Semester - Sona College of Technology

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Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Civil Engineering
Branch: Structural Engineering
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Applied Mathematics
3
1
0
4
Theory
1
P14STR101
2
P14STR102
Advanced Design of Concrete Structures
3
1
0
4
3
P14STR103
Finite Element Methods of Structural Analysis
3
1
0
4
4
P14STR104
Theory of Elasticity and Plasticity
3
0
0
3
Elective
5
P14STR502
Elective- Stability of Structures
3
0
0
3
6
P14STR514
Elective- Design of Tall Buildings
3
0
0
3
Total Credits
21
Approved by
Chairperson, Civil Engineering BOS
Prof.K.Prasad Babu
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/Civil, First Semester ME STR Students and Staff, COE
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14STR101
Applied Mathematics
3104
Course Objective:
To enable the students to
 Study the One Dimensional Wave And Heat Equations
 Explain the Laplace equation and Fourier transformation
 Describe the Calculus Of Variations
 Explain the Eigen Value Problems
 Study the Numerical Integration
One Dimensional Wave And Heat Equations
9+3
Laplace transform methods for one-dimensional wave equation – Displacements in a long string –
longitudinal vibration of an elastic bar – Fourier transform methods for one-dimensional heat conduction
problems in infinite and semi-infinite rods.
Elliptic Equation
9+3
Laplace equation – Properties of harmonic functions – Solution of Laplace’s equation by means of
Fourier transforms in a half plane, in an infinite strip and in a semi-infinite strip – Solution of Poisson
equation by Fourier transform method.
Calculus Of Variations
9+3
Concept of variation and its properties – Euler’s equation – Functional dependant on first and higher
order derivatives – Functionals dependant on functions of several independent variables – Variational
problems with moving boundaries –Direct methods – Ritz and Kantorovich methods.
Eigen Value Problems
9+3
Methods of solutions: Faddeev – Leverrier Method, Power Method with deflation – Approximate
Methods: Rayleigh – Ritz Method
Numerical Integration
9+3
Gaussian Quadrature – One and Two Dimensions – Gauss Hermite Quadrature – Monte Carlo Method –
Multiple Integration by using mapping function
Total: 60
Course outcomes
 To familiarize the students in the field of differential and elliptic equations to solve boundary
value problems associated with engineering applications.
 To expose the students to variational formulation and numerical integration techniques and their
applications to obtain solutions for buckling, dynamic response, heat and flow problems of one
and two dimensional conditions.
References:
1. Sankara Rao, K., “Introduction to Partial Differential Equations”, Prentice Hall of India
Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, 1997.
2. Rajasekaran.S, “Numerical Methods in Science and Engineering A Practical Approach”, A.H.Wheeler
and Company Private Limited, 1986.
3. Gupta, A.S., “Calculus of Variations with Applications”, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi,
1997.
4. Andrews, L.C. and Shivamoggi, B.K., “Integral Transforms for Engineers”,Prentice Hall of India Pvt.
Ltd., New Delhi, 2003.
P14STR102
Advanced Design of Concrete Structures
3104
(Use of IS 456-2000, SP 16, SP 34, IS 5525, IS 13920 and other relevant codes are permitted)
Course Objectives
To enable students to
 Design Corbels, shear walls, flat slab and grid floors
 Explain the concepts of ductile detailing of R.C. members as per IS Codes
 Discuss the Inelastic behaviour of R.C. beams
 Design R.C.C. Beams and columns using limit state method
 Explain the concepts of ductile detailing of R.C. members as per IS Codes
Review of limit State Design
9+3
Design for limit state of collapse-Design of beams for combined effect of shear, bending moment and
torsion-Design of slabs- Design of short and slender columns including biaxial bending -Design for limit
state of serviceability-Calculation of deflection and crackwidth according to IS and ACI codes
Design of special R.C. Elements
9+3
Design of R.C. walls - Shear walls- Classification and design principles-Rectangular and Flanged shear
walls-Design of corbels- Design of deep beams
Design of Flat slabs and Grid floors
9+3
Yield line analysis of slabs-Hillerberg’s strip method of design of slab-Design of flat slab-Equivalent
frame method of design-Approximate analysis and Design of grid floors
Inelastic behaviour of R.C. beams
9+3
Inelastic behaviour of concrete beams – Moment Rotation curves – Moment redistribution – Baker’s
method of analysis and design – Design of cast in situ joints in frame.
Detailing Requirements
9+3
Design and detailing of structural members using seismic design - Reinforcement detailing of structural
members as per SP:34 & IS:5525 – Earth quake Resistant Design – Detailing requirements for Ductility
as per IS:13920 - Fire resistance of buildings.
Lecture : 45, Tutorial : 15 , Total : 60
Course Outcomes :
At the end of this course students will be able to design special R.C. elements such as deep
beams, Corbels, shear walls, flat slab and grid floors
References
1. Varghese, P.C. “ Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design” Prentice Hall of India,2002
2. KrishnaRaju .N. “Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design”, CBS Publishers and Distributors 1986.
3. Purushothaman .P. “ Reinforced Concrete Structural Elements Behaviour Analysis and Design”, Tata
Mcgraw Hill ,1986.
4. Park..R and Pauly.T. “Reinforced Concrete Structures”, John wiley & Sons,1975.
P14STR103
Finite Element Methods of Structural analysis
3104
Course Objectives
To enable students to
1. Analyses structure by matrix flexibility and matrix stiffness methods
 Understand the basic concepts of finite element method
 Derive the shape functions of various 1D and 2D elements
 Study the displacement formulations for various 1D and 2D elements and analyse for structures.
 Apply FEM for simple problems like beams, pin jointed frames and plate problems
Review of Matrix Methods
9+3
Flexibility Method-Equilibrium and compatibility – Determinate Vs Indeterminate structures – Indeterminacy Primary structure – Compatibility conditions – Analysis of indeterminate pin-jointed plane frames, continuous
beams, rigid jointed plane frames. Stiffness Method – Degree of freedom or Kinematic indeterminacy –Analysis
procedure-Stiffness co-efficient- – Analysis of continuous beams – Analysis of pin-jointed plane frames and rigid
frames.
Introduction to FEM
9+3
Introduction – General description of the method - Analysis procedure- Stress and strain vectors- strain
displacement equations-linear Constitutive equations-Plane stress, plane strain and axisymmetric cases
of elasticity-Energy principles- Variational methods- Rayleigh Ritz Method- Galerkins method –Concept
of piecewise approximation.
Element Types and Properties
9+3
Concept of an element - Various element shapes- Approximating displacements by polynomialsConvergence and Compatibility Requirements-Pascal’s Triangle- Node numbering procedure – Natural
coordinate system – Generalized coordinates – shape function – Lagrange, Serendipity and Hermitian
elements – stiffness matrix – Nodal load vector –Condensation of internal degrees of freedomDegrading Technique.
Stress Analysis
9+3
Displacement formulation for axial element, beam bending element, Constant linear strain triangular
elements- Linear Isoparametric quadrilateral and hexahedral elements, plate bending element and
axisymmetric elements
Applications of FEM
9+3
Discretisation of a body or structure- Minimization of bandwidth- Selection of proper displacement or
interpolation model- Derivation of element stiffness matrices and load vectors-Assemblage of element
equation to obtain the overall equilibrium equation-Theory of direct stiffness method- solution for
unknown nodal displacements-computation of element strains and stresses-Application of displacement
finite elements to the analysis of simple problems like beams, pin jointed plane frames and plate
problems
Lecture : 45, Tutorial : 15 , Total :60
Course outcome:
 At the end of this course students will have sound knowledge of Finite element method and will
be able to analyse linear elastic structures
References
1. Weaver, J.R and Gere,J.M., Matrix analysis of framed structures,CBS Publishers,newDelhi,1986.
2. Rao, S.S., The Finite Element Method in Engineering, Pergamon Press, 1999.
3. Bathe, K.J., Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis, Prentice Hall, 1995.
4. Chandrakant S Desai and John F Abel., introduction to Finite Element Method, Affiliated EastWest Press private Limited,1987
5. Krishnamoorthy C.S, Finite Element Analysis – Theory and programming, Second edition, Tata
McGraw Hill Publishing Co.. 1994
6. Tirupathi R. Chandrupatla and Ashok D. Belegundu, Introduction to Finite Elements in
Engineering, Prentice Hall of India Pvt.Ltd., New Delhi, 2002
7. Structural Analysis – A Matrix Approach – G.S. Pandit & S.P. Gupta, Tata McGraw Hill 2004.
P14STR104
Theory of Elasticity and Plasticity
3003
Course Objectives
To enable students to
 Explain the Stress and Strain in Cartesian Coordinates
 Discuss Two Dimensional Problems in Cartesian Coordinates
 Study Two Dimensional Problems in Polar Coordinates
 Discuss the problems related to Torsion of prismatic hollow sections
 Explain the behavior of members due to elastic and plastic stages
Analysis of Stress and Strain in Cartesian Coordinates
9
Analysis of stress (two and three dimension)- Body force, surface force - Uniform state of stress –
Principal stresses - stress transformation laws - Differential equations of equilibrium. Analysis of strain
(two and three dimension) Strain displacement relations - Compatibility equations - state of strain at a
point – strain transformation - principal strain - principle of superposition. Stress - strain relations generalized Hooke's law - Lame's constants - methods of formulation of elasticity problems Equilibrium equations in terms of displacements - compatibility equations in terms of stresses Boundary value problems.
Two Dimensional Problems in Cartesian Coordinates
9
Introduction: Plane stress and Plane strain problems - Airy's stress function - polynomials – Direct
method of determining Airy's polynomial stress function - solution of Biharmonic equation by fourier
series - St. Venant principle.
Two Dimensional Problems in Polar Coordinates
9
General equations in polar coordinates - stress distribution symmetrical about an axis - pure bending of
curved bars - strain components in polar coordinates - displacements for symmetrical stress distribution Rotating Disc - Bending of a curved bar by force at the end - Effect of circular hole on stress distribution
- concentrated force at a point of a straight boundary - Forces on wedges - A circular disc with diametric
loading.
Torsion of Prismatic Bars
9
General solutions of the problem by displacement (St. Venant's warping function) and force (Prandtl's
stress function) approaches - Membrane analogy-Torsion of shafts of circular and noncircular (elliptic,
triangular and rectangular) cross sectional shapes. Torsion of thin rectangular section and hollow thin
walled single and multicelled sections.
Introduction to Plasticity
9
Introduction to stress-strain curve - Ideal plastic body - criterion of yielding - Rankine's theory St.Venant's theory - Tresca's criterion - Beltramis theory - Von-mises criterion - Mohr's theory of
yielding - yield surface - Flow rule (plastic stress- strain relation) Prandtl Reuss equations - Plastic work
- Plastic potential - uniqueness of stress distribution - Elastoplastic problems of beams in bending – thick
hollow spheres and cylinders subjected to internal pressure - General relations - plastic torsion – perfect
plasticity - bar of circular cross section - Nadai's sand heap analogy.
Total: 45
Course outcomes:
 At the end of the course students will be in a position to find out the stresses in bodies subjected
to two-dimensional and three dimensional forces
 They will be familiar with the elastic and plastic stage by the more general theory of elasticity
and plasticityReferences
1. Sadhu Singh, Theory of Plasticity, Khanna Publishers, N.Delhi, 2008.
2. P. C. Chow and N. J. Pagano, Elasticity, Tensor, Dyadic and Engg. Approaches, D. Vannostrard Co.,
New York, 1992
3. S. Timoshenko and J. N. Goodier, Theory of Elasticity, Mc Graw Hill Book Co., 2007
4. T. Chakrabarthy, Theory of Plasticity, Mc Graw Hill Book Co., New Delhi, 2006
Elective
P14STR514
Design of Tall Buildings
3003
Course Objectives
To enable the students to
 Study the behaviour, analysis and design of tall structures
 Study the effects of various loads on tall buildings
 Describe the factors to be considered in the design of tall buildings
 Learn the behavior of various structural systems
 Study the different methods of analysis of tall building systems
 Detail the stability aspects of tall buildings
Design Principles and Loading
9
Design philosophy – Loading - Sequential loading - Materials - High performance - concrete - Fibre
reinforced Concrete - Light weight concrete - Design mixes. Gravity loading - Wind loading Earthquake loading
Structural Elements
9
Sectional shapes - Properties and resisting capacity -Design, deflection, cracking – Prestressing -Shear
flow - Design for differential movement, creep and shrinkage effects, temperature effects and fire
resistance.
Behaviour of Various Structural Systems
9
Factors affecting growth, Height and Structural form - High rise behavior - Rigid frames - Braced frames
-Infilled frames - Shear walls - Coupled shear walls - Wall-frames – Tubulars , cores, futrigger - Braced
and hybrid mega systems.
Analysis and Design
9
Modelling for approximate analysis - Accurate analysis and reduction techniques - Analysis of buildings
as total structural system considering overall integrity and major subsystem interaction - Analysis for
member forces - Drift and twist - Computerised general three dimensional analysis.
Stability of Tall Buildings
9
Overall buckling analysis of frames - Wall-frames -Approximate methods - Second order effects of
gravity of loading - P-Delta analysis - Simultaneous first-order and P-Delta analysis - Translational,
Torsional instability-, out of plumb effects - Stiffness of member in stability -Effect of foundation
rotation.
Total: 45 Course outcomes
At the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and design such structures taking into account
the effect of creep, shrinkage and p-delta effect
References
1. Bryan Stafford Smith and Alexcoull, “Tall Building Structures - Analysis and Design”, John Wiley
and Sons, Inc., 1991.
2. Taranath B.S., “Structural Analysis and Design of Tall Buildings”, McGraw Hill, 1988.
3. Gupta.Y.P.,(Editor), Proceedings of National Seminar on High Rise Structures - Design and
Construction Practices for Middle Level Cities, New Age International Limited, New Delhi,1995.
4. Lin T.Y and Stotes Burry D, “Structural Concepts and systems for Architects and Engineers”, John
Wiley, 1988.
5. Beedle.L.S., “Advances in Tall Buildings”, CBS Publishers and Distributors, Delhi, 1986.
P14STR502
Stability of Structures
3003
Course Objectives
To enable the students to
 Explain eh buckling behavior of columns
 Describe the approximate methods of analysis for finding buckling loads
 Discuss the buckling behavior of beams, columns and frames
 Explain the concepts of lateral and torsional buckling of beams
 Describe the buckling behavior of thin plates
Stability of Columns
9
Concepts of Elastic Structural stability- Analytical approaches to stability - characteristics of stability
analysis- Elastic Buckling of columns- Equilibrium; Energy and Imperfection approaches – Nonprismatic columns- Built up columns- Buckling modes- Effect of shear on buckling load - Large
deflection theory.
