noted that when stmaight
iJiisit.r.tl seniotity phls are adopted the
long service record
'nilphill)yee with a
sh.uld ,i protooied. hilth event of neeesSuity la; -offS or dIi t iot S, by pei'lliitithw
transfer
to S(tile
lthihb lpor 'tuity' of
flivlse ... ...
~Ibe,
" hich hb Cltl qualif
rieon ,in..
I
n.p..lsfere tr..
NVhet an
'~eelpa illttl gi'l/HdP elu 'liviiort to autothei
delicate question f'i'IIauttly arises as to
his ,enioity status reative to the grai/.,
lie heave and to the group ibi Ihbejoins
[f fair play to both
[it sinking a balance
.
h(,' t.n.ploye
o.....'t I tLe rild the grou I p lhe
nl'al
ag Lcei\4'ilts p rtllii e, illi
snce,. that the eanplt y,.'e ,lcla) exei6cs ill
pae, group thea sciiot'ilvy whih bye ha
t,p uTIIil sch tin*
hiI
I.uilt tp within Ihat
It lis seniority ii the new l'oup equal
that which IT had ill the I]l g.rou.i o (a
wvhich time his sinitLty tig!hts in the old
wroup) cease) ad aito providing that fr
sx
irst j.IOths Ilf his efltploynlenl ilt
th. l
ay not exrcise his
ih new gt'ou p IT
that group.
,snioirity 'ights hitn
plltt'rs,
sI bjet of seniilI)fOur utility
these clattsc~
Sons'[JnwgQ
agreem(nte:t,
t i.... .
agtiL. v.. . LneIi'S.....V L itle the asc
Miitary
ity rules
aPBO
]'ty
hiaee
servIc
i
in uiily
clau ses
h
p(,11
Ii(
ey'mniI his
cOI
dII'
;ICiIAT
basw
I Bbiht
granted unldi'd the sective service law'
Tmnhly.
tbat .elt,mrst discharged
of ]940,
flora military servk'e'hall be eIcT.pleyed
"xithoui ITss of ',niclity" adid "to
positioui of like era t M Status and play.provided they are still qualified to pir,
t'lat,'
Io ,1 tIe duties arid apply within
,y lniatt of 40 days after discharge.
Cacl li
At iii
pajI,)
ill S4U ie'ta'ihHI o~'f se i e.
(lil1ihid\'l&'
tiS Orill
itu't * 511)1l'
hns
off'for' u'eItsoI
ill
I)~lIDd~I)
y.
lie
y ;Vig !eti ltt. It
.IL.y be hld'fit.d,
.IIPr
tji ..fi..$
eit.... Iris
lemhc[b of
ith til' i... i;h yeI'. ']II
oi....dIrhs? 'de e 'vi(e
I......
t I . L powie
cTnl, iry of yrIJe tsiLy h'
ILI
Ili
AGItEEMMENTS INSUREI] FAIR PLAY
'1:MiR
iii', , I
Soitie 'if O ut' a}
qit
ihut.
N DUTSTRIES SERVED BY EILECTRICAL P]>VF[
42L)
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
400
q 040
ma~z
heaeloped
fr
tdivakoin~
LABOR on /4s
By FRANK METZGER, L. U. No. 602
(Secon
oif
w ltie)
A PRO(JET SELECTED FORI
COMPARISON
0 show the effects and applicatin of
tenotations that appeared in last
Tmonth'sarticle,
as, applired to latirnat-
ain, it will be convenient to exhibit, for
comparison, the labor r.eot'd of a ,on,
pieted projeet.The project selected, while
not a large one, was, eornlpieedtunde,-r the
supervision of the PWA. The building
with a full basement tdi thlet firms,
built in an L shape, was an addition to a
hospital. The outside wall,, as well as the
inside corridorlswawee
brick and wall
bearing.
*
Floor Construction. - Corridors were
5-inch flat concre.e,slabs.
Baths and
toilets wel. 2-inch flat concrete slabs,
inured on high rib lath. The lath was
placed on 0. T. steel joist. 0. T. steel joist
and wood flooring were used on al the
room
doorm.
Ceiling.-Metal lath. The ceiling was
installed first, and then the partiLions
were built. The room partitions were 2ihr ti
tal t ib channel with metal lath
on each side.
I, the stel joist constrtetiont, the conduit were goose-necked into the tack of
the outlet boxes. Thts placed the conduit
conveniently t. tie agatis the lattice
Estimator
of long experience gives valuable tips on evaluating labor
costs
work of the joist, and also facilitated the
wire pulling and spotting the outlets. The
outlets wore in alignment the conduit
was cut for the center to center of
r'oolns; easurement
..
taken fromn the floor
plans. After this operation, the conduit
was impelled through the lattice work of
the joist, lined up and tied.
The ceiling outlets that were in alignmeat required only one-third the time to
install as those that were not in alignnmeet, in this case, the same floor construclion, and the same nmhber of condu.itS
entering tih outlet box.
The outlets that were not in aligntent
required consider'able more time ill measti.ing and spotting to their location. The
25 Ml int static,
amirine16t.tot
6electrc- panels
tI tlphone cabinlet
a ~arety SSwttALo
.3 h~a~r
lutet
I lelph nue
,erv i
'Tfi, project has a total of 379 outlets.
I list fmaterial given below was taken
T
f. ..... e invceps Iot the material shipped
to tbo job. It will be convenient to list
this ,aterial in two parts. (1 roughingin, and !2) finishing. The roughing-in
time should Ie sepataw from the finishig timw, if for no other r..ason than for
comnpar son,
The man-huras on this job can be di,tided ibt thrte parts; II r
hing-in;
(2) finislIe ; and
)a lared of time
belonging to joh expense. This part and
palmel of tinte Lay vary in nagmitude in
different orgm.izationts
In this list of maeria. for estitatitng
the roughing-in labor, a unit "C" factor
will be utilized.
31atbem.
.t~ei
2IM
' rg nr...itfol
2" ' (totd ittt
SI)e
J11g
I
20tt
20'
" trrduit
oildulit
$0l
t2~0'
225
Switrh tnxgs 225
conduit
Ou tlet
Iboxes
I00.8; 50
· I c,,867
210{t8 80
2(00Q 100
951,x8 I33
428lg; 2100
22&x$ 40
225x$ 40
9.75
16.00
172.40
45.00
45.00
following is a break-down on the outlets
for this particular project:
122 ceiing outlets
1 (utside bracket
4three-way switches
99
79
]0
20
single pole switches
flUSh reeep Iaeles
tetlephoE outlets
signal lights
ver d ',orsi
A'tn L e~l to r
2n1 5 x 6.75x0.253
1.95
ILizhttig
7.20
3[Ain liflit
p[:tnelo~
safety
pwit,
%witthel
100
amnip.
safety
switeh
swite hlI
FE41h)41;1ed t6rl/e
417.55
The atualt tin
e
t install the
rouhhing-in
material
for this job was
,105.5 hours. There was a small amount of
the ahove
....
tctrial retur.ned. apparently,
the estimatedtite is just a mite short.
Tie
estimated timpie
in
tho
fini.,ihn
caption, while apparetuly long, could be
reduced. Fortunately no difficulties were
oneounlt'eId il fiishing.
Ext¢.M3ttte Im
s itruglo
S~iXIt,hi',
3. waY
chit
i ns
lea
Q tr...-.
titles
100
4
.l tn e
tal
c(~uecptlo
10 100/1oft I
,0.00
4/10'xt
.40
lOx 3/lOOxl
lx 80/100xl
,30
8.00
1x
ic
mwtchrs
ticejptadl~e
2
so
{CozitliluEl on page 4S2)
NOVEMBER,
1943
40I
YnrAIecNTENA See Val"e
o$MAINTENANCE *1"o4
The Itfer...i o.... AsIoeti,lhi. of/ Ehe,rioal Ik.sperlF.h , Oth ( -o lil frtil,
vf cI ctriedl )ftlpeei')rn ehtacged tw /ith hfl
,jp~igbilit 1; of upholding hlfig ihtN/i/(luft,
s/antd(,rdn,
C/ Cc? i g a? ....
Crf/dh ('u(Itcilolt It)
it F I ) Ce Wi k.
.tiffraldrlrS3
Intelnational Association
of Electrical Inspectors issues
gui d to effective electrical
maintenance
GENERAL
FFI
TIV
... aiit.e..ane..
o. el.. tie'aI
Equtipn>'iet btgins
with
cation eiii
andi
inslallat.blt
rt
IrI'ol
per
li-
Mall1l
iters of equipunion{ are usial]y th, best
Iraii~les to proper..
pplieatl tth. 'The Natiehal Elhct
al Code. is lIh
hec
ted
standaid fir safe installalhur.
'Th e T ir, )OSe Of r[ aj .tetia e' i In Ilr V it the otrutlr t' ulvle of tl.t.h..
ii',
ca] equipmenlnt.
This k best a.c..nl.ished
hy pl'epariig a
(0 itlhwti lnlttit JLatrflee
soh r'bile, etiVit luP. all ('(] iIp lnelt~ ;:l,
lolloximri it
mgis
'ly.
The ft)]hwblg ijafpiri
dh Ilohk
h olin~ 'i for
o~
~ Ffl'qt......
,,}
I'ilalce
F I i It'of
gtnt.'s] rfIrahie
tiheI I, maim
electrical
eqlltuiineltl.
MIore
treqiter/db
spectionls may bte requn'cd for ('qtii]pnll'rt
In dirty or lanjI Ioeatoris. or ilr
equipment subjcctd h) severe
.li.l.mg
ndiLion.s.
Whepe},,
issible. iJhlaili
the
.teeolnpazyirlg etch
aid{
follow'
i11oi
]ileee il
,equi......t
Vi'(,nrnilliiIi[t12frs
SUBST VI ION EQUIPMENT
Tiransforers
Teost tcn~e,*;ttqti*('s ei
[tiatusfitiinei.s
op-
el sting
at full boad at least .m.. .
nIonth.
Oil temflperature of nil-im,'rs,' selfciooled transforers should niew... exceed
90 Centigrade Ill
such t,'...r.'ers
siltmid not he I.rmi.ted to opernle for
It...g periods of time above
..
}80
Cericgide.
(heck oil level in tralsf
tners evely
three month
inld replace I.lkage and
evil)o vatioh i Iloss, Insp('eL for oil leaks in
transfor'me? tankdis, Check gj'ou..In
lug
[d g.otit. l chtntit.
Co.,i l.... ..I tlnsloIrm r iil shtlhJ be
tested at
it
nce each
yar. II the
dielectric stiengil Js less than
;Is 0?. oil
soubld beg
entdlithined. New ilh
he ilested
befoe heing
placd'
ii i'rIls
furnier ani shOtlild have I iieh t,(Hi
sirongth of lt last 18 lv
Lightning Arreslers
Inspect all lightnias arr'ster (iiictilns in early sring just behfi lr. htnintt
Seasol anI
. .I
eiely ether ....
ni til,
s.l...
.r.
before
exNe
lfea t
lightlingt
(ids i',
le g
,.ld
simt
iihl
... ,]
t
mi'eiklm)Niii
bleinhs;
I...
l .e.esi
cnieial "
ijury w,n!essire
and pipe *ire
bainded together.
S
if
F
it
hii,-
p~ovetnefits to lowcr it to five hi...s or
less. Never '
rOliid
,
wire iItugh iron
or steel pipe for plot etion agahlst le -
WIRING
Wires l(I (abl)ls
Wh'bmg ys n
s Mblt('t lI to vibration
s he i..e.te
..o..tbly.
All .. eha. ieal vi),let",
)i'tlssgh aI ieeknuts, bhush
hing-, 'i.. shoiuldl be tiffhtened. Bowl wilt's
nti, griuifu (4 o elt ionJl
ls s
bould
he (bo li 'd
Chetk systtInU
to ... ke ('lltini that
hrazirrls barv devmblejd since last iwqme
tilt sch is oil or w;iti
laks
k1ear a I/llyS, leth.1.. pipes {iiititle] real, ellili's
n'mlceuwiys, high temp&'rature.ol...itiqIui
rh'v'lohped inl Vau]l:s o1' Swciatl FOOllS, et(.
[ yari ub' all
w¥r1t1I
i
tl swi tch
boxes,
CI~e
' ioll ee~tion s, ode,, flor possible ilol'I'mikili'i nju ry. w~,"¥[hfati.I
e-huIlienl
W in e
i r at o e i,s h,,ipt
iuieseiit, this inlspeet~tiot shiith]
be tinl/lb
lEIxninnie itop
etids arid portable
Idh's (,very three tmo..ths when inr filgula use.
.
Rplai:... y danmage
e
r sevre
weal' such as fleoid
a pIi..it where v ire
tiit en
t soc,
0I.....ets . l) s* a nd I .l
qpplldibutcs. Keep ext-'nsimI ords a'txay
I.....
ljLto] s!ea11
dipa'., nails, hboks,
all
d FIcvfl iee
ib.it'ets, K(etp ru"bb,
coinl, o1ii iOf SIll] hite
Rs illIch as possihle
aIld fetVk
K/l
oi,
ef
h.l.p,guards
8'ilcltc1 Boxes.
VI(
]
1'P ilid chejidticls.
ie
anoe] BHips's
e(c.
Victor
'oU ,l-y
V
eli-known ail lVI
tar, ol i..t.
ts orga , at,
er(-
of overheathi
am
sia 'sult i[ high resist
auice cotictt s or overloads. I'heel o]el-aionl of "'cjii-k-,reak'' ftatlures, 0et.
LIGHTING EQUIPMENT
Need for
Rg
tlar
ai te.....eI
...
Lark ,f nlIitit(,llllee of ightimg' equilpnIent nmay reAt tu available
IighE by as
mu,,ch as 50 ,i (it
en
.r .1.{... This loss
i'p'esenl~
]hss in inv e ttirett, hinceased
'pce-ait[ijg
e'xtp/Ise,
and
nitty
catLie
cned-
deIts and l)rodtltm t
loss.
en Type of tain
tensnce sheldutle nleeded will var
widely
wth type of plant Ind size if installation
hIt it shtmld i...lude the following five
Inih t lir g ......
1. Provide easy access
]lndllarhca
to all
2. Cleani hunmiuaries regublly with soup
aId /ater
3. Repilae hIuni outage8 prttmnptly
4. Paint walls and eililig light olor
and keep thei light
5,M~aiitait rated voltage at. Itmn ar~ties
Insete.
all i]mtaI
i
I,
if the wlin/g
nlorhilbby. (hi
.le.Ltions
that gie
plrhtilarly
dusty,
h
.,;cs
should
li
1
lehaer d ..Itt weekly.)
Mke cerain that
ill
eil
fit tightly a."d are inl plae;
all itisu l 'lknoe k tij' holes pll tg el[
tight ly. Il in. w ires l...d git'O ncl (uilI etorus shoubl he eckedlu.
(ONTROL EQT 1PMEN'P
VystclI/
Fuses lin.
Switches
llspi''t all fas.s twice
aceh year to
aseeitini that cicuitsirt . unoivt rFuui d.
K ie, fuse
l'p..
and I ight and ehek
ib[]
..i.nt.'tioims I0 I'('V.T.. oV...eathli.
hI pee}'ct cblsely fot-
heathl
iru
slimy (!vitle'iee of dryer-
s a It'cstnI,
(d' hig'h ]'esistamn'
fmmscs,
mte]htciIng
cI'[ ipt~
cases, ll~ lt
certaitl th~mt. cases artrtefilhld w''pb
liumks
o[ ,I'Iuopn
r tatihtg',
asse'n bled tightly.
lnsllect s\ith('h
aj1e chke]f.
Inspee
ixid
that
itt same
t
fuses ir e
time fuses
clbmly for
vkilde,/,
Keep
Equ pi
tCI('lean
In dusty lo
h
ions, (lea... a.l. b[).lw out
ali star'tinig swit.ches, eomfnelc sattors. con
trollers, adinliir ticult breake.'s at least
weekly. DIo nIt allow lulst l dirt. tO Iell/tlat, ol high voltage
h
ushings or
termins.
h
)o not per..it an aeteurI tion
it' dirt, oil. g' cease or water ... the tpe]
rIti[ g pa ,ls
Cl
ti
l eq tIpi..... . In ilanmp
ni c..r..oseii atmosphere, i I.
conitrol
) atts ItItitemlq VIll
c' aI ... alll 'y. I5i clan
]ocations S(..llal.. lu.I clainings wil suffice.
C
Mheck
Mechanical (nd iions
The mi/chai...l
ci ndilioi fIall ('ity]ol
eqIuipmen.t sh u..tl he checked w,'kly if
subject to vlbration er n..i.tbly
otb e/'wise. Tightem
ill
its and .s..c. . .
ximnhinc etertie
an dl] mechaniicl corniceCoaliimled ona page 427)
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
402
Aid MILITARY Aem4uhqz
r by
HIE s..si.n Wa' p[ies tlelOVe
Chairman PauIsfn. All nehers lported present. o. roll catI, to wit:
C7M. Paulso n C. F. PrIler. Charle,
Foehr, D. W. Tracy, F. 1- Kelley, William
G. Shord, Ha[I} VaI Aridale. Jr., J, L.
McBride, D. A. Manning.
The minutes of the June, 1943 council
leetilNg were read. aid approved.
International Secretary Bugniazet I ported that Mrs, Did Donovan, widno
of mehmber David Donevan, had written
with reference to the action of the Intelnational Executive Council on her request
for further consideration of prior pension
payments. The International Secretary
advised that he had acknowledged the
letter and furnished Mrs. Donovan the
further information she had requested.
and that he had received no further conmunication fromt her with reference to
iris last letter.
Other matters eferred to the internotier al officers for action at the June, 1D94:
council meeting will be taken up fur
disposition later on in the council's wok.
Chairman Paulsen appointed Execuitive Council Metals C}.F. Prolefatd,
Charles Foehn as the committee on audit.
They were instructed to examine the
audit of the 1. B. E. W. for the three
no.ith,,' period ending dune 0. 191l3, a,
reported by the firm of Wayne Kendrlck
and Company, C. P. A.s employed by the
International Executitie Council, and ti
-eport their findings to the council before
its adjournment.
The chaiman referred the audit of the
Electrical Workers' Benefit Association
for the first half of 194, as submitted by
the firm of Wayne Kendrick & Company,
C. P. A.'s, to the committe on audit
with instructions that they report their
findings back to the comci, for the council to act upon and pres'nt a report to thi
tr..tees of the E. W. R. A. at the semiamnual ,oieting of the, t0rues.
foro pension which
The applications
were Presented by the following nanled
inebet
Minutes of
third regular quarterly }neeting of the International Executive Council
L. V. N,
I (neck. August %itliar
I ayes, John B.
B...ner.r, Adrian
o1wden, Walter
2
I
arrap,
Philip A.
Valkeiberg. John
(mrow, John W,
Hagrup. Henry
Itarsb,.
Charles
Mattes, Gustave A.
9
IHARLES PAULSEN
A.
]lushes, William HI.
KeneskE. Anthony J.
2N Nwhel JoIhT
3 O'Neill, Jane=
Ituekle. Louis
]
3 SAheuplein. 11enry A.
3 Schneider. Charlesl i 3 >c,,
3 Shapiro. Jacob
JSnlth, GeCrge.
ierney, Harry M[.
]
P0' oihaan. (irailI
Flugun, Joseph M.
ul.OhArthur
9 Juhncon, Alfed
'0I)wd,John E.
,
Perry. Hear
rut tie, George E.
9Wilson, Charles C.
W okersin.l IlTenry
7 Landy, Edward J.
17 Taylor, Richard
(hale
eves, A.
34
2S Stahl. Miller
>young. W~illinn J.
K. I.
.1!
l1
41
44
40
48
No.
IPhilip I,
(9
[;rv.
Valt Zehbn Hermain
(!airoll, Frank EF
()este rre.eh, Albert
IhLrry J.
Warcren
N ycee Fipte)h C.
John II.
RIhrTrdso,,
h
AS Zy, V. J.
,iae, W
illia..mI
a2 (;at
a;mmisoit,
\Vllit,
aS
;jr
.dnsII. liarry B
Fitlalk S,
LJnirdrUl,,
5Spiger, Chris J.
31 Killiori. DoSk B.
(;. L.
71 Manl.q.
104 Donohuv. Thomls 3104I LI~tnla , Trhomnas
[t I) rn, Joseph W,
li
.Swur. HlIman
12a Norris, (buries A.
PR
I29WVard, litlie
MilloT, Bort C.
UT
134 MIatthies. Willm IL.
134 NeIl... John (,
}lh.nsrtodl, Egil K.
15l
160
at
veew examiuned:
1.IF. C,
chaunltan
r k, Eugene
M.
I64
186
95
22
'11
214
31IJ
32,
:/~
:4r
: 1,
F.
Inaukhal, (reore
Keevly, William Edwa rId
Frnok A
hi
E nb:ch.
L....., West F.
('till or, Wallter A.
Weir. Thpomas R.
Morgan. R. Il.
MeLGta'ey. Jai"os F
Willi.", Friuli
Irstw
,
Iemtlderson Duncan
Lamb, John Thomas.
D¾' Bois, Robert TI,
537
2
5
Wilson, lore~z IL,
ginpl, I'lliu't, F.
7112
8I7
Reed. Willi:a.. E.
Zydel,Mi chael
Pr,,,sI
L. I % o.
I.0.
.0.
1.0.
1.0.
L 0.
] .0
[.O.
I. N.
Ad,.ls, Ernst I,.
arry (.
..
pater,
Dallaa, Hserbert A
Davis, Car i.I
IEvanla. Johni
layes, Morgan Wheeler
Kenney, William .1.
Nayle., Willpam H.
Trautnitan. (Charle G
]. IO. Weihr. Willi ...
702
Il,
The cuuneil f.u...
tinled applications
(,dine, wilh hbe provisions of the In1
trnIiililonal Constitution, nd that the
lli
Suppoit the applicants'
.ffi. ia[recrds
IlS; to PeI.hn age tan continuous
r'lkt
st ia..dinl in the I1iOTIltllOfl therefotre
86
SI;
81 7
139
19)7
that the aforemen
made in ac
wer,
D, A. MANNING
1 C
secretorI. E
it was dee.e..,.
motion. which was
i
upon
f'rlhnitleJicd oul pace 4 OI
NOVEMBER, 1943
403
AeCC&U14/OP4OpOd4ed
T
IHE
19-1.... .owm...ioi
Mwd
t4'rnari~hlrtal ] xec'll~e IIh<
(tiurreil
... ,
on',
It,,, 'IoI
,d ,<-,
' t. do.
4A"edlmma
i IoIu.i..
nit Dnce:it? Of a.......Il
the htl.. ,
In,
1lie p'i in q'
D ., l1
ord't. -da Iefr ,e.Iit.... s bioitted tt, the m, , bership r
.co
.n.nidf
stuil , iI ,itei to niaku rvoui
ndil irorw tlo IlU te m oniig il, Id.pljion: that starting Janluar, 1044. to am]
... Iciding
¥etti
:A, tile conmfllti,)IIb;lh b
p14
ostptnl.I
....
It, IlIe
.n..mofr- j...e,. I 44, each heneficia membter pa, a .. e dollar ($1.i)(1)
,h ip I,
.cc...l..toif h],
a I '. lllt' IitiinlLI I]
in
('ol.ilI
.u.ie
:ts1esmnellt p.r .. iiith; and Ihat starting .Jul3, Ig44. and each
propc'ses, ; pii t. take (:le
T he aIcIli ..f the 1941
ers' Benefit A \sociati.n, Ill
lV
a ses liilt
1,lilt'siliu tion.
....
titin of hile ihlatTici
....
e.tioi
... o.t..
tile
left the si
I'il h.I.....
I,(
to the trt..Ii,
,,
tiru
to i I aie tII is
benefit asSo.iati
p..
I....
trustees wit], pow
sessmient rate, o thie itHIe1 of rsesst'til p C
the laws [oo
tb e ,illvetiol
sitiattion, for the rast....
vide th, .
....1 (..l this
:1
per
tn.oi.tl.
i nlipbthereafter until the text cOn\Cillon, StId ss .S.ll'.t.t
c edu... td to bitV cents (q0c) p.t II..I.tlth; <tihpaym.ent to
Ie
dklil~t.11
follos:
Of thr' ; 1.00 a.sessn..m. 70 cents to [t' plaeid ina thie person
flln.. tarid , ceInsI et th
e
ttr ttto;ir 5- t.i.ul. of the bene lt
,so-
, btt .. id
s.h.I..
.. pt1l tb,
law s of tihe Bi...ierl.o..l
that tbe
..r...lil.t of p rI capiat
\V ,rk
tlthat (qtch
it...
.Tle..llbe
m ust pay, ard to make ;Hi% khulnk. e inlih, 211o IIl i, I.i.......t
by theII. em. er. requir
.
s '
eTni'... I
on ;I
l.ii
.ee
... of
the mem bership, in order to IlL.il.ti te th, . .iccc..it,.I{ i.nl...(dtng s everal sect o... of thl consltirins hit in K
g that hlsk to
be done [)y the next Cot..n.th
The International lxec.i.,'i 'ouInci propoal
..
It tie care
of this Sit,:'tio.. and lhe pe
ns, ,ion
ru..
n It) .n;
.. .. ......t
plan to operate until thfI.x.
con.l'.
0ir,. dbpoeS if both
propositions without the ntcc>4iU of [nakmnlg cilai.e. ineither
const It ustiul.
slit
tOf
bcf
f ...nd.
.0
cents assessmn....t, 20 cents to IIlaced in the pen
centrs irl th, ' ... tua.
fimi of the ben fit
a1>1 C'tatitol.
Adoption if the ahoe pln [nulets bhat for the lirst six
rutoni lih of 1944 each benefciald .... nhc,
ilI lie pavi ng into the
Wtiomn plani SI,(t per month fr aI$40,00 tier montpt penion
/t)I....l
a,rtnd rime.lthen until tile nixt
57 cents
5tyefltiOri
r[ niHIh tin thie s Imu purpose:
.
rd until the
n.eIt
o n tf lotion
pat ng $·.20 a I.onth, into th, F, \V. 1. A. for the de;ath Ie.efit p'an.
T be ahoitve ant. un~-., stat-eidor
tO r
oloid are thie c{Imbnetd
i...,t'U , of the per capita dppo) rtii.nilleIlt ill the ConisrtitutOll to
thes Iunis. pIus h. tihe
p tti.
.t Ilie, a t$'[inleri ;i'tl
t
K t ldto the
two fuds
D. C. INS[RAN(E [)EA ItFIMENT ACTS
The IIns.
. ip'
uranc
e of the ID)isrikl it (i,i..hia
has just
.I
amnined the }N 'fir aisSoc t l.. .l..d ratie tioeld
I.com..
nl.dalton, an, the I.lqnhers.hip. inl aCTir,, lap aLib at
this imie on the recI
.
.iimmenlation of thr IIte r..atio..al I~E c titr P
Council to meet tie re.. iO.iiiirtdatb1ij
oi ti.e
r.ur. ..
..
.r
t
meat of the District of Cilu..bhia, as well as tie 'itiatio,eist
ig w ith the 1\Iichifg n I......an/..'
)ijal'ITI li ,on CtIt t ot
the wordmig of the Michil.an Ste, I..s..rance
,,
lCd',
will lI
building for the future soIun.ess of the benefit : csneiati.Il,
and making pr
fot
pin imeetiig its itr e ohligatmrns.
Should the me... erslp fail to adojpt tile plan, pisente,
the onIV thing that teIh iuntees of the hem'flt ;.s.cU.titJri
caI
.
do to meet this important (ohligation is to lower tie henifits l
50 per cent
meatin
the present 90 ents pav I.t
..
(tomeet that
obligation. This means that iembn
lrs witle
)'t ea
...
rotiti..I
ols standinm would he Ip tacted for a M
.l IHIJ) deith
,lrnit,
and
.n.i..b1 rs
fwith
it
I
't r
;IIr .......CIiti]iOiiSt
st
n... ltig
w.uII be protected for a $500.00 death hbjflit, , ith all thle'r
iett eitq the nIllriiTlUrll a..
..
t.I i..i l...i hlkn ts tioId
dcrin tIle
stone manner. The trIsttteesakrl, vi[
ht pohei ti......
ndi I
prese... laws ai.d hi tctiof totId riotlief ...e .ital, tillhea...pld
ment if the lawI
b , reieren.I
.
irI , XV are sare hInh ii.. ...
hers do not dcsire that htl Irust eI ht t(ooe. to rake this ation.
bh, ~.e..
c.....s.it
.... ,
...aoull
,ke the ...itl.. i
pa I..ent by each ni..i..er. to the benit lrsoalh
,Si.20 ..
less than 30 cetns a .eek it this wlv abhrle p. o.ec..rtoo
For the benefit of tile i..:ohership. all ti, omarial ill'
pubhiihed inthe Noierlher issue of be \VrWORK1R, illtItlimlt Id1
pensiO n dat, furni
sheI
l,: t tilion , tor
i...
¢illilflhttll,,,
alnd the verhatim reeonne.t dathi s of bie i rm'hlr;air
departmerit of the I)itrk Iof Col.t.bia.
AMOUNT OF PIOPOSEID ASSESSMENT
Thbe Execljrile Coi ril'l plan to sol e for th
o.l.....It h
COMPA/RED WITH PRIVATE INSUIRANCFS
l[nlurntri e .o.pani..s would cbat ge, tor a ten dollar ($10.00)
Ihl
tih'1 sl carrYing it reaches
ithe age of 65, appriximatelv as shown m the following table.
I.er n.. th :llilntuitv. payable wi,
I'le
plans of ifis.r.nic
c
ori
,
dliftE
..
m.ew.. hat
rirml
ours.
bitt inl the table of costs leblo,
is estimated what would be
thbei chmre if tbey .w.d.. write t.l.. pla.
he year periods
belng used to show the difte.. c... it cost it those ,iars that the
;irItlitaill Marts paving fur th teIl tholllat a .... timhr.n.u.i.y
whikb hl is tO rceive ftom. the time hnreaches 65 until II
[i pHtivislt u si1 iilai to that of .... pe'nsion pla.;
lrpproximate Cost
per Month prt $10.00
tt~ Intit dtnnui'ty
2!)
·
·
-5
$ .28
45
59
40
It$
I
I le,
flgure-;re he snartdrLId lars
,f
i I .o.pany.
reduced
to .It... I l. I II i their trite to ;low fto tIhe difterence in their
ph:..manii ....
\liItiplh
tit'
o, in the above table h5 4 and
tn will ha;1 the c,. for a 54000 a onuth annuity. Colm
itot'ies (edid contact ilr
Igrltt
;ilcr III their rates tor sini
btr ot..i rI; .-.
If cour-e 01.. phla
.
ip.. tIlaa e a tiifor. ri rate,
rcg;[rdh~'s oi the agze at which the III.t.iib 'r iS aInti. ed tdoer
hu plan.
V
N ow
~,mi-I seet[i's is supportel h} a percentage ctIIrrlhulionD f(1 l th
b(
orke..
.tit
arid.I
simiiat i[....UIrt paid hy
Ihi ,I1lphlPI
Ai thl, premt 11tio, he rate is uric per cen[t of
tII' ,orker 'S salar, and a hi...lr ..il[.... lt paivabie II his enl
,I/x.
( )IX oltrding I he taIhh, tib 20-year hiasi will giv yut
Ia iwriteml , t' Cost.
like hbe$1 5(].00) .n.... l ejittnli.. of
le
hae
778 mc-heis 6 realrs of age or over, but not 62,
an employee-it would cost hi. $1.5D n month aid tlhe .n.
it Il 6i)
b
srointiinuntus standing.
th
plover would pal the same amount, or ; totalof $3.00)a
actually pii in for .0 )Cars, IoC the eanplote, on reaching (35
WV hanc 775 .ne.I.he.s 60 year' of age or o -utbe
r
not 61,
. .... n.th, arid the {it pe, cetl
rerit'c,36 0 a
rears of a t,
with 15 years' continuous standing.
rate now pl.., hUtd i1i xtill he increased to two per cent for
There nlav be some for instance among tilh 60-scar old
e
,ear. inaking ia total pa.yiment
Hnd rnphl; ,r ,n-,
C,,n1loVC
btelnher
rwII
,
have }8 or 19 years' contimluous standing, hat
p (arniligN,
.li.ees
if foul per cent ol e i/
I bate given vy the. minb num cars' standlin, which is 15
groups.
\ears for that gmrp. The same applies to all the o ther
SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS
St. y .o. can see how mains-if they mainrain their stand
min -will be eigilhe when thet- ale 65. It means that oe r a
The present law provides as pm the fidlw in table:
itve lear periodl unless deathintervenes or thei drop their
me.mbtship, we ma, have 5,948 n.e.hbes eligible for the penMonthly Pay ..
Alg~eragr monthly pay
3 ....... oo"
$ 50 .
g;
_.
100 . 150 .......
250.
$ so
--
1010
150
250.
c..ra.e:
$50
100
I2 year'
to
JWorker ait (5
$ ?of6,l
25.75
3"190
41.20,
$ 21L01)
2625
i3,50
42.410
$ 22m0)
2750
33- (1
-44100
sinT. This is a ua'immn possibility.
As to our death rate at present a.t..o..
.e.n .erls n pension,
I had a comIptation
male
to cow-r tile last live years. 'This
com. putaion thows a la;grr number of deaths than in anr pIeduring the operation of the pension plan.
It
imis peiod
shomS tlhat th(le a,;\g&t of 77 ne...hers, a year died while on
pension. da.ing that period.
The airage [ength
if l....i.
pn>... ne..tS is about. fit years
and se'en
.mthbs. This a.erage is Iow ecause our plan is
o.ung. We will not get a real areage titnie nrplan has rut
30 to 40 ;fars.
LOW PENSION RATES
went into effect in 1928. a little he. than 5
'11h paymenr to tile fund is 37 cents a month per
isen..lheI ,,it $4.44 a tar.
I 24.1)1
$ 5o.