Methods of Analysis and In Elastic Buckling
9
Approximate methods – Rayleigh and Galerkin methods – numerical methods – Finite difference and
finite Element - analysis of columns – Experimental study of column behaviour – South well plot Column curves - Derivation of Column design formula - Effective length of Columns - Inelastic
behaviour- Tangent modulus and Double modulus theory
Beam Columns and Frames
9
Beam column behaviour- standard cases- Continuous columns and beam columns – Columns on elastic
foundation – Buckling of frames – Single storey portal frames with and without side sway – Classical
and stiffness methods – Use of Wood’s charts.
Buckling of Beams
9
Lateral buckling of beams – Energy method- Application to Symmetric and single symmetric I beams – simply
supported and Cantilever beams - Narrow rectangular cross sections- – Numerical solutions – Torsional buckling
– Uniform and non uniform Torsion on open cross section - Flexural torsional buckling – Equilibrium and energy
approach.
Buckling of Thin Plates
9
Isotropic rectangular plates - Governing Differential equations - Simply Supported on all edges – Use of Energy
methods –Numerical Techniques.
Total: 45
Course outcomes
 At the end of this course students will be in a position to understand the phenomenon of buckling
and its effects on structural components.
 They will be in a position to design these components taking into account the effect of buckling
References
1. Timoshenko, S., and Gere., “Theory of Elastic Stability”, McGraw Hill Book Company, 2009.
2. Chajes, A. “Principles of Structures Stability Theory”, Prentice Hall, 1974.
3. Ashwini Kumar, Stability of Structures, Allied Publishers LTD, New Delhi, 2003
4. Iyenger.N.G.R.,, “Structural stability of columns and plates”, Affiliated East West Press,1986.
5. Gambhir, “Stability Analysis and Design of Structures”, springer, New York , 2004.
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Mechanical Engineering
Branch: M.E. Engineering Design
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14END101
Advanced Numerical Methods
3
1
0
4
2
P14END102
Computer Applications in Design
3
0
0
3
3
P14END103
Finite Element Analysis
3
1
0
4
4
P14END104
Concepts of Engineering Design
3
0
0
3
5
P14END105
Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Design
3
0
0
3
6
P14END501
Elective- Rapid Prototyping And Tooling
3
0
0
3
0
0
3
2
Practical
4
P14END106
CAD Laboratory
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Mechanical Engineering BOS
Dr.R.Venkatesan
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/MECH, First Semester ME END Students and Staff, COE
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
Course Code
P14END101
Course Name
ADVANCED NUMERICAL METHODS
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
1Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
4
Pre-requisite subjects: Mathematics I & II, Transforms and Partial Differential Equations and Numerical
Methods
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Apply numerical methods for algebraic or transcendental equation
CO2 Apply numerical technique for solving IVPs and BVPs in ODEs
and characteristics value problem by using suitable method
CO3 Describe and obtain the solution of partial differential equations that
are time-dependent
Course
Outcomes CO4 Describe and obtain the solution of partial differential equations that
are time-independent
CO5 Explain the concept of finite element method, orthogonal collocation
method, orthogonal collocation with finite element method and
Galerkin finite element method for solving PDEs
L
9
T
3
Unit I
ALGEBRAIC EQUATIONS
Systems of linear equations: Gauss Elimination method, pivoting techniques – Jacobi, Gauss
Seidel, SOR iteration methods - Systems of nonlinear equations: Fixed point iterations,
Newton Method, Eigenvalue problems: power method, inverse power method.
L
9
T
3
Unit II
ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Runge Kutta Methods for system of IVPs, numerical stability, solution of stiff ODEs,
shooting method, BVP: Finite difference method, orthogonal collocation method, orthogonal
collocation with finite element method, Galerkin finite element method.
L 9
T
3
FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR TIME DEPENDENT
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL QUATIONS
Parabolic equations: explicit and implicit finite difference methods, weighted average
approximation - Dirichlet and Neumann conditions - Two dimensional parabolic equations –
ADI method; First order hyperbolic equations – method of characteristics.
Unit III
L
9
T
3
FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR TIME INDEPENDENT
PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Laplace and Poisson’s equations in a rectangular region: Five point finite difference schemes,
Leibmann’s iterative methods, Dirichlet and Neumann conditions – Laplace equation in polar
coordinates: finite difference schemes – approximation of derivatives near a curved boundary
while using a square mesh.
Unit IV
L
9
T
3
Unit V
FINITE ELEMENT METHOD
Partial differential equations – Finite element method - orthogonal collocation method,
orthogonal collocation with finite element method, Galerkin finite element method.
Tutorials: 15 Hrs
Total
: 60 Hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Thomas algorithm for tridiagonal system
2. Faddeev – Leverrier Method
3. Adams-Bashforth multistep method
4. Method of lines
5. Cranck-Nicholson Method
6. Wave equation- Explicit scheme
Learning Resources
Reference books
1. Saumyen Guha and Rajesh Srivastava, “Numerical methods for Engineering and
Science”, Oxford Higher Education, New Delhi, 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0195693485.
2. Gupta S.K., “Numerical Methods for Engineers”, New Age Publishers, 3rd edition,
2015.ISBN-978-81-224-3359-3.
3. Burden, R.L., and Faires, J.D., “Numerical Analysis – Theory and Applications”,
Cengage Learning, India Edition, New Delhi, 2009.ISBN-13-9788131510858.
4. Jain M. K., Iyengar S. R., Kanchi M. B., Jain , “Computational Methods for Partial
Differential Equations”, New Age Publishers, 1st edition, 1994, reprint 2007. ISBN 13:
9788122404296.
5. Morton K.W. and Mayers D.F., “Numerical solution of partial differential
equations”,Cambridge University press, Cambridge, 2nd edition, 2005.ISBN-978-0521-60793-3.
Course Code
P14END102
Course Name
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN DESIGN
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Pre-requisite subjects: Engineering Graphics, CAD/CAM/CIM, Design of Machine Elements and
Design of Jigs, Fixtures, Press tools and Moulds.
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Impart knowledge on parametric sketching
CO2 Practice modeling, assembly, tolerance analysis of Mechanical
components
Course
Outcomes CO3 Design Rapid tooling in computers
CO4 Impart knowledge on visual basic, pro/program, script, LISP etc
CO5 Provide standardization and design optimization for geometry.
L
9
T
0
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS IN NEW PRODUCT DESIGN
Concept design – parametric sketching – constraints – computer graphics principles- 2D
transformation, scaling, rotation – windowing, view ports – clipping – data exchange
formats.
Unit I
L 10
T
0
Unit II
COMPUTERS IN DESIGN
Solid modeling of Mechanical components – associative features – Sheet metal
components, nesting and development – plastic parts with draft and shrinkage allowance –
Reverse engineering of components – assembly of parts – tolerance analysis – mass
property calculations
L 9
T
0
Unit III COMPUTERS IN TOOLING DESIGN
Mould design – jigs and fixtures design – check for interferences – mechanism design and
analysis – Rapid tooling
L
8
T
0
Unit IV COMPUTERS IN DESIGN PRODUCTIVITY
Customizing various software by using visual basic, pro/program, script, LISP etc to write
applications like design of shafts, gears etc.
L
9
T
0
Unit V
MANAGING PRODUCT DESIGN DATA
Version control – library creation – catalog making – standardization for design –
collaborative design among peer groups – Design optimization for geometry - Design
check, approval and validation.
Total: 45 Hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Basics of AUTOCAD
2. Interchangeability in Design
3. Design of Casting
Learning Resources
Reference Books
1. William M. Neumann and Robert Sproul “ Principles of interactive Computer Graphics”
Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. Ltd, 21st Reprint 2008,ISBN 13 –978-0-07-463293-2.
2. Ibrahim Zeid “CAD/CAM – Theory and Practice” – McGraw Hill, Special Indian Edition,
Fifth reprint 2010 ISBN 13 – 978-0-07-015134-5.
3. P N Rao “CAD/CAM :Principles and Applications” Tata McGraw Hill Education Pvt Ltd,
Third Edition. 2011, ISBN-13-978-0-07-068793-4
4. Schlechtendahl, E. G, CAD – Data transfer for Solid Models, Springer Verlag, Berlin,
1989, ISBN 9783540518266
5. Donald Hearn and M Pauline Baker “Computer Graphics” Prentice Hall Inc 1994, Second
Edition, ISBN – 9780131615304.
Course Code
P14END103
Course Name
FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
1Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
4
Pre-requisite subjects: Engineering Mathematics, Numerical Methods, Strength of Materials Heat and
mass transfer and Finite Element Analysis b
Course
Outcomes
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1
 Provide further Advanced FEA knowledge and techniques for solving
1D complex problems in engineering.
CO2 Gain Knowledge to solve two-dimensional problems
CO3 Provide Knowledge to expertise in basic elements, Isoparametric
elements
CO4 Impart Knowledge to structural dynamics applications
CO5 Understand non linear problems and error estimates
L 10
T
3
INTRODUCTION & ONE-DIMENSIONAL
PROBLEMS
Relevance of finite element analysis in design - Variational principles and methods –
Weighted-Integral statements – Weak formulations – Ritz method – Method of weighted
residuals – Applications of FEA - Finite element modeling – Co-ordinates and shape functions
- Potential energy approach – Galerkin’s approach – One dimensional finite element models in
Solid mechanics and Heat transfer – Finite element model for beams
Unit I
L 10
T
3
Unit II
TWO-DIMENSIONAL PROBLEMS
Poisson equation – Laplace equation – Weak form – Element matrices for triangular and
rectangular elements – Evaluation of integrals – Assembly – Axi-symmetric problems –
Applications – Conduction and convection heat transfer - Torsional cylindrical member –
Transient analysis - Theory of elasticity – Plane strain – Plane stress – Axi-symmetric
problems – Principle of virtual displacement
L
8
T
3
Unit III ISOPARAMETRIC ELEMENTS
Introduction – Bilinear quadrilateral elements – Quadratic quadrilaterals – Hexahedral
elements - Numerical integration – Gauss quadrature – Static condensation – Load
considerations – Stress calculations – Examples of 2D and 3D applications
L
9
T
3
Unit IV STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS APPLICATIONS
Dynamic equations – Mass and damping matrices – Natural frequencies and modes –
Reduction of number of DOF-response history – Model methods – Ritz vectors – Component
mode synthesis – Harmonic response – Direct integration techniques – Explicit and implicit
methods – Analysis by response spectra – Example problems
L
8
T
3
Unit V
NON-LINEAR PROBLEMS & ERROR ESTIMATES
Introduction – Material non-linearity – Elasto Plasticity – Plasticity – Visco plasticity –
Geometric non-linearity – Large displacement – Error norms and convergence rates – Hrefinement with adaptivity – adaptive refinement
Tutorials: 15 Hrs
Total
: 60 Hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Two-dimensional mesh generation – advancing front method
2. Three-dimensional mesh generation – Delaunay triangulation
3. Coupled problems
4. Transient response by analytical procedures
Learning Resources
Reference Books
1. Reddy J.N., “An Introduction to the Finite Element Method”, McGraw Hill,
International Edition 2005, ISBN -0-07-060741-9.
2. Logan D.L, “A First Course in the Finite Element Method”, Fifth Edition, Cengage
Learning, 2011, ISBN – 978-0-495-66827-5.
3. Robert Davis Cook, Davis S. Malkus, “Concepts and Applications of Finite Element
Analysis”, Wiley, John & Sons, Forth Edition 2003, ISBN-13-978-0471356059.
4. Larry J.Segerlind, “Applied Finite Element Analysis”, Second Edition, John Wiley, 1984,
ISBN–978-0-471-80662-2.
5. S.S.Rao, “The Finite Element Analysis in Engineering”, Forth Edition, Elsevier 2005,
ISBN – 81-8147- 885 -1.
6. Zienkiewicz, O.C. and Taylor, R.L., “The Finite Element Method”, Sixth Edition,
Butterworth – Heinemann, 2005, ISBN–0–7506-6320-0.
Course Code
P14END104
Course Name
CONCEPTS OF ENGINEERING DESIGN
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Pre-requisite subjects: Finite element Analysis, CAD/CAM/CIM, Engineering materials and Metallurgy,
Manufacturing Technology I & II, Product Quality Development.
Course
Outcomes
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Impart knowledge on design process
CO2 Gain knowledge on mathematical modelling, geometric modelling.
material selection Chart, Pugh selection method,
CO3 Understand
selection with computed aided databases
CO4 Develop knowledge on material processing and design
CO5 Understand and respond Environmental and safety issues.
L
8
T
0
Unit I
THE DESIGN PROCESS
The Design Process - need identification – Design requirements – Product Life Cycle –
Morphology of Design steps of Product Design – Conceptual Design, Embodiment Design,
detailed Design – Concurrent Engineering – CAD & CAM, Human factors in Design.
L
9
T
0
Unit II
TOOLS IN ENGINEERING DESIGN
Creativity and problem solving, Decision Theory, Modeling – Role of models in
Engineering Design, Mathematical modeling, Geometric modeling, finite element
modeling, Rapid Prototyping – Simulation Finite Difference method, Monte Carlo method –
Optimization – Search methods, Geometric programming, Structural and shape
optimization.
L 9
T
0
Unit III MATERIAL SELECTION AND MATERIALS IN
DESIGN
The Classification and properties of Engineering materials, material standards and
specifications – Methods of material selection – Ashby Chart and method of weight factors,
Derivation of material indices, Use of material selection Chart, Pugh selection method,
selection with computed aided databases – Design for brittle fracture, Design for fatigue
failure, Design for corrosion resistance, Designing with plastics.
L
9
T
0
Unit IV MATERIAL PROCESSING AND DESIGN
Classification of manufacturing processes and their role in design, Factors determining the
process selection, use of process selection chart and computerized database – Design for
manufacturing, Design for forging and sheet metal forming, Design for casting, Design for
machining, welding and assembly, design for residual stresses and heat – treatment
L 10
T
0
Unit V
LEGAL, ETHICAL ENVIRONMENTAL AND
SAFETY ISSUES IN DESIGN AND QUALITY
ENGINEERING
The origin of laws, Contracts, - Liability – Tort Law- Product Liability – Design aspects of
product liability, Codes of ethics, solving ethical conflicts. Design for environment – Life
Cycle assessment – Material recycling and remanufacture, Design for safety – Potential
Dangers and Guidelines for design for safety, Design for reliability failure mode effect
analysis, robust Design.
Total: 45 Hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Basic concept of design
2. Design procedures
3. Design application in industries
4. Basic quality concepts
Learning Resources
Reference Books
1. Dieter, George E, Engineering Design –“A materials and processing Approach”,
Paperback, McGraw Hill Higher Education,5th International edition,2012, ISBN-13:
9780071326254.
2. Karl T. Vlrich and Steven D. Eppinger “Product design and Development”, Mc Graw
Hill, International Edition, 5th Edition,2000,ISBN: 0073404772
rd
3. Pahlgand Beitz W “Engineering Design” Springer – London,3 Edition, 2006,ISBN13: 9781846283185
4. Suh. N. P. “The principles of design”,Oxford University Press USA 1990, ISBN-13:
9780195043457
st
5. Ray M.S. “Elements of Engineering Design”, Printice Hall Inc.,1 Edition, 1985,
ISBN-13: 9780132641852
Course Code
P14END105
Course Name
MICRO ELECTRO MECHANICAL SYSTEMS DESIGN
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Pre-requisite subjects: Engineering Physics, Engineering Chemistry, Mechatronics, Strength of
Materials, Dynamics of Machinery and Engineering Materials and Metallurgy.
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Make scale up and scale down the physical quantities of micro system
CO2 Impart knowledge on MEMS with their manufacturing techniques
Course
CO3 Impart knowledge on micromechanics
Outcomes CO4 Describe packaging techniques of MEMS
CO5 Design micro systems in various applications like automotive
industry, bio-medical etc.
L
9
T
0
Unit I
INTRODUCTION
Overview-Microsystems and microelectronics - Working principle of Microsystems -micro
actuation techniques-micro sensors-types-microactuators-types-micropump-micromotorsmicro-valves-microgrippers-scaling laws-scaling in geometry-scaling in rigid body
dynamics- scaling in electrostatic forces- scaling in electricity- scaling in fluid mechanicsscaling in heat transfer
L
9
T
0
Unit II
MATERIALS AND FABRICATION PROCESS
Substrates and wafer-single crystal silicon wafer formation-ideal substrates-mechanical
properties-silicon compounds - Sio2, SiC, Si3N4 and polycrystalline silicon - Silicon
piezoresistors - Gallium aresenside, Quartz-piezoelectric crystals-polymers for MEMS conductive polymers – Photolithography - Ion implantation - Diffusion – Oxidation –CVD
- Physical vapor deposition - Deposition by epitaxy - etching process
L
9
T
0
Unit III MICROMECHANICS
Introduction-static bending of thin plates-circular plates with edge fixed - rectangular plate
with all edges fixed and square plate with all edges fixed – Mechanical vibration-resonant
vibration- micro accelerometers-design theory and damping coefficients- thermo
mechanics-thermal stresses-fracture mechanics-stress intensity factors, fracture toughness
and interfacial fracture mechanics.
L
9
T
0
Unit IV MICRO SYSTEM MANUFACTURING
Clean room technology-Bulk Micro manufacturing- surface micro machining –LIGASLIGA-Micro system packaging-materials-die level-device level-system level-packaging
techniques-die preparation-surface bonding-wire bonding-sealing
L
9
T
0
Unit V
MICRO SYSTEM DESIGN
Design considerations-process design-mask layout design- mechanical design-applications
of micro system in -automotive industry-bio medical –aero space-telecommunications
Total : 45 hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Micro Gyroscope
2. Micro robots
3. Sensors used in Aircraft control panels
Learning Resources
Reference Books
1. Mohamed Gad-el-Hak, “The MEMS Hand book”, First Edition, CRC press 2001,
ISBN13-978-0849300776.
2. Julian W.Gardner, Vijay K.Varadan, Osama O.Awadel Karim, “Microsensors MEMS and
Smart Devices”, John Wiey & sons Ltd.,2001. ISBN13: 978-0-471-86109-6.
3. Sergej Fatikow, Ulrich. Rembold, “Microsystem Technology and Microrobotics”,
Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg ,1997, ISBN-3-540-60658.
4. Tai-Ran Hsu, “MEMS & Microsystems Design and Manufacture”, International Edition,
Tata McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN-9780071204767.
5. Francis E.H Tay and W.O Choong, “Microfludics and BioMEMS Applications”, Springer
US, 2011, ISBN-9781441953162.
ELECTIVE
Course Code
P14END501
Course Name
RAPID PROTOTYPING AND TOOLING
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Pre-requisite subjects: Manufacturing Technology-I, Manufacturing Technology-II, CAD/CAM/CIM,
and Unconventional Machining process.
Upon completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Describe liquid based RPT like stereo Lithography Systems Selective
Laser Sintering
CO2 Impart knowledge in Solid based RPT like LOM, FDM.
Course
Outcomes CO3 Describe Powder based RPT and concept modelers
CO4 Provide knowledge in LENS, Indirect and Direct Rapid Tooling
CO5 Apply concepts of RPT in component development
L
9
T
0
Unit I
LIQUID BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
Introduction to RP Process-Need for the compression in product development, History of
RP systems, Survey of applications, Growth of RP industry, classification of RP systems.
Stereo lithography Systems: Principle, Process parameters, Process details, Data
preparation, Data files and Machine details, Applications. Solid Ground Curing: Principle of
operation, Machine details, Applications.
L
9
T
0
Unit II
SOLID BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
Laminated object manufacturing: principle of operation, LOM materials, process Details,
applications. Fusion deposition modeling: principle, process parameters, path generation,
Applications
L
9
T
0
Unit III POWDER BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
Selective laser sintering: types of machines, principle of operation, process Parameters, data
preparation for SLS applications. Concept modelers: principle, thermo jet printer, sander's
model market, 3-d printer, genisys xs printer, jp system 5, object Quadra system
Unit IV
RAPID TOOLING
L
9
T
0
Laser Engineered Net Shaping (Lens), Indirect Rapid Tooling - Silicone rubber tooling,
Aluminum filled epoxy tooling, Spray metal tooling, Cast Kirk site, 3D Keltool, etc. Direct
Rapid Tooling - Direct AIM, Quick cast process, Copper polyamide, Rapid Tool, DMILS,
Pro Metal, Sand casting tooling, Laminate tooling, soft tooling vs. hard tooling.
L
9
T
0
Unit V
RAPID MANUFACTURING PROCESS
Software For RP: STL files, Overview of Solid view, Magics, mimics, magics
communicator, etc. Internet based software, Collaboration tools. Rapid Manufacturing
Process Optimization: Factors influencing accuracy, Data preparation errors, Part building
errors, Errors in finishing, Influence of part build orientation. Allied Processes: Vacuum
Casting, Surface Digitizing, Surface Generation from point cloud, Surface modification,
data transfer to solid models.
Total: 45 Hrs
Content Beyond Syllabus
1. Laser 3D printing
2. Smart materials used in RPT
3. Advanced Treatment for cleaning the prototypes
Learning Resources
Reference Books
1. Paul. F. Jacobs, "Stereo lithography and other RP & M Technologies", Society of
Manufacturing Engineers, NY, 1996, ISBN-9780872634671.
2. Pham. D. T. & Dimov. S. S., "Rapid Manufacturing", Springer, 2001, ISBN9781852333607
3. Peter D.Hilton, Hilton/Jacobs, Paul F.Jacobs. “Rapid Tooling: Technologies and Industrial
Applications”, Marcel Dekker, Inc, 2003, ISBN- 0824741595.
4. Terry Wohlers,"Wohlers Report 2006",Wohlers Associates, 2006, ISBN 0-9754429-2-9
5. Chua C.K., Leong K.F., and Lim C.S., “Rapid prototyping: Principles and applications”,
World Scientific Publishing Company; 3 Har/Dvdr edition (January 14, 2010), ISBN-13:
978-9812778970
Course Code
P14END106
Course Name
CAD LABORATORY
Lecture
- Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
60
Tutorial
- Hrs/Week
External Marks
40
Practical
- 3
Credits
2
Pre-requisite subjects: Machine Drawing and CAD laboratory
Upon Completion of this course the students will be able to
CO1 Understand the basic concepts of modeling and analysis softwares like PRO-E /
SOLID WORKS /SOLID EDGE/CATIA / NX / ANSYS / NASTRAN etc.
CO2 Familiar with the sectioning concepts and drawing standards.
Course
Outcomes CO3 Develop part models by sketching.
CO4 Assemble part models into an assembly.
CO5
Create detailed drawing of assembly to understand 2D views.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
Total : 45 Hrs
1
Introduction to CAD and solid works
2
Study of Sectional views and types of keys
3
Study of drawing standards
4
Split muff coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
5
Protected type Flange coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
6
Pipe vice – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
7
Screw jack – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
8
Simple eccentric – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
9
Universal coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
10
Plummer block – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
11
Claw coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
12
Knuckle joint – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
13
Bushed Pin type Flexible Coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
14
Oldham’s coupling – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
15
Machine Vice – Part, Assembly and Detail drawing
List of Equipments
1. Computer workstation 20
2. Software requirement
(a) PRO-E /SOLID WORKS /SOLID EDGE/CATIA / NX / ANSYS / NASTRAN
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Mechanical Engineering
Branch: M.E. Product Design and Development
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14PDD101
Geometric Modeling
3
1
0
4
2
P14PDD102
Product Development Strategies
3
0
0
3
3
P14PDD103
Finite Element Mechanism Analysis
3
1
0
4
4
P14PDD104
Product Data Management
3
0
0
3
5
P14PDD105
Rapid Prototyping and Tooling
3
0
0
3
6
P14PDD503
Elective- Production and Operations
Management
Practical
3
0
0
3
7
P14PDD106
CAD Laboratory
0
0
3
2
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Mechanical Engineering BOS
Dr.R.Venkatesan
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/MECH, First Semester ME PDD Students and Staff, COE
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
Course Code
P14PDD101
Course Name
GEOMETRIC MODELING
Lecture
-
Tutorial
-
Practical
-
Course
Objectives
3Hrs/Week
1Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
External Marks
50
Credits
4
CO1 Explain the fundamentals of wire frame modeling technique and its
representation.
CO2 Apply the fundamental concepts of surface modeling technique to
product.
CO3 Draw the solid modeling of product by using B-rep and CSG
techniques.
CO4 Discuss the fundamental concepts of hidden line removal, shading and
colorings.
CO5 Apply the fundamental concepts of animation technique to some
product using software.
L
9
P
3
MATHEMATICAL REPRESENTATION OF
CURVES
Introduction,-types ,Wire frame models, parametric representation of curves (analytic &
synthetic), curve manipulation, design examples.
Unit I
L
9
P
MATHEMATICAL REPRESENTATION OF
SURFACES
Introduction, Surface models, parametric representation, surface manipulation, design
applications.
Unit II
3
L
9
P
3
MATHEMATICAL REPRESENTATION OF
SOLIDS
Fundamentals of solid modeling,-Boundary representation, constructive solid geometry,
sweep representation, analytic solid modeler design applications.
Unit III
L
9
P
3
Unit IV VISUAL REALISATION
Introduction, model cleanup, hidden line removal, hidden surface removal, shading,
coloring.
L
9
P
3
Unit V
COMPUTER ANIMATION:
Introduction to computer animation computer animation, animation systems - types and
technique, design applications, computer graphics standard. Laboratory practices.
Note: Lab Practice of 15 Hrs
TOTAL HOURS 45+15 = 60
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. Ibrahim Zeid & R Sivasubramaniyan,"CAD/CAM Theory and Practice", McGraw Hill
Inc., New York, 2010
2. Radhakrishnan P & Kothandaraman C P, "Computer Graphics and Design", Dhanpat
Rai and Sons, 2005
3. Radhakrishnan P, Subramanyan S & Raju V, “CAD/CAM/CIM”, New Age International
(P) Ltd.,2004
4. Michael E Mortenson, “Geometric Modeling”, Industrial Press Inc., 2006
Course Code
P14PDD102
Course Name
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES
Lecture
-
Tutorial
Practical
Course
Objectives
Unit I
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
-
External Marks
50
-
Credits
3
CO1 Explain the concepts of concurrent engineering and sequential
engineering.
CO2 Explain the fundamentals of design for manufacturing and assembly
CO3 Draw the product sketch using geometric modeling technique like
wireframe, surface and solid modeling.
CO4 Discuss the role of rapid prototyping in product development.
CO5 Explain the fundamentals of tolerance modeling and discuss the
application of FEM in product development.
INTRODUCTION
L
9
T
0
Introduction to product development -Phases in the life cycle of a product, time compression
engineering, concurrent and sequential engineering, configuration management, change
management.
Unit II
CONCURRENT ENGINEERING
L
9
T
0
Introduction to Concurrent Engineering, Cost of design changes, schemes for
concurrent engineering, axiomatic design, design for manufacturing and assembly, robust
design, failure mode and effect analysis, Value engineering.
Unit III
GEOMETRIC MODELING
L
9
T
0
CAD/CAM hardware - windows NT and Unix based systems ,Introduction to geometric
modeling, types,-wire frame modeling ,surface modeling and solid modeling techniques current
concepts, part design, sketching, use of datum constructionFeatures, free form
manipulation, patterning, copying, modifying features.
Unit IV
RAPID PROTOTYPING AND TOOLING
L
9
T
0
Introduction product development, role of RP process in product development, RP process –
CAD modeling –STL file formatting- layering – processing -post processing. Classification of
RP process - stereo lithographic, selective laser sintering, laminated object manufacturing,
fused deposition modeling.
Unit V
ASSEMBLY MODELLING AND FEM
L
9
T
0
Assembly modeling, tolerance modeling, mass property calculations, Finite element
modeling and analysis, general procedure, analysis techniques, application of finite element
method to product development,
TOTAL HOURS: 45
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. Ibrahim Zeid & R Sivasubramaniyan,"CAD/CAM Theory and Practice", McGraw Hill
Inc., New York, 2010.
2. Singiresu S RAO, "The Finite Element Method in Engineering", E l s e v i e r
Inc.,2010.
3. Pham. D. T. & Dimov. S. S., "Rapid Manufacturing", Verlag, London, 2001
Course Code
P14PDD103
Course Name
FINITE ELEMENT AND MECHANISM ANALYSIS
Lecture
-
4Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
1Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
4
Course
Objectives
Unit I
CO1 Explain the application of FEA in structural, heat transfer and fluid
flow problems.
CO2 Solve the fundamental static problem using finite element analysis
procedure.
CO3 Discuss the various solution techniques used in finite element
analysis.
CO4 Solve the fundamental heat transfer problems and fluid flow
problems.
CO5 Solve the fundamental dynamics analysis problems of kinematic
models.
INTRODUCTION TO FEM
L
9
T
3
Engineering design and analysis - meaning and purpose-steady state, propagation and transient
problems-basic concepts of FEM - applicability of FEM to structural analysis heat transfer and
fluid flow problems-advantages and limitations of FEM - commercial finite element packagesorganization-advantages & limitations.
Unit II
STATIC ANALYSIS
L
9
T
3
General procedure of FEM - skeletal and continuum structures -Discrtization of domain-basic
types of elements-shape function - Rayleigh - Ritz method formulation of element stiffness
matrices - truss, beam, triangular- CST element - Isoparametric elements.