,1
A a
le ca]culation..-ou.r plan provides that when a
* 130.00
rember rteaches 65 sars of age, a.d has 20 ears' continuus
36.00
I II
1I .00
aroinsg. he nax appl- for the pension iif he is retiring from
250.
the tllae, and if admitted Ihereceives S40.00 each month. '1ihe
15)
rm] pas s his per capita tax, whcih is now $2.00 a month, to
I I $
$261
nlainrain his continuous standing, and when he dlies $1/000.00
-3250
39.041
150is paid i ton the death bem,fit I.n.rd to his heneficiary. Ftr the
252.00
250
pens.ioan: .. dIhene.
he r
l.s he pss his local union dues, and the
1001
I...e
from thosed ues, pays t, tile ,. 0. a per capita
4t0years r~,rr'Jf:
tax ol .2.00f a m.n.th, of which 37 cents is placed in the pension
$ 2g JI
$]O.}
fnid, 90 cents iin the death benefit Hnad, anti the remaining 73
42.00
1511 ,ts
per capita is diiddc among
.
the other funds, in accrdance
*
56,110
250(
with the pr...s.on of the constituthln.
NOw our problem urnder oul preseltt law is that we h}ax,
Thelrefore, our member, if he establishes 20 years' con1,558 members on pensh], arnd abo..t 60 nu. tho are ten.piPtirnmlt ...
nlngand reaches the ate of 65, a.d is adm.itted to
b.
in the war ffort,. hut
rarily off the pension list - work
persion. is in jine to eciye S480.00 a year, besides which the
will return to tile pension list whe1n their enlplo, rent ceilses.
peIrlison fund pays $24.00 a rearI.h.i as his per capita tax,
\Ioreover, the folhlwirg additioinal n.t..l.ell
f ...e.
hers andhiI, standinhag is mantain d at no cot to him until lie dies.
mla go on pension in the next tlve year,,s, wlveui w ild ...ateNew ;Mat is the co.t fot the aboCe? WVell, the member
riallv increase the above figure:
p-its f.r the pensbin $4.44 a ?ar.
Iultiplv that hr 20 rears,
has paid a otaIl
We }.ave 1,004 meinh'rs wh..
I. uIe
iear; ohl or o
anddtr, and the re.sult is that in 20 years I he milii,
s.um nf.88.80
m the pesin fund. Now if cous our
e penwho il.-. 20 years or i..o.. c.C.mtintlos Standinr. making theimi
stim fund,s inot that old-it is onI i5
I ears oAll-and we have
all eligible to be placed in pension in..ediatel; if they shiu.ld
beer pat hig m bhers' pension for that length of time. The first
make application.
,emheis-idmnitted to persim lad paid onily three months into
Then the following:
the iety I estaibllshed pension fund.
We have 533 ..m.. hers 64 Vlers f age
.. .. r ' r, hbt ..ot 6q,
with 19 years' contin .. us sta;
tdirg.
TYPICAL MEMBIER'S PAYMENTS
We have 606 membIiers 63
years of age or over, I.t l.t 64,
with 18
rs' conth
yea
to it' irdn.
I*he following is an exampIe of one pensioed nieriiher who
has passed a y he was on pfissi.n for 177 months, or 14
We have 634 mereers 62 years .f ag, or iA/t, hut .i.t 63,
arid 9 ...oiuthis,an.I he teem ed $7,080.00 fot the above
y.ears
with 17 years' conthinUs stand.ling.
Nowv our plan
Cears
NO VEMBER, 1943
405
ktecea4 jo
pramd. in Atddit
Ii ,i &II
I, the pe. imirr ..r.. p
tax of $2.01)1
a th ain
...
tng to $354l.00.
Example: R e...d S7.'.....
is Itid per capita
..is
~.08
(I
/~
P~cpded Yqd"umeni
.0 0
$3~4.()0
a 4-l~rI
I -per
ndthcaritl parid
for hut'
]J)(}0()(G
[eath hcmjip
paid hii lih ·
$';434.0
lie lcuam ,
tiu..r...r
lntilrtionf ee and $e'
Iree,
[>a
2 (Irm fiCtiiti,
Drlb)eceber
II,
19.02. paid a ,11 05I Of
)enifi.l illApri. 1928: th ,r-
(}t[i,
1013 to
GS
ilt
ft
,:iro... I,
uirls otf t l'h hi ', ts a i t niber, d
it I, 'ti.l..ated that thl
lLi..Il.ll[heI paid lor iniatiamn fe
fill
k h hh..j....t iS kr 'l, Iri,
and d(lrt
ior 25
Ill the econ
,ear., wI.
52,1 800,
I.ic
en. fit, for
and besides rtce i/mr
whinch li joined tih organina
fionl, at tie t..i. expectnkg nothing tise-as beneits
these
1)CpL..le efflec ive 25 >car> ater lie .jimn d he iirganEzalt
fir tihe aib>l pa l"iit' s hit, hh nztadl
ithe l o('
C
UriOrv le
waS ii Hlt1meqm
er
as i.o..thld due,--I and hI heirs rec.i..,l
VALUATION
Aat
D.ecin... .31.
1942, the a'ss*ial o had t60.2q1
ipme ,fiers
ha, hzlu k tithil in force a.... untii.t to S85.30
3 I,S00i.
A tist x a,
i [he as'ociation's r nla mit rn io a..er
,rife
trim if th re w a II, it uirce card forl, aci
I
Ie....r
ud tl
,Utah cards
proper1v
.e.e
tabuoate&
Thl insurance Iaws Ii the District If CI.u...Iii doi
require leneilt isoeiiai(}ll' to inIIueI res...e s ill their annu, d
statilelnts. theeft r ' ;'
niave o, itt.ed
. i.l.I..
iil preptri
lite financial
(In
order
statenlent in this report.
tn dier.fli nl ]11
t til
amo
so
/ ho
.. lId
haxe oi haIn
d to pay its future (ligatom
wvithou.t cI.an .
I, the ask
if coilctioIm , in the . .st..iipt.o.lthat its
ralhiv will he thec same
as that set f.hl,
in tile Namao[.rI
Fraternal Conigless niorialli table. and thai the rate of inI rest vwillhe 4 per cent or
ore.
.. w Ih..e adIIded to thle toal
act ali m norttuar; ttii]
assets as .howt. in the finan.c..ial qlate
nmnt. a coiltn.gent asset .nounIn.g to S27.143.927.10 ior
lwi present alue of fu
iture I rItir
ilt... , . T i. .liii.t? I irfund liabiIlrtihhI ;l'e iben innceased hx the sum of S5 .779 'em63 31, whllh reT esents the present I e if pronied
...
benefits.
Ti le resulit
shjiws
tilt,
asset$--actulal
alid
ci~ltltir
~elit
to
62.88 per cent of the act ual aId coItim nt liabilitis.
For tile pellod rcviewd, the ittllf T. expecied
mnal
, " i, fto][lows
1938
1939 1940....
I
-4-
19412
-
-,
....---_
~
-------
he
5
)92,48pI, ciet
S .(,(9 per cent
88.07 per cent
K394
8- per cent
77.73 per cent
COMMENTS
As at 1)ecenlbe, 31, 1 42. tihe A,siA atnit, ld bIen
h. i
opcratl.. for t"e1tv' one (21) ...ears. l)ui.in
tain prirod it
acquired a n.....slIp of 160,291. with [wer.fits In force ol
8, tL[A)50.00(), TIh
admitted
asets re $,315,7.46
arid elias'igried ..ilds amounted to $8.1/9,21if139.
A,\ pe) .t. ly mentioned, onyI one firia
of certfiwate is issued. It s a whole, life .oot.act with detl benelits In graded
alI [i
frts t}hr lrst tfi e years aid ,s ilth.ut other sur[uMitVa /e.
l"rrn
it.
Oi
(ile 9)
{lcepri Oll t.i ,
s.ociat.i',i its
tip litred on a iflat
tiltS a. ll..ll. er per iTiof li, al
SillCC
[av
,
P942, has applied 84 cents of such
Larout,
ir
l1008 a
r
Ic
Illal
to tiel'
to
benefit or n.ortujary fund
pII... de ithe p.o..lis/d benefit
'lhl
rate is iadefII Ilial
,, Ofi lne
lmhir of the Natimial Fraternal C(Irlcs.. tablle
it 4 pr
f. mortality
Cel.
- DI.ecimber 31, 1942, the average titt:iild hhe
ge
of
... hnbi-rlip wa 43.22 3ears, ;md it'
.er.iga. ..oullt of
be nfit v;:, S532(t0, For the twenlor.. ( 21) years
,,
ith
A: iiciatior'' (iptrationls thle ave ze frllt
'Ift
I
b.enefit was
)f
•687.10.
F~il.o..in
lb a c...ari.o. of thl i¢ lates, currently ill
II,
I) te .-\ssnriamior
with th os has ed ... the Nati. alI
I`rit-rn l Co lgjr~,s
abltbeof l
all..llint
sl 4 per cent il ith,
ivt:l1ige I11,111ir
ts ofI 532IS0) arid '6 .87lJO, ind tileul timate
®
; l/t11t (It SI (JI}L
'l tJe Hles
ie or thl att
ined
ates as
at ]),celber I3I 1(42.
Ni t Fall CtlrrentI
ini use In A
,ci;ition
Net
rate, Nrtilnd Fraternal (011;Dss,
amlunt of S532.00
Net rate, N ationatl lr'
amol.un..t (If .687.0
Net rate.
National
razl
-
oil
. on
...
Congrss,
]
aierage
1217
,
Fratella
arnount of $1300o0l) --
C.
$1(I00
..a.erage
Iq17
-
on ultimate
--
22.87
At thie presentI tuIlle l. issoci.tlion is, If coilhse,
ain
tion to pay its ciajims hut it is far i n..
i [ eing in ia positin. io
cr
out its c'intraeci witFout th, calinmg of extrl ass(ssmnts
(hr tile readjnlstmi'ilt of its .ssessel.l. t rate tor all .I.t...bers.
Tle
l nsul:'rce law-' if the District of Columbllia do not retilt' cI;ugirig of adequp te rates m (hirs by Ii iieft asOCila
(Imls; howex ir, it
till'D reasonable to pisstrt
that
4much
jssO
cretitiris sliiiuid enid i;, (II t. provide aleti
r tatl!
tes. [ hi EI cnal M
Vorkrs' }en-fit Associati. .n .ould certitlyIv thro
Iloptrlu se e hi ii
if it, piesent rat{. was suf:[ien ttn
plox d, a I l
;lIt
;u least ((qIui to it, rwetit u-ont e (21) years
averag,, [amle;1
aI ;'-e
fg/Inouit if •6S87,0 and a net an
atv[
lial rate tf $1q.71. Further,. it wo(ld
.
re.
in lire that the
ssIIo-ia loll, Inl tuille( 1 gra lull i[r1m Im es Ii1 rmat, Jir...ld tltain
a net rare slflcjr'lt t provide for the fllI Ipomised [elefit
of $1/,000.00.
In a tiecview of tile I.s.ociatuilds
nlistitutioi
ntld lw-law s,
it WIas noted that .. it Of its Ibjects is tIn,stilhlsh a s'st.em(.f
II111tl~cll
11-c]
benevlc
e
and relief in case of dtrath, sickness, accil-lit, or d i ralbilit\ if its inlti.hers. Vlhilc tire
hls; sso iation
sucI a.ithrlty
.
U.de it constitution ..nd ceI lh;ate of incorpo-
rlrti-l.
no SiSteli
pruvI Il.ed
If 1lneIfit other thian hdt'i
has
ever been
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
406
JOURNAL OF
ELEETRICAL WORHERS
OFELECTRICAL WORH1EPS
OFFICIAL PUULICTIOFn IfTERMfATIonlflL BROTHERHOOD
Vohtim
X1i'
W¶ashington, D. C.,
N.oyer'!lit.
11143
Drift to The report of the Executive Council of the
Fascism A. F. of L. to the A. F. of L, convention
in Boston indicates that 61 bills have been
introduced in the United States Congress, offering
crippling restrictions on labor unions, This is only
one indication of the drift toward fascism in wartime
of this great republic. Despite the fact that everyone
who can read knows that attacks on labor unions are
an index of the state of democratic feeling in any country; and despite the fact that the United States has
viewed the spectacle of Hitler and Mussolini trampling
unions under foot, the United States Congress has
seen fit to receive 61 crippling bills.
There is something in wartime psychology that always tends to stifle freedom of speech. Men fear, and
when men fear, they tend to retreat back to old slogans
and old ways of doing things. The loud talker and the
professional patriot are given an opportunity to cut
their capers and to establish artificial and shallow
standards for the measurement of man's contribution
to his country. Because of this psychological reaction,
it is a wise nation that knows how to steer its ship
of destiny into the turbulent democratic channels and
keep it there.
The Electrical Workers Journal believes there has
been a lessening of the democratic spirit in this
country during the last three months. We fear that
this reaction will increase. We have confidence in the
heart and spirit of the American people to right itself
and return to democratic ways.
One of the reasons that the United States
was able to perform "the miracle of production" during the last two years was
our tremendous concentration of machines in industry.
But this same concentration of machines has presented
a problem of unemployment to America for the last
20 years and will continue to present that problem.
Elliott R. Sands, one of our members in Portland,
Oregon, faces this problem in the following words:
"I read with considerable interest the first two
editorials in the September Electrical Workers Journal.
These are the first articles I have read in any labor
publication which approached the subject of unem-
Machines
and Men
ploymenl, I c hological and otherwise. during and
after this war program. It ties in very well with a
recent irpo't
of the U. S. Department of Commerce
in which was pnedicted an unemployment figure of
b9,000,000 workers by 1946, due to technological development. This did not include the returned anred
forces. Corp(a'ute enterprise was unable to supply jobs
for the army of unemployed during the lean years of
1930-36 and they will be unable to supply jobs in the
postwar period, due to these same technological trends.
"I have been a member of the I. B. E. W. for approximately 25 years and have watched labor lose
the battle against technology. I feel that some solution
is needed al once. I have always considered the
I. B. E. W. the most advanced of any of the unions
and now is the time for them to really step out in
front with soric real constructive action."
The amazing transformation of the German
people into a nation of savages is dramatized
in contrast by the fact that a monument
has been built in Washington, D. C., for Baron von
Steuben, German, who gave his services to the American army as chief drill-master. He was born, of all
places, bi Prussia and came to New Hampshire in
1777, and offered his services to the United States
Congress as a volunteer. The next year at Valley
Forge, when American morale was at its lowest point,
von Steuben began to take the inexperienced soldiers
and train them into fighting men.
Von Steuben wrote a book entitled "Regulations for
the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United
States," and sat on the court-martial which convicted
Major John Andre as a spy.
Interesting enough, von Steuben died in New York
State at Steubenville. lie was living there on a pension
granted to him by the United States Congress.
What a story this is of devotion to the ideal of
liberty. In 1777, not even Prussia had developed the
bitter anti-human philosophy that the Hitlerites now
exalt into a religion.
von
Steuben
Thomas C, Blaisdell, Jr., formerly of
the National Resources Planning
Board, now with the War Production
Board, writes in the New York Times:
"While preparation for rapid conversion is essential
so that unemployment can be reduced to a minimum,
there is no doubt that the need for an integrated
system of social insurance will be accentuated during
this period. Even during the full employment provided
by war there are millions of civilians who are dependent on public provision for their daily bread. The
major risks of life-old age, unemployment, disability
and sickness, and family dependency-can all be provided for by ato adequate system of social security.
Attacks on
Social Security
NOYEMBER,
1943
When the costs of fighting a e ar have been Iif ed rorn
the backs of the people, they can better afford lt
security than at any other time. The advance provision
of an adequate systerm adjusted to p1oph1 retu rndng to
civilian life from the artmed fores an(d to those released from war industry is still to he aet> nplished."
Despite the reason that lies behind Ibis Imint of
view and despite the need for social in stamc ib a
ctIuntry where technological advancemnt m'
nejui ¢
rapidly, clandestine attacks are going forwardl ever?
day against sociat security as it now exists i order
to head off any reforms Of the system. These attacks
are uSually based upon half-truths or quarter-trutis.
For instance, one chain of newspapers is insphling
fear by claiming that the wage records kept by the
government might invalidate pension benefits to those
covered I5 the insurance plan. There is, of course, no
truth in this statement whatsoever but the unwarranted attacks have caused hundreds of thousands of
inquiries at the Social Security Board offices.
Physicians, too, have organized to create the impres-
sion that any health insurance program as advocated
by the American Federation of Labor will fasten state
medicine upon the United States. This, too, of course,
is an effort to deceive and defraud working people who
need insurance coverage.
About
Strikes
It takes time to catch up with lies. The inpression created by the daily press that
American labor was engaged in sabotage in
the war program with strikes is being slowly dissipated by facts. For example the Corps of Engineers,
Army Service Forces, reports that on its six-billiondollar construction program during the fiscal year
ended June 30, 1943, strikes amounted to only 2 100
of one per cent. Can any other section of the con,munity match this record of labor in this particular
field? In all of 1942 the ratio of strike man-hours lost
to hours worked was only 6100 of one per cent, which
is almost nothing. This was under the voluntary ilO,strike pledge.
l)espite this magnificent record the Smith-Connally
bill was enacted to prevent strikes and it certainly has
had the opposite effect.
National
Just as there has been confusion in the
Service Act public mind about the effect of strikes
in war production. there has been confusion in the public mind on shortage of labor. Actual
facts cannot be produced to prove that there has been
a total shortage of labor in the United States,. It is
true there has been, a shortage of certain crafts. It is
true there has been a shortage of men in certain war
production areas. Indeed the true issue behind the
497
so-called inlnpower shortage is One of poor managetrent on lhe part of the natioual War Manpower
Commission and not an actual shortage.
The danger, of coupse, in thi; hotched painting of
the War ManpTo wer Comminssion is, it is going to be
used jo inroeduce in Congress a bill for a national
service act. Labor does not want a national service
act for niatry reasons, chief of wh ich is, it is not needed.
At no time in the last two years has there been danger
or an invasion in this country. The United Stales has
a margin of time in military operations that Great
Britain has never had.
The Four
Decencies
For some time labor in the United States
has felt that there could be an implementation of the four freedoms in terms of
nations, states and regions. Now the British Trade
Union Congress has undertaken to do this with British
labor under tle term "the four decencies."
According to a dispatch by David Anderson to the
New York Times the four decencies are a little closer
to the average man than the loftier four freedoms.
"The average Briton wants a decent home, a decent
job, decent education, decent social security which
means cash to pay the doctor and an independent old
age."
Mr. Anderson goes on to report that what the
British people want is as plain as day. On the question
of the four decencies there is to he no compromise.
Incentive
Taxation
A resolution has been sent to the American
Federation of Labor convention which is of
interest to all American citizens. It is on
incentive taxation: "The federation recommends the
principle of levying higher taxes on corporations and
individuals who leave their money idle and lower taxes
on those who promptly use it to provide employment
as an incentive to full postwar employment by private
enterprise."
It has been frequently pointed out in this Journal
that the American taxation system is in a hopeless
muddle. There has never been a social philosophy
underlying our taxation syslem. It has been a patchwork thing reflecting somewhat the changes of public
opinion over a period of generations. The trend has
been largely away from taxes on real estate and
property toward taxes on income. The incentive taxation plan originated by Clarence Ilazelett, an electrical
engineer, does take a social point of view. Mr. Hazelett
undertakes to apply the principle of single tax to
money. People who hoard money in banks ought to
be taxed heavily. People who invest money or put it
to work to give employment are to have lighter taxes.
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
4i8
Eh/9tt
01VI
cfpE
'I.
MOTHERS, GUARD THE FUTURE
ly A WOtRKER'S WIFE
W,
bellvers in the "Iamlk to
.e. fire
schoo" Letoky for the chillhen of the
has
Sttes. The situatire
United
grown quit serious., In 1942, 901,l00 bays
and girls between theages of 141 and 17
E
obtained eertl-cates permit risg them
work. Of 0it
Fu inuer I 15.0(a were only
11 or 15 y'ars of age. In addition large
umaberS of children have entered in
ploymnet without certificates beelse I hey
are not required by the ocupation .
cause the children have gone to woik
illegally. Many of these young workers,
particularly those under I6. ate in j.ib:
that are not essential to the war effort
and offer little training for usefuless
after the war.
It is quite easy to understand why so
many of our children are anxious to work,
In the first place they feel that they arie
helping in the war effort, and in th second, they are filfilling a normal dieslire to
earn their own money (which eincentally
is very sand ...oney these daysl and buy
the goods and sdrvices they have always
longed to have, Yes, the prospeel is very
bright and promising, but what of tomorrow? That picture is not so inviting- a
scarcity of jobs and a great niany young
persons, untrained and uneducated, will
he cla oring for those that are available.
Times will have changed and tlhe employers' natural reaction will be, "Sorry,
things are different now. No education
no job." Mothers, think what a, tremendous price your children may have to pay
far a couple of years' good employment
at good wages-a lifetime of inseurity
and frustration overpowered always with
the feeling of being a misfit. The brief
present-weighed against all the rest of
their lives, That is a snbject not to be
passed over lightly. There are other considerations to the problem also. It has
often been said that education is the most
can envaluable gift with which parents
dow their children. You may not have
blessed theni with good physical appearance; you may not have money to ,eave
them, but these things are passing after
all, and if you ,e, that they get a good
education, you will have given themn a gift
that no nan can take from them and
,omething that will probably enable themi
to get out of life the most of the things
that really count. Another point--keeping
your children in school keeps them young,
insures healthy fuli and good times for
them flow, keeps them fronm growing old
beforethei tlin. .nd
ad
WC..Idly-wise
gives them a happy youth to look back
on.
Some
fiildden
ire going to object to
school
,i
or COntllnuing their
education
trier gradlaPing fiom high
school on lhe grounds that it is not pat,ljlie and that their duty lies ini aiding
the war MlIrt all they'ait. Let's set what
ctLiin.and In-chief
of
our
P
Ind
.resident
the arm.il f.r.es has u say abdout this:
~romn: hacIk
"We nIst have weli-educated and intelligeat citizens who have sound judgme nt
in dealing with the diflficut problenm of
today. We must also have sciettlsits, enrgreern, eronom ists and other people with
specidized knowledge to plan for na iraal
defense as well as for social inI economic
piesess. All our energies at the present
bus
le devoted to wi n i ng Ihe war.
Liue
Yet wi..u ing the war will h, taolid if we
daod
n.t,thoughout the periold ol winning,
oI r people
.repared
ta .. ake a lastkee l ...
hisg
id worthy peace."
Thit is how the President of the United
Staten mId the person most responsible
for the welfare of this nation t hiks about
tile problem.
N.ow a word on advanced education
selection of .o..r.s by yon]r boys
girls who have finished high school.
There are
opportumities today
young mene and wealell to train to take
and
and
for
in
'Back to School" Lunches
The schol lunch
]'can
be a highlight of the day for the children if
it is intersting. Keep the "daily
eight" in mind for health. Little airtight wax cups may be obtained at
the Ten-Cent Store for packing
salads and soft desserts. ai.d
n.iniafor jam and
tllre (nils
available
are
jelly, pickles or other cI.ndin.ents.
SUGGESTIONS
Sand,,lcht*--Slired egg. egg salad.
a Si-.,I cheeses,
rho ppid ¥Pgetabi,
chopp,*d
jeily,
.
,,Ue g, pea it iinblUuttr.
l~eft-lver
narnalade,.
gIol,
nieat o; fresh or clanedl iA. A threedcker
l
ol btration' zanldirh provides
ivteresting variety in Ile sandwich
'ille,.
(Ca-paek, - ioatat" slad. sliced
colelhIw.
/leked
frui
or herries
iustard.
rusia;ril, rile
beanls. cu
,heoolate, fruit cornItareh. or blread
pu ding.
Cal'rot sticks, celery cnrls a ripe
tamale, a deviled egg, a little packet
of nuts, are all healthly additions
i..n.v. tions
and will prove .wel. o.
to the scholoI lunch box.
perta. l
Ilanes
Never bIas such
in ll
postwar world
ounld tiading at so little
os't been afforded. When peace comes the
fields of aviation, rad., medicine, chem
istry, physics and many of the trades will
bO alerv centers of oeeupation. Ti-aining
and educaion
..
owL.winbhritg success arid
happiness in an interetimn work a few
years from n1w. These fields are open to
ritl
well as boys. A particulaaly fib
opportn.ity is offered to girls who have
graduated from high school, in the newly
irgan zed United States Cadet Nrs,
Corps, Under the plan authorized by the
Balton Act, funIds are admlinistered to
nursing schools by the Public Health
Service to ployldr aI-expeiSe scholar,hips
covering the cost Iftuition, fees and
...anilenlan.(%. The ns
will
es be paid
mon thly allowances of from $15 to $30 de-
Pending on theirgrade and will be issu,'d
,,ifer.is.
.outh should be trained. Whether still
in high school or looking toward higher
edIneatkltY.,you mothers should encou rage
Year boys and girls lo get the cdiilation
and training that will bent fit them for
intelligent, self-satisfying service to the
country in the days when peace comes.
There is already a shortage of manpait iI tile iUnited States today, palr Iarly the lght kind of m.anpower. We are
a nation of 134.000.000 people and there
is no nation like us in he world, But we
do not have to look farther than our Army
and our war industrles to realize that U]nloss we Cal train a huge force of men and
women rapidly we face a long and bitter
struggle. Strength aitd patriotism and
courage are not enough. We need these
three
hut
we neel them mixed with training and skill This war is being fought hy
specialists and we aren't getting theni at
the present induction centers.
Our Army totalled S0P,000 men in the
winter of 1942 aid there was already a
shoratoe of 800,01)0 specialists in the
'arkfl and orn military leaders predicted
a shortage of 2,000,0044 if our youth did
no[ z(t proper training immediately.
Li[,utl.n..t General rihon B. Somervell,
ComimandLig General of the Army's Services of Supply, srtated Lh cold facts:
"For every 1,000 solders, 15 men inl
radio are needed. At present only one such
Fer every 300,000 sotman
available.
is
dies, 4,501 medical technologists are
needed; 166 are available, Foro the saime
300,000 soldiers 1,562 master mechanics
are needed; only 14 ar available."
There ar e the facts.
Please do your
NOVEMBER, 1943
m6
ojeUtcae
C=]~ .
L U.
Elect rem is
Part
EdCitor: ¶11,4l iti [!0.lee
f.teh
a gliis,
tith
nmembe~crs he di] his part in gubidig theiilocal
oly
rsespiitrtt'le Ipt.
to an eminenler, ibaL
MO.
NO. I, ST. LOUIS,
R - A D)
[sTw
l)eiup'sl.
L. V. No. f30 has organni-ed a fine
hi rou~hrh
whosep colitii't art
tot-e-~tirlg tdi,.
sian
....
New agreement for nFit leal,. L. 1.
No. 1019
L. I . No. 28 tells of its , orb in' the
marine field
A fe~ quest},ons about OPA
...
irrlti*l
rtot oild river the
tube: is
iita vetry tmportrHiitl ill hite1
iet
e. t
I I ru.
I 1il..ge Iltern
try lieritt11e i~ tr fi
2iiid
Ahipii
I
tIl....t.
eInt into direct
I
reil"tit
nuagnesium pie.IsuilIllst h-ave dilt
i.wer SystetII Ns t-laIost
purl the itatitiItl
eitjely afterimti r
ruirient,
pltruowyD hi intl
2. Photo l....eti.i. Pubes:
riilOst e'eryunp nalld art- used to slisr id urll'{
atuil on in/aehtnes. FIthtulmin
utfurna(tv
h
il litwdbtLmiiig~ ;rodtct'ii .... I[ifIt
defects
1mallL'st
iY, that catcelt's PIet
light hea..,,
va~riationi in the liutunation
Ray tube>: air iued ui tile
3 Cathopli
ip {kht
visioni ati[ pick up tie variatif.
t,
nid shilon a> thi- picture flashesie i
4. Kenetrip,, t{iihe
are user] bp Coed X
it ;;ill
pretiplor
tubets. antI hi -,lpioperate
have nmarty ctOuputlrt4 at uses ufteli the warix
over.
5. X-rays. have 'ie~rp -a I;tiilar n~ror'e- fu>r
$1) years. Today the X ray tuhb rioe mort
iru
hune
,; ay
IlIe peek at people>
ti ex[andine ilhe r'uiistrurtioxt ofP ninaps -iiliri
obIjects for flawys.
or
s: lS ,,.llOy
Itu...
~L Thyr tyit
It is
ire used for ImItop iin welding roitr
tetmp,' t/leS Himdfol
.i.iihitg
uits used Ior rtr
Most
levels
p ewower
iBL~ly other uses ul l
all o( idulstry is-s wedilng te..lly7. plyIItron
tlphs:
arc pra t of the
ere
h
If1g'ale
No lessening of
nilmedijiH
Jr
(UIll'{cals a m-Iri
uli ....
i l
ShUinus, I. Var tI LItlir
oil h alt k I. 'the pI/e
iL it i lip-,, I
lyies of iTLit
tal.
Loal Ni.
p e -a m' l t mmrp : o u
ive
inglous I mclst
rPi , I hI- I
>t. L lw e
I. t I ,
Jt iL [F nm mt'pL
nlv. ih 'h e
tmn 0l ti~Ie at th eir o '
iW
eir t In- m. i mhrlni
li d
ioinig,l it-m
BI
rother t..llih, i was
ri n-rttnio'
.r lper
th-exhighly J,> his Blr ther tipemp ack -'l with
lent Il nkre
he ad
iielh.lt e.~ae
I Xie1he1lvl,
]Rus.l{I
\cIocal
It ithPl
At the at itl,'tixlw Of l
ie
Ipresol-ent If
rank Jacobs. the prei.ress
pI.I IIr
a motion f
tt local. P.lert...i.eA
was [p;is-.}i*11J
[tiOlDpt erpntnpiittee' w~hm
titmIe L-mpr No. l
tmrusl~. Trhi ix ht fis
It wit fI.ur..
,mminittoe
ha-. ever hadil '-t-p.
tot
lhion with re-gp±t.~o lirlnging t .upttldst
ilMs
Ienim'tnruoim
iton.
llfornlti
speakers.
chepit-llM
mz~llgh t eme.rnt,rm n flie- mi-wet tyvp r'''
iii ipmi lal
u[-itiitee Qoumieerpiiimt itistallntii
ti-nsnee in theI -leut r,1 e't ong .t-t.out idlus
- -y
Aflter lhe Su',ih1-niir arti'le wlls writtl
NL.a]
N. I was inviled by
membership of
the
i,bt~SiTS
lalI P
t thu [. fec
£> the " >I +Louis eh,u plu[Fr mI
, u t r g]..tp t sportsoreid
WAs m tpttimtio.
r i-Iem I,hai*
,
II. E :h
miuttataeits
to, %'hlpihi antiy ito 1innr- of
It~i,]i*ilpg-:*ltnl
a r e r'i ibt-u ,
I UI ;
Tih- rrlJt-ct of the enm~ltioytrs is to fitt t~le-
~
litlza
ti iP the le gtnptr-y al. The orgim
e tItIF
. ers if I,. I
ti tF
es ilt vist(-tlC
NO I .t..l thi- Elevi tiupd (Iiit aL..rs ASite],frit-ens..... d ,INh¥- ltr e e,I r'I
tmi . w hip taA
]y et ,mplti e r etmpluiNiei tte uct to n,
i{
of "Light'
Ihe ]iover
rec/nvened
sad[ showing the
ing about
ho have
made rute r..r
7 ittetieeizm
A ilt bhtel
than
~r:,tor. about 53. :nid ,me-third
rt es'eltitVes. ...... dI 150. were
WVmrl,
tf the
irc-.eset w'htt th, t.'el fell
The papers that
litte si...e and
,;pt
n
tI,- -rck avnv in tIhe back
,,here ILI J¥erite 1101, it iilpul never
piage
ill ...e.t.i..
s-ee it. NIlhii,, ''as saId :1"h
.r salbrtagiii' :he- ~ar efforr hy; cxn'ressrnwan.
I., .h.u.. ..
t
pis-,tl-l
'it be
meiioz~ciiirr
whal
if
/t'iey
it
very
hle-re
frierds of tv-i delinqlten<
tapers itiunzledl t-rpteiscr?
or wyorkers in l; ghi1 yarpl
wtII i titill the
a group
Suppqose
or airphani Iflan~t
dc-ided in theiiidst of the war that they
,werled , vIIat ion, s ( lnrress diid, atid then
half
pit the end of the ¥aeatiol periodi..Il/y
tIf theil show l ip for worhf? (piH /L. pi,
re the lbt,,II lte?
iiy the })tilers that til' anti
W ls[,itt,
,lt w'rlkirrg tIt tp tie satisst rike iawt
p"e"et
<attn c1f mid 14,), fo)r instetd I,
ing trikes it ILt(LLaII legal:'zi, hitnL- It IS
evert rerpcmrti that the Natiunnl MauIl taetu-have
the
action
aking to
i-s Ass-oial on I, t
arid .f eomuse ha' irg L tilore
iaw repeat.
st ningent rite aoaed.
.
e.. y tealhIr pit rrgu.elzd i.It Gihlv>
hi weIiht ir,ti>Iid to
Wo to legin to thr',,
the tnt that i,'nItier o.f tnnlfrrre- itnl1te that
!at~or ,wilS}SS ot its right tp liheheard on
leit~suthont n:tfi tints labor's iwelfarp'
strirJ'S is fightirig to do away
WIhile big
,
.ill
with relletro ttiiprp tt roalrarts which
cut down tlhj-r ulnlholy pro'ls, aild /ql..O.,Ii
intltati.n lid.I kteeI
subsidjjies that will lreit
tltn ]i¥1l, tums. it has exitpadl its ad
retising to Il 0 per cent ,f tthe piewat level
This last i''t, is taken, fromx, the ('Iniiercc
l)¢partuoent's
s/lrey of current
htisitliuns for
Thit at a time whll, there is anl
extiertie paper shoprt~age reerttrot.P
'The average newspaper
the tremendous i!,VHuse in
Ihel~ notrcjrt
s i11 praetieily ill the Ieadingr
ru/ll-pl e
September.