Unit III
SOLUTION METHODS FOR FINITE ELEMENT
EQUATIONS
L
9
T
3
Handling of simultaneous equations - Gaussian elimination method - Choleski method-solving
of Eigen value problems - Jacobi & subspace iteration methods - direct integration and mode
superposition methods - Interpolation techniques.
Unit IV
HEAT TRANSFER AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS
L
9
T
3
Basic equations of heat transfer & fluid flow problems - Galar kin method- finite element
formulation - one dimensional heat and fluid flow problems.
Unit V
MECHANISM ANALYSIS
L
9
T
3
Equations of motion for dynamic problems - consistent and lumped mass matrices formulation of element mass matrices - free vibration and forced vibration problem
formulation. Introduction to Analysis of mechanisms - Creation of kinematic models imposement of constraints and forces - inertial data - static and dynamic analysis of kinematic
systems
TOTAL HOURS: 60
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. Bathe K J, "Finite Element Procedures", Prentice Hall, Pearson Education Inc., 2006
2. Shames I H & Dym C L , “Energy and Finite Element Methods in Structural Mechanics,”
New Age International (P) Ltd., 2006
3. Uicker .J. J, Pennock G R, Shigley .J. E, "Theory of Machines and Mechanisms", Oxford
University Press, 2011
4. Rao SS, "The Finite Element Method in Engineering", Butterworth-Heinemann, 2011
5. Cook R.D., Malkus D.S., & Plesha M.E., "Concepts and Applications of Finite
ElementAnalysis", Wiley India (p) Ltd, 2007
Course Code
P14PDD104
Course Name
PRODUCT DATA MANAGEMENT
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
0Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Course
Objectives
Unit I
CO1
CO2
CO3
CO4
CO5
Explain the fundamentals of Product Data Management.
Write the case study for document management.
Discuss configuration management and change management.
Explain the fundamentals of product life cycle management.
Compare sales configuration nd product configurator.
INTRODUCTION
L
9
T
0
Introduction to PDM-present market constraints-need for collaboration- internet and
developments in server-client computing.
Unit II
COMPONENTS OF PDM
L
9
T
0
Components of a typical PDM setup-hardware and software- document managementcreation and viewing of documents-creating parts-versions and version control of parts and
documents- case studies.
Unit III
CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT AND
CHANGE MANAGEMENT
Base lines-product
L
9
T
0
structure-configuration management- case studies. Change issue-
change request-change investigation-change proposal-change activity-case studies.
Unit IV
PROJECTS AND ROLES
L
9
T
0
Creation of projects and roles- life cycle of a product- life cycle management- automating
information flow- work flows- creation of work flow templates-life cycle-work flow
integration- case studies.
Unit V
GENERIC PRODUCTS AND VARIANTS
L
9
T
0
Product configurator-comparison between sales configuration and product configuratorgeneric product modeling in configuration modeler- use of order generator for variant
creation- registering of variants in product register-case studies.
TOTAL HOURS: 45
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. John Stark, “Product Lifecycle Management: 21st Century Paradigm for Product
Realisation”, Springer Verlag, 2011
2. Rodger Burden, “Product Data Management”, Resource Publishing, 2003.
3. Wind-chill R5.0 Reference manuals, 2000
4. Terry Quatrain, “Visual Modeling with Rational Rose 2002 and UML”, Pearson
Education Inc ., 2004
Course Code
P14PDD105
Course Name
RAPID PROTOTYPING AND TOOLING
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
0Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Course
Objectives
Unit I
CO1 Explain the fundamentals of liquid based rapid prototyping process.
Discuss its process parameters.
CO2 Explain the fundamentals of solid based rapid prototyping process.
Discuss its process parameters.
CO3 Explain the fundamentals of powder based rapid prototyping process.
Discuss its process parameters.
CO4 Discuss the fundamentals of indirect and direct rapid tooling
techniques in RP process.
CO5 Explain the fundamentals of STL file format and various rapid
manufacturing.
LIQUID BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
L
9
T
0
Introduction to RP Process-Need for the compression in product development, History of RP
systems, Survey of applications, Growth of RP industry, classification of RP systems. Stereo
lithography Systems: Principle, Process parameters, Process details, Data preparation, Data
files and Machine details, Applications. Solid Ground Curing: Principle of operation, Machine
details, Applications.
Unit II
SOLID BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
L
9
T
0
Laminated object manufacturing: principle of operation, LOM materials, process Details,
applications. Fusion deposition modeling: principle, process parameters, path generation,
Applications.
Unit III
POWDER BASED RAPID PROTOTYPING
L
9
T
0
Selective laser sintering: types of machines, principle of operation, process Parameters, data
preparation for SLS applications. Concept modelers: principle, thermo jet printer, sander's
model market, 3-d printer, genisys xs printer, jp system 5, object Quadra system.
Unit IV
RAPID TOOLING
L
9
T
0
Laser Engineered Net Shaping (Lens), Indirect Rapid Tooling - Silicone rubber tooling,
Aluminum filled epoxy tooling, Spray metal tooling, Cast Kirk site, 3D Keltool, etc. Direct
Rapid Tooling - Direct AIM, Quick cast process, Copper polyamide, Rapid Tool, DMILS,
ProMetal, Sand casting tooling, Laminate tooling, soft tooling vs. hard tooling.
Unit V
RAPID MANUFACTURING PROCESS
L
9
T
0
Software For RP: STL files, Overview of Solid view, Magics, mimics, magics communicator,
etc. Internet based software, Collaboration tools. Rapid Manufacturing Process Optimization:
Factors influencing accuracy, Data preparation errors, Part building errors, Errors in finishing,
Influence of part build orientation. Allied Processes: Vacuum Casting, Surface Digitizing,
Surface Generation from point cloud, Surface modification, data transfer to solid models.
TOTAL HOURS: 45
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. Pham. D. T. & Dimov. S. S., "Rapid Manufacturing", Verlag, London, 2001.
2. Rapid Prototyping and Engineering applications: A tool box for prototype development,
Liou W.Liou, Frank W.Liou, CRC Press, 2007.
3. Rapid Prototyping: Theory and practice, Ali K. Kamrani, Emad Abouel Nasr,
Springer, 2006
Elective
Course Code
P14PDD503
Course Name
PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
Lecture
-
3Hrs/Week
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
0Hrs/Week
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
3
Course
Objectives
Unit I
CO1 Explain the importance of forecasting and facility location.
CO2 Explain the various stages in master production schedule. Explain the
importance of controlling.
CO3 Discuss the fundamentals of different elements of just in time and
calculate economics order quantity.
CO4 Evaluate the various networking technique used in project planning.
CO5 Explain the importance of resource constrained in scheduling
problems.
FACILITY LOCATION, LAYOUT AND
FORECASTING
L
9
T
0
FACILITY LOCATION & LAYOUT: Introduction - Need for Selecting a Suitable
Location - factors influencing plant location/facility location. Introduction to Plant layout Principles of Plant Layout - Classification of plant Layout
FORECASTING: Introduction, objectives of forecast- classification of forecasting
methods – regression model.
Unit II
MASTER PRODUCTION AND SCHEDULING
L
9
T
0
MASTER PRODUCTION SCHEDULING: Development of a master production
schedule, materials requirement planning (MRP- I) and manufacturing resource planning
(MRP -II).
SCHEDULING: Objectives in Scheduling - Major steps involved -information system
linkages in Production Planning.
Unit III
JUST IN TIME AND INVENTORY ANALYSIS:
L
9
T
0
JUST IN TIME MANUFACTURING: INTRODUCTION: Elements of JIT – uniform
production rate - Pull versus Push method- Kanban system - small lot size - Quick,
inexpensive set-up - Continuous improvement.
INVENTORY ANALYSIS: Definitions - ABC inventory System – EOQ models Inventory order policies.
Unit IV
PROJECT PLANNING
L
9
T
0
PROJECT PLANNING: Introduction- Evolution of Network Planning Techniques Critical Path Method (CPM) - Project Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT).
Unit V
SCHEDULING & FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING
SYSTEM
L
9
T
0
SCHEDULING: Introduction - Allocation of units for a single resource - allocation of
multiple resources - Resource Balancing. Line Balancing
Flexible manufacturing system: Introduction - concepts - advantages and limitation Computer Integration and agile manufacturing and operations. Electronic data interchange.
TOTAL HOURS: 45
Learning Resources
Text Books
1. Roberta S. Russell, Bernard W. Taylor III, “Operations Management : Creating Value
Along the Supply Chain”, John Wiley & Sons, New York , 7th edition, 2011
2. Martand Telsang ,” Industrial Engineering and production management” ,S.Chand &
company Ltd ,2012
3. R.Panneerselvam,“Production and Operations Management”, PHI Learning Pvt.Ltd., 2012
Course Code
P14PDD106
Course Name
CAD LABORATORY
Lecture
-
Internal Marks
50
Tutorial
-
External Marks
50
Practical
-
Credits
2
Course
Objectives
Ex. No
1.
3Hrs/Week
CO1
CO2
CO3
CO4
CO5
Explain the modeling, analysis, simulation and rapid prototyping.
Draw 2D sketch using modeling software.
Draw 3D modeling of product using modeling software.
Assemble the basic product using modeling software.
Analyze the basic components using analysis software.
L
0
CAD LABORATORY
Introduction to modeling, analysis, simulation and rapid prototyping
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Introduction to solid works and COSMOSXpress software
Modeling of control arm rod
Modeling of anchor plate
Modeling of tray using 3d sketch
Modeling of hook
Modeling and assembly of screw jack
8.
9.
10.
11.
Modeling and assembly of universal coupling
Analysis and simulation of connecting rod
Analysis and simulation of anchor plate
Analysis and simulation of hook
p
3
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME c under Regulations 2014
Electrical and Electronics Engineering
Branch: M.E. Power Electronics and Drives
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14PED101
Applied Mathematics
3
1
0
4
2
P14PED102
Modeling and Analysis of Electrical Machines
3
1
0
4
3
P14PED103
Advanced Power Semiconductor Devices
3
0
0
3
4
P14PED104
Analysis of Power Converters
3
0
0
3
5
P14PED105
Analysis of Inverter
3
0
0
3
6
P14PED501
Elective - High Voltage Direct Current
Transmission
Practical
3
0
0
3
7
P14PED106
Modeling and Simulation Laboratory
0
0
3
2
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Electrical Engineering BOS
Dr.C.Easwarlal
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/EEE, First Semester ME PED Students and Staff, COE
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14PED101
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students to,
1. Describe the concepts in calculus of variations, state different types of Euler’s equation, solve
variational and isoperimetric problems
2. State Z – transform, Discuss and prove the properties, state and apply convolution theorem to various
functions, form and solve the difference equations
3. Classify random process, State autocorrelation and cross correlation and its properties, State
properties of power spectral density, find autocorrelation and power spectral density, Describe
Poisson process and its properties
4. Explain the algorithm of simplex method; two phase, Big-M and solve linear programming
problems, state duality theory, apply dual simplex algorithm to LPP, find the optimal solutions
to Transportation and Assignment problems
5. Formulate Non-linear programming problem, Describe optimization problems, state and apply
Lagrangian method and Khun tucker conditions to Non-LPP, Describe and solve saddle point
problems, solve Non-linear programming problem by using graphical method and Wolf’s
modified simplex method.
UNIT - I
Calculus of Variation
12
Functional – Euler’s equation – Variational problems involving one unknown function – Several
unknown functions – Functional dependent on higher order derivatives – Several independent variables
– Isoperimetric problems.
UNIT - II
Z – Transform
12
Transform of standard functions – Convolution – Initial and Final value problems – Shifting
Theorem – Inverse transform (Using Partial Fraction – Residues) – Solution of difference Equations
using Z – Transform.
UNIT - III
Random Processes
12
Classification – Auto correlation – Cross correlation – Ergodicity – Power spectral density
function – Poisson processes.
UNIT - IV
Linear Programming
12
Simplex algorithm – Two-phase and Big–M method – Duality theory – Dual simplex
method -Transportation and Assignment problems.
UNIT - V
Non - Linear Programming
12
Formulation of non–linear programming problem – Constrained optimization with equality
constraints – Constrained optimization with inequality constraints – Saddle point problem –
Graphical method of non–linear programming problem involving only two variables – Kuhn-tucker
conditions with non-negative constraints – Wolfe’s modified simplex method.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 15, Total: 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
1.
M.K.Venkataraman
,
“Higher
Mathematics
for
Engineering
&
Science”,
Publishing Company,2000
2.
Kandasamy, “Engineering Mathematics Volume – II”, S.Chand & Co., 2001
3.
P.K.Gupta , D.S.Hira, ”Operations Research”, S.Chand &Co ., 1999
4.
T.Veerarajan,”Probability, Statistics & Random Processes”, Tata McGraw Hill., 2002
National
P14PED102 MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL MACHINES
LTPC
3 10 4
OBJECTIVES:
a. To learn the importance of DC motors and Induction motors
b. To understand the basic mathematical equations to model the electrical motors.
c. To become familiar with dynamic modeling and phase, frequency
d. To learn the vector control of induction motors.
e. To know different types of special electrical machines.
UNIT - I
MODELING OF DC MACHINES
12
Induced EMF-Equivalent circuit and Electromagnetic torque-Field excitation: separate, shunt, series
and compound excitation-Commutator action. Effect of armature mmf-Analytical fundamentals: Compensating
winding -Inter poles.
UNIT - II
DYNAMIC MODELING OF INDUCTION MACHINES
12
Equivalent circuits- Steady state performance equations-Dynamic modeling of induction machines:
Real time model of a two phase induction machines, Three phase to two phase transformationElectromagnetic torque-generalized model in arbitrary reference frames-stator reference frames model-rotor
reference frames model-synchronously rotating reference frame model.
UNIT - III
PHASE CONTROLLED AND FREQUENCY CONTROLLED
INDUCTION MACHINES
12
Stator voltage control-Steady state analysis-approximate analysis-Slip energy recovery scheme:
principle of operation-steady state analysis range of slip - equivalent circuit and performance characteristics Static Scherbius drive. Constant Volts/Hz controls implementation-steady state performance-dynamic
simulation. Constant slip speed control-Constant air-gap flux control.
UNIT - IV
VECTOR CONTROLLED INDUCTION MACHINES
12
Principle of vector control-Direct vector control: flux and torque processor-DVC in stator
reference frames with space vector modulation. Indirect vector control scheme: Derivation and
implementation. Flux weakening operation: principle-flux weakening in stator flux linkage and rotor flux
linkage.
UNIT - V
SPECIAL MACHINES
12
Permanent magnet – Airgap line- Demagnetizing characteristics –Energy density -synchronous
machines with PMs: Machine configuration-flux density distribution-types of PMSM-Vector control of
PMSM - Variable Reluctance Machines: Basics-analysis-practical configuration-circuit wave forms for
torque production- stepping motors.
Lecture : 45, Tutorial :15, Total : 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. R.Krishnan.”Electric motor & Drives: Modeling, Analysis and Control”, Prentice Hall of India,
2001.
2. Charles kingsley, Jr., A.E.Fityzgerald, Stephen D.Umans “Electric Machinery”, Tata McGraw Hill,
Sixth Edition, 2002.
3. Miller, T.J.E.”Brushless permanent magnet and reluctance motor drives”, Oxford, 2005.
4. C.V.Jones, ”The Unified Theory of ElectricalMachines:,Butterworth,London,1967.
5. P.S.Bhimbra, ”Generalised theory of electrical machines”, Khanna Publishers.
6. P.S.Bhimbra,”Generalised theory of electrical machines”, Khanna Publishers, 4th Edition, 1993.
ADVANCED POWER SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES
P14PED103
LTPC
3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES:

To impart the knowledge of basics of power semiconductor devices and its characteristics.

To determine the operation, characteristics and performance of thyristors.

To understand the static and dynamic characteristics of current controlled power
semiconductor devices
To understand the static and dynamic characteristics of voltage controlled power
semiconductor devices
To understand the control and firing circuit for different devices


UNIT - I
INTRODUCTION
9
Power switching devices overview – classifications of power semiconductors, circuit symbols –
characteristics and specifications of switches – EMI due to switching – Power diodes – Types, forward
and reverse characteristics, switching characteristics – rating.
UNIT – II
THYRISTORS
9
Thyristors – Physical and electrical principle underlying operating mode – Two transistor analogy –
I-V characteristics and switching characteristics – series and parallel operation – commutation of
thyristors- methods of improving di/dt and dvdt ratings.
UNIT – III
CURRENT CONTROLLED TRANSISTORS
9
BJTs – Construction, static characteristics and switching characteristics – Breakdown voltages secondary
breakdown – On state losses – safe operating areas – comparison of BJT and thyristors.
UNIT - IV
VOLTAGE CONTROLLED DEVICES
9
Power MOSFETs – Construction , types , static characteristics and switching characteristics- IGBTs –
construction, types, static and switching characteristics – Basics of GTO, MCT, RCT and IGCT.
UNIT – IV
FIRING AND PROTECTING CIRCUITS
9
Necessity of isolation – pulse transformer – opto-coupler; Gate drive circuit for SCR, MOSFET, and
base driving for power BJT – snubber – turn on ,turn off, over voltage snubber-Heat transfer –
conduction, convection and radiation , heat sink .
Lecture : 45, Tutorial :00 , Total : 45
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Ned Mohan., Undeland and Robbins, " Power Electronics: Converters, Applications and Design ",
John Wiley and Sons (Asia) Pte Ltd, Singapore, 2003
2. B.W. Williams, “Power Electronics – Devices, Drivers, Applications and passive components”,
Macmillan, (2/e), 1992.
3. Rashid M.H., “Power Electronics circuits, Devices and Applications”, Prentice Hall India,
Third Edition, Newdelhi, 2004.
4. M.D. Singh and K.B.Khanchandani, “Power Electronics”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2001.
P14PED104
ANALYSIS OF POWER CONVERTERS
LTPC
30 0 3
OBJECTIVES
 To analyze the switching circuits.
 To analyze and study about the controlled rectifiers.
 To learn the various modes of operation of Dc- Dc switch mode converters.
 To analyze the various types of Choppers.
 To know the principles and operations of regulators and cycloconverters.
UNIT – I
ANALYSIS OF SWITCHED CIRCUITS
9
Ideal models of power switches – analysis of the thyristor controlled half wave rectifier – R, L,
RL, RC load circuits – load circuit with electromotive force – thyristor specifications – heat sink
calculations – Surge currents – limitation on di/dt, dv/dt, classification and analysis of commutation.
UNIT - II
CONTROLLED RECTIFIERS
9
Continuous and discontinuous modes of half controlled and fully controlled converters with R-L, RL-E loads and freewheeling diodes – inverter operation – Performance parameters: harmonics, ripple,
distortion factor, power factor – Effect of source impedance- Effect of transformer leakage reactance –
operating domains of three phase full converters and semi converters.
UNIT - III
DC-DC SWITCH MODE CONVERTERS
9
DC-DC converter systems – control of DC-DC converters, Buck converters – Continuous and
discontinuous modes – Boost converters – continuous and discontinuous modes – Buck boost
converters – continuous and discontinuous and discontinuous modes. Cuck converters – continuous
and discontinuous models – DC-DC converter comparison; ZVS and ZCS resonant converters.
UNIT - IV
CHOPPERS
9
Classification of DC chopper circuits – analysis of type A chopper and type B chopper –
voltage, current and load commutation of choppers – step up chopper – pulse width modulated AC
choppers – Current topologies and Harmonic elimination methods.
UNIT - V
AC- AC POWER CONVERTER
9
AC voltage Regulator – Principle of phase control, single and three phase controller – analysis with R
and RL Load.
Cycloconverter – Principle of operation – single and three phase Cycloconverter – power factor control.
Lecture : 45, Tutorial :00 , Total : 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Dewan, S.B. and Straugher A., “Power Semiconductor Circuits”, John Wiley and sons, 1975.
2. Dubey G.K., Doralda S.R., Joshi A., and sinha R.M.K., “Thyristorised power controllers”,
Wiley Eastern Limited, 1986.
3. Rashid M.H., “Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and Applications”, PHI, (3/e), 2004.
4. Sen P.C., “Thyristor DC Drives”, John Wiley and sons. 1981. Ned Mohan, Undeland and Robbins,
“Power Electronics: concepts, applications and design”, John wiley and sons, Singapore,2000.
5. Bimal K. Bose, “Modern Power Electronics and AC Drives”, Pearson (2/e), 2003
P14PED105
ANALYSIS OF INVERTER
LTPC
3003
OBJECTIVES
 To Provide the electrical circuit concepts behind the different working modes of inverters so as to
enable deep understanding of their operation.
 Ability to design different single phase and three phase inverters
 To equip with required skills to derive the criteria for the current source inverters.
 Ability to design different types of multilevel inverters
 Ability to analysis and comprehend the various operating modes of different configurations of
resonant inverters.
UNIT I
SINGLE PHASE INVERTERS
12
Introduction to self commutated switches: MOSFET and IGBT – Principle of operation of half and full
bridge inverters – Performance parameters – Voltage control of single phase inverters using various
PWM techniques – various harmonic elimination techniques – forced commutated Thyristor inverters.
UNIT II
THREE PHASE VOLTAGE SOURCE INVERTERS
9
180 degree and 120 degree conduction mode inverters with star and delta connected loads – voltage
control of three phase inverters: single, multi pulse, sinusoidal, space vector modulation techniques.
UNIT III
CURRENT SOURCE INVERTERS
9
Operation of six-step thyristor inverter – inverter operation modes – load – commutated inverters – Auto
sequential current source inverter (ASCI) – current pulsations – comparison of current source inverter
and voltage source inverters.
UNIT IV
MULTILEVEL INVERTERS
9
Multilevel concept – diode clamped – flying capacitor – cascade type multilevel inverters - Comparison
of multilevel inverters - application of multilevel inverters
UNIT V
RESONANT INVERTERS
6
Series and parallel resonant inverters - voltage control of resonant inverters – Class E resonant inverter –
resonant DC – link inverters.
TOTAL: 45 PERIODS
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Rashid M.H., “Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and Applications ", Prentice Hall India, Third
Edition, New Delhi, 2004.
2. Jai P.Agrawal, “Power Electronics Systems”, Pearson Education, Second Edition, 2002.
3. Bimal K.Bose “Modern Power Electronics and AC Drives”, Pearson Education, Second Edition,
2003.
4. Ned Mohan,Undeland and Robbin, “Power Electronics: converters, Application and design” John
Wiley and sons.Inc,Newyork,1995.
5. Philip T. krein, “Elements of Power Electronics” Oxford University Press -1998.
MODELING & SIMULATION LABORATORY
P14PED106
LTPC
0 0 3 2
OBJECTIVES:

To apply switching techniques of various power semiconductor devices.

To impart the knowledge of single phase and three phase AC-DC converters.

To make students to study and simulate the ac voltage controllers.

To design and simulate the various inverter circuits.

To Design and simulate the dual converter.
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Modeling of simple PN Junction diode
2. Modeling of Silicon Controlled Rectifier.
3. Modeling of MOSFET
4. Modeling of IGBT .
5. Modeling of BJT .
6. Simulation of Single phase Semi converter
(i) R Load
(ii) RL Load
(iii) RLE (motor) Load
7. Simulation of Single phase Fully controlled converter
(i) R Load
(ii) RL Load
(iii) RLE (motor) Load
8. Simulation of Single phase Dual converter
9. Simulation of Three phase semi converter.
10. Simulation of Three phase fully controlled converter
11. Simulation of Single phase full bridge Inverter
12. Simulation of Three phase full bridge inverter.
a) 180 degree mode operation
b) 120 degree mode operation
13. Simulation of Three phase AC Voltage Controller.
a) Lamp load
b) Motor load
All the above experiments are performed using MATLAB
Elective
P14PED501
HIGH VOLTAGE DIRECT CURRENT TRANSMISSION L T P C
(Common to Power Electronics & Drives and Power System Engineering) 3 0 0 3
OBJECTIVES





To impart knowledge on operation, and modelling of HVDC link.
To analyze the HVDC converters in various modes.
To study the control characteristics of HVDC converters.
To understand the various protection elements of HVDC system.
To expose various HVDC simulators.
UNIT - I
GENERAL ASPECTS
9
Historical development of HVAC and DC links – kinds of DC links-HVDC projects in India and
abroad – advantages and disadvantages of HVDC transmission - Applications of DC transmission –
economic factors – development of power devices for HVDC transmission – thyristors – light
activated thyristors – MOS controlled thyristors (MCTs) –Switching and steady state characteristics–
Cooling of Thyristors Problem.
UNIT - II
THYRISTOR CONVERTERS
9
Three phase fully controlled thyristor bridge converters – operation as rectifiers and line commutated
inverters – converter equivalent circuits – parameters and characteristics of rectifiers and
inverters – series and parallel arrangement of thyristors – multibridge converters.
UNIT - III
CONTROL OF CONVERTERS AND REACTIVE POWER
CONTROL
9
Gate control – basic means of control and modes of operation – power reversal – desired features of
control – control characteristics – constant current control – constant extinction angle control –
stability of control – tap changer control – power control and current limits. Reactive Power
Requirements – Reactive Power Control during Steady State and Transients
UNIT - IV
PROTECTION OF HVDC SYSTEMS, HARMONICS, FILTERS
AND GROUND RETURN
9
Basics of protection of HVDC systems – DC reactors – voltage and current oscillations – DC
line oscillations – clearing line faults and re-energizing the line – circuit breakers – over voltage
protection -Characteristics and uncharacteristic harmonics – troubles caused by harmonics –
means of reducing harmonics –– harmonic filters – Corona and Radio interference- ground
return and ground Electrodes
UNIT - V
SIMULATION OF HVDC SYSTEMS
9
Introduction – System Simulation: Philosophy and Tools – HVDC System Simulation – Modeling of
HVDC Systems for Digital Dynamic Simulation – Digital Dynamic Simulation of Converters and
DC Systems.
Lecture : 45, Tutorial : 00 , Total : 45
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Kimbark E.X., “Direct Current Transmission”, Vol. I, Wiley Interscience, New York 1971
2. Allan Greenwood, ‘Electrical Transients in Power Systems’, John Wiley and Sons New York,
1992
3. Kory(ed) B. J., “ High Voltage Direct Current Converters and Systems”. Macdonald & Co,
London 1995
4. Adamson and Hingorani N.G., “High Voltage Direct Current Power Transmission”, Garraway ltd.,
England, 1960.
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Electrical and Electronics Engineering
Branch: M.E. Power System Engineering
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14PSE101
Applied Mathematics
3
1
0
4
2
P14PSE102
Linear and Non Linear Systems Theory
3
1
0
4
3
P14PSE103
Computer Aided Power System Analysis
3
1
0
4
4
P14PSE104
Power System Operation and Control
3
0
0
3
5
P14PSE105
Power Quality Engineering
3
0
0
3
6
P14PSE501
Elective- High Voltage Direct Current
Transmission
Practical
3
0
0
3
7
P14PSE106
Power System Simulation Laboratory-I
0
0
3
2
Total Credits
23
Approved by
Chairperson, Electrical Engineering BOS
Dr.C.Easwarlal
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/EEE, First Semester ME PSE Students and Staff, COE
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14PSE101
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students to,
1. Describe the concepts in calculus of variations, state different types of Euler’s equation, solve
variational and isoperimetric problems
2. State Z – transform, Discuss and prove the properties, state and apply convolution theorem to various
functions, form and solve the difference equations
3. Classify random process, State autocorrelation and cross correlation and its properties, State
properties of power spectral density, find autocorrelation and power spectral density, Describe
Poisson process and its properties
4. Explain the algorithm of simplex method; two phase, Big-M and solve linear programming
problems, state duality theory, apply dual simplex algorithm to LPP, find the optimal solutions
to Transportation and Assignment problems
5. Formulate Non-linear programming problem, Describe optimization problems, state and apply
Lagrangian method and Khun tucker conditions to Non-LPP, Describe and solve saddle point
problems, solve Non-linear programming problem by using graphical method and Wolf’s
modified simplex method.
UNIT - I
Calculus of Variation
12
Functional – Euler’s equation – Variational problems involving one unknown function – Several
unknown functions – Functional dependent on higher order derivatives – Several independent variables
– Isoperimetric problems.
UNIT - II
Z – Transform
12
Transform of standard functions – Convolution – Initial and Final value problems – Shifting
Theorem – Inverse transform (Using Partial Fraction – Residues) – Solution of difference Equations
using Z – Transform.
UNIT - III
Random Processes
12
Classification – Auto correlation – Cross correlation – Ergodicity – Power spectral density
function – Poisson processes.
UNIT - IV
Linear Programming
12
Simplex algorithm – Two-phase and Big–M method – Duality theory – Dual simplex
method -Transportation and Assignment problems.
UNIT - V
Non - Linear Programming
12
Formulation of non–linear programming problem – Constrained optimization with equality
constraints – Constrained optimization with inequality constraints – Saddle point problem –
Graphical method of non–linear programming problem involving only two variables – Kuhn-tucker
conditions with non-negative constraints – Wolfe’s modified simplex method.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 15, Total: 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
5.
M.K.Venkataraman
,
“Higher
Mathematics
for
Engineering
&
Science”,
Publishing Company,2000
6.
Kandasamy, “Engineering Mathematics Volume – II”, S.Chand & Co., 2001
7.