.(.siali)era.
])y 1itii/tieilly all the iniustries
r
his apdi
,pHILlei-iKrlgwr SWipi,,t
n by the
pidl
is ind ieetly
vertising. whipl
r
t]/g:Lged il
L. I. NO. 3, NEW YORK C'TY, N. Y.
/dmiiiPitprt
I-fighlighis
e.
eO
,OW FIM
wh ich
mfy
af
ito
iglhtijg form
radio systim. L nil have a piriceitt drahitthrniy
an~d high fru-quillv nrldtuctiomi healw t
i
hisidi antid ..ut. iel
ettins hentifilt,
,eg,-
alinqns by L. I. No,. 271
does
-ary
L. f, No. 794's press s.Ire
s4olme clea*r uh~iiiiin~ ott aI rcifiC~l
I. Th,
cournter
ill wlkS of
half o[ the
picnic
l. piresent tme then- Lire
A
science. At
(eli&ttx..e tites.
te s
diffir-'I ti
750fInIeI
art high
.
inIe
gi'-fille d and
S~onle art
trpiel of
differet-i
At 1e,4il slee
Van-ownl
thf
tidies are on liii- l~trirket tporhta+. mtl<] fr
benefit of tho-i' "ho. lik~e a g'o\ifphiig t<
withl tube uses, the fitlltwini
qualintance
er
No. 377 tel-, of ils 'pre-" ar"
L. I
ff
1p,1
il1;
n(ue-
itt
bylsel 1hi pnpers that IIrligve$~
this
ontlh atl whLtt a1
rlir
We
Trade, and Labor I....g:ress
he ]I3 L. IT. No. 353
ylI nulel
... I i it
lie,. We wit h hi.. thI blst ,f ittk ar.d an
early retita to health for hhnI III I hd wlife.
''Military" O.pngiltee
ac-tert like a vale with electriity, has rI
t>iateily ixeer ti'LL. 'th,-re xi ether Lype of
[010½ riot be, w-li known, that hII*e
lctronic i..ltthsty alnd
wellin~g up in th, ,
... k tales il the f:ailirhaIl
whole feats mind
0
by fltiB, H
rItil
[re,
,,loi...I f
publir-shio
llr
l
J~e
r['ro`lrcwk VLi;
~l,,,t
Fi~I
it ii....I
imp, hilin-r of t ue idh aime
IL I 52,,
wit
, h
tH tiiti
It
reat .eerel
of li tplhrr
k N . h~i I.,
od
ihnlt we h, ... I
IBert llilk.im ti.
up
W
utal
ii
ii I:s
l m....... tIm ie!ofth
a t th".
],I ev rread
i t eiettie nI i Ii- .
I ii' lo nil, t yhB
i p r h -r. pt i...
p-l t hI t ,t tol
i ltml
lr . fi
f-itt
Wtriri
ami~ru-stsixD
teirc
to fltithien
I
afC imp]pltnmme rllf
tip mh'¾-lihe the ft'eliov
ii,
Fpr
ottfir
h-f
l ...is
',
he
eiiie5 of the lo al
sttt-uirrh toh light th,
nt[hi , gh
i si'
pirestl lui all
imit p -e irx
g as prestiletit
]w, jpTesimlIe l tt hi imi I miclieit
.1' the nifit-er'- t111]
W ith the (tllH v-opimlinrtlu-n
gIerIi..nt
tlax otl Lie
ttroL.h
loss
i f`xe
s
p,.fit,
jid Fito the ...tvertising
poit)klritS
serves to k... the nIewspa ers }i. .i..?so that
news and i~pf~rmriltirni dernugal Ne to these
rft pedalled~
Etnlistr'
hiope that all he rtdicrs
WV I:le" ,,
will ot niut ..i.. -I t e el 'I n ,,-ilt y e ,en
though it iI, iil piff >year. last y. r 'Ewi aI
h~aug" too, many voters
of ear for labtor
I{ vote with tI- Iesttit that
iler,' 'tio buy"
a lot o-f real thmxarieis slippedi mit, ( t~nigre~s
and other ehti-'fuffr
J,:rE P
SI l
tN,P. S.
L. U. NO. 7. SPRINGFIELD. MASS.
ellt I'llet
yingill
r11
Edict.r: As I Wits s
that labor is Iceing hard hit HIregard tlr
410
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
anid
Iiyilvmgt weve
,
uon Ito the tioinu ,ien
lhat thIe reat body known as Congress,
pass laws thuil aeI desigied to be specific aid
vet III can pick 12 lawyies at ralndloe,
InII
hays
.heal
iiterpret
the laws in 12 dligsent
was .iiitl hl,, 12 dlifferent piiitlns, So, who
canO exl t .. a poor, ,in i'gIIlleiant. wtuI.le
seri.,
esd profess tIo Ie, tI cmiiipete with
Ri-eat le,:ll TnIIuIJS who apipare, thy can't traYe
tiht icitten, wocrd agree with {lie spokan ward?
In I'lul",I words. consider this a pia far the
plrolj.r uniil..tanding of OUr efforts, l)Dn't
!ry to read between the lines where onIl
blank rialereally appear,[n
other wordA
try "t liy on the bean,,
And row we rain tell you that the pipp.ie
wafyto
illth
ne amie ,f lur
1;
i
ial
seretary 'hould be Gerge Neuko,,m.
At i.i last megthilg we learned that:
War Bond Contest
TrIe,
ievfileens
at TVA s Foreitan
War Bfonds. Before the argulenl
Dam
.
I ot
arguing about whlo
Was OVer, they hod bo1.ht $.7,000
would buy the most
oirth of Bonds Ill additinn
to sizable deductions through the payroll savings ppian.
ro
left to right are G E. Mutplhey,
Construelioti Supelillteuldtut, ClIdt HoIeieom,
Construction Aide: Frederick C. Sehlcmnmr,
Project Maiage;: and Ihe Ihree Bond buyers. A. C SivrIs. Wilbur xV. Steed, and E F. "Don
Flerss, eleetr/Iianl foieremanl Hesse bought tHree $1,000 Bonds
tlteder
two. and Bivins, wo
These purchases chinaxeid a drive in which 9251 per cent of the Fontina employees pledged
168 per cel t of theiriota l payrol Ior governneni War 1Bonds
our
ieibers going into the armed forces.
But yesterday I surely was surprised to have
our business manager, Charles (affrey. come
areund to the job and teil us he is suing to
start working for Uncei Sau,
It certainly
was a surprise, for Charlie has been a wo0derfu] and harddworking business manager
and really will he missed by his Brother
members andd the contractors and the outof town members who havle come and gnt,.
But our country always comes first and
Charlie has been commissined a captain, sIl
I know he will surely be a great help to
Uncle Sam aid to the boys in our armed
forces who will be working
ailder him. We
all hope and pray he will nit be away
from us very long and will come baick in good
health, ready to start where he left off The
executive c.ommittee held a meeinrg and ppointed Bill Bailey to take Charlie's office
while he is gone, and I know Bill will ry
his best to take the place of Charlie ,whilehe
is in the service.
My friend t.arold Bueba bid the boys all
gooAbye for awhile yesterday. for he is
going into the Seabees. It is Harold's see
ond hitch, for he was in World War I and
caIme out without a scratch, aid we all hope
he eomes back safe and sound again, lie
has a son inl the Navy who w
also
as a
membher of Local No. 7. so we have one father
and son from the local in the armed fnrces,
Theboys will miss Harold for he was a goyd
friend to everyone.
Another one of our meibers, Steve Swotehok, who has just beeome the pIrinu.I father
of a baby girl,
expects o Ile called intot ile
service in
shh.
tine,., We don't know
when it will end, tlt I surely hope the war
will end real Boon or we wont have entugh
members to hold a meeting.
We will have to back our inenr, I's [by
buying all the War Bonds we at, to hielp
put this Thid War Lin,
e thise top anid
bring our boys back hone lIl the sooner, It
su rely would be a iimiralel to have our
ys
home for Christmas. but aylthilg Canl happim
in these ages with all the diffe rent kinds
of guns aid ships, et.,
i L{is war,. It's
a lot difftrent froni the last one.
bF. MUitirAniy, p. S.
L. U. NO. 28, BALTIMORE. MI).
Editor: This
writing finds the greater
pr-
o
picks of cigarettes were purchlased fr the
Lays in service
Ibei. iS an llniovation which meets oul
hearty apprnval--new
prospective members
are now exanlaired first by written exeinations arid made to prove themselves befro
being ¥oted on.
A nil JaPry assessmeint i 7i,eits
per uartur was passeid on, raising dues by just that
amount.
Above all and by all means corresp;>ni{
with the hoys overseas. They cra. e a letter
now Ind then from their fellow workers and
Brothers.
Organize labor dis urged to i.nate blood.,
Our sick list has 21 members
noted.
Harold Slater claims to be on good behariir.
centage of the boy busily engaged in; the
marine field. Together with the worthy aid
Nrtli Ar, and Charles St. IsIan importan}
and assistance f the out-of-ta heboyswee
corner to somie of the boys.
busy winng the assorted collectmio of boa.its
Joe Selhcirst vnd his crew of Efford and
brought to this port.
McNeil bowl Wednesday nights. The perenOue of the oal contractors evidentlIy mrade nial ste ' 'ardusea his faniIs sweeper all"
,ood as he is the only one, out of a IeInthy
on them. Jolhn Raynr please take IIte.
list, still in this particular field Needlless to
R. S, RlOsv&N, P. S,
say the excellent superyisory force built up
or the local hoys was the chief reas., for
L. U. NO. I8. PORTLAND, ORE.
the great suc.es. enjoyed by the above tin.
Editor: One of the curr.it topics of di,
tractor,
One must bear in mind that marine work
cussios ir.,undl here concerns the reent atis a neew ite on the Sidt of 9 per cenit of
ticles which have appeared in Peier's Digrat
the boys. After a lotn period of nhevat ion
regarding labor management relations.Seen
we're firmly convineed that a gIooi bI ilding
ingly a
ninorlty of ]ahor-.anagement ciitratte mechanic makes a general all.around
mittees hove functioned extremely well aid
good electrician inl ahnost any line. Due to
lend
encouragement to
efforts
to establish
his varied
experience he appies the latest
similar set-ups. Apparently failure result,
methods and
improvements and shart euts
only when parties concerned are not actively
whether it he on shipa. railroad or any .ther
interestel ia progress for both sides. With
line in which he find, himself, Ineted Of fophope that I lot of nlokhuill," can be elimlowing in the groove
worn deep by the reguinated, suggestions have bee-n made to Sillie
Iar nieehanic
engaged it, say marmnt, work,
brodecast stations for a sitiliar arrange
the "building trader'" immediiately iooks
Ieat. Rules and regulaions to
P overn uch
I
around for a short cut and i
nprm}vemne'it
in
procedure will probably be necessary.Any
existing I
netbeds,
The result is time saved,
information Y.our local has would be wil
possibly ]ess iaterial and nachinry
coined.
quired. {ere we finid improved methods ill
Have you noticed the swell page the
puitir
long
n runs of cable with a nilhniua
B.,E. W. gang at WIW-WSAI have in ih,
amount of effort and repetition and damage
N. B. C. company union magazine? Wonder
We Kine an easy, anfe method for jockimg u,
why they lon't get over on our side all the
heavy reels of cable. We find a quick. easy
way?
way for instaIling large groulings of kick
Several times
il the past sonie of our
pIpe, and stulffing tubes whether it be ia drerk
menbers have indicated , total lack of .n.
or bulkhead. 'Tes,
are only a few iteen that
ettrnldilng of Inion jurislsictilon. An iscome to mind, As the boys go along experistance arose where several fellows wanted
eece finds the, getting wiser and bette r ii
to take it easy and let announcers do wurk
every way, This Is a concete etxailpe of
by relays rather thati
e bothereld by patching
the versatility of the building truths le trl- for a heavy schedule of reites, Somle meire.
ilan. a genutine li ii ilte war effort.
bers even yet fail to unIerstand that all
After a long period If "tril and errtic" iT; tehnieIal work should be performed by tech.
these pages we still find the effort in Iryitg
Iltias. TIhis brings to minil the though
to
put words o
paper
l
and
have theil read
that a little
education might be in lin..
iaetly the way we inten d..d themin by nihers,
for all of us. Some local stations still have
still an
extremely Ififileu task. We, ind ,uu
announcers doing our stuff, hut the stations
efforts often interpreted and misin terlIreted,
that take pride in their work have techniciai,
tInilerstod anl inllsnderstood. We atteri pt to
availablh for everything.
sort of steer a middle course to keep off of
I wondecr how aniny of your loetis hare
sore toes and., by gosh we find luriseyes it
discussed the possibility of having a travel
times unconsciously wading right in on then,,
lng
reprsestntatie for each i tern ationil
After a long periot of pondering, thinking
district to ceordinate broadlrat efforts? $eetns
NOVEMBER, 1943
iLydidtli,
o
such a ,sItem.. woud
t
hat
wouIdnit it 11e
evenl mor , *y,
gLTli~tit>
roth r Ke ).
ih
]
l i,, ,
t
ar
,,wvrll to have
W iid r
in;t 'rl tltli al ,,fleei 'arii'' eltativi
reiich
hnat ice Preideet Miln
ratrnia\
if
br' tueI-d in?
hatIe ILeIr
W-]
FAX ciet~i
G
it
Gimtg
ha' ang c nsaLa
ni turkish
llts al! Stul~nte.
Seejin~ aI if F. C I' slFge-tt doors bn
rid thus teIiperIItu e s',a 's [i)
lolked
lb
,ahe. yea there Te onle iii1
and
ven
e'etiing biil paaini air Ilmkara fillt tnner eL. -rt
ennsist Jf hatld ai' frIII
{if aullinig 'th-h
:t
Dress room af newspLar, Operalti
nid stale tiLL [KIt
pretty dopey with heat
[Iu se. IhIve 'cen thlreit
earey o] anid IhoI..,
can the guy8 if loors are left unaniin{ OLL
lorked. X..tp. opter'atr. glad tlibt ,ot where
it's hot hut you can I.raath e fresh air (pollen
thiloy
ii free-hi,
Of,
lijei.war aItLteriaii. flr ii'nllf, bI
amd dkug- Mfany If the 1e, hi, siear- arp
their lives iu the fight for freedoni
Iiviug
haunln
hi is p~i ali
per' his ]artpagandaj
isliI
h<di,r eil 'dhlnr
1lnps Inure than a
eITtaVtr Iih .
,h,I
I
rotindrd(,Lsn
By Bill Huston
Elii *II
t
St
...Ih
ku-I..
II
ip n'
,
A:nee lea>
ca4ittd
1 x~pe
fihlla
4iQi
N 1
liii
o£
sorncn
vitek it
1
Il.
29
nd
was
' 110
ali-td
,tn Iu
that the
ihi ialitmitoi,
ouI nlill,,,I I'l,
nattonal
Imd
'L'~.
outi
awifiy.
.
Iha' ri-alk,nial
By the IbanI~ksLILthe l, 1ju/Itmnp'h
Siliht' trilhat tegeuds s
ekiie.s
ay
'Thundt.bIhirdIlvl
Ie priuld
KOIN KALE X mt:. /lgn have aILrge, a haltit fila to clear oui th, hit airli r nl aIt
OLiecooled bottles. Rum01a' ha., it thaL the
Yeatis h; sluithere'' uidst tile fir terS
air coniio ] f thl
ectrio is being il
nIl ilean of wilIf
a
New IWO caIne
snys
jookwalter
Chief
Itowever,
densorsaeeloh [rllnhi it
the
. .ltyilD
Ilyi
iaies
of
pIngleS
to
tie
right
the ilntes are at
And f frlee10Tm thait it liegi.
anidI it's a lot of hoey. Aniyway te[ifue
perature is better.
lreait , arid thu theyL}. ul.i.
Thus they
The idside wirenien Of 48 are of coLulrse
shared their Irram.
a
nation
And
hip,all busy and hitting the hail. 0Oegon
While the elatter of te rivets
ships into the
. hi
Kaisery
are sendIiL
yards (
Echoed wvhere the sen gullP stream.
Willamette river this nionItk andt tooling up
is gtui g stron/g ta turn out the nlew eitory
ives
and eaugteis,
51on by hibuuanhd, w
,hips. Vanicouver is sidng out flat-tops. Mon
ilads a..ni swe. t.
d
their hearts and
(;ove
fromn 48 are in all the plants everywhere.
they
fashianedr
plies
And the ]nigh'.
Our local is sponsurlni a scries of public
not been e([ualhledl 5e'.
i1eetit' gs to discuss post war conai lions. Bus Vi- There have
is pitihulag hard t
].toli
hess Manager Joe
Phoe nix-tilke £he bi rd has risen
keep the gang goig when the let-aown
iroin tile flats by Pu get Soui id+
conieb, It's greeA, this rot putting off for
gne
Arl the thunder of hiL enl
from
tou.arrw. As one a. said. "It's di'amI,
Now is heari,d the w hridaround.
which stuff is niade." PresidentMrQuarie
. II.
airH
anld tharles Foster. Guy Davis,
tres
Flyrig F, rot ess, Flyig Fo
rison-. I. L. orland and Mel lettingell of tOhe
Flagging hearts are hold again.
i the'ir tine
executive hoard are all putting
As volt wing your way no so rei5
rgaiiilzaton ol an even keel.
to kefp the
.fmen,
Par s.>ive the h-aunts
Brother Bru.t double-hecks the hbuks arid
There are
keeps all our records ship shipi.
rhdt of those who build the Fohrtress?
to
no better oficers aywhere andt
not kn.w 'ach aunne,
Hilory hnay
thein for every thing.
nowi
h
liau each buildr buildet
S,
J. A. 1l.W... N,
fan.
l
'hirt' are aImor rtw. "Ihan
IL U. NO. 79, SYRACUSE. N. Y.
r ruhltId shouh i..rs
wi t horse thiyevsa rai hOldlI wreckers? I
have, ard noted how thIty were tolerated by
their chance .issoiettd wor'kmen-. They did
their work with a zest .nitd jest that was sort
seemed to mitigate their
isarmiig, aIt
of d
nii.ual turpitude. TheY were iay lie rLeanL O.
t
'a..iedl Yet I ... ...traIIci ed hy t certain
section of my readers ifor biLIg 'too rligious,, whatever that is- Too religious in
defense of a land disiraarel. esplored, 'et
Y"u
tied, and defeided hy religious me!
Wile
too much honor,
do
Is he tryfine ilsciple of Valiare asks:
rig to convert us3" ALdM answer. 'Y's.
cunversinn to alt...t aLythig shoulld he
preferable to the sLb fish, petty. purblind
state You ill in now."
Mr OlljettIr. afew ye-ars back if you dlraove
iL shnv enr wiIh sueh grace or disgrace as
riclinatia.n permitted; if yo.
nature a..i
had say $1.100 in the tank; if you euuld
enuinmlat platnitudes with npressive .]l
mill run Nonh
nity you likely passeid for
being supported hy
sL ppitrt i IO
AniebtIii
thle American stauidlardt of livingTrile, ehillr a did nat enter intoillt y ai
sI fishlTies
lYutUg
of thinfs,
schemi
{ f/ y et ,1%
could not risk such i Ithreat
with the sh,:d I 4f
ago, we, said, And nw
inductive . .rvi,' alabove s, f'cunditv lhaai. .
forth in long-whiile suril" ',lil in the fnirrit
of tiny heirs to selfish I]lia's inheritane~.
Editor: Have you
or ur children shalt reilIember,
"As t~he natioji' dan$ger grow,
e pulled trigethor
ILpo
All tinb
Anal they iulled hurki cuntry through'
.uilldee'sspirit
SinlethLy ,les of this
.ashrined in everyai irt,.
I' vin
elTi-uehw
Si, their hlanes i are h
andasoul and hatlrt
With a miri
By the
Wrig~s
'an ks of the [3iiutanish
are once
again
un furled
are winging
Thunderbirds
the
Anrid
On their way across the wrhld
WeVInir t, the war babies! Mathy they liv
with shame arid I
' fill Iheir forebears
trititirn Oh what ar tenet c ouuple If million
En glar dlI
in,pie ,If
he'
1 would
ILe
turn
t.nlnr iwK illth rates]
antil United Sta.tes'
yes. we l<,~ed oirenI...itly, hbut w hvLoed
A
s nrt.
Ibpr.L
I. U. NO. 81{. NOIFOLK, VA.
aIlumII
if
Edkril.I: IofteR we d' r at utah
it Ipl.e rIleeps-I wepllI ut 'iMh, or if hi sIleep
ra.Ig
if all o her ,th
lI tI JU iaL
1 ~dl I wI nder'
ox
the nia'n w hi itr. fa in
ntei'ci anit nlarii
trItIre d.an...ers and Tilakn' fivre t eriflees.
while he itfs eiomforlai-ly in his natl-itu of
Inalny rUOtns am1 laths, built raeentlywith
l k
,f
It i the ,afleQ ldiD
urtll I~1if$ o
(ouaprie
I~the,'
b
bbIIItr
, ',ories xI.III
By rdibtil, lih t, illdt I>
iih
u tlOI
duct IiiohtlIZ -*uii*I
r, nd,*1
Llrha
li'-his
l'egler
'II
le,
wrk
,1dl
I>f I I'LI.L
IlzlIIsII'T
V
e
O
h
rutl, I
I;Io II
"fll.unvh .f
t
~eTi1lttlo'l
L
sanme groTunds he rohLT atit~llaLr
A rnIy
fridNavy
It
dIL
iemocracy evtIy I'rv iLI of
lanle the
oia'n'rvali
,he eftrinea
ehijil 'u
extrc'la radical sheull h14 peranditteI to) IIe
h...IL, hut there should he inL i'n.n... for suth
never yLt
its Peglel's flho haI
elIll I ral
ittfrt'al ally constructive eIlil Iism or.ma.fl
fair or scnsible suggestrin.
Ils staff has been all ,F gutter variety
disel'dtis hhiiu with firwhich lat onli
aI
alsont lt veI,
I
ileIceIIt peophILI, Iut
hde anILd'tii,
Ilitt spread hi.
Pil puhiiratiiis
,tigiiu
garbage,
ale repoirttd sick
h
All the InLcters whI,
hrsiitnls are back oni
ill
in thLt'r hoIses.
the IAb
Will be hack next I.o.rith. in lte meantlile.
foictie andI our meroIl blies our i
chanlt se{amen{. Buy) inure Wrr Bonds.
M" I, MAIits, V. I.
I
L. U. NO. 102. PATERItSON, N-. .
seenhe
Editor: The geliaIt election wil
candidate to ILe elected in
]h,
iai
li'tr
nh
New Jesfy is the grileror WIhn i it to> he?
any
candida.te is fonil
Thb
liepublica,
trme amnijasf
U. S. nefatu,j
iir,>Litocifr~e
E. edge,. Edge is
adir to IFrance. Vttr
72
years nld a. w.heri hi was a United
eke he votedl
States senator a geatnittalin
agatlist the soliers ' I.ious. Is history to
rqIait
itself?
rididata is Vincent J
rrhe Democratit
Murphy, one of our own. gince served in
the Navy in the last waI, Vilct is 53 years
ir of the N. 3. State
4II, seetary trtasu
uayor of the
.
l''a'ih'ratun of Labor,
city of Newark.
The Irarty shouldII hI inii....teutiaL So let
Vince is t he
the eaidiuatns
lib emineIn
rlansprirbg of the '*institute of Labor" which
lniversit
Rlulars
baen conducted
hids hy
in roopeatueel with the N-J . State Federatiull of Laoar, and the Wnrhers Education
y13arli reau of America fitr the lostl
When these iistitutys started, u.e.nploynueiit
andl soial security were lust heIlsinilae
merirca,
'['hee institute,
insg pse,,'ered in A
brought together elawarL Ih,lhpkig mem.erL
of e'lof the labor inoventetlt. [)rIf'Lorsu
forwardierlelis, pirominenfit stnta'-iment and
buslnessmen toI, fIu their Lattelntlon
lehitna
of us
ali-eling ill
ili teeonamiic probcIai
('bhit is the way
aiul this possible soilutionsv
Murpihv's nmind runs,
At the time this is xwritten, Edgle is Coil
laig to Paterson 'lhursrday, September l
([pro are some. quotes fm-.,n iin nrticle :ppTalnui
ang mi the I'ateraso, ~Jen t a, New s of Sep
r 26: "E.dge wilIlihe thet Itouest of1 a nilranitbem
ler of lbusinessnmen ii t lnac]~haen[I affair at the
flrttl at Thursday nloon
Alexaudier Ilarnihuna
· he session wa~ called I, ffive Iluciti'-"
ne
in vimtidttity to me
,
and jDro~fassinnlo Tina
S't
Ed aelnd ,lidsru" prhlderls of the damy
the buisiinessmniti ftel thiat Edgea is their eILil
iiale!.
They know how Edges mind runs.
I ealirot uunderstand, or ale I, how rertan
llge,
soi ailed labor leaders cLi be uactve for
412
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
If they have energy
til spate, why don't they
use it for the labor olleItonelt by unionigin g
the typographIical depiart ments of the two
locnl InewPlplr? When I was tctive In tih,
IN
strike
i
ont
year
n,,Lo 'jiM we attempted
tu launch a ]lngr-.eonitrnolld
'Plipt~gtLn to
lhe 'tol-k
texs[
saper [n
ilbat,
I
felt that
certalinr lolh loNl'r~ wie i lukewarn iJn both
IrIeares N.,, soHi( of the'tn lille rp 'Plittcally witlh the edil,,,
n
'It th two ,aperI, that
Firkhe the stlike a....I.. .. l,
non
Poyunion
Pliinters, Is this Utelly a cojtlltei'[te
lrntheis, after the wa
thedvonnIestie
jrobIlem will again
i
te t e fore. The
main problem l,1"I Ibe Thill the marvelous
Proluetion mallchine y ihat we have, Il al
bowe(I to cause misery ytold
XXnllt ir shrl tin
proiluction machinery Ib eon..Iellll tl, pll
dlure abundance fIr all ev1-ri art the expense
of a suiler-sper alainilanc[ fol a r:. ?
Who will be hlst able to hell, solve hat
problem to our aPl,
trigeb,
Fre ,1ho thibks
in terms of usinestrst aId any h it
to labor as a eIre by-produtot. or M urphy who
thinks In terms of w
for alt
Olfare
Obviously there is [ut pie
fii )r
lwe(uS
Mklrphy. Th'e tinit we caitn IPto, ile i
bitter or sweet, Pill hi' theireult-s of the
~eeds we sow iy 191l8 aid 1941. Think it over.
tirothers. Fo~llow
1olntpers' ad vice. Vnte
for the fellow who wil give you the e1st
hreak- D.o not r
yollly
c-onoll]Pour
effOrt,
oil Ith political ljleJ! Don't eitP it the ],a.-
"For Conspicuous
Gallantry
A Silver Star with
citatin for eonspic'uous gallantry andi
intrepidity has
been awarded lbosthuiously to M5arine
Pet. John J. Gi]ligatg. who I.,s a, i,
prentice electriciar
in L. U. No. 52,
Newt, k. N, J.. mut th! sori if L. If. 5 2's
finracial sec-etary, John J. Gilligas.
John 2ifligan, Jr, volun leered tihe day
aftrel Iear}, ltal-bot. Te Was I9 years old
w hun he was killed August 8. ]1942, on
Itling. SootIqnw
Islands.
Onl ollrt haeabill front I ain reportilg that
1,cgil 212's lhase'ti.ll
alean lost out in the
iLIt. W¥e halg a very glood teai.
fiue
season and our boys '.ere
beaten
by 1 beter
sealn. lIs- PiPinrnn
sincere congrxutulialilun.
to the troph$y siglrers and, thanksO,
,iourown
l
tenam for their tine sho,,ing. CoI~n luck t,,
then next
P
1, r
li~lring eb- jat
month our lblU- htSi,,e!g
represenliarive hill
Ieeto') labor fIegatilob,
eonveatntio
in (ld-l
0!h',., aid
...
a
ah
Ky. I k-nios Irit
is theilest
Igiiel
bill al,bassodor I]Real 212 has ever had! Kee p it up.
lot lox! t
]I'*¶EO ilIruItIi~aKz,
L.
p'
NO. 130, NEW ORLEANS, LA.
Edtilo: At thik tint.. teg
I
wishes to dedicate. its rp
nInn Ne, l3&!
t. IIs xry pDrPise
wo rilhY mila
liIi
y ' i jittee. This
Iiern is absoutt.ly unlpaid, ex¢It for glor,
they
eiveye rII
led by (Illailrlrg..rl
nf
.rnp
t.+.I
To( the K noxville, TenP,
Iocal
At thb*
writilt )You hblaI three of our swell nbgg.. Jn
il
y,)tgr iietI.
namIely: (liftorld
(luke
f tht.
bnn~ IB. R'all this
commgirnittee Stages1-PI-N prlrties on the thild
F ib
tay
of ea.h l.nnlth atonu unionblhal
The
elitire procees6 of these
men in ser ice. As oftei,
1:30 se"I'll our figthti
fuyr
$.00
affairs,go I')
Lowry. tr-erge C~rap~) 31orris :rnd Edwardl
Car w1i,11'
Rini[[g. These hys n-,, groil
nlelt alnd teal 1t,,i-chlnic.
Thanks for yi',,-
JOHIN GILLIGAN. JR
on(
kindnes
ns posible L- I I No.
Blruthtrs each a rhee-
for ciga rettes or an 5 other uPthey nay find for it. At this wrti,, el(
lo-al has a total of If! mlen in rveiie arid
this total is i ncreasingw
(ekly
fleeently this toi/nniltoe had an odid ex
pt'rfen-c when it had Iuleg of it, rheIs r,turned wbth the fsllo
nig Ataternesit frontlt-e
1. S. government:
i'Th' enclosedi chcck, wl ihc
addressed
to an Areri-an pris*ner of war hewd in enelly
territory is reItrned to 1he s*laider. 3,]iling
of SUCh property tI
I...ni
err itrry it pro
hibitod by the Trt-ar*r
lIepllartn.e.,t. Yuir
letter which enclosed this property has beer,
fIgorardd."
The commlitee r hoever, decided to senI
LCiicheek to lhi blys
re
IT
who
s live ill oIown city. NT this eoIlgnlitter- goes the heart
felt respect of every lvtbeh- in the local.
M'ay find see fit to allow thish grop of Illen
to continue their tine work without interrupIt takes the eleetricieins to 'rove that thele
is still time for furn in a world of wtr.
On Saturday, August 21, the e er
iar-s'
Pleasure Club"'f
]/igibn
Iin
dustrie s staged
It whale of a sm oker Pt the White Kitchen
The membershlip turled Out 00 per ,ent
for the show andll Suppr,.
'hings Ioninerg-'
happening earlyIrhet at $130 1'. R the floor
show started. Iiieh tally it, 'as on, of tli
best shows presented by the chb to date. ImIdildiately fdolowing thi tefrggmlnce
e
a
Id.,lilusu chIckell
.l..erwIr served- DuriPg
thle fteI thie offieers f the lubiinvited a few
seirviemen to jgin in the fl., )'ie of tIl,
soldiers who was inivit!d turned out to hl- it
I-ly renlarkhleiI nillgl., Aft,, he had his
lile)' lare always glad to he able to
IeniI cur
li ttle hit of sript, toward ou r IiOlltNAI.'S
puhlicatioa
IVe nnle
l
hill Arthiur
Gans, Jr. (onR of
O.s aleother. Artlilur Gamsre, St.I, has arrived
honPe withaill
holurP'oe niediea, dischrage
fronlhe
thr Allry All {torps. We aire all sorry
Art, Jr. Is in
wIsh him thi best of lick.
I also wih tn sate that while we are on
miiatt ,- objeg[.
note that Wilhiam Rultd
CrI Cvi]ie,las joined the Navy. Blilly
liehler hb joined the aSIeabees". Al, bote
thitha lglil
its' Bertk e is 1,ow in the
Arluy ....d luck toi each and every Igrg. of
our menio th e service of our oil otbt-!
We ire- s orryto report that ('rl I G qz
snietere hthu is,~J his faihet,
harII
C.oet. o
SIt, iegl''lhe
21, 104.4. The entile
local stuld it.
ie- ..-. s.
.
p ly
to (a
il
and hi, ,tmr fIrljPi
Mllay h> MiLd
I
rot
IgOw, aiIt
,it'leer.
On our sick list we notice (lit Far aley
has undilegone an operation as has o.r
Will ant WViukcra, To both we w;i h speegly re.
ove ry-. Waild that GtIs Biggs is ,el
aai
Andi kee, up the good work (a i-I Voellmenienke.
The citation signed by Secretary of
the Navy Frank Knox, l.arN:
"Fat conspicuous giallantry and
iftrepPdity ill action while serving
with the First Marine RaWdr Battalion during the attack amianst
Cnelily Japanese for..es 1, Tulargi,
August 7. 1942. Realizing that his
platoon leader wase Uusi ly woundPetd.
Privatr Gilligan with utter dfisrelgard
for his own personaal aftey rushed
forward to his assistimce hilt was
n/ltally W(,undetl ill the attept.
"Ils heroic co, dt
was in keeping with the highest traditions of the
United States Naval Service, lie galIantly gave up his life in the defense
oIf his ,oultry.'
fill of refreshmelts, hI really did
ti
jIb of eitertaining the .rn-...L
l ¢luslt,
do
we wish to thank the officers
of
Utr eutgb for a fi]I, fille. May they he blhe
to e-gntinu~e
shi)W 9
1 ellswer
to stage
to
I
our
tltese
svtry
1,Vat- Sav ing
we wish to report thai the{eslm..
enjoyable
Bloia
drive.
frgil.
..
ur
nlge~~luu-shi has been rely sAttifac-;i/y. We
art, {!rldca oroiitg t,
placetill, I. I. 1r, W .,,
halie no ils gitnay jeeps 1:s potssible.
IlAROLP I[Sllf lIl, P. S.