P.K.Gupta , D.S.Hira, ”Operations Research”, S.Chand &Co ., 1999
8.
T.Veerarajan,”Probability, Statistics & Random Processes”, Tata McGraw Hill., 2002
National
P14PSE102
LINEAR AND NON LINEAR SYSTEMS THEORY
3 1 0 4 100
Course Objectives :
To enable students,
1. To have a knowledge in the modeling and analysis of linear and non linear systems
2. To study the stability of linear and non linear systems
3. To have a knowledge in the optimal design of linear systems
4. To have a knowledge in the advanced controller techniques.
UNIT – I
LINEAR SYSTEMS
12
Concepts of state, state variables and state model - State model for linear time invariant continuous
systems. Diagonalization – Solution of state equations – Concepts of Controllability and ObservabilityPole placement by state feedback – Observer systems.
UNIT – II
NON-LINEAR SYSTEMS
12
Types of non-linearity – Typical examples – Phase plane analysis – Singular points – Limit cycles –
Construction of phase trajectories – Describing function method – Derivation of describing functions.
UNIT – III
LIAPUNOV STABILITY
12
Liapunov stability analysis – Stability in the sense of Liapunov – Definiteness of scalar Functions –
Quadratic forms – Second method of Liapunov – Liapunov stability analysis of linear time invariant
systems and non-linear systems.
UNIT - IV
OPTIMAL CONTROL SYSTEMS
12
Parameter Optimization: Servomechanisms – Optimal Control Problems: Transfer function Approach –
State variable approach – the state regulator problem – The Infinite-time regulator problem – Output
regulator and the tracking Problems – Parameter Optimization: Regulators. (Continuous system only).
UNIT - V
ADVANCED CONTROL SYSTEMS
12
Adaptive Control: Model-Reference Adaptive Control fundamental concepts – Self tuning control Robust Control: Parameter perturbations - Design of robust control system – PID controllers – Fuzzy
Logic Control – Neural Network Controller.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 15, Total: 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Nagrath.I.J. and Gopal. M. “Control Systems Engineering”, New Age International (P)Limited,
New Delhi, Fourth Edition,2005.
2. Katsuhiko Ogata, “Modern Control Engineering”, Pearson Education, New Delhi, Fifth Edition,
2011.
3. Benjamin C.Kuo. “Automatic Control Systems”, Prentice Hall of India Private Ltd., New Delhi,
Seventh Edition, 2001.
4. Agarwal K.K. “Control System Analysis and Design”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1999.
P14PSE103
COMPUTER AIDED POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students,
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
To describe the various sparsity techniques and factorization methods.
To analyze the various power flow solution methods.
To describe the symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis in power systems.
To analyze the transient stability solution methods and case study demonstration.
To impart various solution techniques for optimal power flow analysis.
UNIT I SOLUTION TECHNIQUES
12
Concept of sparsity for large scale power systems- Various sparsity techniques- Optimal ordering
schemes for preserving sparsity. Flexible packed storage scheme for storing matrix as compact arrays –
Factorization by Bifactorization and Gauss elimination methods.
UNIT II POWER - FLOW SOLUTIONS
12
Power flow equation in real and polar forms; Review of Gauss seidel and Newton Raphson methodDecoupled power flow method- Power flow studies in system design and operation-Regulating
Transformers.
UNIT III SHORT CIRCUIT ANALYSIS
12
Symmetrical fault analysis using bus impedance matrix – Concepts in symmetrical components of
unsymmetrical phasors- Sequence networks for various power system models- Unsymmetrical faults in
power systems- Unsymmetrical fault analysis using bus impedance matrix.
UNIT IV TRANSIENT STABILITY ANALYSIS
12
An elementary view of transient stability – Factors influencing transient stability – Numerical
Integration methods- Euler method-Modified Euler method – Runge Kutta method- Case study of
transient stability of a large power system.
UNIT V OPTIMAL POWER FLOW
12
Problem statement- Solution of optimal power flow- Gradient method and Newton’s method- Linear
Sensitivity analysis- Linear programming methods- LP method with only real power variables – LP with
AC power flow variables and detailed cost functions- Security constrained optimal power flow- Bus
incremental costs.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 15, Total: 60
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. John J. Grainger, William D. Stevenson, “Power System Analysis”, Tata Mc- Graw Hill, Reprint
Edition, 2008.
2. Prabha Kundur, “Power System Stability and Control”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2012.
3. Allen J Wood, Bruce F Wollenberg, “Power Generation and Control”, John Wiley & Sons, New
york, reprint edition, 2010.
4. M.A.Pai, “Computer Techniques in Power System Analysis”, Tata Mc Graw- Hill publishing ltd,
New Delhi, 2006
P14PSE104
POWER SYSTEM OPERATION AND CONTROL
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students,
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
To impart the various hydro thermal scheduling modeling and its solution techniques.
To solve the economic dispatch and unit commitment calculation.
To analyze the various state estimation methods and bad data identification.
To impart various security assessment and enhancement procedures in power systems.
To analyze the various recent developments in power system operation and control.
UNIT - I
HYDRO THERMAL COORDINATION
9
Problem definition –Long range and Short range Hydro Scheduling problem - λ-γ iteration scheme for
hydrothermal scheduling- Dynamic Programming solution to hydrothermal scheduling problem- Hydro
Scheduling using Linear programming- Pumped storage hydro plants- Pumped storage scheduling with
λ-γ iteration.
UNIT - II
ECONOMIC DISPATCH AND UNIT COMMITMENT
9
Economic dispatch problem- Solution methods using Lamda iteration, Gradient search and piecewise
linear cost functions. Unit Commitment problem: various constraints- Solution methods using Priority
list, Dynamic programming and Lagrange relaxation method.
UNIT - III
STATE ESTIMATION
9
Introduction – Maximum Likelihood Weighted Least Squares Estimation-State estimation of an AC
network- State estimation by Orthogonal Decomposition algorithm- Detection and Identification of Bad
measurements- Network Observability and Pseudo measurements- Application of power system state
estimation.
UNIT - IV
POWER SYSTEM SECURITY
9
Factors influencing power system security- System operating states by security control functions –
Monitoring, evaluation of system state by contingency analysis – Security assessment using Linear
Sensitivity factors-Security enhancement by preventive, emergency and restorative control.
UNIT - V
COMPUTER CONTROL OF POWER SYSTEM
9
Energy control center – Various levels – National – Regional and state level SCADA system – Computer
configuration – Functions – Monitoring, data acquisition and controls – EMS systems – Software in
EMS system – Expert system application for power system operation.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 00, Total: 45
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Allen J Wood, Bruce F Wollenberg, “Power Generation and Control”, John Wiley & Sons,
Newyork, Reprint Edition, 2010.
2. Kundur P, “Power System Stability and Control”, McGraw Hill, 2006.
3. D.P.Kothari and I.J.Nagrath,”Modern Power System Analysis”, Tata Mc- Graw Hill Ltd,
Newdelhi, 2003.
4. Olle.I. Elgerd, “Electric Energy Systems Theory- An Introduction”, Tata Mc Graw Hill publishing
ltd, 2003.
P14PSE105
POWER QUALITY ENGINEERING
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students,
1. To study basic power quality issues
2. To evaluate harmonics in power system due to power electronic devices
3. To study about voltage related problems using software
4. To monitor power quality using measuring equipments
5. Improve power quality using different types of filters.
UNIT– I
INTRODUCTION
9
Introduction –Power Quality- overview of power quality phenomena-classification of power quality
issues-power quality measures and standards- THD-TIF-DIN-C- message weights-flicker factortransient phenomena-occurrence of power quality problems-power acceptability curves- IEEE guidesstandards and recommended practices.
UNIT–II
HARMONICS
9
Harmonics- individual and total harmonic distortion- RMS value of a harmonic waveform-triplex
harmonics- important harmonic introducing devices- SMPS-Three phase power converters-arcing
devices- saturable devices- Harmonic Distortion of fluorescent lamps- effect of power system harmonics
on power system equipment and loads-Modeling of network and components under non-sinusoidal
conditions transmission and distribution systems- shunt capacitors- transformers- electric machines
ground systems- loads that cause power quality problems- power quality problems created by drives and
its impact on drives.
UNIT – III
VOLTAGE RELATED PROBLEMS
9
Sources of sags and interruptions- estimating voltage sag performance-motor starting sags- estimating
the sag severity-mitigation of voltage sags- active series compensators-static transfer switches and fast
transfer switches- Sources of over voltages- Capacitor switching, lightning- Ferro resonance- mitigation
of voltage swells- Surge arresters, low pass filters, power conditioners – Lightning protection, shielding,
line arresters, protection of transformers and cables- computer analysis tools for transients, PSCAD and
EMTP.
UNIT- IV
POWER QUALITY MONITORING
9
Monitoring considerations- Power line disturbance analyzer- per quality measurement equipmentharmonic / spectrum analyzer- flicker meters- disturbance analyzer-applications of expert system for
power quality monitoring.
UNIT- V
POWER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT
9
Static compensator – Distribution static compensator- Dynamic voltage restorer – Power factor corrector
– Active filters – Shunt active filters- applications – PSCAD / EMTDC -simulation of Active filters.
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 0, Total: 45
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Arrillaga, J.,“ Power System Quality Assessment” , John Wiley, 2000.
2. Arrillaga J., Smith,B,C.,Vatsan,N,R and Wood,A,R., “Power System Harmonic Analysis,” John
Wiley, 1997.
3. Loi Lei Loi, “Power System Restructuring and Deregulation – Trading, performance &
information technology”, John Wiley Publications.
4. shok,S,A.,” Selected Topics in Power quality and customer power “ ,Course book for STTP 2004.
P14PSE106
POWER SYSTEM SIMULATION LABORATORY –I
0 0 3 2 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students,
1. To have hands on experience on various system studies and different
techniques used for system planning. software packages.
2. To perform the dynamic analysis of power system
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Load flow analysis by Newton-Raphson method
2. Load flow analysis by Fast decoupled method
3. Contingency analysis: to calculate sensitivity factors.
4. Economic dispatch using lambda-iteration method
5. Unit commitment: Priority-list schemes and dynamic programming
6. Short circuit analysis
7. State estimation of power system network
8. Transient stability analysis of single machine-infinite bus system using classical
machine model
9. Familiarization of Relay Test Kit
10. Simulation and Implementation of Voltage Source Inverter.
Total: 45 Hours
Elective
P14PSE501
HIGH VOLTAGE DIRECT CURRENT TRANSMISSION
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
To enable students,
1. To discuss the general aspects of HVDC transmission and their power devices.
2. To analyze the equivalent circuits and characteristics of thyristor converters.
3. To explain the different modes of gate control of converters and discuss the reactive power
control.
4. To illustrate the protection, harmonics and filters of HVDC systems.
5. To analyze the simulation of HVDC systems.
UNIT - I
GENERAL ASPECTS
9
Historical development of HVAC and DC links – kinds of DC links-HVDC projects in India and abroad
– advantages and disadvantages of HVDC transmission -Applications of DC transmission – economic
factors – development of power devices for HVDC transmission – thyristors – light activated thyristors –
MOS controlled thyristors (MCTs) –Switching and steady state characteristics–Cooling of Thyristors
Problem.
UNIT - II
THYRISTOR CONVERTERS
9
Three phase fully controlled thyristor bridge converters – operation as rectifiers and Line commutated
inverters – converter equivalent circuits – parameters and Characteristics of rectifiers and inverters –
series and parallel arrangement of thyristors – multibridge converters.
UNIT - III
CONTROL OF CONVERTERS AND REACTIVE POWER CONTROL
9
Gate control – basic means of control and modes of operation – power reversal – desired features of
control – control characteristics – constant current control – constant extinction angle control – stability
of control – tap changer control – power control and current limits. Reactive Power Requirements –
Reactive Power Control during Steady State and Transients
UNIT - IV
PROTECTION OF HVDC SYSTEMS, HARMONICS, FILTERS
AND GROUND RETURN
9
Basics of protection of HVDC systems – DC reactors – voltage and current Oscillations – DC line
oscillations – clearing line faults and re-energizing the line – Circuit breakers – over voltage protection Characteristics and uncharacteristic Harmonics – troubles caused by harmonics – means of reducing
harmonics -Harmonic filters – Corona and Radio interference- ground return and ground Electrodes.
UNIT - V
SIMULATION OF HVDC SYSTEMS
9
Introduction – System Simulation: Philosophy and Tools – HVDC System Simulation – Modeling of
HVDC Systems for Digital Dynamic Simulation – Digital Dynamic Simulation of Converters and DC
Systems
Lecture: 45, Tutorial: 0, Total: 45
REFERENCE BOOKS
1. Kim barks E.X., “Direct Current Transmission”, Vol. I, Wiley Interscience, New York 1971
2. Allan Greenwood, ‘Electrical Transients in Power Systems’, John Wiley and Sons New York,
1992
3. Kory(ed) B. J., “ High Voltage Direct Current Converters and Systems”. Macdonald & Co, London
1995
4. Adamson and Hingorani N.G.,“High Voltage Direct Current Power Transmission”, Garraway ltd.,
England, 1960.
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Electronics and Communication Engineering
Branch: M.E. Communication Systems
S. No Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14COS101
Applied Mathematics
3
1
0
4
2
P14COS102
Advanced Digital Signal Processing
3
1
0
4
P14COS103
Advanced modulation and coding
3
0
0
3
3
Techniques
4
P14COS104
Optical Communication Networks
3
0
0
3
5
P14COS105
Advanced Radiation Systems
3
0
0
3
6
P14COS106
Satellite Communication
3
0
0
3
0
0
3
2
Practical
7
P14COS107
Communication System Laboratory - I
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Electronics and Communication Engineering BOS Member Secretary, Academic Council Chairperson, Academic Council &Principal
Dr.K.R.Kashwan
Copy to:HOD/ECE (PG), First Semester ME COS Students and Staff, COE
Prof.G.Prakash
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14COS101
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to
1. Explain the fundamental concept of system of equations, methods to solve a linear system of
equations by direct and iterative methods and methods for finding Eigen value of a matrix.
2. Describe the solution of initial and boundary value problems and Laplace Transform Solutions of
one dimensional wave equations.
3. State the Bessel’s equation and Legendre’s equation, describe the concept of Legendre’s
Polynomial, Rodrique’s formula & recurrence relation.
4. Define and explain the one dimensional random variable and two dimensional random variable
and give brief accounts of standard distributions.
5. Explain the fundamental concept of queuing system and queue discipline and discuss the models
involved in solving them.
UNIT – I Linear Algebraic Equation and Eigen Value Problems
12
System of equations- Solution by Gauss Elimination, Gauss-Jordan and LU decomposition methodJacobi, Gauss-Seidal iteration method- Eigen values of a matrix by Jacobi and Power method.