1. U. NO. 212, CINCINNATI. O110
Eftdkr, Another cdiiotl relly fCot tile
nillinr pre.sss of our J...tINAt
W,e I..r.. in
to
then.
Believe
m, wI of 212
lhose things. G.oo
luck, Ilike.
Ed allnt GenIgit
So 'ailtil
ir net isse
I shall say goe
again 'Aul revoir."
apirceiiIt'
E- M[ SM...
.
212's, New. H]oud.
L I'. NO. 226, TOPEKA, KANS.
itor: *oW a.ain sendt greeting, to all
Brothers of the Internationnal tad tr, Trrthr
If the homle lcill whertever they may he.
].fenIse work ot the projects entr TijDek,
has henn1 euimlyltetri except for a few minonr
additonnP', all] 1''ay of the nien have lIft
for other jouhs or have joine soew- h,Initch
oi the serviee, I am, now workin, in. Ig list
i,!f the lin is
ri
n thne branh in whieh
they are St rin, whieh may possibly I .ly
e
for the next issue.
A few incy ber are wnrkin (in lmain
te na. ae Ponhg at the Winter General ilnsi
Topeka AImv Air Base, and the suiipply de .t.
BusRihlleSS Mnager TRoy LeWis rt-port th01
i'me are hard to locate ill tin.ea of variois
calls, sg to alI indications all Ir1iothers
are workiytg.
\Xv svr'uh] Ilk.. to [ieill fro/n till Iroth*+rs
of our loalll. Sg I wish to take thi, uppe r
unllity to l1sk thenl, t drop a card ]ettiltg us
k...I. how they are doing.
Oh Yc,, have yon hbard of the little rit,rll
who cut his lilgers uiff ill order to wtite,
sh(lhra-ilnnl
'
For a good-bye., BUY WAR BONtrlS.
PHTlI, MAM1tT?, P S
L. U. NO. 245, TOLEDO, 01110
'littg
Og'inober asaih and with it the
bowling, hutnt in and foothall s.easoi, eac
NOVEMBER, 1943
413
with itl
attentianI
oHfb fIrI failure,. Il
bowliwrg season has opened for the
d soniLea
.d is 1now it fill] swing. Local 245 is barkinbg
twe Learns hi the labor league. V., liht. that
they 'Ire riotlgLvery well. Brother' lIowll
(Shorty to yo..) is dling pli.aes Lin{I
.
oif,,i
thinif in this ltming stuff,
at
re.t.ltI
IIatchl gn
tie kept the ,lid ajo..LI
:tTi tIitg
t -lk, to II Ltune If 201] ,L¥
;ra e. M,]
ak .i.
W alter MeKittlaatl is ti'
new Waipttaia .f thi
Rig cers' l. Mait
iLt Barry
enj
o
ys thlb,
[tarn
I.arl/e
rI*olic and ,it'e, tiit
is II
liutjl
t e tililr. II, rIi
t dn
i both at
ne. Ili
adn it' t hat it lib ,s riot he lp the
lmt
Ic/tt.
iI', ,eLS if Nu., AImaI- iI rOpjl ,,lO d hb ftita
teats thi, yI a-
tlrtdltuck JSIe
gMlllI of AltmI ;Y(L the uI;
o[ I; nol ook-set diit[,. ?(.
fGr/lltate vitLmi
attI
I
'Thil .ithiir, e lloawt thuil] I
vltay fl.ini
i ..If :Ln the cat- lIftM
fendt'rs /itad
...I
I ttst hbl temlher.
1ssIItr Ardh1a-f,rmirr aain
af I fly, i,
with ikck Mikdl oaic'whelre in ahe Pfit ll
he curlb Witht .. u'
aMikr-i a
)rnt
Patrol
mullh,
C."orpItls
chw
ienhter
IIs ;I
.
f theb Ciali}m Aih
Itlenadid offer
[ni{ I,,
Ai'tl
17 ye...s ,id.
['aiit
ShMluriz hII rhat eld
t
rand IL,,
pi.,se.... .A Viyr
Don't l>k /ow.
l
c1t{h{ thel
b,
illt
'till intat .
The
I'a I,
gc, r
eloser
hz
to Aim
I1[i
(ptUth! ~'.teut- rwpeeps have Jlive
woi
irt I l t hl &tWii
e turbine ryo itt I nd
,
tr
h,
Soif tife I..k [thie hrewitLf
a
iorder 0, a
law passed freezing w..ges, arid nloig with it
the people were ilf oymd that the
al-ices
on forod would be
frozen
but at this time
the pItices, as se l.he.t,
I
blue sky.
You ao doubt riaa.e.....e
sit
n ev ,aler ';;
very cYnWi
-
~
Iraghter
d hi
;x
a;plida-
bIuyldultp a shLI
i
itilt
tht,
idI
,
I IL
I
gt
hat
/I s
fittIt
nJZr
Navy Wjtch ,'' Ill ......
Tokio' h* hWIiLL"
M a rtia
r
.a .r
I I' tild
New York
in~o
mp!
4 du
{ ~,1[,] { b
(o
hi pak
f I ai,i
tI
Ian that n -ta,
or iv,1a1iad
itat the prr/n: ,[£ patitaliii,*iLii~O , IVr eOt ? \V -I
if ri Le I
ittl i
u
swlI
if evT~ofarid oIL
aii
wha'irt,it
[lak thts
IL,
,
{ha
tie fa rrartt a>
Ith-l euri[t
ani
it- O lPA h.,ve to
Art' {in a-netis
Aknt-v
tart l Oi} tat Itd
i, r vI1y
al the rarxt
Wha, lit things
]tia k flat it i, Iblc..rt
that tuill..
took I
-h o n uit thO
V o p l itil
baird
irt l
thi
it IV tir ul
rae- ga'e ).b. If,
I Ita>Ltatl. Now let
u>f what the, s?,ta
itta4t .....
.4 lheir tlat, 1
Nut
,
[ang
time
tid
Oi,
at hr-aa'
x:i...]phe
s...e.. Ihihnk
..
Sensior
Rt... I ;,,I[ (on.r.s.tairitlli Nke s of Jltaa'ir
were
hlere in Aiehilaru a' ah- wa'. a hilid aOt ll at
,e I>.-,q l th 1,a
hI id
It Ii ..a. areait
.qalups
i n W'r h inrrta y n. l*ut tit- ri ll ri tA nainti a r otin a
templk-
I
t
tu,
a idi,
diff'ere t
I kaow
.atof,
i,
Il
ILI ii
I1
craflt
Ch ailier
oI
th rat Blhc fitTu r. I ut 'th tll
litnakl]btf of fllnt. VIMr
'te the ti Oh 3I-. R iel, ) r. It i,. an{
rIt.
I air-[,
,ttiand all
nh nf yI ARtE NOI CO.
ING IA(XK TO WA>IIIN(]ON. 'theai '<)ir]
tI-ralh...at.Y\
are tIu got a..>
I, IfuNIN
ck for
te a'est at thit
senata, .
,perh 6h.
xi-
t k al,t
anI rcO
a
thr
ra',o
Aa%'
, k1, .w ;tuLr hilia n
I-VII ia-j II
biii
T lh-
p ut
1h
ap-btl~
ito the
rarry
Ilnihe l
and
eita,-
ha-li.r. \,hy
Wht W it Ilfriaiie folr Ih.at
tra er rf w,,ti?
(*tllI
it In thi
we will
r edi ; that
I th
w
''[till t
ip
l irt irt the
&htl i
l}
illI
fI[If rl m
I tth I
t, r t bkaa
i£
Iotat
oi
li'aIIWgIIi
IC
lic ii hIa
lndif
lI..tttef:'
biall,
Iiy
~~
this
Ilnt tin t b.h t- it-a t-l t ai lai qi
o-tb
l
u.lik 1 f iliult Ii I I li]...tia
y fitr w ive frar . ;v'ix
t .
ILL) I pik up thil, p'pier araI real wiher-
diii ha''
hair cut and an Orllctr' austhdi- I
~-i iairae r , bra~sb e ii1 Jlttiitt
v~l ie ti lite Oil '<h 1k
It o -.nti
o' t lik r c c ,,vt' ct ra d t l
Itiiti i s
,LO~ w£ lLt][
at flbhik.i
*;~v
tu Ifoeed
II~1l;
hf
i t belier
ai ..
s,{IW le il{2...},
Il
Ihfti
when
aetir the
O fs L I
raili
I.L
il very
wririn
n-a
a'H
' y-o o ,exr
'a ll
FL iell<
daft
Erothlet
,iaileIy
irs to ta.-, out -)halp
lit lak the Axis
thl ¥ 'r mLi*
"'aia,
ai. fair - IaI irInIf
E, I.
and
[,t{. P' LI
f. I. NO. 313. W LM31INGTON. D)I..
lIt u- o a aa ell with thai W fiii f lan d
drive whih
(in abrr [lay.
illal
] I, No.
: ;~11
.. it- i..a ...i,.r- pura hasea. ,i v
$58,oo
tfit1itri htoriTb
Il I .i.ra truk. ,or IInausti-
ft , it...
i. . .nI.r... Ic].. I hdi
A , be aeia q i D.J iI l.
, It'u ii
i
la aii ti I tI i-
returned homte fruil the hospital
It is wilh "rLI..
th' lIt: th if lhhallrv
.,,rker
re..retIhat
W.
[;I aolijllailIlirl,: Wa- ,
Jtfa
in
lbe I'hoitt Ir fraIternit,
Id
I lIl!,
anti
ail lye niaaieT tay ai host of irienik.
Nt-ar ril'itl
stall o cur.
f
iiit
lil tf
lines in 1h' To leoP ILOM, rlyly af{li1 i P'
f ctL t11int I .i; al 245
$4,000
'(itrIl
Ih
If
the
I
if hIeIl-
haI l bILh
durik,,
t
at
l ti al pPil
)tet. l..r.
t
'loilitg
fai j oad fll Ioll
..f Local Ž15 art awake. thlie
walt 1',t Itr, Ithitk of theji
wn t-eas
inl .rst,.. aIllI ILLhr
avcnrdingly
i Iate
t he I11p
'i,
u1 aitrarched
l in the i..li.b
tnradtl
ea~ry
it
tile rvriit
lht]]ltzh
raid
I[hl
~itloni~iiiai].Th
1it
weather
. huaIIogc
I, gr' n-i
g yWe b uta~dy ahId
ia
1o reach the 1tct hal
ill had thota*hts whatI,
lvhrty e h-l
t o llv a tintarl
If
Iluire's wit-hing ¥uLI
(i
ItzOO~tl hiaralii1t,
Ca,-
'l h nitk ga va,ig kiili,1 ,, natn d x lirhlidi
of
II
'fhiiiik~riviitr. i'helh, i, it ta,e it Tieitahiln
a-11l
a~])l~
ni ~ a Ttit
~
D. 1). TIErRO.
L. I.
I'.,.
NO. 271. WICHITA, KANS.
Ediel/, I al, oult hnnting }It this writ
ing,. hutlint
flt OPA rIll Iheir
.IilhIli
pILI
Jev
tt .
ut t~ eiI HOW I h av e,,
ieultaI
fitMi whiff I harti bIe
]okin0hg fair Atlt e
'ttnit
VlroAh r trai.. -Wh et, has fllIitl
'yhrii
I
It
ln. rlea s ui i a itv il l r ,
t tbtil
lg f
Wir.
Ii,
orace
TI 3ota w ill1 noithie ~ih~urant
w altk
iota, a StaIT
tfl w ill an doubt filid 11 lI~ll
rilelir., "OUli
( tILING PRICES", bat ll]
IL where lfe ti'LI OP'A CETLING
PlICEl-:S?
V. I.
NO. 276. StIPEIIOOR, WlS.
i.'daiai
.. N, l 2N pi grinig strong
rr preI. n. t. fle h" .va i....
a....e ber
htip c.n.idenahily in fh,
tI't vel,
ht'w thiayaids here are pr{>/I-..i.Pg I....aui
]'] jie
I ri ed S tate s arid otanm Io is a rt datinlg ti wit ai 't, en t.lteaL
A s th e e i l re~ospyairhuat gr~iata
shocw-, elee
trarrans. wherever lhay may h, :a.
ire the boysa
wh it ,raeTT' st n d o ut
]I i
a l~irian tinig
to
e to
h LOWJle
at w5heal Sernadaol
ai ,oh,,at
. Ta F.,,)
[tl'thr
Moore
htie. 3,.,
ml:ade anz inl pP'a] ioal h p ~larotiglh l1ht
At
Iint:
.Ia
2>
IUtpen
'iai
ceW
l tI
o t iu
I
,11
II pIr ald IL~rlI"
III
I LILlhe a I~
.me Hulee
• a~
t at -r t.]. a tre. u na tlT
h r S otZr. ti ol] riatt
Whit, Oifl...sti allale.
ti"fin- l...
two,
', az lt.i.. ;irr
i 'aa
L}
ur ,t0uH wociai,1pe
feairhu ;oa-d th-i
a ... tenjo
d
uhitaetctadt'i euaud~i'ille tOitentmtailav.
unarmra g. rand s uaita ltld
arid1 r m iulat r u-f res hltaaat-r1
the-~~~.
h
haug
Eaa~T a fltarin~ 1±totaf]isihaiptqlt
I
LIi. T,;t.
t itf ] w a oi lr tltil, ee.
jA}^ME ]3 limitu.
W~alt~er Budltr
ship' Drirl in .SIIpa'nrtr }1., had
h ks pictuirt taken 'yath .tar riCf ou r i:teiibTt- .
the fiotliiwrri~, 'e >,k Si-ely itor W tilt,
the
ju n iO r -.o -ato F frrtta
'\ is orai lit ;vit
go in g
thiraui
the (la lie hlity:rd Ien' IIh i .alfta ri
a n~d wh en~ h,- ;and i; tr]anl~b ot> Ciap]
trLiat ] ~
tahi, uf the I'
. A. C
hart their pctue
itake , 'hi,
I
yr ith the mi'd le
h,
roh
liaudtItiGfr'ilf
n.
I
eleh trpu-i ai. S ag
n Sf ate
w iff
uiflui . i L. if l,ar(c
tUiii NV.
15[fof Er'
Iak trait.
ThesI lilphto
iat
, af t o i ytlict
I
aSn -AIurtba I wit l\tira
I
. l lr
pi()bLT
]IS~ i
fzaL
Iire" Ita nt
.
to a,tas
I jurdh uln ph,eti
f aIlli'Ll/
I ?}
' ltiy
eitniai
I.
L. I'. NO. 319. MIAMI. FLA.
P
, ,
L,
ti'I
/
] tI i, it' IvIt
-taI
Itedl
ait I L a. th t t would not caniillct with
;any wt:..work{
naIiaaigthe tiny
it stiartaer to
r laiu '-ary Itlard jair't n- th e }Tliriaa]' tart uutadli~ay N],L
s,,'
Jil() IS
(f..,t
(ol~~!71 II
1 0ilS OS it]l 'S -t-I iti th ere {tuk iuir
[ a irlt If
it. ]
] I} ~
ii du t-, iIf Ia ia I LLt oIa, rtri
il, I t h..e I' l
a , 1 rri... L i¥ IIO- i l f ill a ll the i-k, lar d
fi Tbi}h
dlialp fa tdail tiCi t.f i l otih i ti li .
TheI Ill I
! x,, ] IIb ~, I,, Illout
nlr,bL 1Ih I
sa id including
tll tho,),
,ho
nrraheid.
\'
OlsutI, ha,
r
been u-aIIIitilai oit thi
Ihia/ .ar t]te
vt-nra tutu ra tibip"gioes oia sIet qis to
gNI
i uan e.if aI. I ick ( isiOi
iri tv-la
/*, 3.
a i
o ..
i IO
Ihn o {he
niutve. as raavnrdmi l'~'ar-etary
i111< flurar
('unsrlrr
is vias.{prosidtraii
,tgaiiU
Y tura
ltIla
is fira 'a.iiil,
e a.. trIry rI trIo
D(l ei , I hqO
ta . LItil I ti ttHatttiilH roiulipt tein
the icptre1I1here al e ralir
railiaile nest heat at
~
IT ll
bIi- ilr
Lb-thul
I tIrts
af Lhe
l tim e help
illotit r ' .i11 p a il pa- I iaf SstFL r
watch t , pI ,ndi
T hu iIita iniuta
] .art -itilha nI
u
t Lt WeI
ai n]
[ia
Ilei
joh in 'hI"
hind Writ.
r di OuI ;i ~ P
r...IeidDtrive. It is
i ,Itf i I]iI fi aIliltnifI
wo lb. Not
tbIal toi I a
aIifle h ip Ii
t
ailld if tIis nitaal.ha a tlt.- a
lire .j; in thI nf,
irii'l d rlca es. A ltot tfa thtl
dough wits ITtralild in St. Louis. BHatilaiI.
a
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
414
The Fighting
Electricians
L. 1. NO. 353, TIORONTO, ON'T.
/dit,,
I:Igsnizcd la hr. as represented ib
iltal<
Chief Eietticjli' Mate. J. R. Hood,
i.
il ith,
the "SInbtee'
sf~Iewhere in the
lulp ji, of electrical
Pacif"c, doing a ba; ...
H-
the
hi[TLade
and Labor (.nnlges,.
held its atn'ui einvenion ill the hituFrle
abl tit; u~ Qt le ee ila1 w"tiL (r . t...r I.,ii
,
urt
luaihiterln.. iaS IFl g lissl.tini d w ilh
the present go
;ltnehlt> lablotr Ipulley.
faithne..rmir"ters were
.r.. l
IINdr
a..i jls
Iyso, for theh attitude tow, Id that sl(
tiol of tour Ilpulatio, whih i ltin one' IhnId
were praised for theli 1r)routtivt efarts to'ioFd
rl
itnijnr$gthe wr. at.l
cI lhe other were
bing delliberately iLlnoed ;heI labor Ioards
anti eonhTittiTiee were f. rrned.
] sometimes wonder. after Ilisteln, to these
heated
qlieussions
at
labor
ceun'etII~hns,
i[
we re not wasting
our erley
g andI breath by
eIttcizirig the eleted re-preseatliLi'es in
r.'uIrItilerlt. After all tOiel
ain nly blffers
hjetween the people wh actually coIItruol the
ounItry snd tihe
people who try o work amil
live ini it.
The
we
,ooner
turn our attention Tf the
ita nnfactares' asso.iations and
hnardsof
trade anld seruthinze with gre. Ilr car, their
"siggebtlons" to our rhv~tfiflefts the sooner
we will win this war and prevent any fur
the, massacres in the future. Of course this
igilante will ha.e t< Ihe
inIitaileil tile
world ever because capital, as we have known
it, neve- had any fixed natiouMity or Iligi..
Another feature of the cuntctat.i)a
that
ilipre'%ed [lmewas the difference of op'nlio..lU
between the old French Can.alilLa dilegates
antI the younger generation of habitant
declegates.
Various
roenaluiens
wore
iniu
ducid b3 orgniiatiot
outsiide of Quebe
with a view to raising the standard of living
of French-Canadian workers. The nitfrence
that their living eonditi..s were a.n
worse
than Ihla f man'y other parat of Canada
was protested by the older residents while
i wa
oneur'red in by their younger oI..
foresl.
Both sides agreed, however, that in
the niatter o organization Quebec had plelty
of rool. for ipcroemer.t. I think tile other
plrayImoe< will agree that in this respect they
could all put a greater effort i lto rn ggin
the unorganized.
I again had the pleasure of
meeting Brother
Ji, Brairk, who keepf hye
is watchful
il
]nattcr5 pertaining to the Eleetris.al Wo r
ers in Quebec along with George Melvin firoe
consturution for our Navy. Brother H.ood
is a member of L. U. No. 505 of Mobile,
Ala.
le has eight "wire twistsrs"
waLkillg Ill hil and they ar, all
nlImSt. JoIM, \Xew Brt.'swk, IIHope d Emil[l
bers of the L. B. E, W.
from Witndsor. Ross froI /ancouver. In fat
the eleetrial workers in Canada had ap,
('hlintnati,
Washington, Ii. C.. Louisville
and pittshaegh, Pa,,
Blrather A. B. Dixon iu ol e Nick lisi at
preI it. Dick is one of our oldest nenib, r.
37 years in. I believe he cante here from i,. .
No. :a in 1916. Address 2790 Shippintg Ave.,
Miami,
Fla.
,I .l.ok as th...g.
w*'here we had it in IS27, $1.75.
Now
if the work will hbld ouy it looks like w,
will Ie able to buy .rt.i... Inct and a Iew
extra war stmpes
Th. Plorilia FJtclleatiorauil atlild Plriuteetive
o"tnI itleei's lnIr-nled irm o te ill alrksrptiille
under the guidane. of Jit
ae..rLt, who ha'
bee with te Treasury Dihlartmetlt for the
past few years. We expeet to see
me real
actkin strt within the nst few
.
oonths.
Airpad b
Cuf'...g..s..atl
Triey of Thorold. Hi efforts
aog thi, io,
late at night, were rewarded by the lanage.
enelltof the hotel inviting our parth outside
far a midnight smack I ex(.us tie, i
tuaek i.
we hl ve 6Inally trotter
our senle on soie of
nwork that was con,,.ct awarded after AulgusI 3. 1943I, back
up to
pioxlnlatly 26 Fdelegates there.
The ,ocial side of the gathbering wa iAly
Ilpooked aflter by the local c.mitt[.ewhile the
[trIIrriully
singing was cndtucteil by Nig.
t)annini
is
trying to
explain Ip lhtbr why he didn't try , Itefeal
the Sminth-(n..naIlly hill The sanI thing Ioes
for Senator
elr[per,'o
Bth hae
ehenIbefore
tiemhers of organized
labor
here iil Miami
recently. Quite ullusual? A bit .leo late no
rtoubt.
HIruIthir Iarprell (]omranle, afiel gleat effor Slid self sacrifice ta, appointed teller
for the electi
i ti . n a-ring
rio one tense
,ito.tlIt durini
the proIlceedinil f.u.nd himlself
the onp a il onlly pillar of suppolrt for Preiideal JBensgough lle cane through. however.
with flyiig colors and ealloutses .. hi, feet.
Brther Farquhlar had a little trouble rat the
first with the language but gradually picked
itup until today yt can't
u
ndterst ard him
at all.
Well, Mrl Editor, if you Calltugiatago to et
this a]ll in wvithout rutting aiy ouit, I 'i~.)rrni it
ta be, biefl reft month.
J. firl
AND, P. S.
L. U. NO. 377, LYNN, MASS.
ll,;dt,,: Al the new eorrespundert I will try
n) convey the nexs it 1 see it, aniid alao
wish luck to Brother Melnerney the eal
in his
jiirur arounld Pittsburgh.
Yesi.dIday ]y;eIFteniar 18 we ha... our out{;y( fi-thgid
nInuh tS to bIe said in
high praIise
the coI..mlittee in charge, Broth
Il
q Sltdrafhihv,
C, g. Hurns
Mll, arid Dalton.
naslurIIh as we
i he0 ii the elst are rationed
s,, ihsly everylody ha'd quite I surprise
in K at
in tre fOr th.nn fro' we starteI .Lit with the
r( tidLnr han0l
anp,
the
u[al (lectrieiahs
tqIeI1II,, Ih
unt anhd I half innings, game
alIled biehe till players laid out nit the
gratund t exhaustedl. By cotincidence a beer
tuck
II,
ke rlowI right outside the gate
jL*> hefth e rm..
Latedl.
swIar
]
will
rover
ulTpire
ntiphel nit,
nf those
games
aulin. I Welt, Brother ltiee, who hy the way.
was sporta conductor, luyked over the tug
if-war rope, whieh wt Iiig
3
limp, on the
grass antI dec-idI not to aIIbLie he poor thing
ano n.uru, sU he got the dash races lined up
ahd leady to go
when the cook yelled frant
Ile rilin Ipat.e, "Cine and get your corn
with BUTTERt" All I ran say is that it's a
gat...l thing we hod a lot of priae pencil bteeause everybody wel. TheI camp
the suOrprise,
tvtryue got two lobterV
h
i each
hand, two chickens, friedand cut up in his
r.
coffee to hold in his fingers (if lucky)
Fn ear pf corn Ibuttererd stuck in between
his teeth. All then tadle their way to the
tables to partake of a pro-war meal. They
were gorgngt
thse chirken aInd
.Irktng away onl the lobsters when Io and
behold, right in the center there was our little
giant Ill. M.) with hi, little knife antI fork
sllieng away on a thick piece or tenderllin
STEAK. There wasn't a sound
much F.
Wel,. everything was back to normal when a
shriek sounded from the far end of the tabils
nid Brioher F rinchstAod up with a chicken
leg int his hand yellng. "Look at the band
on the leg My Bessie" (Moans.) Murder
will out, as it scents the ommittee fourid
not the ,ear Brother owns a big thicken
ranch up in New lamnishire. Then there
war ai loud chuckle over in the other corner
when one said, 'You should laugh Brother
le.r.y. wait until you see the broker padlock
on your lohater ear.'
Seriusly though, we had one of our best
nims. a nl it really did scent like pro.war
lays. Arid we will thaik God when Ie ear,
git brak to then, I suppose
i
f we want to
contine
m
to write ilt public
and read these
artices, We
¢
u LUdbehd on extra effort to
buy just one niore extra War pond to make
that day that much nearer. Don't they say the
third drive never fails!
It seems that this locality ii slowing dawn
to a walk. We are about to wind up our last
mlajor project. With another member gonu
in the servIfe (Brther Gove..
nnl several
of the boys going out to other territoriea
and the shillyardls, the loeal
con ractours are
pretty buy uytakin care of the reImItinder.
]'her- is a good glean in the future though.
Ware anlticpiatilig the ...nIzg A. F. of I..
p'uriveittio.i in Bosto.. next
I
onI,. where we
lihtjl titel
our i]ternatioat.I Office officials
and to. get a belring Oil our potwOr ftiture.
St,
nt il then I will sign iff.
~
DON
l'ts,it.iLtN, P
.
8
U,. NO. 429, NASH[VILLE, TENN.
P'roof thfit L IT No. 429 h4 dinrig
its hll u the war fronIt as well as the home
front is t.eneihd with nines of our 9 i,en
i Ihe armed forees as of Sotptmber 19, Many
if thnsp
in n, havye ,hi ,veil high Ililks in
thil particular
,ranllch of services but our
Iet trd lirl qulit
Ihcrar.te, themrelre we
give On.ly the names with apiologies where
cre dlit is Ine.
Sorry!
I
Iark uf aT.ir
will not pernit us
It publish
,
your list.)
AX...
T.
those
re ar(ing
whn
L the
'righhet
ftlt that
i
Ialiltile
ilnubItful
war contrihutions
NOVEMBER. 1943
415
to dlIreetly If) the if y oI the ovIfI. d for('tIr
the. yihe
should <,l 1 ili,, the 'fiWe of ftir
to ,.tt somre of the
11ititr
ulL
neild reiLllv
the boys to whotn we
Ia. ri~ct'irt froc,
d
I
'ci',r t
~ ,aLdeigh
·I halfk
''r'
f
,
.
{b..
ha I
I~ieled
liav
b
tillse
Ofn d, hhald]h*
ofl
fLoat,
in the 'Ih rlr %a
]'Pp
Zn[lew''l~l'
l~nnii
ladtltt
Day
Rep~orts onL the
hal IL'aIIV exceededi $V~{OHit.00
ditic
[> S.
p...ukv. [pyx,
L. L. NO. fill, ALBItIQIERQUE.
N. MEX.
'flip
h exrif~i'iertfe Lmal 61ii is havinl
6i1h the three,..ar coali'aet with the Al
..
s &
atlifG
l CI OI
i erestitig
I i.....rIue
coet.itet in these
three yeJi'
'Iit' hie
offa
Th'
l
, revmrnl
. .s
ilnieS II itninus l in Itsi,'
Septu'mli
St ,n...I.
'nt"er l i no,
Idtil
unft,
tIlk run
Iirl
i'al¢,l
fer
art
ajpprioximtme
1.
e.
1941.
Wil1k
average
on
ofllce¥,
e,>
O
ot
u~, , ifI Ik,
hioard's regii.na offier in lDencer for
to grant anti rI'eeer' the in.rrea>
perIfii
.lOfl
it
wr>
idl,
ie'i
, IhtIIIt prejui..
i'
y Ihestahnilizattot
.dir.lt...
eonslsting
of
ftlir
rifIr'lleuattt
,e%
iif
tld IfOU f r
thit.,i ff.r
o
for inlau tr?
jilhlbe [ { Was $uIrlisitc I to oathek hnad tho'
miven iili(itlate rosth'
they alight lnt have
Il
*ziiilicacien
if the contract
,'ratbin to the
[t
wa
eteIAtl the niT.pa.hl) and the lnion,
plnil
nut that
thc cIlItIlat
its agreed ipot
the
tiit
nlicths before Ih e e'laitiPnt o
v Price I( ttiil A.I Itn.I in Inl wILY
nl'>, en pec
Il tteId the act; that he
tI..litInywvas will
[Iq
ill the
I
to grant the in ri;i
aggreti
get i
ttttlact; that the rIm, irn lhi "ost
of living
t't'edls the waLge inicaIIis0; thai the coat 'ohIll
to tlite eInlaImer th ...l,y
,it
lIe passed nit
sitt;;
,
lthitt in linrease
farther knstitig living
It
gn'rntncIt
WlgeS wxold enable Ihe
ti
miore icome tax frtiII th, workers Ind
,ldl/e
ent.iLd
the workers l hllyj tior~i War blot"il
pleprieseitrtives were
ci riply the tIrlid
einable the
tlI
thdt tho den the rtalk wuhl
To
ta,.
..
xces priits
(rIf.. any to pay mIote
to the
,;rilait ith raise woil be,tIntrary
ul*
of the Little , Steel fkttillh aInt th l
lre laid udown ii1 thi' NaieBal War lIh
i oe
TO~l
o >eveni
lhe
arI]
.. .o
Iber,
ease hai,
AI in Washington
uxyilv
Il i(
Lif
the lIeh :t al... t l s for
iii art aeCCutit If al.
'l
' .i...ri. ma' he f, illit
The Amti
idi,!iet that happ' in''! i Swil
llria,
eyi take if hill II IIIIedl II'
Isi, hing throutgh
,,Irnlant.
Ciffric,,l w.
the
Ilh
whole hill
'hei glasses $r,>:, , lhh,.
Itoi tets
bI
long
I
cIrnI
lb,hmn~ loin
AlI thill" rould Il settia was
lllery
·ia ' ati'
InIoke ari. I
aind dJInt nile ,,fS, r renilt]ked.
th at
tIttk h i, ' Lit Iak'iit
I'llh
t i ia vea'
hill,'I
lik. the
I
iiaitidoai Wf liki
hThoeefl( hi,
en e' ctteni~toipt], !h o cadire elf ou b ou'. 'v; H b '
,'he
NX
jobli at
Ik
et.'d
I
I
AIills
S'hiproek. N,
the Hluilw
INIl).
.ltc,,t
tA'ii,i
r holk, i
1,win,
ieali'u,
r'wnl'ti
I.,rd I hi'
,i;113
as I
thoulghts
ceiling.
(M],
61epe
r
ah., I greatl ltiiun we all lielong to?
If ,hir I rk llitiaLtikoits ".u.al tn
! bila
tIr. B y III
. [ . IV , bill c c ' tFL
ti -an
the hih raI.IreitIp
of exert!-
our
our helm. nitr oid 'liwhi
through
I
Pank
alid file menIdrsh
..
cuItl. n g ill
rieitata g, with
I no,
Lt.hat in
,a, teltig B o her i, th ie , I't'ii..) ethti'l I.ocials,
the
I l,
tllu
are wilth i. few
xceptiotns
aN of 'guys'"
nic, winhl
like' t hbave as
ntighhf)r'
in hcis owtL lIIo. te tow n. '['hie un
r "natal
t I(lk
who Ire only oIlkp.ortutist..
In/a and never will lie ui~iic n/el Ili accolict
in
of ihe nIariowI.gtilfi
h helt ialed a bod,
which
hey live.
t Is the bile. rietidi'l al,[ fraternal spirit
perfad i o. ut locals that makes the 1. B
'KL'rwkrW',
II'
P. S.
L. I'. NO. 716. HOUSTON, TEXAS
s
{;reeti ( fie
local
'.I[linte
N ,
7Df;, 11Ibmtoa. rex
ThIl
'lga
ixii Lio. I... . .i. ii bilitI drive ii,
Ioi{jliuttiidn with the [hblrd War Iloan Drive
in, proshes,
Ild
we aire
to
happi
it-
the Electrical WiLrters or the vI
Ili Iha.
hihou.hu"i
tilts jiiri di'til
po
tuIle johl
Wi feel
iIih .is' $2i0fflri wrth of WI, Ihnds
that our urerbership I,,aN iinsole
*tliI
effort (in this drivh , a,]d
Iifn.....illm 1hich the aljpit'tcatils fop honds
bihnnds will
h. '
rolle.
We hple' that tst'
their part tl som '
s t'ltser to vietory.
Iti se, vice
arn which will
?niltill
W'iiy
in
lirh]igiT/g
W, Irist that all the
lly
C]Iti' li k Io a pjIt,
rnIkf their sairifices
''rtwhile
Liuil IUt11 1, Nio 716 is latincin it, alp
o.raui.. fur the year le
prcntict trailnng
,iI'cilg
Septem ber gI.
194:13 ol.. we tirl
glhing to enforce rigid rtiles alqn( psidlltie
rake all alpLreittiee
and other
cti ,iia,' tI
,IS
wincueni attend this shool. for we feel
Itt JiL the Tiostwr era, we will se, a pt
Il'i..iir
nI,'l whIh will (a
iic
hope that m st
o,f
mIIch iitie knowledge
it.i. .....
th.eri iil, Ihl
IfI
Iligi'le for school will aafil themIselves of
this trcii[nfg. bIt Oc. he tither hatid. we will
IIakI
it 'onirilsee? for the flw whoi ni ,t
Iail
it that way.
hi-
t
ille
hliton
,-tnl Ifral'-
of
stw ard<
S'hipliuildinc
sprinsored
ill e nftg in
t
I
it
slelk
er s on
prlratio'
the
Tr-b
iLabor Dayi ' PregranIt
ftip,lhiuriching fi the N'
P'illfi],al
(herlfl
of place on
acceptan,
of tickets for
CO]I
niortex 'makin
In, new
Greetings ar"d welcm'
Wrids of encOi..'.gtp'iiiitI
wo ikeri presi dent.
Praise to the o'.n.il.l.
nenil
th,
ErastsI Slkith.
pirgractl
'er,
I uhl, 0] Ernesh O4 'IhoII..T"s(I. rl lItc..ad (
or.t state of' Iexis' aLnd Mr. ])aa W.
mii"ist
I ra; , aL cstaflt secrtllr'
eif
i
ahrl, . Th,
mit I
n I slur,
[irrie.aI it w a, w' ll killnn. 'dl
(hi'
a1ld rcni tes '¥e i muich
firti.tizefd haine
,
ifI gL ttietleit
iIf
I',o 'L II IiT exten'liI by
I,
l hI
-ra tl..M
If
iti
far-d inl p... itti
iciL thI
poi
1
if fni
716 pre alwiy'
rtlbil to have Dit,
"ilt
lrae>
hak it rInIuI timiT for it short vis t.
to the over
lhaisi'an
'hi
of wIrk,
atUally does it gotd lill,
Kindcomiments o, the wilrk of thl' of
ticirs and
I
olTritt,,,.
( .ns. ructive
e'itiesl t.
Suibscription to oaiich
Prompt
r
organ.
'sponsQ
Li co Iauspondthnlc
Offer of service,.
(kIorit'ihutiont o tIl
he pLbioets of yoI,
otganiza ti on.
All of tleuse gifts will be ,mch more
in the
elfTctive if
aftefully wpi p..
... Iooperation,
white paper of loyalty an
ho..d with the bright libb..n. of cheerriness and seatled wih f'ieidship seals.
Con
.
tsy of the 0,'),
Jour ... nal,
f No. 716 is
Wlok in the
iurlsdictioi.
lirithaig up. We ha." serifcal large projects
will
,till
going, but our rbib r progranl
finish in part by late fltL We have Ilk new
and so we
work sehpdtied at tille pre, set
union
feel that 1941 wi hi
ll brgILis ]oila
hile to normal times hwii l. F ronm the amount
f
wiresreceived ii the hikisines, office of the
orgaltnizatiori we surmi)se, wait
in
ealIlhy throughout the f'tu
Es irtishing
up
itry.
L J, (;Ai.[Mi(tiE. P. S'
i'otiet~1
results
a
th'
lre very gratifying ide'dk
The stewards
~m the iols are due t gre at leal] of ri'llit
the efficient
fil
ite effort put
or.i,. alti
iit
lRegu a r attendahoryc.
The fn'iendl¥ reception
rth.,r is seed well
E. W. so outstanding,
given the travelin
E tllia,,:
Will this be your gift to your organi'tatitll?
ni's.
fi.~
Ilottin g smloke tIt
lt
,I
Season's Greetings
uiittees.
IPur,' aŽ.
M tI¥tEL, I .
L. I . NO. 697, (GAR' AND IIAMMONI).
nik.w
lhe union then sent IwI, tel)!esetatitils
DenverIt get Ihe case li-fore the eftdrlI
bI
IIIIrl
joh to a non
de'nse work starteO .
I'fle
I
-thi
giit"
tlf
i
on,
Llifr
thfre ..
(L.ni
rI'
tl
litItu
after findldig
thal the eomnpany was willing to granti the
jl it'
i:La[
as per contrat¢ . mail attrpl tctht>is
t,, the Nti,dnalW1 ni
I; wlih lhe enpard
itL're nis
Wney.
Which
year'
riprI>acheI fir lheiirl
, s the time
and
II
increase
ilel
i/
wages of 5 per
i-e' fIr the
>,,nr and :gain for rhe third year.
idnik If
I h,i'
Ih ' Irk
iclif'.,
eo/1
e'Ll
tip' w ,r I oer.
4, Wi 'cant to
aftc*
1f11 ha! I- s its Ir
Iofa
I
0L,
rocih
- gift " f
tiff, , .Ion', ftal liy 'well folk, i-1,k ho',,
An...
"'Thanks for th, kidt rIfl.e..). r:ArleI+
il'' a ~refit feeliii2 to L i'l,' th ma so lptn
anIiL hIioouli
i',
neilredl.' areillil
ha ,e.t
ot
'iq'el any dtioid that w( atr
3-nl hsjp
iil to keep up
I .i...rl.he of our fitlg i] /;
to rilrlw
li s bv
these Fitrt hIll h'lpihlt
.,is
tnto
L l 7A' ]l prpaa
l ae r
lu r atssistai
with Lt.. lgain
it tlke~ c
L. U. NO. 791. CIIICAGO, ILL.
AIbto: Grreetitgs. Thu rsday, August 26.
edic
i iate plaqut
it s.r. ice
e in
19 ,otr f local
hon or
of our
felt
w
melnhers
who
are
at.
ounty ill the armed
present sewiiag their f
this dedica14 i.es.
There were i present, a
tin. th, mothers of thaie .o.s whom we had
e-dui('cia.ly inviteld ti witlits this dedication
by the post
Ibil
ediietio
wa
eantuhted
.
froll the Alnerilen Leglon. wha didl a splet
did pih.
'['hirsay. August 109, 1It4, al our regular
me
very iportanil
Iiee'titi
we diseussil
s
}usiness. The high lWiht if the dilscussion
andTrades
Labor
wifs i h'ttr read fiom the
iititil 'if South Ihiragf! A. ;'.of L. request
big our ktial to set,]fdelinattes to I meeting
of Mlaiial interest arr'al.ged. by a joint legis
rport
r hli
thI
h~il,
'ontniitee to, hatl
T
Sctit ],luc;s, I ,S Senator; Honor
l[, inraulc
alehi Williat
A. Ri ,wan. Inaqlir of Congres.,
2nd
district, IHli.o.s. atild Iloieorable Fred
cord. arid their at
. BUdby, on their past
i
toward organizd laboir'
legilatixe
tilaet
pr train. inludini
prire rollba k, subsidies.
na
Act, the [Ioi6hh bill, the
the Smith ( vmf
talk
ther
While
X
Itinkehl cii! and manai
in,
lhLlit leIlatlon ] wan( to take this Ilp
lnocutllitv t<) state'
I
ie
coiin ittree.
hert
the
ninporttine
(if
Fo. rir I e Iproth''r
tili,,
gelroal lhairrilln BIt Railroad,. Chi
with) is
1ir, I'hkr...,I if the le il
Iat
alv''e 'i nitre' iff L call Nr. 794 has been
giving a great part of hi, time and enertgy
in mee'timg with coInti.itteo. I ro . othi, rail
the
,,iimd work fr
IffflwalIbsy~n th'
so
linl whet
r tilruld workers in ('heit',u
ill
aind
our voti, g strengtlh
1944 cral,
The Joural of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
41G
be realized anl whe n we Io to the polls Wi'
will have that fifr
determination that we
are going to defeat o r enemy. For your
in fnrrantion, *rr'ailemernts are ecomplote fot
a politicai actioni
onference in the third
eIaiigressinati]l Ilst ilt, Colonial Hall,
I43
Wentworth Ave., (I iago. Friday, Octber
22, 1943, 7:30 P. Ml,
Another im .. tatt Iue-tion was the resignsaiton of OUi fit.a rnicI l secretary. rother
Ia s te h hart{l]> say the loss o, this
Brother ti our Isnea I n not be oval uato/.
For seven lung )ears
y
ISr'other Haeus kelt
np the good w
offrkthis locah giving practi'ally all of hTO time. Our nssoeiaions with
hill have
mntletId ia friendship ofi
uer
standing that will
it b3eforgotten Ir year,
to come, Brother
W,lat
s mad' foremati
on the N, Y. C. lailatl
at ist Ruimt ~llet
coach yards. (hia.,,, [IL The nlern.lhtr,
Here is a I, hLlrum'' f one of out'
iln('bers, Pie. Allied Pillow, who wts
journeyman wireenu i;t L. I.. Nol 140,
Riverside, Cal if., hef,4i'e he began I.. wrk
for Uncle Sam. This
pshot
sa was IOken on Alfred's rent furlough when hi,
was elected
president,Tothis men we pIr
seatled the to> .f shouldering all th tilials
anti tri}3ilatinous of our nIlnlbership, itI
(Goi.th isa lrott sdidIl i..a aIti hnuhl Ill
iale to standri Ip 11,,1
AI
'A
inW peweC!
Here onl
bera
and sion
nl'uCoinfressinan
clrefili
l'ngce ixiVrt'
when sat
inhg the
offages
various
classes of wo,,rki.rs. Mr. Engel tkm's grilt
paiMns to give
l
dletail'd statement in wage
for nstkflIed workers as he put it, usmig
astrononlical figures. lle averages silie oif
the wt- workers' wages sayin
that they
make from $214 to $2.11 per month. Ie gites
a statement fom a Iousewife now linig th.
welding torch. 'iTe work is hard. she says,
but he fidrs it ..o hadter than her ever
<lay hou.ework, still she earns $270 a .... n.th.
In one pilant, says M,. Engel, and.] I qIluo,
"II took the InInn...s of 25 fliers oni incline
uns.
These
men llr .
no
ge. tinl
frit..
.
$t,200 to $8.001 i sear,"
This Iakes n ie.
readiug ard sotunim.s like a lot of more.
and no doubt it is. and whIn we real thi,,
we begil to compare our wages aonld it inaku
ils Jealous and discontentei.
We take thnse
statements illto Pair nwit sh(ops, show their
to our fellow workert-'such
liarge
sullt, of
,tiey fr uniskilled
labor and her, I [iIm a
skilled w re
and wI Io ]ot earn
/early Ihat.
aimoiunt.
AndI so
Ihe tilk goes around. or
{mursI stun{! nf It
oIntl fall far thin; w,
just accept it It it
Cae value.
believe
lihebest way to answe r Mr. EagseI wi/lh
be
to ask afew questions
Mr. 1]ngOl states ini his a 'tike that he haid
access to the honk of payroll with tnlulS,
wages a."d iircupllimnt.
1. What about the Inook. of the employers
and the falIihluts Irofits they art
nilking?
hous~e,
the I'.
N, 0. & 2'. P. I call,l
if the tr,/ahid'
go Ithet,
tiaint , eitli
be
a
oided , s$~ing
mittaK' hoits
delay, if there wit anl electrician present at
the time.
As I hea,- o th, Elktmtern Lilies there is al
rltadi
a mlma
tr tItt aIIsirned to the pit'Isl
rew vwhith t,'y .ll Ightt
shoulde an ite,
"1nskilled Workers: $214 a Month." by Alblrt
and inlpet-
}I3I
ltat [)0 Jpr cent
So nutc.h for this part If the
}
Inins,
read an article i,
he
Sieptember isgtl,
if
R ¢de¢r',*I)ipe t, At the lop left corner in
small print "Check ithfintion at the sanroe!"
In bold print in hearlies it reads as
rg hooks, WilhaIt
aw has made it ali ..n.. antly deaer to me why our war is
,t tug
so much and why inflation is on the tmarlh.
The story of intyal t is to he fill
ill the
payrolls of our wir fatories."
The writer of thhin lit l
gCoe o,, to 4ttot
that he has
ertifiled clpies of the acttal
payrolls, lI, gives a lIst nf names, wages rird
occupa
tions
welils, drfiHlrs. filers. ast-in
,
ntilele rnr aLi
t,' i
lo
1ral in regard
.
..
chie... ha.Ln
rltli
I
itl th JlIit
.
h,
tous electrical witkIrs I h iTltily aIree with
this t'orrerlinilit'ti
kit thi: iattttc~ ant
iter
he
'adid the
PD.el ih nothbig let, than~ a roll
engraved. Local 79.4, 1. B. E, W.
plants interviewing personnel
L. U. NO. 85S8, SOMERSET, KY.
Editor: It hat been iuite awhilu sitr' thils
ltcal ha, suliltitteld any news, but we will
tly to be milorefreuerit iil the future,
We have hlhl i.ur telal electii.t. rIoll/acing all the old oflicer's Ihut one. W. ,. (t1om'1tlt
l-peal No. 7941 wih hi.. the best of lak
in his new vocation in life and as a llke
(if appreciation for his ever devoted efftrts
andI loyalty to this local, the membrstarp
roisented Brother Bacus
with
wrist tatth
J. Engei, m
embrof (on gross from
M! hhitgal,.
I have read thfil
tittle verO. caefflly
fore omamenting ot this artile I wa.ld like
to quote a few of the high lights fro.. it:
`I IIm a Imelber of the house eki,,
Init..I
%which looks after War I.earttneitt approprlt'
tions. I believe it to ho my duty , nt metI
to provide funds fur this war biut tI Ite what
isbeing do.,
wih them, Trr tiilt out why
a 30-te, tarnk easts
$0.000 ant a 1fI ..
gunl Costs $21.(100.
I
have visited 17
aniswered
this to tito hest of my abilit;.
I hope I have dhared away SOmIie of the injat.
W. S. McLAI,
P.S.
It s'eems to ie
:if this , oul be a filold
s'Ie aOritlies to look ilt> uT's
lltter, atnti (bI, a little howling in behalf
of the Iltell that they are working for, Ar
so slmuldi all Id tlmr local mttemtbers Iel, to
gItII er a,d trod
ottI rqIrl sentatie s itk
uoijirn a litth in'.sti. atiri g. May be wi he,,re
nit the SoutheIrnear 'tip thi, in the bIl,
We have six tea. rs ill the arlnedt fee
atld twoI Lf our oldest .i.'l n'(,'s hall retllies ,
in errlie. Mr. A. E. urns has a sot it, ihl
Army, and WV.L Todd ha, at gran.Isoi
itl
Ihe Air FIrre, ItI1
of lhoa,
,r1
do,ingn gIatlI
Oine for
dad, J. F. Pihlw, also a member of L. Ill
No. 440, took three (lays needed vaeation from his imnporta 'it defenlf,,
wtml,.
and with the ,it of the family joined
Alfred m a ftw days hunting and
.
ish.
im. Pfe. Pillow is witl, the Antlbibia
engineers arid he ays his electrical train'
rig has been most helpful to hinl in Itis
iew work.
our 'ciii
hotaT IH N[:
[
wonder if Mr. Eliige, had 4cerI
their }3ooks?
3. Why dlues not Mr. Ergel stale the
profits of tls'e
c.i..apnles along side fith'
wages of the workers. for we would like t,
compare
theml
4. Why (Ion't Alr, EligI
of man
give
he iiulhe,
hours of thotse xorkers?
5. Why is it thla a congressman
t
and it
mtem,,ber of the house .attti...ittee* which lo.ks
after W ar Iepalrtleiit apraiIri ots iv
ii
detailed statermerit of wages of war workers
'ithout stating the profits of the emplayers
for whom they work?
Think those i ies.a iosdrawver and
yiur
twit
con clu sons.
It is not my i'tention to challenge Mi.
ingel's figures, IuMfi it to say that I til int
dlined to believe there is another rret.tt. hI'
hind it all, While MrI Etgel is Ih,,ld,
CI rned abLI iitnlilttian. I notice he fails to lentian the high salaries if pr
and
,,idens
vice
.residents, of tIhIose
,I..n.u.ieits who ]r*, w fnit
$80,000 tam $00,0ll)0
a vear, not to mtention
the preerte'l
oldetsh arn
foek there are
nltany of thon,. I Ouppore that fill nolhlt[ii,
to rio with tle cause if inflation. I wish I hal
the tile and space'' t)o go into detail on this
tItterl
'ul I will hay,. til eaIt.elude whit lhis
cIos'ii,1' s a. l n......m
lI W in tust. he
In'
on,n ' m
l tad
i11reading such artidles as this, Surely we
knlow ft-nl Inst experienc that eIIl... vrs
,were vry
caiefulin payits their workets
high wage,
Ili. i,
teli recall the lleniy
Fords, the Girdlers. the MeC(orticls wheni
ie
tinkers' }3lend flowed in the streeOs,
fI
course this was int peac, timie, It is tot sn
easy to lismiss this fi'lU our
I
in ld. I haye
P. S.
L U7.NO. 921, ELIZABETH, N. J.
Edilte: LOeal Un'Mn
X,. 921, Ellzabelh,
N.
whos
hif
n
is cntposed
e'ployees <if G.nera. In-trument (Iorpuritiu.t,
mtanufacturers of radii
noin.unicati.n oqui D
intlt .'oildenise]s,
''amirl}3
ins
teard from
through the medium
pages for t (In tittw,
MIch ha. transpirdi
here, the
iver to war riroduea'oIin, the loss of
riot h......
rif these
ihanging
mantty oii
.ur stelwart niiimls nhveriil'rs to the railitary
firces, arid an outstsanding event, lhi award
nIf the A 'ny aoIl Nay
r'l" in Jui
IeI13,
,
We hear reg~iIarly f ronil ntu ratrem,,be r' ser'r
int I'w it, tIll I.nrta of the worlld. [lappily
they are all
till i ttrested in 921', pr.i
,'itsS
ut' fortti,vr
tusiiness
nanagyr.
I. l
O;innill, is a flilng eadet In the Army Air
( orps, and
,,r;Letel
B],oard feinl}3er Milhie
itwick is It 'ergeant i, the War, S,'gtn
Litwick, while hbet.e.il
furlough, attelnh'
a ...ember½.liplmeetingttf
No. 921 an, ait
lid't]
the meml3ers t, kv,,, thl union strorng
TIht
award if the Artmy arid Navy "E"Iwas pr-e
seatet
with el
a}e certllies ill the rwin
fities Stadium. ElizalIeth. N, .1 rid wia
atttendedtr
hyv various state dilinitarie's atnd
lntertntjt~Mtn Itoh iesenatatioe Willilmin hee
wag aui h..r.r..
g.Ld
or, the phIOform. it
rt'i'ornit ll i
ofl h vs i, ntiri t,,
i' 's in t
cal No. 421.
Our labor
l,,aagtmenle t rloi.imlttei iI ftll'.
tiimlng full bla t attd is responsible for iiall,
ilprovetl..nts it, thI factory. Our tew a...ree
t
mleltt with Iht I
tIi...ali,.
aftei
lo. . g a.
arduous tiegelt iotitiS, was fin,/Ily sig.n.T on
March 12, 1943, In het rrt.oative to Feobmry.
1943
Vnfortil
n.lly %,e are still iirtitn/g
NOVEMBER, 1943
decision
oil
wages
fror
4Al
the
W[il.
T..lay
Movies for War Plants
of iovet.l i. el.t
with ard we huIge yet t~
.ea..I
labor has a cl/iglionelri'ti}t
lbiar.ls Io diea
at fniy iabor hI..ard
cairie iletion
taking
ITrec new movies are now availahle
for exhibition in war plants. They are:
"December 7th." "The Life and Death
of the Hornet'. ad "The Navy Flits
O(.' Get then, 'OlI In
r.iaIdu.st
[nentive
Division, Navy D(!part,.nt, Washington, Dl.C.
"I)eember 7th" shows the events Icad
ing up to the Japanese sn.eak attack on
Pmarl Hiarbor and shows the dest ru I
wrought at the bas,. Good documentary.
"The Life and heath of the
opi-ret"
i the complete fl,m story of the Shalghi
La flom, whole, Maij.
el Jimrie D.,ulittle's fliers took ff It.mp .o..hu Tokio. Filh
shows her sinking to,.
"The Navy Flies On" traces the dra,tnti, historyef the NaVYysair am Lots
pront and[ Ill
Our rie.otiatitins
..
r IT new agreeme.ont
and icllilased wages wlrl
toulh as usual,
hut [Iternational teirresntative Bill jeedie
~,ifgdt
was always there when the
wa. teugh
e .t, a tid tilh m em ers oIf No,. )21
lie ¥ , as
t',oretary of State ef Ne
aidh,
Jaseph
Jersey the Honir
Brophy said at; ohe Army arid
presenttatirii, "Bill
Navy ,E"
[teelie i
uf Oi
the u trndinfl
I,-t ifrl.r ...... IIllar le[
era" ltnfl the eola ..oe..s' g.ir, ruiuT .t,
p
ieaotts are testiib...itt
t
hhi' lpternailtuluuail
Signing off 'ti
ne'IL
P, I
A. MT,
uIm
L. U. NO. 980, NORFOLK. VA
Editor: Labor
i or
on the or,
pon
.r'''etl
hy the N. folk ( airti'Ml i bla
or I
m
of plant picturoes.
ai program
ill hueheNt~d ,tvr 3 Siuriay eve
ring, at :lit) l'.i AL
[.
v !]I A,
I,,f . kt h l
in this lruiiitx
iil
fuprin
. .. the paiubii aI..
The corpnanies' r(ltiniu
somnte of the goot things that la[or
nui
IalltS
,o doif,
things that crtami cot
uoniits
ser
Tue er oi
hheard of. 'the
lill Ie [la.,i oier
llation &.SAF'
at PortsrIoruth. \ a.
Oiii ron-tract tiegefii/t1niiO hallye rogressed
eer niely, but due to .thor
lressing
bhi
nos they hail It, be nhIsernI.tintield [,r two
wee-ks
JIoli~ver. uii, hope to telte
Ihlrt
fit O(tober I.
e ar all II x uios t.o hugiri
,.o,-kitg urnler a Teal I.
II O W IIVriraI t
thoerhr Preston
froet
h] aihllllrn t irill
Oficee is essltins Ilepresenitative Reilly and
t
they are dut,i,rg
Wie re.ret
bite job i d-d
t
o repitut
r
Ilother Stol
wat r1ecently uiijiillj e oni the job. At jtleleat
he ix still confined h, hi,
fore.
jut xte htile
thut hi ,ill
fooi
t tlehh
he to return, t hi, jb.
Atei hilve su t,r i
Id.i
terrih
, dila-ler hire
,ince otr last report. CO September 17. a
nIuimber or depth Chilti*i expided ]t the
~aj] opratpngz base ueirunh, h'iig a hangar
anlo se¥ira hL iiplitl
ih i eixpllol io,
klled
14
27 pcerons anod ijlred aboult
others,
A
....... er <if the viil Ti- '.ile 'till in a critical
condition. The Nn, gave high praise for
{th quick inobil~iatio;
of nll e7~lpgelue 'Igauitatii>ns. Thus i, the ,orst disaster her,
situe the lurnbug of he ii-ship R lIIc
in h, 20¥,
Gro;ss that i- etli;]ugh tip n.Driur
(or 11iw.
HA(K TIlE AITA( K 1uys. Wi ;ire raIsiri
q[iota
olr hill
HI C.
I
lOPAIND,
H
f
L. 1. NO. 1001. WlLKES-BAlRRE, PA.
reap ljrt
E do , A
tih
pa.,t
teverail
3eari
th,
I full3
.]iti
N Lt
f[li
realize the
Tiot
Oiioa scribe lhad w~ishul tiitn
h im , N (e¥eri el o
h(Is. ;Lu 1il ul iuulel
s~
e l ]the
.
the
.haiireian of the pe ,,nsa Ivuutjia Sqtate As
precarious
firlst altenl. t lo fill thli, s Si O]/l,,eiitA ii
K,-st of ni yahuilit> if space will iei it.
Ddleguta s te thi i'ii
sx1,ivanil State AS,.
lily
tih
e-iotin
deirivedl
of
[le2tor
ical
WV
lwkers
tuijo i
rel lintd
m uch lu ueteit f tultu Ja rul' ;Ihrl Htet-t
ogr htehl in lhe lity uuf ;rril ,urg,.Pi., Slitt.. ld
f13. lt4:
Do, to arrol ru uIenls 1ait(I. will Mr. KeIu
oh liie WVar
PiriaNee
{>liiiTil tee
of D1enul
v uinlit a mssu
rift(,i
tuith I hb. C TerS wV D)epart
iiOeI
if the Unitel SItte,
M1,
Laimeni.
reil ils
ti/
[ative
itf tih ItIo ,l
I
('uu
hirt v I I...iittee., %as
lelepi
uel h, spiouik to the nIuPln
hui
of the ssaeii... ui... e arer rrtiui
the lli'ud
IB.undil D ri e.
She
ga
. s
t.. ry ]nsptriii
ilire~s,
supplied lit'riitLr
arid
.. very
uly
outtie
ilmumrt:nt. of the sup..irt
expectedl of ]auor. She lsktrli eald, delegali
I..nutel
WEAis YOUR SERVU'E STAlR
'The
hbove emim
,
nl .desiguud for I B. E.
WV. ,,I[nh.s
hauing
nnu1l,,'s of their
family ill the servie,
lair maplt i plastic.
with celhfloid lapel buto[,. and IoI otr
woln(.ri I.t(..n..('ils thets' ik 2p u-dilary pin
auituieheul, fol faslutifluig to the grtamet,
'The sel'city oif netals for ~ar uses has
madeit necessary to itOi£ttctuie the
I..ltle... .I the abov. .iateijals. We 'an
Inish them %ithout, I t or hrfee stars.
andltlh price of tin em.blem, is Ith .ents.
1tt carr.
her nIes'utz
Jo rt IIIII nIuII. I I ies
Ilruth.r P.
ric
I
.
¥arious
totals
li IaII
of the Internattifonp
.eehnitg
this
ruted the srit
onupldium
d
iealy
:uf
ttumle' d
eI
iii
to lbi
Iti i I
up ,d' thu
stuate
]i1it erulnl~tonal T.i
hpl -tdeui
W,alkel ad, l,, lhe
,euul'l],{,is anti p ointed o ut
the
miilatl
]zn'[lc-rri
ct~ufr.iialnk the eIPetrlca
ttuiuke lS amd the ui;. ? c]la itiges anuticipaite d
after the war Ia m].i
I he uItirrt-ei~e)le
ola{ilk'tiuonm with the gr[ti'
;.s...a.ti'ln wa diu
lscu[,d eialilg with egi s-
Ifative
'm atliers anti
mtiy
i other
uesti m s
ltiut rtiueH
iu z th e vlcutm-irh M w umrke'r<
hiole
ireely 4]m oies .. til v ffto, lttl
fims
I Iit , ro utf ionting th uli, I ca"s a nd uIsua lly
0t1eh s, one h elpful] .al'ie. (roun umher d~ e
$fates, whoci have pleah
t will, ,...tilmih
,rhilohs.
.UPgH'ut
A feW if tOle oetutlf alre is
ollrows
A Wages hrouvht to
tslalludaril
bhalu
file.
It Ant djustahle .slidio, waiie scale on the
uiul) nt iient of le w eivpi i} e(.
Of
as5~.
M. FmOOr,
1'. S%.
Cati
C...
Ipointed to lonk after thee- differenee~.
C All
;11ut highly
o1
pwer
neau
O
lectric Lighl, aid letireau Trans.n.s
lui, C'..) appoinied their committee to meet
our iownictmiitttee to discuis the s
mat,ve
etsr lhlugh these, n.e..itlat lori ao agree
eiont ,as drawn up ir'a[ sfueuh jointly by
both
criirudttees anl pIrost'trald to the NIltilala
Wir- LEabor
]oairl
on July 27, 1913,
This was ratifiled ly rite War Lahor Itoarti
oIn SepTember II. 1943. a... thI agreemnits
Aire IlOw iI the harids of the toilipalt. i}i.T
they ire now orking ol it Iso that we will
eecleoi our new rate it* the first
hee-k it
October with the itirfeise retroactive frolit
the Igt of Aprtl, 143.
There are -tiIl a fe.
mainordetails to be
ironed out, but Ioutliutte.s hatve been ah
CoSt of livuinge l
it HIolidiays
wilh
beelnl griltod beui e.
it
ii
No
ol
verti
s Id
jmy
,
ln..eS made
a bert
lilmi
staph
none
for
had
I,
pe
tlnt.
ree
I ;Inluh] like to,
itt l[ here that a great
leal of credit *holuhl l
tei ... to uniI
,,lli c -e mind coui u3ttte rs
t-l theilr iu utl rirug
il>
n olir phehlf, aI[ also it, toi the fact
thai Iu1rhial relalu
us hIehy.Ie.. the eOImpiottl
JuTl1 o lu
O l-1l otlo
s
I-iI.
ntaiiu I ]nai
thIr tigh ouu
the
wholi
hu,
t
i
Irul
'it-,gs.
I oitiIi U
ly
rI veu It. he er
o pqe
'ltive In
those
... .. got i. Ut
A letter.
as rill ,iv l frlnil A.l
I
N,
II SOTL.
..
I
eTurl- iteilt I
nd
l.ene.a.I
alti
agor of ihe (Gatit-alot Tit"we
Cu, expresshi
his gratiica toi
of the mannler in which all
L. I. NO. 1039. lit LL, QJUB.
lousin.ess w.as e.rried .utIt. mildt he eIll
ordil
)elaliollf,
kb
hi
h
.i.s.I, ollIioiled that the'
lEh : iti,first
.ontrihitiutio
of
W."lI eOntinue.
iPWS from thi
scti'p
£ifthe IL B. E. W,
O.Ri. .
M.
INCLATR, 1'. S
irt-giusigt~ iu
i, h.t.
it h
mlmr
to he
has
g. .o.I
,,ews
hupt'
s fOi- s this lot.al is (lertetd. anud w(
tim
ontiituc
writing items
for the,
tI s-tart 6I0L. umr locai was or[r oiund the first pTit of 1943 anii
um,,eha uit r
,va-,grantLd1 on l¥eli ntTy 27. lIast
WelH
l~ilvlzd
Siiae bhentour offleer.s ice-re ulitel.e[ exeeuitivt;O lS ov{ fOt-ic-le ,
and
lhr
various
shoph
stt'w turus ,jlq~u~iifllc l, In, tlil f ollow ing niu iuths
the puresihlerut aiuiu e, uimj.ivti¥
Cn til~ittee have
gil-ni
mullehof their utwu
.1tinl in~ orderl to
(irmuw pip a wage~shcmhedtle aituu butter workiitg
emSlith ai fo]. al
t ts.
L. U. NO. 1067, WARREN, 01110
l'diftr: Hello, everyk...ly.
HeIre we
,]re
sufain, Local Nti. 1067. W.arrenu, Ohio., lIlc
phoi.i.
o]}erLttllrk
We are gZetting runtl (hri~shTm~i bouxes ready
rtiiTthe I..
thhse same
s last year. with
plrizJes for theI
ust.rigrinal
arid Itest paicked
hoxus $O.I'I tirst prize, $3.01]
.9etniid prize,
$2.
third
T prize. 'hese lire
b fir
oth overseas
aio U.. I. A. boxes.
hin delegales to tMHmal,.e Jnvehti,
it
(tinnllt~uhs
were
Mi ssj
Jan
John ston.
oulr
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
418
a Lens,
fihat
,i nj7ed labor of the
IllJnid
ttitt[
has enphas~ied again and
again I h'oirfII the ofliecal poral.n........ Ill
(,1 the (oni\
Liti,
ln
f o.r.. ... igt.iZati"or.
Ilhis ih the tduth that otitjztid hl ...
tI
hust iV{o by, if it ib to [i¥1. it all, Jl',
romt
dictatorial
runil...
This
is
am:
of view wherevr we inay go.
J 1,greetings to nt.y I1
in1,IebeI.
lhl
A,.er
1Pan
. .eder ,ioni
oii I
Lif ando
dl[ij..Asll
to Presiden~'t 'i ilIliait t.,eet
hid my i ,hd
A,
have tcLtne&l to Ma\
hi
Salhth
. -
I
president, and Miss Sally Parks, a Iong
diftanee supervisor.
WI are planning to entertain the
from Camp Reynolds, (eenville,.
P. whirh
is a training center near here,.
We raised
over $1,627 in Iln
a..
for Pie
Third War Loan Drive.
Will have more to write about
t Il
Ime
u
Yours for virt~iry son,~l
VADA T. LALLY. i. S
L. U. NO. 1214, MANDAN-BISM ARCK,
NORTH DAKOTA
Editor: It seeIs that Presidet Curt Due
ain of Local 1214 (Mandan- Bimarekn is the
owner of a steam roller. Perhlmp~s the reade rs
are
Indnlering wh.t a steam roller i ldoing
in the ranks of the I,. I. E W.' It's a long
story, but we will try to condneot
t, steam-roller is tot the hi l used to
pack pavement or roadbeds, lJut ihe kinl used
to make some poor Brother the goat when
it conIes to paying the check. (Perhaps we
,h.uld get Brother Chernich to epaini.i
When, we hav a new 'nenIber all sinied up.
we have a steak feed bI .ur tit .e.thlig
thereafter. This is where the steam-roller
comes in. It takes ear. of the ititiation
and the check.
The same method wat tHrId on Brother
laosn aind yours truly for a fish dinner
after we retturne fron our vacation to the
lakes. It looked e though it had filfleId an
Brother C(ur had a saIvage coIlector giv
him an estimate on the contraption. How
ever, we did give them the fish
feel.and a
very nice one at that, hut not until another
Brother promisen a pheasant feast luring
hunting season. (By the way. Brother Curl
had to have his jaw reaet, It dropped a f.nt
when he saw the fish.)
Perhaps we can give out
aime 'ery good
news in the not-too-distant future. We liave
several ]itt]e matters in the fire that should
materialize very so
One
.n. of them night
be new contracts.
BDo K¥iLnansTAn, P, S
BROWN'S BROADCAST CEMENTS
SOUTH AMERICAN FRIENDSHIP
(Contintud firon page 391
geailnst the brutal nazism, aind against
the corruption If fascism.
In the lands of .. r enemies, there is no
genulin/e trade union movemnen, This is
l,~!
:le
pI
IelI
nf d
E]gii, mei
Mtr. Pit.p52 [email protected] arriItI
[ltnIl]
we if the North Ameroic an Paluu dlg:..
hInu been. dmeeply mIold by the
wariir
hi
i
eaIl
of the offii
r
and nii
tei y o, fIII
Itihelil Idmr neveineatt
anid eIpt iuht by
thnse knndaems es that have /een sin graciously extended to us by its willPig leader,
Blerinards
larez
These nittelatansI
hile
heaped upIn u6 aI idiv iduaIs. do xIt
tuop
IIn.