UNIT – II Wave Equation
12
Solution of initial and boundary value problems - Characteristics- D’Alembert’s Solution Significance of characteristic curves - Laplace transform solutions for displacement in a long string - a
long string under its weight - a bar with prescribed force on one end- free vibrations of a string.
UNIT – III
Special Functions
12
Bessel’s equation - Bessel Functions- Legendre’s equation - Legendre polynomials -Rodrigue’s formula
- Recurrence relations- generating functions and orthogonal property for Bessel functions -Legendre
polynomials.
UNIT – IV Random Variables
12
One dimensional Random Variable - Moments and MGF – Binomial, Poisson, Geometrical, Normal
Distributions - Two dimensional Random Variables – Marginal and Conditional Distributions –
Covariance and Correlation Coefficient - Functions of Two dimensional random variable.
UNIT - V Queuing Theory
12
Single and Multiple server Markovian queueing models - Steady state system size probabilities – Little’s
formula - Priority queues - M/G/1 queueing system – P.K. formula.
L + T = 45 + 15 = 60 hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Sankara Rao.K., “Introduction to Partial Differential Equation”, PHI, 1995.
2. Taha. H.A., “Operations Research- An Introduction”, 6th Edition, PHI, 1997.
3. Jain M.K. Iyengar, S.R.K. & Jain R.K., “International Methods for Scientific and Engineering
Computation”, New Age International (P) Ltd, Publlishers, 2003.
REFERENCES:
1. Kanpur J.N. & Saxena. H.C,“Mathematical Statistics”, S.Chand & Co. New Delhi, 2003.
2. Greweal B.S, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Khanna Publishers, 2005.
P14COS102
ADVANCED DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
COURSE OBJECTIVES
3 0 0 3 100
To enable students to
1. Overview of the basic concepts of Signal processing and to apply in discrete random signal
Processing.
2. Describe the spectrum estimation using parametric methods and non parametric methods.
3. Describe the Estimation and prediction techniques using wiener FIR & IIR filters.
4. Describe the adaptive filtering techniques and the applications of it.
5. Analyze
the
sampling
rate
conversion
using
different
filter
structures.
Unit I Discrete Random Signal Processing
9
Discrete Random Processes- Ensemble averages, stationary processes, Autocorrelation and Auto
covariance matrices. Parseval's Theorem, Wiener-Khintchine Relation- Power Spectral
DensityPeriodogram, Spectral Factorization, Filtering random processes. Low Pass Filtering of White
Noise. Parameter estimation: Bias and consistency.
Unit II
Spectrum Estimation
9
Estimation of spectra from finite duration signals, Non-Parametric Methods-Correlation Method
,Periodogram Estimator, Performance Analysis of Estimators -Unbiased, Consistent EstimatorsModified periodogram, Bartlett and Welch methods, Blackman –Tukey method. Parametric Methods AR, MA, ARMA model based spectral estimation. Parameter Estimation -Yule-Walker equations,
solutions using Durbin’s algorithm.
Unit III Linear Estimation and Prediction
9
Linear prediction- Forward and backward predictions, Solutions of the Normal equations- LevinsonDurbin algorithms. Least mean squared error criterion -Wiener filter for filtering and prediction, FIR
Wiener filter and Wiener IIR filters, Discrete Kalman filter.
Unit IV Adaptive Filters
9
FIR adaptive filters -adaptive filter based on steepest descent method-Widrow-Hoff LMS adaptive
algorithm, Normalized LMS. Adaptive channel equalization-Adaptive echo cancellation-Adaptive noise
cancellation- Adaptive recursive filters (IIR). RLS adaptive filters-Exponentially weighted RLS-sliding
window RLS.
Unit V Multirate Digital Signal Processing
9
Mathematical description of change of sampling rate - Interpolation and Decimation , Decimation by an
integer factor - Interpolation by an integer factor, Sampling rate conversion by a rational factor, Filter
implementation for sampling rate conversion- Direct form FIR structures, Polyphase filter structures,
time-variant structures. Multistage implementation of multirate system. Application to sub band coding Wavelet transform and filter bank implementation of wavelet expansion of signals.
Total: 45 hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Monson H.Hayes, “Statistical Digital Signal Processing and Modeling”, John Wiley and
Sons,Inc.,Singapore, 2002.
2. John G.Proakis, Dimitris G.Manolakis, “Digital Signal Processing Pearson Education”, 2002.
REFERENCES:
1. John G. Proakis et.al.“Algorithms for Statistical Signal Processing”, Pearson Education, 2002.
2. Dimitris G. Manolakis et.al., “Statistical and adaptive signal Processing”, McGraw
Hill,Newyork,2000.
3. Rafael C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods, “Digital Image Processing”, Pearson Education, Inc.,
Second Edition, 2004( For Wavelet Transform Topic).
P14COS103
ADVANCED MODULATION AND CODING TECHNIQUES
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to
1. To enable the student to understand the role of the communication medium in the design
approaches for coding and modulation techniques.
2. To identify the trade-offs involved in the design of basic and advanced coding and modulation
techniques.
3. To expose the student to the advanced baseband signal conditioning methods evolved for
exploiting the channel and user application characteristics and to familiarize them on the system
design approaches.
UNIT I Review of Digital Modulation Techniques
9
Base band and band pass communication; Signal space representation, Linear and nonlinear modulation
techniques, M-ary modulation techniques; Spectral characteristics of digital modulation, Spread
spectrum modulation techniques.
UNIT II Receivers for AWGN and Fading Channels
9
Optimum receivers for AWGN channel -Correlation demodulator, matched filter, maximum likelihood
sequence detector, envelope detectors for M-ary signals; Characterization of fading multipath channels,
RAKE demodulator, Multiuser detection techniques.
UNIT III Multicarrier Systems
9
OFDM- Generation of sub-carriers using the IFFT; Guard Time and Cyclic Extension; Windowing; Peak
to Average Power reduction schemes; Multicarrier CDMA- System design, Performance parameters.
UNIT IV Trellis Coded Modulation
9
Coded modulation for bandwidth-constrained channels-Trellis coded modulation; Set Partitioning, Four
–state Trellis-coded modulation with 8-PSK signal constellation, Eight-state Trellis code for coded 8PSK modulation, Eight-state Trellis for rectangular QAM signal constellations, Decoding methods and
implementation issues.
UNIT V Turbo Coding
9
Introduction-Turbo Encoder, Turbo Decoder, Iterative Turbo Decoding Principles; Modifications of the
MAP Algorithm-The Soft-Output Viterbi Algorithm(SOVA); Turbo Coding for AWGN channels, Turbo
Coding for Rayleigh Channels, LDPC Codes.
L + T = 45 + 15 = 60 hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Bernard Sklar., “Digital Communications”, second edition, Pearson Education, 2001.
2. John G. Proakis., “Digital Communication”, 4 th edition, Mc Graw Hill Publication, 2001.
3. Richard Van Nee & Ramjee Prasad.,“OFDM for Multimedia Communications” Artech House
Publication, 2001.
P14COS104
OPTICAL COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to
1. Explain the Optical network components for Optical Network communication.
2. Analyze the various Network architecture and topologies, multihop networks and test
beds in broadcast and select networks.
3. Discuss the issues in the network design and operation for wavelength routing in
optical networks.
4. Explain the various blocks of optical TDM networks.
5. Analyze the various network design considerations and management functions of high capacity
networks.
Unit I Optical Networking Components
9
Light propagation in optical fibers – Loss & bandwidth, Non-Linear effects, Solitons ; Optical Network
Components – Couplers, Isolators & Circulators, Multiplexers & Filters, Optical Amplifiers, Switches,
Wavelength Converters.
Unit II Optical Network Architectures
9
Introduction to Optical Networks; SONET / SDH standards, Broadcast and Select Networks–Topologies
for Broadcast Networks, Media Access Control Protocols, Test beds for Broadcast & Select networks.
Unit III Wavelength-Routing Networks
9
Node designs, Issues in Network design and operation, Optical layer cost Tradeoffs, Routing and
Wavelength assignment, Wavelength routing test beds.
Unit IV High Capacity Networks
9
Photonic Packet Switching – OTDM, Multiplexing and Demultiplexing, Synchronization, Broadcast
OTDM networks, Switch-based networks; Access Networks – Network Architecture overview, OTDM
networks; Optical Access Network Architectures; Future Access Networks.
Unit IV Network Design and Management
9
Transmission System Engineering – System model, Power penalty - transmitter, receiver, Optical
Amplifiers, crosstalk, dispersion; Wavelength stabilization; Overall design considerations; Control and
Management – Network management functions, Configuration management, Performance management,
Fault management, Optical safety, Service interface.
L = 45 hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Rajiv Ramaswami and Kumar Sivarajan, “Optical Networks: A practical perspective”,Morgan
Kaufmann, 2nd edition, 2004
REFERENCES:
1. Hussein T. Mouftab and Pin-Han Ho, “Optical Networks: Architecture and Survivability”,
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002
2. Biswanath Mukherjee, “Optical Communication Networks", McGraw Hill, 1997
P14COS105
ADVANCED RADIATION SYSTEMS
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
1. To enhance the students knowledge in the area of various antenna design and to make them
understand their radiation mechanism.
2. To impart knowledge about the state of art in antenna technology.
Unit I Antenna Fundamentals
9
Introduction – Types of Antennas – Radiation Mechanism – Current Distribution on Wire Antennas –
Antenna Fundamental Parameters – Radiation Integrals; Duality and Reciprocity Theorem; Retarded
Vector Potentials – Heuristic Approach and Maxwell’s Equation Approach.
Unit II Antenna Arrays
9
Linear Array – Uniform Amplitude and Spacing – Array Factor and Directivity of End-Fire and Broad
Side Array; Uniform Spacing and Nonuniform Amplitude – Binomial and Tschebyscheff Distributions;
Mutual Coupling in Finite Arrays; Smart Antennas – Background, Evolutionary Signal Processing,
Wideband Direction of Arrival Estimation.
Unit III Radiation from Apertures
9
Field Equivalence Principle – Radiation from Rectangular and Circular Apertures: Uniform Aperture
Distribution on an Infinite Ground Plane; Babinets Principle; E-Plane & H-Plane Sectoral Horns;
Reflector Antenna – Plane and Cassegrain Parabolic reflectors.
Unit IV Microstrip Antenna
9
Introduction – Feeding Methods – Rectangular patch: Transmission line modes and radiation analysis
from cavity model – Circular patch: Quality factor, Bandwidth, Efficiency and input impedance;
Microstrip array and feed network.
Unit V Modern Antennas
9
UWB Antennas – Introduction, Foundation of Multiband and UWB Array Design, Modern UWB Array
Design Techniques and Examples; Antennas in Medicine – Planar Meandered Dipoles, Antenna Design
in Free space and Human body, SAR and Link Budget Analysis; Leaky Wave Antennas – Introduction,
Theory, Novel structures.
Total: 45 hours
REFERENCES:
1. Balanis.A, “Antenna Theory Analysis and Design”, 3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New
York,1982.
2. Frank B. Gross, “Frontiers in Antennas”, Mc Graw Hill, 2011.
3. S. Drabowitch, A. Papiernik, H.D.Griffiths, J.Encinas, B.L.Smith, “Modern Antennas”, II
Edition,Springer Publications, 2007.
4. Krauss.J.D, “Antennas”, II edition, John Wiley and sons, New York, 1997.
5. I.J. Bahl and P. Bhartia, “Microstrip Antennas”, Artech House,Inc.,1980
6. W.L.Stutzman and G.A.Thiele, “Antenna Theory and Design”, 2nd edition, John Wiley& Sons
Inc.,1998.
7. Jim R. James,P.S.Hall , “Handbook of Microstrip Antennas” IEE Electromagnetic wave series
28,
P14COS106
SATELLITE COMMUNICATION
3 0 0 3 100
To enable students to
1.
Classify the orbital mechanics and space craft sub systems and earth station.
2.
Discuss the various blocks of space craft sub systems and earth station.
3.
Formulate the equation for space links in the satellite link design.
4. Discuss the various multiple access techniques and network aspects for Space
Services and
applications.
5. Express the various services and applications.
Unit I Orbital Mechanics
9
Kepler laws , Orbital elements , Orbital perturbations, Apogee perigee heights, Inclines orbits Sun
synchronous orbits ,Geo stationary orbits , Limits of visibility ,Sun transit outage , polar Mount antenna
,Antenna Look angles, launching orbits ,Low earth orbits ,medium orbits constellation.
Unit II Spacecraft Sub Systems and Earth Station
9
Spacecraft Subsystems, Altitude and Orbit Control, Telemetry and Tracking, Power Systems,
Communication Subsystems, Transponders, Antennas, Equipment Reliability, Earth Stations, Example
of payloads of operating and planned systems.
Unit III Space Links
9
The Space Link, Satellite Link Design - Satellite uplink -down link power Budget, Basic Transmission
Theory, System Noise Temp, G/T Ratio, Noise Figure, Downlink Design, Design of Satellite Links for
Specified C/N - Microwave Propagation on Satellite-Earth Paths. Interference between satellite circuits,
Energy Dispersal, propagation characteristics of fixed and mobile satellite links.
Unit IV
Multiple Access Techniques and Network Aspects
9
Single access vs. multiple access (MA). Classical MA techniques: FDMA, TDMA. Single channel per
carrier (SCPC) access - Code division multiple access (CDMA). Demand assignment techniques. Mobile
satellite network design, ATM via satellite. TCP/IP via satellite - Call control, handover and call set up
procedures. Hybrid satellite-terrestrial networks
Unit V Services and Applications
9
Fixed and mobile services - Multimedia satellite services - Advanced applications based on satellite
platforms - INTELSAT series - INSAT, VSAT, Remote Sensing - Mobile satellite service: GSM. GPS,
INMARSAT, Navigation System, Direct to Home service (DTH), Special services, E-mail, Video
conferencing and Internet connectivity
Total: 45 hours
TEXT BOOK:
1. Dennis Roddy, “Satellite Communications”, 3rd Edition, Mc Graw Hill International Editions,
2001
REFERENCES:
1. Bruce R. Elbert, “Introduction to Satellite Communication” , Artech House Inc.,1999
2. Timothy Pratt, Charles W. Bostian, Jeremy Allnutt, “Satellite Communications”, 2nd Edition,
Wiley, John & Sons, 2002
3. Wilbur L. Pritchard, Hendri G. Suyderhood, Robert A.Nelson, “Satellite Communication
Systems Engineering”, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1993
4. Tri T. Ha, “Digital satellite communication”, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill, New york.1990
P14COS107
COMMUNICATION SYSTEM LAB I
0 0 4 2 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Practice the radiation pattern for various antennas.
Implement the Adaptive Filters, periodogram and multistage multirate system in DSP Processor
Implement Linear and Cyclic Codes
Review Spread Spectrum Techniques using MATLAB.