They ynbotize the Sn
eept
rind rIzetad liJd by 'iIe Chilet I' Wyorkers
for their fellow workers in North A.neria.
VhenlreInident Dfavid ]. Rlb,n.,i...
of
the Birotherhod of Lp.oa.na.tive
lre
andi Elnginel en. akelaIe
to repreIInt him
it
thl
nission of gaodw.ill he was partieularly keen that I lear., mnt-ihing If
the
railroad organization here in South
Ameriea. You L~ill be interested to knu,
hat the oldest cont. i.ns trald uiints
in
I hils. like those of the United States,
are
thbI> of the railroad workers, the en gi ers.
ire inen, and apprentices of such grnuip hai,
fsirst organized so ite $4 years ng,.o,
around the y'ear 1889. Si[1ce rIFnlin
here.
I have had the pleasure
of riding in the
casl
of steam, electric and Diee Ioeomo
lies to attend meetings of railroad wInrera and to fraternize with tilen, generallty.
arid here I find among this grou thsil
me
eonir~adeship that railroad
.ten i.lI slhaFS
with one another,
The labor organization
whih it i isy
pliluzeK~ to represent has for lila'ly
veliS
lbeen concerned in the welfare .f wi,rkras
in nier Coatres, arid ith
iourlley ill
nihih
I am new participating with the lenders of
the A. F. of I.. and C. I. 0 is 1he
latest
vidiene of our traditional into rest
e--l
vel opinig a broader nude rstanudi Hg amontii i all
/rniteirs of all countries.
'resnl,hgt Robertson had this in mind whet he appointed
rne In serve as a member of the ilabor
eIegatiot now touring the great SouIth Ame
wian lepntlie af Chile. ie alan haid Ii: mind
tbat as itien's and workers, organized labor
has a stake
uteiiiqoraey
i,1 ahto
ale
/a
n-i',
I kld il.'f gri'td Ie
It.r tSI,
.. U['
ad
ox Iure'. t
.IilaLS the uit
et'
ii
I ' li
to, L
n'i
I .. grerit
.S
naiidy
''aihte', b~uni, Lg
ntl~er northernJ stanhhni,i
I
ilt ii
tooirul,'k,
Itlte
p}ltiiu. ii ila itha
, laity
lo/a!Npe'd
ronnun~atut.I' IoIhng hills, nvineial dlro*t',
its Ii;theri land af LakIes, nuagllicen hillbi,> inhliJt nIl
tCities
but of
eourse, Ino
thi
erI~ Aan'na
~ glII (,i agi"r~l,
trlaveler %I,elll
hein
[Jonic,
IUIt,
whether
['e..l
~id
,,a~ll. oI ifwln,]l,~land.i,
~M ~,.
Philip,
political aind iunjust ra]t
itwllar to Ui alit resem.
Inlle
in inter-Americas,
cooperattion.
anid Ilit
interest
iur
[in]ringing IthPnlleles
4f North, C'ental. and South AIerica yn,,
lioety together is an andortnk rin worthy
oif 'he constai and untirinig etaruIs arid o
tinuou consideration or all e,,neerte,..I and!
thiron!
It)
this process, it i. irseeitablt that
abor of the western hemisphere will .i..
effeetivdy contribute tOU h, prgiil tll
wan etrrolt and more fully' ilevehltl
titerAt.,.riran reb l ins.
Anpn, , Ici':Arid n.. w the third
i
adel(' of
the U S libtr detegatinn, Mr. Diavid Mel)orind Jf tIhe
of
Iaeiess
industrial
Ir
31, '
,tl)~...rald: The lirtt imptn...i. I
"ived ef
'hi!e was that the peullIe are
lill
those aIf the United States iti nIlarny
respeet,. tatluieolty their '!b~igii i' ntrigin, ale
thI I
anIe Ia,
r
Their cinlec hiabits
of work, art, archItecture
nspirtIItons
I
forit
better economic life, aid des ro too
litallly i..lnemnt their tie and itell.oened
'The wraith, of ('bile ia still
iaupped.
It's a It,[d of the future Much relnauns to
hle (lone. The
people with w hinn,, I Inl
crie
I eontact look foruxard to the day
"hni their
h
nt-iliries and resuure's wit [i
dLerlcptria
ia
point where Chile will In'
outsrai~taindl
r~anriufaeturing nation.
Ihey
uidnire the indiusrial enterprise ,if the
United State
about it.
iand Io Iol
hellto
eii ask
The working men aInd women ofI
l
enjoy the
hlneflt antid protection of 'tr,
labor uninl wIhich ()perate
In,
a denoIrntie
fahion. TheI, organjiztioss have stealfast
Iy aJdvaned Idecause oifthe All ied Nt, int
They have fi resworn strikes for the dluttinn of the war, as organized labor has d.....
in the Untied States,. The .i..n OintheI reel
out Irakien la ifindlIp
hi,
fIr tIne Ulnited
tates Al every meeting which I h,,e
tenlId the,
ere mention Of the,ehit'IleiftS of the
ie.ipje
of the IJitd
Stales
on the fishirli and productin" f
hnn
rnught dnl.n tile house. The ChilI.., feels
and knows thet this is his war, this wIar
of free
II
n ii the defese of their fr.ed,,*11
-a sI ru~rth
.f
free men who will staiy [let
These lecluratiun and erptions are ntalchenl
nil pIrson by rankinv omciais of the ,Ioerrcii. lhe A.m.. at. I Navy. "blhal
caIl
we to b, he 1ll you win the war?' i the
qusenWt I hear froli countless siftSl ,I And
the a.s..er
.
s: prod]ue the raw material,
ineriaset yulr production, and rintinn
your strt, gth it us and for us. And ho.l U,
II natin
thu
ti
togethr? I ha
Ieni
hinnry made i, Mie,
Sehene<"
tadl', and Pittshtrgh by members of nor
union, hntatht iy Mr. Philip Murra,
now
utilized efficienitly for the moIh.r, rrieessng
orf
vital for our war effort.
lteris
I fervently htpe lhat down hrn
.
h the
years Ittl ititlial ,anifestatioi of friend'
ahilp will result in a practie a irnrnvneit
If the b fe f the people of all AA
.e rica
ot,rnh he proper utilization oif the re
oilurres of a C(rdi-hessed henIlTnhere,
Annn,,n...' IYn.
havp j11n[ herr,, f'in..t
the U. S. lahor delegation who art 'kiting
Santingo. Chile.
Labor
.
f. r.... ma
m ChiP.
..o..d*.as
1
onni
1 MW,,(r*{I Vefulor'A IOthe
/Ict'nird
sftten, F, blhfi,
A agt s S0. 1913, 6 :?;5.
Str: p. II.. EW..T.
MA N P0 WE K
r('1i utied from. page t8)
ltnoders of organized labor, hoi,,a
, put'n f'r,..d a different vie..
They Iontended that the present Ailnationi Droves ha, r was right when
early this year it warned that thh
army
idas
.lanington large a military force and that production would
suffer.
ie
Bark ini Maich, the A. F. if L.
tee'
that a 11,20(h000-man army, insisted p,,
by the "brtss hats,"
.ould "strip industry of skilled workers.'" The Fede rabi I.
I
419
NOVEMBER, 1943
.Is
that, with America servi,r
eonteIdll
ll] f ]emit' llJ yev ,it W,as lst'
;ill g arse rtni
tiilgenl
ittaint~aifl
tO
at]
trial force: than bulild itn
tad{,qtuate
al miy.
to the,
lUSTIFY WAIRNIN(;
EVENTS
aW., of Ih~
M
aIry
Presidetntl
Older of Ritilway Cr..u.tors, who is it
lel/inber, if Ihn labo.-ntatl eTlllenlt IoicIiy
~
m
COnam ittet(I, the'l~ ¶aTI])o e ('nmt s Lt...
lab..l
htve p[lov.II
ohhlared that "tvettS
ill wir' ing gaainat tI), lalir
'r)[(t!i
c
Wa m;
;titilital}[oee
now
'W,
situation
that
tilp
sCacI
kilbol
tlh,
;gainsa
Iall.,.Y,
pe fiieted
rnclusiqn
hIhl IIIIIshe s'Iv, s she, II
p aal,!i('
rIF~
O thlia
t, lXahf~t
r(][lkl
%t~rItILhI
h ,
fltIols
brire
I, h icl [ lt I,(Sl;
lect-i l bIy ilii
taiati
[i
UtI
.l,*ill
I, ,It
~
PItLIWt¥ill
,
g VIeItl[
l
t
Lhir
II,
,,
T I
~
,
t
D r
IT lIJl
$g I
1 ll h Iclnes
I
*
SLOWLI A. T. & Ti.Toi.Ls
ARE WIHITTLEl)
LOCAl. I'NIN SE'S lE$EAtRIl
!
I l T'(
Cal lar ,, Ih
Thie
(
a,lox
IItrrt zr~
...I Navy, st I.leat
moiizii :1ii ;~tty
t(s
, la-avet aIlr few weih
l to
i..le F , bu'or
.r.li
i n the al-eltal If F
piint ed Iut-
hiul
rI,
,I/eI hr,
[Mther
olu
~
~
I
" II
I /
tI,,i lb,e
it1
I%,
] .
IIarieIi
:
ir
vI taeF.lII1
e vI
Ig
jusi
ll
I
~
I I,
in I I w
IaI e
Three
so[,hLz
il'
darLI
inlulhs.
sxee ivel]y Ill/g(
n I
,l
h "Il ih
l
tlt;lfeileiees
pr Iite.
.
two i ivantjages, while the shipb ulibl 1ng
'
tructhi i (a ,
scale ish, lss than theI (.o.ist.
fill
nwe'halitsc
ides the nlecessltr
it pr
the 'hi pyl .ds which soreiy need ithe
enea llt'atind t ri- gilsthe coristyttetion
'I'd,
s ... t±elV
-lttle, w lltb
tie eVQh
et tI..[. TIv¥sh' i
tSLf hlhl
..
Lolt
I t ,ie
tttXes
all of
es. to
a,it-t
irail
Ilii
that got to~ winningr the wvar.
I wish to take this opportunlity to
i
trail
Iocals
thank Ill if the si.t, r
iP
h1ol,-hea, ttal
nie nb,'rs Yfot their
[;pa If thl
o
polt ill helping us io gtl.ih
t!I k ull
.. I
eo..ijl if'd ciIll
Wvar pre(lg a
bh sh...ttt 1,s lhibl, ti' lli, ;lad
mel'er iii
I1
alek
futtit' tlineab we 1
if at ,ot,(
U )
I
il
,
itlpplying
assist a iliwl il
YN1t
oe-bll,
work, or weok Fill ~ oL1r' '
ac I
to
ea.t alyVkys beliebve
willinK to gladly gixe that asMttaice.
TIlE YANIKS ARE ('O1I>
niLaedI frt rI1
(i
a(;nttiluec
3,11I
l
('om }it satinl
Is
0 111t11tLiieatit
(
Federal
ate
vt
ve inttt
whieh IlaS. jtrisdicti ti
rates only, Tlh coImltissiiFT inisted thalt
ttS sh ath]d Inthe earitinlS. froI "'tI ,
considered hy themselves teg;..dl-e of
hielri
td
As< ite earniilgs ;td ,
over-all
eoc
r nsitllred. th 3 prollucti
wh
that. e
a i'eturn grret-tter than t'oalhl h{ j- il~ t
*The rtdti&reirs il rates w kelea re
to by the c(..pany becausel f this Do'si
tio,, of the commessotin, which the ep],
is unsouli under p
ev
pajny bi .s
Mlti(ah the minlussiont coM(-/,,fition Isl..
siderell is within its discrttion; aliid bcau.se the c(inpany felt it imPlortilnt tf
have thle rate proe.efdiig di eontiniua
so> that it .coldget ..t. with the btmiltlt
of helping wtin the wa,"
It is interesting to 1i..ot
il.rilv
t. e
altopted by the Iwi llp, qutatcll
roasotlinl
I r
ill w'hic h
This illustrate' the l irlrrIt',h
Bell nladslctrJruttes all of hir s;±t*l lilte t )I
,
palries aed how the d)Itines ]aid dl,
the healds of the systI'em atre ftlowetd ilight
(dnw11iith
1 in,
Abother sgficeant filat wiat arila-1iA ie
atnlllyzinCg the. rejllrts rif lhee rate r.,tirt,
,e
s.I1
lase,all cases the rasiduciras
lion
o -lered liet...Li.. the (.oll/ rlsSion, felt 0hai
the profilts thinh the c......rluie w ere e(arn
ing could Int i! j3usti.Ird. Andil in almal,
, tele phrI},Tc o11htrar[I(s
the
jnsltjric
lery
e
inestigtatimts which 'u-re irlstitultet
cnouin
I
'rt nut
if the~ (tLS
true
dr *ietttt .It il. l...
kof
he
L t l l v e l-
hy Il
T is
a ,t
tiht lb 'n. li ure ielsart ti:t-ll
th i-r-stI'(-l in rat, t,
wxh[i
itlxestij1:t dhtI.
r.,
I D]sillg the
5 I. Id h
lt
eori1vra,-t~le that 1reablictiori irt tatle}~ii~lI
1 4
d to aI ae]cIrata I llI-tr/ r
dio
rates 'v ilId
A.
lt
hadl
<o pan ', ;I'milities a.lqltJ
,.h{lle th, e
,L~;i,
r the Ibo14
int
t, t h
.
Iv
ertaxI.d
,ere
pa tl pl]i hi a sy siat, i1
sar y
- to
Ilo ng dhist1 .l.e .rcils. Itow ivar,
ItASIS FOIR
I)O%%N
It
p rin ril
jes
t
...
wd
h -n t .l.rita]lr atlhtal 'ilth IIh11is$1oill auIsis~tII oa
I]ol
In~to the, I'rliltts of
,vtstigratlall
PL;INNINt;
1 a , 391
,,Cl
i
here
business
other i tlrs plitav doing
that wals ullnhblid Cf befole the wi,.
'I'hel, h('eatise ol* itilllr coast city ~vith
hiewar .lougrhft
fe.sinai. boat )ads,.
a
us other things to think Illut, and with
f the
the Navy taking o..r many
la't. ,ltir boat y;Ids
fishing boati, oni the
took oiu aIt w Civeta li I,. ( ur t0 re. .... ll.
two
-lfroml
that had amploed
len
boat v
t
elecricians now have h yun 10
to threy
t 15 nl(,, in the smiaIlh-st, to oveI 00
largest. All 1old s0enthilg like
in the
300 men. are n1. . ItrLillg in thie sill)
~lleke({ly i l lIne, th,', ' na aCRlnnl
IthI Ille ve VIIry t a-c
other,h uth
[
f
C]
helo. The fact is. that tilt eon
of (ve for libh-ltv hlo, I llld
these Iraolle inrescap:lhly together f, 2010
1111{7
lb(t bolel] i
cml teds.
3'ears.
grr alti Itl st1O Ten~(,l khalt e ver.
for very
n olT b...I.l
idrlut rv.
ya it
The QiIc lett ship
.a.d is -ather .... qt
of
irl that th*y are btibllin narges
tIld
eone ete
I'll Iu}
lannelwd ]i1,
ha..
this tint. Soeni of these, barges hav'
made no'e than o.i.. [rip to the: /hal'
it the Slohnns. loaded jilt
theate
oil, and have prIIveI vely satisfatoly
eonre"te
Iln
for this type of .,rrk.
shipyari hlte, il tile otnly yaris building
COncretXe shills or bargzes that did llot hta~e
nirilitie eortrl lct eaI.e. l n]iI ]:ls
their
mon t hwheI. big <teel agreed to fuI-aisb
steel for boats, and the concIete slhily-ad will finish its ¢ rignid;a eotraut for
22 Ibargze s.
IiE( (RI)
WORK c 'RDS
PERO(RICESS
lotis ;'nal
Air
In hltitt ilng back liver
rt erd Siuie I1:3/. x; hen we startU u lthe
l'tifying l nlote
work eI..ls, it is Ir'l
Iur. p lgr-tass affid had we not baelln iHig
the stalistfia]calfis it wonli be i..t.sess
ali while a
siblh to note this flIrg
fil,
il, 1 dit i
.....
t if ....
g1e £ IIailly
s.I....iIdi the> xCk (airds , 1ra)t see( tit
yillr,iha
.l .'ialssilKy [ll* tmlpl
ing li'
w e h a'~
a reay
I fi1
hed
<tlsfne/tct-y
3,ly
)I's
e.ifb fltetI, l Ih A r. &I' sIootI P1111
lines
..
I
ItilI,,rat¥ ig <I t
t r, ailsl, iril r all a reIhr]]l irl
eella ti"1 t,1 th il Ive btigrttitII i tia i
n li Ia dI']aarlt nlae,t ,;laa h
'I [,l 1,
of A . 1'. I
l ' 1
hI)TIt l 111
,ll IItl tesI h l "IeIa ts1ltl E I t
, l ll
graph wi res;s wveil as Iha [,a-s ing r)F
bit
ite tt*yile It] Il
alC v
rietlilla ,
[, lilt<1 it, jol. i d
rl
r c e e
in g iln th e ir'v - -tt g tin he
dlys h ir vei t tg r'e s ll d llorl'n t lv
thent
buildihg ships, enid
h
keep
wa
hl tvr
YIt1
,ili
shilya dal, that
'vary
olStU.l..iO..
]s )IILII'
Ci
ii
Na
T IIi, 'nn
LocaIll
Newt
N 4 *-
laat, tlh JIlt
It
The' ia]y essen[]i;i
Adfil vs
Nld Adlb ss
til
lit
IF tv
au ty
t"fl y
~ i,
a
h
Ir"ttI
We IIi lht 1%.
;Iat worked]
; LI i
ri c tsir]e El
1,N li
t ilt,
W e ktiant //Itl
H . avd
UiT ,ib-er-w.Irk
do the itar If
,u it thl
s;lttsla;.tilllly tli
a r e. i n1 nva-ai of 1] l tl, III 11s(0 ilL[i'
kte p itas ib ie,
wh cn s1
l eic
r](1
to
k-pI wtlr a:.
4i*
Inte i'l i.lall
Iraathlrhlai..d I(f Il
tie-al
\V'SrlterN
1200 ]f5h S[., N. XV,
WOl'k gling that is ],,aeOssly.. lhis Ihs
1
420
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
BIROTIHEIRHOOD VOTES TO
AID MILITARY MEMBERSHIP
Conttnued from page 402)
carried, that the applications of the
aforementioned mlleu.er: be appruved,
and that the 1nmes of these applicants be
Ipl n.ed ii pon the pension roll, and that
their pension payments arc to begin when
the applicant shall have filled out itnd
filed with the International Siecretary the
sptecial withdrawal card which is to hr
Stlit hi... by the International Secretary.
The appcitiamn tf Charles Hagerl.nal,
I. O. memnber. flo a change in his age
Iecrrld,
a.grianted: his requested c..anIge
leink supporltd by written evidence
Ihich substantiates his claim to birth as
August 6, 1882.
The application of Albert W. Go....odw.
L U. No, 58, for international pension
was denied because. the applicant hias not
established
twenty years'
cOnti Iuoti
staticling in the BROT!IERHOr*.
The application for international petn sion of [larry Yeskc, L. U. No. 1147, was
denied because
of lack of twenty yar
"clitntinos standing in the BROTIHtRHtohi.
The appeal of William MeQuade, I. U.
No. :3, far reinstatenment to good standing
as of JaniUary, 1941, aid the ssuanece of
a military service card as of the same
date (January, 1941), was granted, due
to the fart that the evidence proved that
the member had complied with all the
laws pertaining to military service cards
and the payment of dues, but that due
to the mialaing of correspondence, which
was pIacd in the wrong file, this me, her
had been denied his rights under the
constitution. William MeQuade's military service card therefore was ordered
accepted.
The executive council exaaiinied all the
wriitte evidence submtted, including lette's
under date of Septe..ber 9, 1943, and fLepternher 20, 1943, anti found not.h ing iI this
evidence to prove that Furi..in J. Luhigchcr.
L. /, No. 18, had conmplied with the B.. T.....
H"ODl military m.ryice mabnership laws:
therefore his request for inlilitary servic
iie.. ersh. was denied.
Iht v'videniee presented in the furnl oi tln
flfnial reatipt a n correspondencc. in the
c:tse of W J. Erert,,
L. U. No. 870, showid
lhatt the nlnler had complied with til tilies
gnvern rB~g he
lay nen1t of doues and Thou 1d
have been teclared delhituant. The standira, f M. J. Erects in the BiDiTHt;lle0lle wils
nidneeld reinsttedlarciis to show no Leed,
in atl.ndin, for the period involved in thi,
case.
The International president, at the
of ih executive
e
council in the J.un. Illn
iUt~diiu. mItrde a further investigation of tll
[email protected]
f DunickKing, L. - Xci.
N
-,In an'd sub,
alitted n rep.rt if this investivtiation tohe
coo,,il, The counch reviewed thisa ISi preiiUS evildence submi tted. In] agreed that
the dherisii..n of the Internst.1nal Presidet
as renudereid in this eas,, which waIs that il
dlecisioni if International Vice President Ingrami as of eblruary I8, 1943. which sts
trineil the action of the execntive board if
L. U, No, B-P4, wps ,,ade in accorllan.o
with the l.w and ix hereby sustained by tle
rit
The written
evid[cie
p
rese ntad ndr
eaunel, pertaining to the eef
(hCrleq 1. Sigler, Jr., Card No. 7074GL of
-. IT. No,. US. showed that the meilber ha'
ompilied with the laws of the ]nterntlional
Constitut ion overning his neinhelship, but
that dlue to the war -Ircin..stannes
h
L4a
d trige
to thea
olver whi-h ht, had no centre,, }, 0<,
el,,ed
his nmeme rshii standing to beclouied; therefore the Ul.in.i. ordered that his st anding
[ie
'adte eo ntil'lUll in so far aa the latle
involved it this
I
ase
e e aLI airnd
neer ed,
that
he be admitted to military service ... nebership.
International S.erets W
B ugila
replorted
that the referendumn
.ece..tlv
..
the mehiership, rehatil e to itlakhlg Ihe
assessment 25 cents per I..n.h ll
h(Ine ichll
u.ennber flr nilitary nrcrh., Ie'
anIId the referendum voted LJ[11 hy Lth nonbeneficial mebers (B 010Tth nrT", ) re tIaiulg
the no,-0enefcial n
.. a..eer~I[ ,nrrbem>rs
ptaiIii nilitr.i service
eadts when in ilic
iserivie,, as prIerilbed by one con
IilutlJn, wlts Ldopted by th, fnliox hw vet':
Brufc/it-itr Members'
I'otc
IIi the 25 cents per nonth military
tssessmeit
IIi
the 25 cents per riaoth aii-
.gainst
tary assessment
01
22.051
,Lajority
9,s5an
'on-Bcnefricl
1cfleshcrs
Vr,te
IFor
tlh granting of military service
-a tnrtis
rs
to B mbeblhers
Against granting military service
ea rid grats to B meabesr,
494
25
Majority
,lag
The Intriational Secretary informed the
council that he had conplied with the inandate, and will puhlish the result in the offieial Journal
had nutilied
(see
page 4211,
the different
hloal
aud that
unions
he
to
thiseffet.
with
instarutions to place the
chiangeb
ia effect. The council co...u.rr.d in
'
tile t lion of thehlttrnational Socrtary .
In
onfi,,rntiy with an action tiken by the
executive council at the Jalle. 1943iterting.
with reference to the Hollywood, aLir.. stuai.
liIn the I]nternationa1 Presilkt al.d] the In.
ternatolna Secretary made further -ports.
whieh were fully reviewed anid further in
st ruetios were issued by the council to the
Inter, tLonal President.
local
Miliuti
NI.
1914 appiaed fr.n
i e
dkncsion
of the internatuimuil President, as
rnedtred under dhate nf May 18. 194., whir in
tile local nioJn was denild the- right to ]I..
eha 're a certain piece of
property
. The eiun
Ill. aftel examining al1 the
guh,viduncniittd, sustained the [eekii..n of the, Iter
nalionWI President.
On motion which wa
propier-ly
.
,lde.
seconded andt arried. the lnternatinal See
rotary was
authorized to
open a
,,ec ,
with the Bank of Nova Seot i inl he city of
Wir,nipIg. Manitba. C ranada; thi al.cn.u..t I¢
be il the naitte nf the I. IB. E. W.. and withil'fiwia'
l{he miadpe hy checks siged hk th,
lnterattininl Secretary of he I., B. ]. W,
This
atis
Ircoto he klnoIn as a ]nsion
acc
nt.
idf ptitg
Sitnd
5 toLb
uel
fir ty iprtie
Brrltherhon p
ension
iau
tnt
{'ainiitan
ieni
d mten ers.
Local [,nil No. t--30i' t]lir.alill fro.n the
drsitun, rif lit...ational Presidlent
d
ruwn.
wherein he granted 11ernLi-,ir ts tilthe Ine
he1rs f L. 1],No. B 30o known as inside
eeall
a]
workers,. to transfer their nIenlership, fra 1,. . iN,.B-(t9 to L. T. No. B-274:
the lahit.r loal union having recently been
chartered to take into itsmemership.
inside eletrical workers of L. U. NX, B-10!
App eariuf in defense of the appeal (
1._m
tT.
Ne. B 31in were B, S. Reid nIl Roy Canerer
A/pearlng in defense of the Initerlal ontlh
Presldent's decisicn in the case was A. B.
'iichette, L. U. No. B 274. Appeaifr in
lefense of the appeal, hut not iepesti.. A,
either loral union were
.
MLlonn
nle nd
Clhr Fe
Fischer, members of
U.. No, B-274
The ouncil
r
viewed the evidece submitted,.
i, rinestiotrming the witnesse
S,le.ti..iony als
giyen by one of the conttendis parties which
was nt denied It}y Ih ipposin g ide, and
which caused the
tetmnit
rlequest the
International p.rosiiel tt
investigate this
anrle of the ta/ an{d report back to the
exe.u.iv e con Tic at their niex nleeting, when
ih coi
/ will act LIlpi the ase.
I'he 1¶41 (St. Loui)
con .-entlon
law
commii,ittee
no n-concurred in Ial resolutions
erutalnnL.g to the Brotherhood pension aild
the E, W, B. A., and instructed the International E*]xecutive Council to la ke il ex,tendled and thorough invstitation of "iath
fn(d," and
to
report to the 1043 .oaven .. in
rpostp.inteinl) their findinffs
a
-I reeinle
n
ti .S for changes,
ig the
h,,,
I
vr',,rrnlin
oith
the penslea fund and the E, II B. A. funds.
bti a,
to
place
both of I
hbasis. y.,r council. in o.rijunt .n
[nternatlonal
Prasheil
~,
at suOder
with your
nternatio,al
ar:i
Snecretary. has grivn munh [r.ne tonhego]enh
lens. iach mea ber hais s''nuhl antd rceived
advice from the membhe rship in hi. dstrict,
as well as having had the advice of men I,
his district w
hose
life-work has lI{re
Iito
insurance and pensions. Your lIternntional
Secretary has given much of his time to
safeluarding these benefits against enero.achiients by state insurance departmtnte (state
of Michigan), and he has had
Lrare
for
t
the council a full and detailed report of the
action of the Insurance Depart r..ut of the
State off Michigan, and of the recent cxanuorialn amid report in thn E. W. D, A. by the
Insurance Departtent of the Duistrict of
Columbia.
7he council. havinIg devted several days
to an examination and discussion of thes.
reports, concluded a follows:
That the International Secretary ia ta insert in the official JOURNAl. the full text of
the report of the recent insurance d'part,win]
examination
under the caption of
"Veluation-"
That fur
ther,he
to publish in the ofL
fieal JOURNAL the compilationu anild ateril
that he furnished the local unions for the
use of pensionl connittees:
That he prepare and Iuhmlt to the saemhership
a referenidum which will have for
its purpose the plaing of an assessment cf
$1.410 a month per he'lfitiil .'embur
this
/Isse smeat to be tpplied for the first six
ailon his of 11144,
bnningi Ta,,unary I, 1944,
and ending Junle I0, 1944, and weilnning July
1. 1944, aid cootinuing, thereafter the assesm,,bent to he cut from $ .00a nonth to 50
celts it ]nonth per heneficial mlember;
That the $1.00 assessment be divided as
follows 70 teieIs to be placed in the pensIon
fuill, an i 30 rents to le l/laced in the Fl. W.
I. A. fund: and
That the 5In
ts .c , ssessment ie divided
as follows
20 cents to he placed{
sionfund. and t0 entsto
F. W. I3. A, fund.
in the, pen
beplaced
in
the
Beocause the I94g conventlion wals postpkolieIhyouir council, ir, kerpiud, with the
reeonlnenLatioit
of the law eotimrtttee of
the 1941 i't ernatinlal co.ven utn f(iages
2i5 21]¢ of conventio
til .. e..edin,), which
Wilt, lllpertcd lh, a vote of the eL.nvenhin.
sihmilit the alie h.,then....lbership, with
or'l r1emiIentlatilon thai it he nadipte'.
The comm itteeon auldi
,xeeuive
Counoil Mdembers rellier anid Feu...
4
p.r... I that
they had examined the aud{t uf the 1. B.
E, W, aitd E. W. B, A accounts as stbmlitted to the counc il the
y
firm f Wayne
Kendrick & Conpiny, (Ceriifled Public ACeoni
na), ts, and founnd that all accou n ts ehecieked
and that the records were ia order. It was
novel and seconded, that the report of the
committee be approved. Whotion nIaried.
The council reviewed the reprts of the
council members, of thir activte in their
districts since the last meeting.
The International President and the Intlr(Continued on page 4231
NOV EM BER, 1943
0#jU;rd-13""fte"
~ni ..
.hpbitthe ¢.cel.
,
.I ..
gtll
XXIX, sqetar... / If the C~.tslftutfc..
~oU
Thll am2d1 ,l iI lbllIbd b~y th.
tBy eCotnc[] aii ,,, Atlal,1, IX, 8o
u I I ...
Ii
A*[ti~21*3
XXIX, s'l'Lb2 II o Ihe(Il~itli,
XIV, Soe
8
AlI b1tcibci, i
1nterlblalioaal OInpix 'bliaad l ~fsad
a, prbvid~d a,,.
hilt mlb1,i
fDILI
y,"b' Ia*[ mII.....ID
A~ll 1il, crlbbt~al Ofblil, I... l)(
emer
IIIeSrrt.
Ii.11 1)c~
~ ~ ~~I~a
.may
m,,ke Itch It
II Dboll d~ibcls do~
.. ,...
ai~al~l~lbollt ,Ilh locy]l
la, [eiaiL
I.,O~ Ul
biell irbbellU Itlch se
f., ad 1hall ,iot bb¢
l]2liti.I [oll ~ ,lL~y iy[lZll lOaIllyOll
benbfits
.,til IDhe,1i
reeoAt }ill,
l.
cax
t(rice
[}loa
hin
,Ablyl
At IIIe eiis
... l ittiie 1aubibinl Inifll ..
,,lb~zO []l'y l .....
[
lit,, ill fite m' il~ita i.......
iii1 Otil( 'If ([I, L. . Shill( be tiylrlbf~rd to
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The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operalors
JJ F.tI., OVoaer
Midland, T&`\1j
Aurora, Ill
QIasgw. I<v
Sa." Diego· (all,
Charleston, W. Va
Stamford. Cenit,
Haverhill Mass
Millinicket. MaMne
Paducah,
K
San S~ernarcilno, Coel f
Oswego N, Y.
BEaunent, T.xa.
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Eureka, Calif.
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Milwaukee, Wi.J
WHImington N C,
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Des Moinsl l
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San Antonio, Tctas
Vynkers. N, V
Meadville, Pa,
Moaile. Ala. Savallnah, Oa.
i~anid Falls Nfd,
Akiot a, Or'g,
M it ,,, A rl,
Astill, Texas
Coar field, Pa
Wahpeto
N. Dak,
Mwaukee, Wis,
Srma Ont,
Michigan City. hid
Chicago, Ill,
Rnswell, IN, MLX.
smn Fvaneico. Calif
E iriton, Ohio IHar{chi gen, Toxas
St. Joseph, MO.
Nehr
Lincoln
] [ ntington, W Vii,
Gary, ind
Lewistown MoiMt.
Dfurham,, N. C,
Watertown, N. V
Sagihaw,. Mich
Sheffield. Ala.
Montreal. QIe.
Wenatchee. WaSh.
Middletown,
P.
Rn:htbond, Inl.d
BrIdgepor t. CaoN.
Portland, Maine
Montrleal, Qe,.
San Viego, Calif.
Frucscn, Ariz
Ely, Nov.
Warren, Ohlo
Brener~tfln, Wasqh
AiexandrJa, La,
Olympia. Wash,
Moristown, N.
Pocatello. Idyhol
El Paso, Texas
Tulsa, Okh,
Otlawa, OIt
New Orleans. La.
Lowell, Mass,
JSmaica, L. L. N. V.
Stockton, Calif
DonIkirk, N. V.
Santa osa,. Cant
Dflt il}le, Ill. Iowa City, Iowa
Tnrrington, Coan,
Champaign, IlL
Easton, Pa,
Fithiken. N., .,
Jackson. Mss,
Sh,,,nokin, Pa,
S,.nta Cru, Calif.
Atlnta, Ga,
1in lrafael, Cali[
GCand Leland. Neo,
San Mateo, Calif
Omaha, Nelbr
Hot Springs, Ark
[lute, Moot,
Panamla City, FL
silvs, Il,
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Nwburgh, N, V¥
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nor"> ¢Creek. rexas
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N. Y
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7
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32
35
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12
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Ldafyette, hill
FI'flt ROnya Va
11
2
531
24
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B 675 EDiabeh N
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105
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676 P¢l'saeola Fl
19
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149
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677 Cr7itobl, C Z
679 Wit]Ii{j,g. Manl
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27
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139
697 Gary. Intd
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64
698 Besemaer, Ala.
123
112
B-702 West Frankfort, I
0
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2
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13705 Lincoln, Nebr
707
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14
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16
709 Liverpool N. S.
19
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73
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726 El Paso. Tex.s
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67
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728 Ft LauiderdaIle F
13-730 Newark, N J
34
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731 International
Fall
2
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733 Pasr gotilad, Maiis
80
10
?34 Nor.folk, Va
52
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B-739 Columibus, Nebr,
110
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743 Riea~dI9g. Po
345
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744 Philadedphia. Pa
2
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75I p1ll, BlufE, Ark
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58
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14
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41
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.qSperior, Nebr
790 Jacksonvlflh,
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38
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209
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791 Boston, Mass
300
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794 Chii,,ago. III
14
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807 Little Hock. Ark.
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92
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863 Lafayette, Intd
Jersey City, N. .J
865 Ja] tl{ore. Aid
Kaira.s City. Kans
670 Cum~ber land, MU
Kokontio. Iml.
573
871 ljcnver, Cole.
870 Rawhins, WynS
II9 Liverpool. iN S
8B] Sioux City, Iowa
Meirplh/, Treun.
B-882 Shelton. Wa~h.
883 Iowa Falls, Iowa
"a6 Mlnneapo] is, Minn.
"88 St. Augustine, Fla
Hap Las Angles,. Ca[{f.
892 Ft. Collins. CSolo.
Mank~ato, Minn.
094 Oshawa, Oat.
SOS Bsstrop, La.
896 Macon... Ga.
897 Terre Haute, Ind.
898 San Angelo. Texas
900 Jaek~on. Teno.
903 Guilpor-t Miss.
B-904 Taloassee, Ala.
113-05 Neworft Sews. V.
910 Watertown, N. YV
911 Wind~sor, 0on,
912 Cleveland. Ohio
rhorold, Ont, . 914
i,7 Meridian. Miss
922 New YorK, N, ¥
B-025 Grand Jet., Co.§.926 Checopee. Mass
9:38 Jackson, Mieh
937 RHihlnond, Va.
B938
Logan, W. Va.
93
Waterloo, Iowa
930 R ussell K y . B-941 Maryville, M;
946 L.os Angeles, Calif.
B-947 Northampton, Mas,
B-049 Alstin, Minn,
U-951 Plattsburg. N. Y
B-952 Veltura. Calif.
953 Eatj Claire, WIS.
9-0
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950 Deaver Dam. Wis
B11-9{6 Lancaster. N YV
Ke] so- Lonlg¥icY,%
Wash....
13-971 Fecanaba, Mih.
B-R00 Nrotlk, Va. -B-9{1 Lancaster, Ohio
901 Corn jng, N, Y.
B-992 Olleoita, N. Y.
B-993 Louisvil e, Ky,
995
Batonl Rouge, La.
B-007 Pult AnIgleA, Wash
0-.104)2 Tulsa, Okl,
11-1008 Mo..r.via, Calif.
B-1011 Blsbec, Ariz....
Sturgeon 1ay, Wis
1017 S ringfleld. Vt•
Na~.,.Pa.
1021
1024 Pittsburgh, Pa.
1029 Woonsocket, fi },
1032 Bellinghan. Wash
1033 Cagary,. Alta
1034 Concord. N, H 1037 Winn{ peg. 1V/an,
1043 Lebanon. N. H,
B-1053 Salma, Ala.....
B-1076 Tordeo,. Ohio
lin1ha nl Canyon
Utah
Cabin Creek, W Va
10B62 Newp York. N V.
1085 Tacoma, Wash.
Battle Creek. Mic,.
1095 Toronto, ont.
City, Pa.....
1106 Oil
Newark, Ohio -1100 WIllrd. Ohio -. -I ISI Kiinova. W. Va,
1122 AIlxaadria. Va.
1124 lira.. ford, Pa
1133Halifax, N, S...
Annisten, Ala.
1140 (',iunjertand Md.
Oklahoma City OkaL.
1I45 St, Loluis Me
B-1147 Wiscolsin Rapids, Wi,
1140 KadEsltasi{ng. Oat.
1152 SiayrE Pa, It151 Wilkes-Sarre, Pa.
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Por~tl.nd, lIaIII
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as lie Alr titeXXlX. Iii, 2 Il theCils
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Article XXIX SeetlIII 2 d~the £'ontit~itidn:
p-ROpOSlITON:
Arli¢{c XV~ SltlO~l I9, All1 f'lall 'llnlmber
haiving twc11i, months o~,boc of cllitimlous.
Itanddit.g, ,Whd all
drafte'd orl ente. ctillr nIlia¥sriIIe
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VOTES TO All)
mIIrTARY MEMBERS1 Il'
All
L1. U,
B-I1
Al Iet t, I;
I , I.
M. [VU{SEN
Ih}m~
blomw
1), A. M{NNING;
til cr Itry.
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ttmO fa, II I I i{f, or d1fath
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fter lh, wai I
e l,,4
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Ill ...
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A~l:i,¢,r
i I,[ 1 h[ i I, 1{ r s {l t ,
' D...I.{,tr y II
II{
wd
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[h, w"o ,t lll/a~. 1, c n be full
I~
6D][o I} ~}
hx ]l i'l~~ i~"I
f 7[ vII,[
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p,~,llt, ~ de. i
bihh ,,il} pllo i,i jobIs illr
preare to moe ,11,
b l i
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swiftly tt ,
,ilelittht last fful
il th{~, %~a is finlrl
prlstenI..Aillla
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fL
Pr,
Tlh,
S
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
424
IIHrace A. Turner, 1. Ui. No. 856
aI
L:il retie Flyn,
m
L. U. No. 6
iilur tn'l{d .%lardi 2~, 1~136
WVli/iera A hltg[ty Oild, in His wisdom, has
seern lit oLIa i alum ourP ilidist OUr esteemene
and "Ot ]i, hItntlwr. La~wrvmin e Flyinr, who has
been a tLat
aLL
lm
oal BrBttler of Loeal
I1o Nn
ILL Ii, Piee OO be it
Besolved, That We pay trioute to
PI is .n1eo1]l
bD epN),JassKg to his tanlily aid illends our
sincere $np.lUi:,; and be Il lhlre
ResolVied, That a copy of htis rtsoXLutoio
be sent o thr L'aiiMI,
our Iate
leprttled
Brothe, . thai tey be spialed in full .,or
tile
minuts off locaJ Union No. [. arld a copy be
senL to l, Electrical Workers' Journal or.
puaiicatilyni
ind he it falther
Resolved. Thit the meibels stand it sileice
Lot a,itied
of one ilintite and oti1 chat tel
drapedp fol 30 days as a tribute to hi1 I'ierinry.
J. NUNAN.
C. FOSTIN,
tt. MADDEN.
Sa. Fra.ncico, Calif.
Committee
J. C. Kiggins, L. U. No. 125
Initiated September L2. 1917
Agah
hll, COnic to L. U, No. 12T the sad
necessity of Closing its files on a long and use.,
ful meibershi
with the passIng onward of
Brother J. C, Kiggals
The deep frleildship$ formed over a period
of years make stronger tihe bonds ofryrnpatI , and intensify the feeling of mutual
loss
which
we haie with his lOVed
.
e..
z. O,
hearts go out in orrow to thein.
The charter of our Local Union shall be
draped for,0
days in memory if Brother
Jtiggins and a copy of this resaoltion shall be
spread upon the minues of pir mreeting
Copies also shall be sent to his bereaved fan,ily and to our Journal for tlblkcetion
M RU ETZ,
ED ARMSTRONG,
F. F. RUETER,
Portland Oreg0
Committee
Reid C. Schultz, L. U. No. 125
Inttitted AUgUSt 28, I930
Anothermember. Brother Held C. Schultz,
has pased onlward arid sorrowfully L. t No.
125 clOss the files
his
of membership record.
A true
friend and valued member of hi's
union, his absence Will be keenly felt.
Our fraternal Tyinipat[ly IL vs ended to his
beloved ones and we grteve with them as we
share his luss,
The charter of Local Union No. 225 shall
be draped for 30 days and a copy of this
tribute to the memory of Brother Schultz
shall be Ipread upon the minutes of this meeling. Copies shall also he sent to hiL bereaved
faily,. and to our Journal for publication
M, <UPETZ.
ED ARMVSTRONG.
F. F, HUTTER.
Portland. Oreg.
Committee
Henry BrowLworth
L. U. N,. 9
Initiated March 14, I9M, i. L. U No. 142
Pilade PaolieehL L. U. No,. 9
Inituited July 16, 1916
It a1with prfound sorrow that Local Union
No. 9 of the International Brotherhood ef
Electrical Workers records the dLath of Its
two mnebers. whose names are mentioned
above,
These men were known by 1te mhemnbership
of Local Union No. 9 for their fne attachment
to uniniisn iand as inelgIbene. A oil Broh. erhood for their good leaenple in punrnsinLg
these aims
The zeal shown by these
nmn In he problers of our Brotherhood was a great incenltive
to all the members of our Lcal Union., anI
they shall long be remepbered for their eneourageMOelt, and work In our behalf,
Whereas we deere it fMtting mid Proper that
thie
mremabOrs of Local
union NO. 9 oier
their trLbute to the memory of o..r deported
Brothers for their loyalty to otI, [lrnthelhond
nld eountry their, faithful .ne.. to their Local
UGnion and their friends: therefore be it
iesolved, Tha the sin.ere symnDtit
of the
mnember'~hip of the Tnternatinesl Brotherhood
Electricas
,f Werker be hr eby extended to
their boreaved fami'll'.
WIJ, TAM STORS.,
JAMSF BRFNNAN.
RARUY SLATEl
Ch cag., Ill
Commotiee
T omaroii
Charles,
(larhe, L. U. No. 773
Reint1tilllid Niaelarber 14, 1[$3,
It is With
iellcee feeling or soLtOW and
reOret that we report Ilhr loss amd pissilS
(i[ one of our faith fijilt urthiets. Ciharlie Clark(,
lie was a good loyal ienieI
and always
worked for he good 01 the I, B. E WV.and
Local No 773 /i particular: therefore be it
Resolved, Thai the cLilllen r, of tie 4nganization be extended to his wile anLd amOy. to his brother JiO,
a member it Ilocal
NO. 773. and to his cousU. Brother- J Ralyiond,
elallehmo of our executlle board, aid be it
further
t
ttilf, ThIa
InIi chatter be drapd btor J0
days in resect and
nory of tiBother Clrke;
adll be it urthlr
Resolved, That a CO , of tihiese lesohlions
bIerecorded i our DIiLIhUtes, a copy he sent
to the International Offite for publieatitltm
IM
the Joufral, and a copy' be sent to the iatni]
of Lretiler Clario,
F DARK.
A, ROBINSON.
G THOMAS
Windsor, Ont.
Conmiittnee
Prank E. Alexander, L. U. No. 65
ifil tatdiotL.
12, 1915
It is with a Silelr'
feeling of Io rrow and
regret that
.e, the members of the L U No.
65, record the las$ing of oIu frlied and]
Brother, Frank , Alexander.
It is hereby iesolved. That we pay titninte to
]Ils memory by expresing to his failt,
and
frilends our sinere sym pathy in Ihcr hour ot
sorrow: and he it further
Resolved. That we irape the c.hartr fnr a
period o 30 days,. and that copies of these
resolutions be entl to his family, to the Ju..rhat tMo publication, and that a rally be eriered In the Mnnute, of nor oaer
C, J, SPRINGER,
T. , GIJBRIDX.
THOMAS BOUTiEIO,
Selle,Mont.
CiOlnIllyte
Dan Sheehan, L. U. No. 65
Init/oded March 22, 1929
AL it must c-oere to all mten. death carie to
our Brother. Dan Sheehan. August 24. 143
He died as a Noldier in battltcin the line of
duty.
As a ftincle official of Local No
,. 1, B
E, ILL. as an exellenL workman, ns Soyal
a
and sincere Friend, we desire to pay hit [h.
last tribute of cateem and affeetinn.
We wish to extend to his wife, family and
friend. our deepest and nlot sincrol svmnath5
in his their tirne oI grief: therefore be it
ReSolved, Tiat in trlbute to his mmoryn.
we, as a body in meetog assembled, stand
in silenee for a period of one minute. ald be
It further
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions
he sent to the fal¥
Of our atle, Br.th'er:
intl a copy be spread upon the minults of
our L1oeal No.
I nd a Copy be ciii tin th~
,LtkIa
Journa[ for publicetion snd be it
further
ReSolved, That the charter of Local No. 65
te draped In mourning for a period of HI
dfav as a sign of
respect to Lur
Iepill
. tned
C, J. . ESSrtSC}IWARDT.
J, A. PHERICK
A. p, COOPITS,
Rtte. M1%ont,
Ccininl tee
Robert Krieger. L. I. No. 125
T ti nted Tute 11, 1937
To L, U, 125 again falls the regretful duty
of reCOrding th passing onward
t
f a valued
ri~rmpnhbcr, as we rise lhe membership file of
Brother Robert Krenter
We extend
I LI, loved onres ai
...
I
n il
.vinpirlhv
for we share Ithe ols of a friend
1'he charter OfT
13. No 12.5 s*'l;l he rirapid
fIr 30 days in ,,nlory
of Broteher KrlegIe and
o eooI of tbMs. lil0ln h.lall be igerlbLyd on th.
minutes of this neetn. Copies shall alp he
senlt In h,
hernaved faimily. and t oIr
..
oe]atl for publication,
mml,~ A P~AY
C, F DI]"'OVyN
FRED M, DAVIS,
oliladnd. Org.
Ci....mm, Line
Re1nittated July 7, Ia3l, il 1. 0.
It Is w itth deep sorrow add regret that the
members of L- U. NO 056 record the death, of
our iale Brother. Horace A. Turnder theirfore he it
Reslied, That Je extend our yniepallh IC
the berea ,-d fatily in his Ihr, e of their
great 'orlo,
alnd be it toltthor
He o1l vd, TDat a copy of these esol ution
be spread upon the records ot our meeting,
a coly be sent to his faminly, and a copy he
sent to the oeital Joernal Lop Dub eaflico,
I'. D. PACE.
ReoordihLg Secretary
Cedar Falls, Wash.
Leroy Snyder, L. U. No. 481
initiated Augudt 21, J926
%Vt. the nemlber of * U, NO. 481. I,
E V.. with a sintere fllUig lf
-1snrrowand
regrel
rccord the pasilng oe Brother Leroy
Sim¢er, htI',core be it
Resolved That we express our sy'opatliy to
the fanily who mourn
I.s loS; and be it
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions
be S .reald iponi the miiuIet of this nmeting,
a copy bm sent 1.o the official Jonnal fol puIb
lication fnd a copy sent to Ins bereaved hinlLI: and be It urtiher
ReI.lcl
That the nrnenberl. ktand in silence
for one minute as a tribute to his rueltorl
arid
hal our charter
-rilain
draipd Let a
puri od of 30 doys1.
ROY CREASEY,
lodiaapoILs, pid,
Finenial Sccrtehar
(larke Nordqtiuit. L.
IU.
No. S56
In itriaed Otober 23. 1917. Ib L. U, Nt, 416
It
hillh dee sorrow and rngrct that we,
tile mnbers c L. U, No,. $56. record th,
>psang of our esIceried mlember, rothel,
Clarke Notladuist: theilcore be it
Rlsoived. That in tribute to his mnemory.
as a body ill meeting aseinblel, siahnd ill
silence for a period of one nhlute: and be
it further
]Reolvcd, That we extend our deepest syipathy to the fI
and latives
rily of our l1te
eparted ltother: arid be It further
Resolved,.
That a copy of thOse reolutionns
be sent to Ite faTiily of the late Brother,
that a COpy be spread upou the minutes of
tL U. NO , $50 anad a copy be sert to the omeiat
Journ, aIr
p ublcatiot.
F, D, PACE.
Cedar Falls, Wash.
Secordtig Sercrtary
Eugene $ohnson. L. U. No. 59
ReInitlted December 4. 7922
Wbhereas wtlh deep st regt
we, he mtrinw
bers ot L U, No, 5, record the passing of
t)ur worthy Rrother, Eugene Johsonl; theretore be it
Resolved, That we extend o. sincere
r
sTmrpathy to his bereaved family; and be it further
kesllvted, That as a ToILL
of respect our
charter be draped for a
lriod of 30 days,
and ltl. these~ rre.solutions be mode a part
of the mintutes of our meeting. and copie. be
sent to the family and to the officite So
al.
C A. BENEDICT,
S, D PERIGO.
a, L. EVERITT,
S. L. NHEALY.
t. J3 SLATER.
Dallas, Texas.
Coorstlee
James F. Cooney.
L. 1. No. 18
friloxedl
No,,erlnr /i 1940
Wvhrreas Almighty God, in His infinite
wiwslocn, has seen fit to take II..m our midst.
BEil-Iher Jam(ue F Cooniey Ind
Whereal the passing of this Brother To ILLs
eternal P warld hba deprivd
U. No
18
of a loya and respected
emthber therefor
be it
Resolved, That tnis meeting stand for one
mInute ii silent tribute to his miemory; and
be it furthyr
Resolved Thiat the charttr he draped ToL a
period of 30 da'$; and he it further
Resrolv~ d, That we aL thislimn expri.ss
o
iu
condolences to the famly of inother Coonev
ill thnir hbrcavernent; and be It further
Resoilvedh That a copy or these resolutirols~
be incori-liated in the mrnutes of this local
,,nhionaiii p
sent to hO faneily of the late
lBrntr
~r
orney: and a COpY to the Internatonal Of,,,e for publicalionh in the Electrical
Wcqi~ilor ' J otirial.
IRequtescat in pae.
W D.
IcNNIS.
F. WV.BARTHOLOI4tW.t,
I M FOST'I.iR
L,,, Ai,gt,-I, Ciht.
Committee
425
NOVEMBER, 1943
Louis J. Schulz,
Forrest Jordun, L. U. No. 6
Reimitinted Docember 6, 1937
Whereas Alwighly God, in Ius Wi~dllo.
has
I,e ei fi t c all fr o
w,u mi dst ou.,
ee e
and worthy Bfothier, Forlest SotdaI, Who ias
been a true and loyal Brother of L, I. No. 6:
therefore be it
Resolved. That we pay tribLitie to his [Init,cry by expressing o his family and fhieiSs
our sincere sympathy arid be it further
Rensolved, Thai 'a opy of these I.esulition,
be sent to the faiII y of our late depda rted
rother. that they beIspr ad ,n full upon the
minutes of L. U. No. 6. atid a coyd be sent Io
the Electrical Workeis' Journal for puiblic"tion: and be it further
Resolved. That the ]weiibers stand i, tileitece
for a period of one minute and our charte
he diapeld fmll I day3 a a iribute im Ihk
~
men'or5
Sani Francisco. Callf
Jr NUNAN.
C. FOEHN,
H. MADDEN.
cll?,
(r 1tite'
George S. HenrO. L. U. No. 18
Wiereas Almiglhty God. hi His iolfnate wiIsdoln,,. hs seell it to take from oulr
imidsi
[iothe r Georg, S. lienr; anld
WIhereas tihe pas.irig of this
lrothtcr
to his
eternal reward ha.s deprived U. U. No ]
memnez; thietlfole
of a loyal and es11 eeie
he .I
Resolve
dThat this meeting stand. for one
] anid
idi ule, in sdlent tribute to his nlhen lo
be it flurther
Resolved, Thai Ohl chaltl be draped Jf(i
period of 30 dab s, and ie it tlrf bei
Resolved. Thi
we at this time exprcs.I
>tt
condolences to he fi
ly OffBent
Brother
in teill bereaveier;l. aind be it further
Resolved, That a lop;' of Ihese resyuuIIions
ant I ilv thes nilnutes of this IocaI
lie i orp
of th¥e lat
nion; a cop'
sent R
amil
Brother Henry; and a copy to the Interml'.
in
the
Electrical
tinalI Office or pulUc'atIon
Workers' Journal
Req' icescatilplc
W, L. MeNNIS
F W. BARTHOLOMEW,
]1 M. FOSTER.
Los Ageles. Ca.lif
CruIiiitt
Earf B. Guidroz, L.
U[.No. 130
Iwitieid DeIceber 20, 1942
It is with deepest sorrow and regret dila
we, the nieibe's of I., U, No. 130. record 'ihe
passing of Brother Ealt IA GOudtoz. whose
diathi oci red oii Augu.t 13. 1943,and
Whereas we wit,
harftld,
to express to his
and relatives our dleepsI tympathby: thereir,
114=it
Resolved. Thai a cIji
rif these 'esohl tion
be ;ent to his
fidily.
,Fyp be sent thioul
Electrical Wilorkis' Johit i,
for pdbicaliton'
and be it further
Rlesolved Thai ourcrrbe
di',d
for
a ... iod of 30 dcays iIn ii
i ciii o.
IH, C, FIS lfl.
L3J ISLE¥
Nyw Olelans. L
Criinii~Iet
fore
CIa re.. e GraItz, L.
(T.
No. 61
leivi6ihifed April , I9'l
It is with dee pesit 'eget that w., the nyLIt,
hrs of L U No. 6.! idnlioUle thde P].' ig if
Brother Clarenice Gua. who diedoi, JSl, 14,
1943; the]'efi'o I,. it
Resolved That
,I a, "Illhute II his witi
and< f~u~nIl} b
c'spictssng our mnost iiicere¥
i .lililIIiib filthyqf ur t he ill'
ylnp-i-11y;
V i ,li t hi : idti
lhs$ lved Thai a copy of th ese resrluirin"
he s icald on the .Im. .Itl and a copy I
.
to the Elet"rirta Wnyrk''' Jouii'n=a
llu D i
ifi ion and be it flrther
R, o hied T hat IIh c'hl,,tt of L ;ir' N,> 6I
be dliaped oi 30 day iidi i
.t.en.orI
ROBERT S, BATES,
TIOMER NORD{lUIST
CIIARLES BOWDICIT
you ngstcI
Ohh,
I IIlnlil
In,
I
be ii
Ie-olv dt, '['hit a copy of these 'esoitions
I ...Iy a copy .l e sebt to Our
le sent to I
Electrical
Wo.kei>' Joutmal to, puilicatioz.
and be it futtLher
Reso)ltd, That Iur eharter
cl diaped for
a Ieriod Of 3O tia
in his
eroeot ,
H C Fl HER.
L J. ISLE¥.
New Orleans, La.
Comntlttee
Pred W, iloagland, L. U. Nc.
349
ReuIlimaletd
I'ml,.191* in' L. U. No. 35'
With deep
orrow.....
'egret w,. the inembers of L.
No. 349. aecord the death of our
yl
late friend arid Brothe. Fed W Iloagland.
who padwed away on Atiu9ts 12 ]943
Resolved, qhat we. hi metitng aisxe..ifled,
stand for onec inile
in silent jiedilaldin as
a tlrblte Io his.....
iryh.; and tic it ffi',Jdh
Resolved. Thiat a e opy Ift itese, iI.I
t(irios
be sent to his bereaved fanily with our
deepest sypl [zh ;hihot a copy be sprlad Jpon
the minutes of
U, No. 349 and a copy be
sent to the oftIh'ial J*lttial for publication:
and that olr ebarter be draped for a pietod
of 30 days.
EARL CORDON.
Miamdi Fill
Recording sele'taIy
J. R. Mrdnock, L. U. No. 319
Initialed February 3, 19S, in L U. Ni. 134
With
Iorrowand rerte we. the nelmbel's
of L, U, NO. 34, record t
death
he
of oIii late
friend and iroller. JS. Ray Mhrfiuek who
passed away on August 5. l943
ResolvedI Thai we. in, neeting oi.snbled.
stand fot one midlute in s'ient meditation as
a tribute to his m-emtior,: and ae it further
Resolved, That a co y of tlhese rvltittons
be sent to hisbeicaved family will, oui deeDest sympathy. that a co y be spread u on the
minutes of . U. NO 34,9 and a copy be sent
to the official Jotililiol for publIcation. and
tlat our- chalter be draped for a period of
313 days
Miami, FJa,
EARL GORDON.
Recordhiri Serer.taly
Woods 13. Spawn, L. U. No. 571
thintead May 5, 19223
Whereas it is with deepest and ost sincere feeting or sorrow tI a we.
it, ...c.hers of L U
o. 574. I. B. E. W, ay our
last tribute of respelt to our
ate Brother,
Woods B. Spawn, and wish to extend io the
bereaved faily or
eartfelt sympah
and
con.d.olen'
in Ohlrd houir of sorow: tv,"e fore be it
Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be
scit t ,lis faintl y, a Copy be splead oi, the
minutes of tps local union, and a co;py be
sent to our official Journal for
tiblicatlon
J. L VAN Rl SSUM.
EDW. J. DOWNING.
C. S OAKTEY,
Bfi'leyierto,' W ilsh
Co n. .tlee
A- P. Zulle, L. U. No. 748
/litliated Deccm let 4, 294,
It is ttithl a sinerie feeling of sorrnw and
'egiet that .e,. the members If L, U No
?41,
record the passing of our friend and Brother
A, P, Ztille; therefolre be i
Resolved, That We ply tribute to his iteml ou'y by bxpr'essig to his fa ily and frrcnl't
in their hour of s)tirow,
otur minceresvirihpaihi
Ihd all It Ithrift
eThal
,, ha...ape hle cOnatter
ofr a
pei'od of ad da ,,
nI Ihat copies of I".e
reWoluiions Ie sent In his falmily, o the jourawl
for .. ibhie atati.
rId : ciopy entereld intol Jy
iuntite, of o Iii local ~tail ,
J KIOIAU
C'a iford N J.
R coi'ding St,,etlii
Jr., L. U. NO. 130
Initated M., 31, 1D4I
It is with dee
4 SOtrow and mret thai we.
the mem~n~bers ~ . Ul No. 130. record the passutg of Brotlher Louis J Schulz, iJ.
whose
on Au.gust 2,
I942., and
death occurredl
WheIi ai. we wislh to express to lii,
ialiily
l vlid e111vs
oudr deepest sympath; there-
Leon E. W ... dwardt.
L. U. NO. 176
latildted J ... Jry6, 1942
With the dee..
t sorIw and r..el
we,. the
members of L. U N,. 776. record the pasSing
lf our Brotei]. Leh, F., Whnod ward: litelefore
be it
Resolved. That wvepay tribute to his fain
ily by expie'nig o.. most since'i rsympathy;
and be it funlner
Resolved. That a copy of ihleg re61litlons
tie
pread
in the
n~innles
of ourl
local
inl,,l,,.
snId a
p', he sent to Ihe Flee rIeal W" k ers Journal for pubiiication: and be i filt her
Resolv.,d. Thai hur charter be dirapied
i a
pleiod of 30 dIiy~.
FRANK CON-DON.
R. A, BUTRIS. JR
C;ILBERT DAVIS.
Charleston. S C.
(Oili..ill,,he
losina 'raliercin,
L. U. No. 921
inttiited Ma, 22, 1942
Vhereas it Is with deep sorrow that we. the
nlenibers of . U. No. 921, pay ott last tribute
of respect to the memory of Sister Rosina
Taier ejo:
Wherel, We wish to extend lo Ile members
of tier family our deep and heartfelt sWipathy: therefore be it
Resolved, That we as a body, in me'e ling
assembled, stand In silencee fol onle inI3L Ic as a
i rltiel
Iribute to her memory: and he
Resolved.
That a copy of Ill",' eI'sotitionis
be spred uphaonthe mInLutesi oI our leeting,
a copy he sent to her bereaved fainily,
copy
be sent to our ofifcial Jicirnal for publicalion.
and that our charter be draped ior] period
of 30 days.
YOLANDA DELLA SALLA.
Ehlibeth, . J.
.
Recording Secretar
Katie Tortericlo. L. U. N,. 921
Initiated ApriL 17, 19,2
With a sincere feeling of sorrow and regret.
we. the ueicbers of L. U. No. 921 record the
death of our departed friend and Sister. Katie
Towtnirell,.
Resoled. 'Tila we pay tribute to ther alenit
ory by expressing to he,' family and friends
ollr sIncere sy iiathy; and be It furl hr
Resolved, r~hat a copy of these resolutions
cad on our
he sent to hc[ family, a copy b~
mnuhtes, and
copy be sent to theI Electrical
Workers' Journal for publicalon; and be it
fiirt her
Resolved. That the ntembcr1 stand in silence
for a period of one ...innte as a "ilbute to le,
inen/ory, and hat our charter tie draped for
a period of 30 days.
VOLANDA DELLA SALLA.
J.
Recording Secrelary
EliZabeth. N
Jon, V. Tierney, L. 1. No. 25
lnitiated OtoDber 6, 1927, ill L. U. No. 3
It is with deep sorrow an.d re.grel. that wec
the ime'nel, of L, U. Ni. 2M I B. E. W
record the pIasing of our Brother, Sohn V
Ti oned.
Resolved. That we pay trllibtto his meritory by expressing to his
1ife and family ou
nIost sinceei
symipathy in thoir hlli of so.row: and be It further
Resolived, That a copy or thsel
"solutions
be selt to his family and be entered irt lthe
minutes of the local union aid a copy be sent
to he Electrical Wor-kers'
.ournal; and be it
further
Resolved, 'that
our charter IC dadped for
30 days in his
.enoiy.
WM N HIALLERAN.
Miteota, N. Y
Reordln
Secretary
William V. Mc(CalL
L. IU. No. 661
felninnLted October tid, '39
With thIe deepest sorrow we, ie
members
of L. U. No. 664. mourn the deat of Brother
h
William V. Mccall.
He was one of the niogi active ineniber,'
Hlieserved Mitl dlistibcof th{ i ol
u'Jion
tion as treasu.rer and as ainf
nlieI' of the
executive
board
and on a great number of
important committees. He was a most loyal
and
Iearlessworker and stood by his eon-
victilths
Resolved, That we pay tIhbulte 1hIls
ceIifry by expressing our sinceree sympathy to
hi. wi.vfe and by
for 30
. draping i iu[ clc
days,
Resolved, Thiat th es
es lii tIons be placed
in OUr mlilutes and that a copy be sent to
his family and to lie Electrical Worker'
.Journal
tri
publicationa.
New York
EFAIar
*'Yy
W, FURY,
J SKFLTON.
P MAURO.
ComJitlee
taley. L. l.
No, 915
rudited Maop 9. 1943
In sorrow we, the mend.hers ni U. U
,o
915, recoid tihe lasag of oIl Bdother,. Edeai
Raley, antd our hearts go (it
iii extressk
Of synnl lih 1 his Iadlv, nd loved ones
May his inimewly death lead LIS to fuither
uiiicertand itlfe sacilfices being, made on duty
CGodfrey Wilmer. L. U. No. 138
by others, that we waiy dile, .It conditions
Intin hd Matnd I 1928
so that mni like Edgar shall no1, have died in
Wvhereias it is with at sincere retleirw
if %Sl* vain; therefore be it
Resolvdd. That we stand ill Iody In iclteing
liw alld egreay that we. the 'i¥enllerds of L. U
assembled for one minlte inl liilnt meditation:
NO. hi.
'icod the passilng of lb,,ohsr '.olIfrey
WilIner: therefore be it
Resolved, 'ilnt
weselnd a Copy of tlrele r-so
I ttlons to the famlyli
of dhe dchi atd. a copy
Resolved. That ,e pax' trdiute to Ilii mereI the Elyet'ical Workers and that a copy be
oFS by expe
pgil ,li, deep lynipathv to Ill
spread nupoi the hhilntes Of L. U. No. Oh:
I ife n(d fanily, and be, it fiitlihel
and
I' it tlurher
Re'olvecI. Tlhat o, ] charter hi dIn... i tr .
Resolved That we dra;pe our thidriel for 30
period of :0 clays ani a cop. of theis reI.... uda3,s in inltliritiil, and resPec~t 10 ei' deate.,
tIons hb sent to
n me iimbers
b
,f hL~ faiIniv
]Broth~er'
he si[iu'ikdon 'or titlinifle.-. ,in~da ceei''
GORDON TURPIN.
he seal io tlhe F.itellCal] W oi fersr Jotiriulat
LOUIS ROMINSON.
for pubd'atiint
ED THACKER
(IHAS P. STARKEVY
Dan.ile
h.
Ky.
Coa . uihee
Hlamnilto r. ),tu'i u.
R .e.rditi...tSeert' ry
~1copy
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Oporatf.r
421~
Patric Furraile,, L. U . N.. 1026
litta~d Septabet,9, 1940, in L.. Ul N.. bill
It i, with gr..
....
a.tI
a
SIro
idel IIhil1
,,tWe
IhmemerhitfP L. U. No.. 1020. recorlh, pass.
mg nf mir Broher
Patrik rafab
....
eh
IloIn b, 11
ResolveId Thait intibueI
his
neI'mTnO[~11
v I.
inbody ,PemIed. sthld Lor I pithily Of
rie lJlte a]id be R1 itilht
l);II
l;~¢
idlel i~ld IT it hP r li
]{eo,,"
JiI , ;L
i
ely It "I'l',
resohltfiffi
be$~n nl~ JJ:i ,, ;"ee f;JiiLi,
alcopy l ....
Up01] I Iie
z JiLIi ol llil~ ",,,f ~iig, l~d tha,1i
itARVE'f I.ARCHlIBAILD .
5IsRden. NU.,.s
[{codbl
... ..eimS...ri
HerbertJ, ...nson L. IU.NI. 951
/?Itt.led Novl.III
Der
, 19.I~
V.hrea III
Ab Hl~
I litiod
ll ...
I. .inriin l]s
oI, fily 21 I94.'/
esndeu....
our
;~I l,1i;.
BroiheIL~bt lh~nacat*mme
of L~. U.*N..o 95):] Uthirl~l tie 1!
IRe ... ed, That we le:<ta/
I. h, bt~liul
falhly~ our probyound
rid~
OIee
1~ni,
I
inl Whill hou, ofI.Ilflr; ,ud h, 1t (4i111c1
ReN.oLvd, Tha. Ii 1e apr;IIIn
olt}irllil
till
periodW~3days,. and thai C~Dle ¢f I'lle
,,;-lle
l Uen hi, fIl/liy
]eal
De,in
Joul~a Po ithlb]iOb.Hin Lhi{ ; euL,I
eiIltnd;
Pint HIthe mhuefi
tI
Lhi~
loatif
WILTOHN BROWN
POe;;d ni
CLIFFORD SEN(
le
Platt birg N ¥
Re¢'ordi.g Aelill
Igntiu KirstinL. U. N.. 501
IL U.t
!¢, II I~ h ..
WC
Ihu
WBH~".ftml
W, PRre~
1,H
;I
ef P'lM.
x1
M~,If
~dR Hn
G ~mI
]"I
I, 1,,u
illn ,:
I]ull~o
17~
HIIH
1,h
mad4 thr.... Fh
il
IP
hsd1 r
iS.dq~
s4
1oo ou
the,enrqei;
of thera
buillg ILI .i~ts of Bill iI... tiahiio... nII
ducteld hy the I/pr
.nf ,lt~.~ss
airt AtorneyL General Toil]. I'. Ih k ksaid "If
free enteHIlseisto suieeffetl
h
l
o.f 'hi,
Wilal war. the power,
of
carel
I
f.kih
prilate t-xllttea, cIontrl Oiteenlin.
f'ind dig
rupl fi
rhtrade. Ill.(
be
broerI'Mu
to
elmiminat
cartel c
otof hiewoi
eLLofon'nay we"h,1ll
lose~h
le
ee
i'ller!e
ifo
aftlvitie ae Li
stopped before pe'L
¢nli a
they
,Awillhlp
create
d une
.... ... ipo
cause of ~h. demonsPtrated
absefHTh
pitn
~ygt.a by 0art.{s, th. Bieptnrl of
fuathi'e h.,avoae
a
v
ifino
the . ptent
D. B. LoganL. U. No., 278
fit'hln ifl~if 1prHl 1', ]91,j
PI e.l ttPIhe llbL Of L,)eal IUnLo N., 278,
tiLb
sincr
feb"i of sadot.a an t .. re...
reodthe
usn
T
oDfiP
B
rte. B, Lunar
WhotWas
ia]l¢ Wro Xs ,on ,pen,-lif.,94
"yPathily bll h1s £Blrlly t ft:[~hhld
Uhm-IIre,
De il
Itiliediret.hai ou loca1 union. fltad Lir on,
m.fI..,l
re ereilillee III.nd.
our, elml1if
LIe draipd fr A perio
hi "O days,, s a tribute
'Io hi.
memhr ; ad LeIt
11 rther.
Resolve,d
tl II copy If
thesei feslut/....
thy selt PI,, h i falil L"I copy b, s red UDi
thl,
IPfltt If mir, Ienl HITPIP n.
~Oi¥ PI
sent t, our oficia Jo..T.ta fri
. oTAbhIatio
J Ill MAT"HW'UL
LUIRRV RAPOLAIS.
N1 E. NOAKE,
C~lTP
pUf~ his
Te.tas
comie
lhe x~~,
iIIi, il ii ,do....f ni If sm
i +h a
ori, wideI
i IrL{Iwnud be,
I ...
anful of Ih, r~ihs and
privlh"' le e?
rlabo as it Ioli
nf th.l wn/fal.
eif thel dkolll$, miIxetdilth, hunincas IThe
hiPtor/ of lb,
groth of cartel
is elt
with Jstsun
8hoilgthat
i
thel
profit
n~tlnle
kitlhl dnLnnt'iugII
{nfluene ilta{ v£l /hese
.organiations . Money mia il Ig, is alIa yI p laced
ahead of mura ohIigtins". 'hnee ~ hIc
must, he
F.e,o thi, Te....il } iS III l~hat
cartells IIlv i1 de~]l ld Iiiren If l "t
wlfa
andi p
igr
lf hLi;, " i 'pile . i d/f
g r
Ili
le1l11arl iT )Ih ;1"Ihl tra'de,
ilc
E,~¥drie is iteeliiait
th.t the Axis
I
al helifylng
fadm
,l'
theHi vffit Wtmar
%lfinPi]~thei ecoPI~iom whre. c if they
]us,,
}lIe Il~itary la.
Beas
f thdi ifnlqthen
oif hlines~~t
meI If f11
nio$
il
l inlhe NOte
.mltions[al
caItl eyltmn, wih itlhadqrll ..
~i,
Wn Sit .er. iad. Hiliee hoilds
pineru
wealpon.. forl ~oflin
thel ters
lit
[)eik
Bus inI ..in Amertica, flainta
,w ilt haI
anI ifltt'lrt whir tile peac
.IIL IeIs.y i.< Iiaei
47ll n~
HL ~
11It Pil h . dee I feeling ofsulhi tha.t we,
asfee, 0W m~fb~oLOhil U.Wof N., Mi. .
thet InternaionalP
Brotherhood
f Ehl~tieaLL
Workrs
recrdIht,
paINBg If ...
loyal
Brother. Ilyn~iu K/estei fo, OILl we III,,
a, trI,
fhried ad felilow~
workerha depaltid
from our nPBst and therefore b, It
Rslved.?
a,ouTharter PI drape
for
peid
o 0d ys in hono o! hi~i memPrs. and
ac.pyo tN
e, et
reouion,
Lo hi,
hea
fYeaCpy
he Inteald
.,.I P~w
.... B,
,and"Lapco2,' bei
tol the
ht
InTenlioaal Officell
~o PL*~R.
ulction
Hth Jouliiha]
JOHN W. RATCLIFF,
y.Illkel. iN Y¥i
P
if
IiSe,,
in~ " rIteIdI IoIn
l I~
i ..rI fI
f
IkI,
inLf....
fL
Ir II Ileittl
.....
O the,I Jm
lit Ithe Ili i
;1]no im IhIn Ie
h ~hy, TU~,] III the A~ chirman
chaLgtfeR
ilb,
tepatet anlI
an~tilitiut laws
to makeit ......... y to rgistel all phlan for
cartl
al'outw
ith
the, federl ovrn
meat for Liprva
... I P, n
eafI If control
wilhih will) probably I ~,tLI u
In the, Inunr
~*]X~r~er,egind I il
wr
,i
h., lpparently taught
ahdkl,,lie
tatse Chit the, tlti~
ma
tINoa] If piiosta
order aniprmnn
peace, can nnly I..
attand by some- IIIm of
CARTELS
;Continuecd /rum page N39
natia.s,
nt due to Lily ililgl, causesu¢l~)
are
combwinatonmay devote themselves, Lo
"exNploiting the.consumer
insteadP of uinj exilteltce of elate*I. ILbut
a mutipllit ofly
IT
&heir ,pecialefllclc
Io serv hlim....
good.IP,
so
l{*tii which cannotLI satisfied Ir
One ofthe purlose
oF the Britisi
hplanis
DEATH CLAIMS PAID FROM SEPal1ev/ated
merely by the
signnf
a ,ie...
inutl cinTEMBER I TO SEPTEMBIER 30,1943~ "to encourage such form of 4
Lt...ty II thel establishing of a whli
oaNi
peti
ioLs ae
c
nuivetthe pubi c fiter.
aio. it ii hitprai
v that any Ldju.OnlPln
eatl; onversely IT
d, ... isorewatfulii
and
aimeild at ......
cting "auses sthouldI h, insird
desO~truti
competitio.f
Nationl.
enterpise
by a Inns-rage
v~isio rpresentingf the inasI itwo is aided if tdi~dduami s su
Iitaily
the, gle
poweirs lhut of
Legulahed,
This Mitt if
r
euaionfeteres not only If
all h,,,,,
bein
wh, stugle,
suffer, at{
independen enterprisehy earte]
Lhat nt~
maide for efiiee
orproved Lo hI, in th
wfhat the statesmen wh
sekI.
sha~petheir
puh'll, interest
i,
ilthepat
dOStily hav titl~l i I.
The, Britih, world eartell arran,,me
dis,Anothi pIan
which mtight
elminate
Bte
cussed.
Ibv 1ish prseteI"inI
terms friendly
necesslity for the
Iomtn
f Laltels would
Lit lahor and
the
c
osue
IThedene
consis't If
the adohptionby the, goernlenPts
uuIllinff
Phelan
ITr this a11lh', Ill
ijs pr
1 1 ITI.,~
215
surdto tbe Kilgore, ITomm
Pittee tlyThr0
oif the,
ofwrl honr L'r arhitratiln trade,
disputes invoI ln
natonl
iners..
Ilnle
ea)ih,for "the general
adllh/..aIIn..
rill
I Khr~~~~~~~oh~
~ mm I~mIt Arol1d,
sofn t*)
gchpla
is ...opted huslhiess n/eu 6iH
extenion
If work
council8 ad
poPerio...
rou1tjinue I.o fly o conftrol the slt"l~ai. I with
commfit teaBlreadyTI
peatig.
snct, sfl
in
tho
P,,Ifil miuseful insr yetd~eo
p
forh
cerltain
industries" Iin
Lrertgive laho..
II. },
the p,,jpoe,
erlils The raet that these,
J ~Caloll.. ..
I ~
%hlose
cot~ac fill
assocliationl with PILt9Ie
f~il
I RmU
I
I...io
pr"i,a" ag~lel
ftel, flullfy iLOIa lat
nIe t."
exlt~ltheltl'lrt
Li
f s
Cteinr
to dopt
At; a lunheon Io Mtllih IIIe world
trade
neighbo,
po
iesi
a}]
tad{e "Tteeiil
allane
sscition,
John
IInowni,
,h~i
.....
I
IhiLs
hA~h~ h1.l
I aa~ il
maike,, it inptqativei H
that
aiosaothe
of the
economic eImmittee 07 the
British
thil, prnh'lem
Tr
de
Union
Congress, ha1ilethe WP,
~
~loo
NOVEMBER, 1943
427
INSPECTORS SEE VALUE
OF MAINTENANCE WORE
i Continued
Il ...
page 401)
tions on both panels and resistors. Cheek
condition of "pigtail" connections cosely
especially i.. corrosive atmosphe e, Repace any danaged or wrn
parts,. and
inspct c.ndition of magret contact rurfaces. See that con...
mechanism opec
ates freely lndoil or grease if necess. v.
Do not lubricate contact surfaces! Check
operation of
mechanical oI ehlct ri a in
tei-lwk devices.
Maintain
Contacts
Control equipment subject to severe
operating .ond itions should have cotacts
inspected weekly. A nonthly
check is
stincielt for aver'ag'e oelatng conditions. Adjust, file clean. or reneu (on
burned.(Ortacto tips if badly worn oi
dihary roughening of contact tips due to
arcing neeId not h
serviced but laige
projections should he removed with a file.
If there is evidence of overheatipg, oxide
surfface should he removed by a few
strokes with a file.) Examine closely for
any high resistance joints in contactor
circuit. (A new combination a-c/d c mili
voltmeter is available for checking re
sistance of bolted joints and contact
lubricate
cotact
Do not
surfaces.)
surfaces.
Check Oil Condition
Make semiannual inspection of oil level
and condition in starting compensators,
oil switches and circuit breakers. Replace
leakage and evaporation loss; replace oil
if dirty or gummy. (In dirty
ordamp
inspectoil level and condition
location,
quarterly or monthly according to severity of conditions.)
Test Overload De ices
Circuit breaker tripping points should
be checked monthly, Replace dashpot oil
if thick and gummy. Keep orifices in
plunger clear. Keep leather bellows soft
and pliable with neat's foot oil. Be sure
that heater toils for thermal overload
elays are the correct size. Check overload relay settings every six months.
MOTORS
Fillow
Specific Instructions
Wherever specific
naintenanie ins ructions for a particular motor are available,
they should be followed closely. In the al.
se net of such specific instructions, the Iol
lowing periodic checks should be made. The..
are based on average conditions with regard
to severity of duty and dirtincas, of localiln
The frequency of the inspections
4ll
ci
be
varied to suit actual plait coiittions.
31M"
-AS
6. Openstype iotors in dusty location,hould be blown nut thorsoughly.
7. (heck air gap between rot-or and stater
The differeice in width ,1 gap around eIl
cumferen. e will indio es
eIIv,Lt
wcur
oC on
ieari gs. hlbis check
'.l d If made
Ieekly
on motors operatrin, wtlh Ox~re ye belt
lenoon; otherw
L,
U:k
air gap setiannuallly.
f- thatit i brou.gh
$. Start lotar and]
ul tn speed In Tormal Illme
(hekI motr aLi blea.rlng Ieniperature
under actua losd eortiions by feeling Iiih
'
ff
hand.
InspectIlns and Operations
Semiannual
I. (lean
motor thorrughly, blowing out
,ilt rron. %iidingi altd
ipe comnlutato,
alufl brushes.
2. ln'peet coinittiltetr claomping ring.
3. (bhek hrn
.he
ad renew anIy that are
moare than half worn.
4. i~xanllnie bruh lholders and chal then,
if diry
Make sure
ihat
F
brushe
ride
s
froe
5. Cheek brush press.ie.
oi n sl~~
6. (teeltk rtush fosithtm .
l l
ev
7. ]Train. Wa h out, and rnl
)
Iearbigi
5. heck grease In ball or roller bearings.
9 Check operating speed or speeds.
10 See thst end Ilay of shaft is nirmrlal.
1, lipect avil tighten connections on
motor and control
12. Check curent input ald compare with
a,tEIcnrdo SM
dnt$oaenil m tnn lr
P0~ni5oty. A ouick,suapii rd
, dy tdffc r
indcmtct
oam!ttlmtnctaonazd
O
F ELECTlont
N COT
* AUDELS HTANDY praucz:I
M
1OO
oi IIodr.
a*xadt
a had
inmlzl~tnnnA neta~bk
sautc
that ans~ea ~o~ qurjtkn
·
help
ON
NI£tRAbjINFORMATION
chir~tLC.andO.C. Moox-Anmaewe W~nd~g
·and Rpak-i
~W nintr D az ,-U w Lightm g-?ow
Qmctc
m~a
R a dtl~ y. Dcl sb xa
iTpler
"r
&TFlaenel~ThoneInigon-Rdio
). [lt~igeXaLo~ CondcLdonf-O.Dt
and manyM odern
t W.
13. RIu motor an.i examine drive critically
for smooth runn 1g, a
lsenic
of vibiation,
welln gears, chains, or belts.
14. Check mot.o fool
bolts, end shield
bolts, pulley, coupling, gear and journal
setscrews, and kevs,
15. See that all motor covers, belt and
gear guards are in gofd order, in place and
securely astened.
,m
Dr*r .
Ap1l cati n x
~
t ** b t
~
w .
at &CO,4
~
0W n..flfltn~ , N wtwit
aII
lhh~-
Annual Inspections and Operations
1. Clean out and r'enew hall
grease il
or
roller hearing housings.
2. Test insulation by meager.
3. (leaI
out .mgnetic firt that may he
hanging on poles.
4. Cheek clearan. c between shaft and
jolunl1 boxes of sleeve bearcig motors, to
prevent operatioi
with worn beatings.
5. lean our undercut slots in conm utator.
6 Examine connections of roimmutator
xaarmature coils.
7 hiipeet armIatour ...ha,.
( onplete Overhauls.
Motors should generally be given af overhauling at intervals of five years or so.
normally , if the service is more sever. e
more frequently. Such a practice is ienefiicia in avoiding breakdowns and i extending
Ihe useful life of the eqoipo e;t.
IF WE DON'T PLAN
,Continued hroi
page 397}
lathe operators, machinists, tool and die
makers and other skilled and semi-skilled
workers will have to transfer to other
kinds of work. Unskilled
laborers are
likely to face a shortage of jobs in many
parts of
country.
the
To prepare to meet this situation, the
general outline of which can already be
clearly foreseen. trade unionists along
with other Americans need immediately
to address their thoughts to at least six
major issues. These issues and a suggestion of policy are hereby given.
THE ISSUE AND THE POLICY
(I) First and foremost, what can and
ARC WELDING SETS
Special Consider~at ions
The general
ai IiteInac
schedueI relat
log to motors and motor co-trois will appy
generally to arc xtding sets. Oroud conections should he checked periodically Con.titlea of cable
leads
should be inspected
Weekly Inspections aid Operations
freqIlently to prevent
flow of short ircuit
current which may load generator over a
1. Examine commutator and brushes
Ilong peri o of time
n
roper ventilation
2. Check oil leel iI, bearings but do not
should
be provided, and machines operated
over lubricate.
outdlo.s should inot If cvuered with tax
. S., that oil rings turn with shaft. and
paulins in such a way as to impede
t any xcessiye endil play il shaft.
ventilation
4. See that shaft is fle
'f oil anid grease
HRpo
r
if th, IAEl Mofinte.a..e e Corn,frlo, Ibearings.
i,,oseph W'hitbe,- (CCairman). A.
5. E.xani,,
stater
swith.u,
f and
uses
x
Lrndbhog, R. D. MWcmvid, W..I. Ma/ha
other controls, as well as gronn.. Iontraction
and motor leads.
(lif J. G. .ll et,
should be done to assure quick reconversion and create an environ.ment favorable to continued high-level business activity, so that normal enterprise may as
quickly as possible prov-ide a real job
for
every
able bodied
American
who
wants to work?
This issue can be met by formulation
of policies that will go to the roots of
our system of individual initiative and
free, competitive enterprise. These polt
cies should settle the disposal of governmont-owned war plants and surplus stocks
of war goods and release of priorities on
terms that will help pirivate enterprise.
They should cover loans
reconversion.
for
credit and capital facilities for small
428
ME3lEIEIlS' LIE A T~lI l F 1
POCKTEl
It 9 I'D Dli
The Journal of ELECTRICAL WORKERS and Operators
into tern io..a r ..ven. e i p ea e on ra ts
(5) What can and should be done to make
it easier to prov.id fll employment by
reducing the ] uIer of men and women who
want jobs or by rutging down the hours in
a
the working week?
Social security
Iad education Pl i cie s
should le formula
eld to iake possible the
handsome
voluntary withdrawal from the labor market
of wmenu who prefer to work in the home.,
folder
soldijers and other young people who have
to contain
not yet completed thp edueation they should
have, and workers who have reached retireOfficial
nlerIt age. Pollcis should be formulated with
respect to the length of the workweek.
(6) Finally, hiat can and should be done
rown or black
to promote labor's ability to move not only
from job to job Nut also from place to place
Pr.e..~l
and from one type of work to another, and
(A: (gng
in this way lower the barriers that somesupply IAS/s,
times keep workers and available jobs apart?
Measures are needed to bring labor tie
di,
maud and supply together. Policies should
35 remits
b,,eformulated to providt Amlericari workers
with a federalized joh placement service
equlipped to handle quickly and effectively
the largest voleme of job applications in
our history as a nation. Wounded soldiers
and sailors will need physical rehabilitation
business. Policies are net ,ded to assure
before they can resume normal civil
life,
that the consumer deman I will he large
- t over the country
All
en andi women rust
enough at all times, but
have new training to fit them for newlines
hand not too large, to buy* the maximum
r work.
output of goods and ser rices that the
We must find ways and means for per
nation is capable of produ cing.
manently solving our unem.ployment pro
(2) Second. what can and should be clone
em, for employment is our peoples greatest
to make it possible to give j ohs at fair rates
reed and must he satisfied. Furthermore the
who
of pay on public work projoees to t those
soundness of our foreign policy rests on our
otherwise will he jobless in the transition
domestic policies and whether or not these
policies
assure jobs to all who are willing
pieriod ?
It will be impossible to a, oid sever. unelnand able to work. Finally peace itself for
ploymen t in the transitlon period without
which we are fighting this horrible war, is
a public works program. Since it takes a
at stake. For if, after victory is won, .e are
so coaplled by confusion or weakness at
long tiie to get such apr ugram into the
blueprint stage and ready t start. workers
home that we are unable to stad square y
have a respnosibility to thi
Imselves
to
see
for cooperation with the rtn
a
the
that the plans are made noe odtierwise
;
it
peoples of the world, the pressure of eve its
may be
too
late. A large ni numbet
of small,
will ovenltually force us to the hrlnk of
widely scatte red con structieon projects will
another and even Inore terrible .ar.
probably be better than a few big ones.
Planning of public works should allow for
I. B. E. W. DOMINATES
a number of work projects in the fields of
ELECTRTC UTILITY FIFID
public health, research, education and gen(Continuled from~ page 3991
eral public welfare as well as in construction.
(3) What can and should be done to proThese phrases are seen to be somewhat am
vide temporary linancia support for deIohiguous. It remains for OUr courts yet to
biltied servicemen and war workers to heII
determine whether such terms were intendetd
tide them over the interval
hefore they
Ih
t assure tht tehonorably discharged
secure anty job at all?
servicemenia ]n ay etaeii his f,,oe. 8$ni oe ty
Returning
soldiers
and sailors
night
and position or (21 to conserve to him anly
justly be given a cash bonus-in the form
rights or henefils based on the c.
.
ultp..
of furlough pay, mustering-out pay, or somie seio'ily which would have accrued to hin,
tither forr--at the time of demobilization
had he remalineild in his employenet instead
when they are likely to want it most. All
of entering the military serviee.
workers, including.
x servicen.en, should
Several of our agreements provide more
have adequate compensation while unemliberal se nioi-itv renulation s for m ailitar
servployed.
iceenlrthan the law provides. Our contract
(4) What can and should belone to lesseI
between the Northe ,n St tesPower Conipariy
the abruptness of military and industrial deand L. U. No. 160. Of Minneapolis, for- exmobilmiation so as to cut down the rumbher of
ample, stipulates:
workers appearing in the labor market in
"Arty imployee of tahe companly covered by
the most critical period, the first six monbths
after the end of hostilities?
this agreemnt who may be called to the
< alo'r shall con tinue
Policies sh1o1 beformulated with respect
to crer, aMfe se~o,ity
to the rate at which our armed forces are
with the comdu
pany
ring his absence,. Ipot
to be demobilized. Anything that slows this
written notice within sx raolths after. he is
process down will gain precious time while
eligible for ilscharge from the service, the
the up-swing of peacethige prodction is just
slove employee may return to work, provided
getting under way. On the other hand orhe is physically qualified to do so, and the
justified delays will he strongly reselted by
gular. rues of seniority will Prevail for
the average man in uniform and his family.
those below hi, oil the seniority list." (Italics
which means that action along this line has
oilrs.
obvious limits. So far as war industry is
conocrtned, most of it will
While the I. B. E. W. seeks continually to
have
to be demobilized very rapidly to (lear the road for
protect the position of the employee of long
peace p ouctio
uthis is not so in ever y
service it also concerns itself with the re.
ase, anti policies are needed to decite what
sp.osibility for training newcomeis to the
var con tracts ought to he either on tinued
trade. Long a leader nlaong unions in the ap
and gradually tapered off or else tra'3sfo Tad
prcitieshp and formalized supervision of
rising young mechanics, the BRtotn{anoon has
been highly
in
istrumental
recent years inl
persuading its enployers in the electric tl]
ity field to adopt systematic, on-the-jol training programs on their properties for the
proper instruction of ,entats to the trade.
Such a program assures to the newcomer,
possessing the necessary natural mechanical
aptitude,
of both
acquirirg
a
well rnuled
knowleIdge of his chosen craft an/l the oppor
tonlity t
labor.
risea
bove the ranks
of uiskilled
Normnally the apprenticeship pro.ram ex
tends over a period of about four years. with
wages increasing at semi,-yearly or yai-ly
intervals as the ability of the apprentice anti
his value to the em
ployer
progress.
For the mutual protection of the novice ani
oifthe compay's property, the union agree
neat provides that he must work at all times
under the imnediate supervision and iust rution of a skilled mechanic (or "journeyman".
or a foreman. Under most apprenticeship
programs in utility companies the trainee is
not permitted to work on live lines during his
first year or longer,. Later he
learns assist
to
journeymen on energized lines rot exceeding
some agreed-upon power, as 440 or 600 volts.
At the close of the trainling period the apprerntice is examined by the examination
board of his locaI union. Occasionally the
board also ineludes a representative of the
company. Sometimes, if the apprentice fails
to pass his journeyman's examination he is allowed an additional six months in whilh to
qualify, but if he continues to fail, then the
copapny is free to demote or d
ischarge
him.
Most agreements prohibit the employer'
from trying to employ an unreasonable pro
portion of cheap, poorly trained labor in the
trade by establishing definite apprentice
ratios, such as one apprentice to each five
journeymen, or an apprentice to each workaig crew of a designated size range.
The first six months of apprentiesahip are
generally recognized as a probationary pereio.
If the selectee proves incompetent or unsatisfactory to the employer he may be demoted
or laid off without any further obligation upon
the part of the union to train him, If retained,
the union staidls illthe position of trustee to
hin
the period
for
of his apprenticeship
A. F. OF L. SEES ECONOMIC
CHANGES IN UNITED STATES
(Continued from page 90})
Federation of Labor for the postwar world
are adequately revealed.
In short, the report continues the high
standard of economic discussion which
has d
istinguished this report for more
than a quarter of a century.
DON'T SEND SOLDIERS CHECKS;
SEND MONEY ORDERS
Don't scud a soldier a check drawn onl
a bank in the U. S., the American Red
Cross advises relatives, friends and for
met employers of servicemen, Sicee it is
practically impossible for him to cash
a check, send money by postoffice money
ordr,.
Red Cross workers overseas report that
soldiers
constantly ask them to aid in
cashing checks sent from this country.
Postofflee money orders can be cashed
wherever there is an Army postoffico,
while checks are valuleess to soldiers
receiving them.
NOVEMB ER, 1943
429
I,OCAI, UNION OFFICIAL, RECEIPTS FROM AUGUST IL
If
19431
INC. SEPTEM BER 10,
---- - -
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523.17 hours,. The actuad time reqired
oloclity.
(c. oitimild ITrom pag. 400)
All projct
should be Itreated asl acomincluding hanging the
f
xue,la
529.5
hours. To this must be ,,addedI ... paceof plex job, that is, factor "C" shold,,,have
time 98.5 hoursThis poll... In pmme of
decimal vle
tiIe. the jounemen... in the job had]ne
Imets
angers, and pip, racks, lhoud
Signal
co Tntro
This pro~ject ban a diebit
vr
to treated a,
s
part
operation. The
20I0
10x 2 1100x1
2(>
fixtar~
balanee of 628 hors
label on..hesitems, iDsnn-~
g may
Signal
exedthe pdpe labbor.
Proximately 16 noercent of the man,
2,50
fox 25/100xl
25
statlons
2 0wlre
225'
l3138 n=,10x.
hera's.. this poject was not affected in
Whe .. o...pletiml tate a projectis
'2 ,"I any way by the conditionof the job, or the ,oecnhlr1~, l
10.000x]
abor and materalo
270' 100 ft. per hourxI
2~7f
No,
the working conditionsthereon., nor trav- seem
toIoI.. theirs
infcnegain,
the,
I
bOO' 10f.orh
x
500
No.
eling thime·It does.relect however. , o the
wire
cln ain
may arise where thUmn,' a
3.50' 10
t
ehurx
50
N..
efficiency o2 the organization., Ilih is ln- is only a point in
opaio
to the label
wire Ran' 653(x0. G5 1000,lI
317
No.. 12
dependent of jobma oeatio..
wlire 15000' 41017x 15110001
involve~d. /n suc ..... the esnt
a hat
ims
61.61
N. 14
Illy onhi, own ingenuity
Con. Ilsion.-As building ... ndition
.....
0x
No. 1wIref8028. 5Sgq
Addendum,--Th, job in illusintration
h
eontmnually lhanging, and liner prac.tille
115 ,;I
t imeI
Es"I, It imatd
wa completedl o a sit,, jolt finjshed, on
is different in dffefrenmt localities, alande
oif factor
for "C" if given here, the the ,ester
side of the continental divide·
The time
required to intaI
all the
The job was sIeleted fior it, aiuarte
proal-bilities are the average woud Ine too
finishin
material, a-d han the fixtures
ant geographical hoabtion.The estimated
man o~te,
d too high Inr
was, 124 hours. Fixtures Ilire. anl ,,tra Ilow Ionom
time shown here.in was not ms~pciatedl ]n
.the... It
r
eursno
great Av ... nI of
cons ide...etln.
,ny
ay with the milliona e~tfimate.
Under this ..... eption the estimated mental fatigue, or resarch mok to cornFORM1ULA.E DEVELOPED FOR
ELIM[INATING LABOR ON JOBS1
aatactioe fnion Sap plia
*
nJUIP
W.I
$50
100
(er
Arrears, Offical Notice of.
.90
Book, Teastr er's
Accotnt
{
2.25
Book. 5*1in4te for It. S. (snall)
3.00
Book, M inute for R. S. (larg4,
1.75
...
BooOk, Dfay
1.50
flook, ROll Call
.05
Carbon for Receipt Books
- 1.00
D.plicate
(hIA.ter.
25.00
it
IIl.
Complete Loal (halter
7.50
Coll~t~ltn~oji,per "00
.10
single copies
Eleetrical Worker. Sumbscrilptioil per
- 2.00
t oI
Year
1.25
,*k laaoch
rdni.m
(1.0
.
EnvIlopes, Oflfa], per 1)0
.20
LAbill. DOeealeot a la (lare, per 10
.15
eraieomania (smlall), per t0o
labiels,
.
0
Labels, MetIol, per 100
.2
f~abels, Pape r, Neon. her '00
.20
LAbels, paper, per Ill .... s.
LAbels. Paper, large size tiIr
35
lg. per 100
hlal-a
Ledger, loose leaf binder Fl
.,50
Index
tab
26
ieeretary'
Ledger paper to ft above ledger,
1.5*
P.,r 0
0
Tt'nn "cial Seerotar)'s
Ledger,
2.50
pages
210
rinancial Secretary',
L-edger.
375
-----ae
--------P .
4*0
Secertary'S,
Financia
Ligaer
80
gl ages
lild~ik)
p - Ex,,a Hay
Ledger, loose-baI research, including
12.50
.........
labs
~lri
2.25
Iedgr sIheqs to, above. per 10t
.50
Pap, r, { hitl1 Letter, per 100..
-.....
RIltuals, extra, each
reReceipt [O$RIl, Aliplira ts (30
1.5
- -..
- .
ceipis)
Receipt Book, Applilcants (750 re3.10
---ceiptl)
Reeei p1 Book Members (300 reeipts) 1.75
Receipt ,oolk, Membhers (750 rJle ptS) 3.50
lecelpt Book, Misce{1llaeous (300 ro1.75
........eelpts)
Reeeqlit 13.ok, Miscellaneous (750 r,ertlne assessentt
1.75
OverItile asse.s..prit
350
-Temporary (750 re-c- -l-- -- --- 3 .50
tool., T~emporary (300 re.e.e ipt
1.75
¢e~ip-)
....
Receipt BlOOk, Temporary (90 we.75
- t'ji,10
I
- I ---- ----*25
Rgeceipt Pookl Frin~nla l S cretary's
Z5
2
…
tereipt Boo..0k. TreaslirerS ......
leather
M1etibers'
Reeeipt
ploldetHt,
.3$
- -pooket. Fotdtni g, ea,
Receipt l
lH
Members' Pockett,
olders,
Celluloid, sold oly in bulk, Small- .. - - e,1 lot. 50
.
. -3.00 .per 00)
.40
Research weekly report cardd, per 100
-1.1{
.. I
Seal, cut o- .
Receipt lieok,
(300 ,CoIiolp )
Reei'pt Book,
(750 reI 1ts)
Receipt lieok,
{
~ I Il
2150
.50
.75
7.50
.10
.25
JEWELRY
I-old
No.
Filled
Bittte
Gilt Tic
No. P-l0 k¢. Gold [t0Al Button,....
Gold Pin (for ladles)No. 3Holled
N o., 4-R lled Gold "Lap1 l S to rr.
k1. Gold Buttn Rolled
NoI..
--1
.
Gold Tie Clasp
10 kLt. Gold Lapel fliuttoi-_
No.
--1 kt. Gold Lfpel Button
No.
Utoil Rolled
No.
--10 kt. Gold4
.
Gold Tie Clasp
No. 9-l0 kt. Gold Vest Slide Charm..
No. 1(--10 lit Gold Ring...........
No. 11 10 kt. Gold fladge of onor..-No. 12-10 Id. Sold Emblem: Rolled
Gold Chain Tie Clap -----Jewelry not sent C. 0. D.
it I
no
ADDRESS, G. M. BUGNIAZET, I. S.
1200 Fifteenth St. N. W.
.40
.30
FOR E. W. B. A.
LABEL
METAL
Cidt.,
.....................
Book, Minute
Charters, DPtplkleateS -.........
.......
Blanks* per 100
Reinstatemen£
Consttu£tof and lBy-Laws, p!e, 100.--Single Copies.................
….................
Rituals, each
anoun£
... isite of Cash occompoanes
artcres imill iti supplied hien the re
NOTE The (bo-I
hoe ploatap0
hts
Othenx'ia the order twill not he reco Wzcd. Ali ,ti.Mpliet sett by
order.
the
),,,,.repaid.
Or express C,(l,
tyxo for Bin!'Sz
I 2 I 4 I I I I I2011 1215
AI
5.00
7.50
free
Seal (pocket) ..............
Traveling cards .....
ithm T...
Withdrawal Cards,
per dozen .......................
Warrant Book, o., ], N.........
Washington 5. D. C.
1.10
.75
.75
1.75
...........
1.25
172.5
.........
4.00
0,
2.25
4.00
A
!
URGENT
PUBLIC
NOTICE!
HE tremendous gains made against
Ttuberculosis are in danger of being
wiped out. Crowded housing, abnormal
eating conditions, overwork, and all the
other by-products of war can give the
dread TB a new lease on life. We found
this out in the last war. Your help is
needed, urgently. To carry on the year's
fight against TB, we rely on your purchase of Christmas Seals. Please send in
your contribution today, as much as you
can give.
BUY CHRISTMAS SEALS
Because of dte importance of the above
message, this space has been contributed by
The Journal of Electrical Workers
and Operators
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