Simulate QMF using Simulation Packages
EXPERIMENTS
1. Simulation of Modulation and Coding in a AWGN Communication Channel using
Simulation Packages.
2. Implementation of Adaptive Filters, periodogram and multistage multirate system in DSP
Processor.
3. Simulation of QMF using Simulation Packages
4. Antenna Radiation Pattern measurement.
5. Simulation of Microstrip Antennas
6. Performance evaluation of Digital Data Transmission through Fiber Optic Link.
7. Implementation of Video Link using Optical Fiber.
8. Design and performance analysis of error control encoder and decoder ( CRC, Convolutional
Codes )
9. Simulation of Turbo coding and SOVA,
10. Wireless Channel equalizer design using DSP ( LMS / RLS )
11. Implementation of Linear and Cyclic Codes.
12. Performance evaluation of simulated CDMA System
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Electronics and Communication Engineering
Branch: M.E. VLSI Design
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14VLD101
Applied Mathematics
3
1
0
4
2
P14VLD102
Digital Signal Processing Integrated Circuits
3
0
0
3
3
P14VLD103
Advanced Digital System Design
3
1
0
4
4
P14VLD104
CMOS VLSI Design
3
0
0
3
5
P14VLD105
Solid State Device Modeling and Simulation
3
0
0
3
6
P14VLD106
Testing of VLSI Circuits
3
0
0
3
0
0
3
2
Practical
7
P14VLD107
VLSI Design Laboratory - I
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Electronics and Communication Engineering BOS Member Secretary, Academic Council
Dr.K.R.Kashwan
Copy to:HOD/ECE (PG), First Semester ME VLSI Students and Staff, COE
Prof.G.Prakash
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14VLD101
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
6. Explain the fundamental concept of system of equations, methods to solve a linear system of
equations by direct and iterative methods and methods for finding Eigen value of a matrix.
7. Describe the solution of initial and boundary value problems and Laplace Transform Solutions of
one dimensional wave equations.
8. State the Bessel’s equation and Legendre’s equation, describe the concept of Legendre’s
Polynomial, Rodrique’s formula & recurrence relation.
9. Define and explain the one dimensional random variable and two dimensional random variable
and give brief accounts of standard distributions.
10. Explain the fundamental concept of queuing system and queue discipline and discuss the models
involved in solving them.
UNIT – I LINEAR ALGEBRAIC EQUATION AND EIGEN VALUE PROBLEMS 12
System of equations- Solution by Gauss Elimination, Gauss-Jordan and LU decomposition methodJacobi, Gauss-Seidal iteration method- Eigen values of a matrix by Jacobi and Power method.
UNIT – II WAVE EQUATION
12
Solution of initial and boundary value problems - Characteristics- D’Alembert’s Solution - Significance
of characteristic curves - Laplace transform solutions for displacement in a long string - a long string
under its weight - a bar with prescribed force on one end- free vibrations of a string.
UNIT – III SPECIAL FUNCTIONS
12
Bessel’s equation - Bessel Functions- Legendre’s equation - Legendre polynomials -Rodrigue’s formula
- Recurrence relations- generating functions and orthogonal property for Bessel functions -Legendre
polynomials.
UNIT – IV RANDOM VARIABLES
12
One dimensional Random Variable - Moments and MGF – Binomial, Poisson, Geometrical, Normal
Distributions - Two dimensional Random Variables – Marginal and Conditional Distributions –
Covariance and Correlation Coefficient - Functions of Two dimensional random variable.
UNIT - V QUEUEING THEORY
12
Single and Multiple server Markovian queueing models - Steady state system size probabilities – Little’s
formula - Priority queues - M/G/1 queueing system – P.K. formula.
L + T = 45 + 15 = 60 Hours
TEXT BOOKS:
4. Sankara Rao.K., “Introduction to Partial Differential Equation”, PHI, 1995.
5. Taha. H.A., “Operations Research- An Introduction”, 6th Edition, PHI, 1997.
6. Jain M.K. Iyengar, S.R.K. & Jain R.K., “International Methods for Scientific and Engineering
Computation”, New Age International (P) Ltd, Publlishers, 2003.
REFERENCES:
2. Kanpur J.N. & Saxena. H.C,“Mathematical Statistics”, S.Chand & Co. New Delhi, 2003.
3. Greweal B.S, “Higher Engineering Mathematics”, Khanna Publishers, 2005.
P14VLD102 DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1. Know the basic standard DSP and various types DSP systems used in ICs.
2. Describe the concepts of DSP systems, DFT, FFT and DCT.
3. Know about the Digital filters- IIR and FIR, Decimation and Interpolation.
4. Describe the DSP architectures and its implementation on PEs and Bit serial PEs.
5. Overview of number systems in arithmetic units and DSP processors.
UNIT I DSP INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND VLSI CIRCUIT TECHNOLOGIES 9
Standard digital signal processors, Application specific IC’s for DSP, DSP systems, DSP system design,
Integrated circuit design. MOS transistors, MOS logic, VLSI process technologies, Trends in CMOS
technologies.
UNIT II DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
9
Digital signal processing, Sampling of analog signals, Selection of sample frequency, Signal-processing
systems, Frequency response, Transfer functions, Signal flow graphs, Filter structures, Adaptive DSP
algorithms, DFT-The Discrete Fourier Transform, FFT-The Fast Fourier Transform Algorithm, Image
coding, Discrete cosine transforms.
UNIT III DIGITAL FILTERS AND FINITE WORD LENGTH EFFECTS
9
FIR filters, FIR filter structures, FIR chips, IIR filters, Specifications of IIR filters, Mapping of analog
transfer functions, Mapping of analog filter structures, Multirate systems, Interpolation with an integer
factor L, Sampling rate change with a ratio L/M, Multirate filters. Finite word length effects –Parasitic
oscillations, Scaling of signal levels, Round-off noise, Measuring round-off noise, Coefficient
sensitivity, Sensitivity and noise.
UNIT IV DSP ARCHITECTURES AND SYNTHESIS OF DSP ARCHITECTURES 9
DSP system architectures, Standard DSP architecture, Ideal DSP architectures, Multiprocessors and
multicomputers, Systolic and Wave front arrays, Shared memory architectures. Mapping of DSP
algorithms onto hardware, Implementation based on complex PEs, Shared memory architecture with Bit
– serial PEs.
UNIT V ARITHMETIC UNITS AND INTEGRATED CIRCUIT DESIGN
9
Conventional number system, Redundant Number system, Residue Number System. Bit-parallel and BitSerial arithmetic, Basic shift accumulator, Reducing the memory size, Complex multipliers, Improved
shift-accumulator. Layout of VLSI circuits, FFT processor, DCT processor and Interpolator as case
studies.
L : 45, T:15 Total :60 Hours
TEXT BOOK:
1. Lars Wanhammer, “DSP Integrated Circuits”, Academic press, New York 1999.
REFERENCES:
1. Oppenheim et.al A.V, “Discrete-time Signal Processing”, Pearson education, 2000.
2. Emmanuel C. Ifeachor, Barrie W. Jervis, “ Digital signal processing – A
practical approach”, Second edition, Pearson education, Asia 2001.
3. Keshab K.Parhi, “VLSI digital Signal Processing Systems design and Implementation”, John
Wiley & Sons, 1999.
4. Bayoumi & Magdy A., “ VLSI Design Methodologies for Digital Signal Processing
Architectures”, BS Publications, 2005.
P14VLD103
ADVANCED DIGITAL SYSTEM DESIGN
3 1 0 4 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1. Analyse and design of Synchronous Sequential Circuit Design.
2. Analyse and design of Asynchronous Sequential Circuit Design.
3. Identify the variable entered maps and techniques to simplify the Boolean expressions
using these Maps.
4. Design System controllers using combinational MSI / LSI circuits.
5. Know design procedures for developing complex system controllers using digital ICs.
UNIT I SYNCHRONOUS SEQUENTIAL CIRCUIT DESIGN
9
Analysis of clocked synchronous sequential circuits – Moore / Mealy State diagrams, State Table, State
Reduction and Assignment - Design of synchronous sequential circuits.
UNIT II ASYNCHRONOUS SEQUENTIAL CIRCUIT DESIGN
9
Analysis of asynchronous sequential circuit – Cycles – Races - Static, Dynamic and Essential hazards –
Primitive Flow Table - State Reductions and State Assignment - Design of asynchronous sequential
circuits.
UNIT III VEM AND INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-INPUT SYSTEM CONTROLLER DESIGN
9
Variable Entered Maps – simplification - System Controllers – Design Phases – MDS Diagram
Generation – MDSD Symbology – Choosing the controller architecture – State Assignment – Next State
decoder – Examples of 2s complement system and Pop Vending Machine – Concepts related to the use
of conditional outputs.
UNIT IV SYSTEM CONTROLLERS USING COMBINATIONAL MSI / LSI CIRCUITS
9
Decoders and Multiplexers in system controllers – Indirect-Addressed MUX configuration – System
controllers using ROM.
UNIT V SEQUENTIAL AND PROGRAMMABLE SYSTEM CONTROLLERS
9
System controllers using Shift Registers and Counters – General requirements of a programmable
controller - Microinstructions – Programmable controllers with fixed instruction set.
L :45 T:15 Total: 60 Hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Donald G. Givone, “Digital principles and Design”, Tata McGraw Hill,2002.
2. William I. Fletcher”, An Engineering Approach to Digital Design”, Prentice Hall India, 2011.
REFERENCES:
1. Nripendra N Biswas, “Logic Design Theory”, Prentice Hall of India, 2001.
2. Charles H. Roth Jr, “Fundamentals of Logic design” ,Thomson Learning, 2004.
P14VLD104
CMOS VLSI DESIGN
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1. Illustrate the VLSI Design process and Fabrication of MOSFETs.
2. Describe the MOS transistors and model MOS transistor.
3. Analyze the static and switching characteristics of MOS inverters.
4. Design the combinational and Sequential MOS Logic circuits.
5. Write the programming codes and simulate circuits using Verilog HDL.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION AND FABRICATION OF MOSFETS
9
Overview of VLSI Design Methodologies – VLSI Design Flow – Design Hierarchy – Concepts of
Regularity, Modularity, and Locality – VLSI Design Styles – Design Quality – Packaging Technology.
Fabrication Process Flow: Basic Steps – The CMOS n-Well Process – Layout Design Rules – FullCustom Mask Layout Design.
UNIT II MOS TRANSISTORS AND ITS’ MODELING USING SPICE
9
The Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) Structure - The MOS System under External Bias Structure and Operation of MOS Transistor (MOSFET) – MOSFET Current-Voltage Characteristics –
MOSFET Scaling and Small-Geometry Effects – MOSFET Capacitances. Basic Concepts – The LEVEL
1 Model Equations -– The LEVEL 2 Model Equations – The LEVEL 3 Model Equations – State-of-theArt MOSFET Models – Capacitance Models – Comparison of the SPICE MOSFET Models.
UNIT III MOS INVERTERS’ CHARACTERISTICS
9
Static Characteristics: Resistive-Load Inverter – Inverters with n-Type MOSFET Load – CMOS
Inverter. Switching Characteristics: Delay-Time Definitions – Determination of delay Times – Inverter
Design with Delay Constraints – Estimation of Interconnect Parasitic – Calculation of Interconnect
Delay – Switching power Dissipation of CMOS inverters.
UNIT IV COMBINATIONAL AND SEQUENTIAL MOS LOGIC CIRCUITS
9
MOS Logic Circuits with Depletion nMOS Loads – CMOS Logic Circuits – Complex Logic Circuits –
CMOS Transmission Gates (Pass Gates). Behavior of Bistable Elements – SR Latch Circuit – Clocked
Latch and Flip-Flop Circuits – CMOS D-Latch and Edge-Triggered Flip-Flop.
UNIT V VERILOG HARDWARE DESCRIPTION LANGUAGE
9
Overview of digital design with Verilog HDL, hierarchical modeling concepts, modules and port
definitions, gate level modeling, data flow modeling, behavioral modeling, task & functions, Test Bench.
Total: 45 Hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Sung-Mo kang and Yusuf Leblebici, “CMOS Digital Integrated Circuits –Analysis and Design”,
Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008.
2. Bhasker J, B.S.Publications, “A Verilog HDL Primer”, 2nd Edition, 2001.
REFERENCES:
1. R.Jacob Baker, “CMOS circuit design, Layout, and Simulation”, John Wiley and Sons, 2012.
2. Neil H.E. Weste and Kamran Eshraghian, “Principles of CMOS VLSI Design”, Pearson
Education ASIA, 2nd edition, 2000.
3. John P. Uyemura, “Introduction to VLSI Circuits and Systems”, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2002.
P14VLD105
SOLID STATE DEVICE MODELING AND SIMULATION 3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1. Know about the MOSFET device physics and operation.
2. Describe the modeling technique for Noise and Proper Modeling for Accurate Distortion
Analysis.
3. Describe the modeling BSIM4 MOSFET model.
4. Know how to design and Simulate EKV model and other MOSFET model.
5. Know the modeling of Process Variation and Quality Assurance of MOSFET Models.
UNIT I MOSFET DEVICE PHYSICS AND OPERATION AND RF MODELING
9
The MOS Capacitor- Threshold Voltage -MOS Capacitance - MOS Charge Control Model -Basic
MOSFET Operation-Basic MOSFET Modeling - Advanced MOSFET. Equivalent Circuit
Representation of MOS Transistors- High-frequency Behavior of MOS Transistors and AC Small-signal
Modeling- Model Parameter Extraction - NQS Model for RF Applications.
UNIT II NOISE MODELING AND PROPER MODELING FOR ACCURATE DISTORTION
ANALYSIS
9
Noise Sources in a MOSFET - Flicker Noise Modeling - The Physical Mechanisms of Flicker Noise Flicker Noise Models - Thermal Noise Modeling - Existing Thermal Noise Models - HF Noise
Parameters - Analytical Calculation of the Noise Parameters. Basic Terminology - Nonlinearities in
CMOS Devices and Their Modeling - Calculation of Distortion in Analog CMOS Circuits.
UNIT III BSIM4 MOSFET MODEL
9
An Introduction to BSIM4 - Gate Dielectric Model-Threshold Voltage Model - Channel Charge Model Mobility Model - Source/Drain Resistance Model- I–V Model -Gate Tunneling Current Model -Substrate
Current Models - Capacitance Models - High-speed (Non-quasi-static) Model - RF Model - Noise
Model.
UNIT IV OTHER MOSFET MODELS
9
Introduction - Model Features - Long-channel Drain Current Model - Modeling Second-order Effects of
the Drain Current - SPICE Example: The Effect of Charge-sharing -Modeling of Charge Storage Effects
- Non-quasi-static Modeling- The Noise Model - Temperature Effects. MOS Model 9 - The MOSA1
Model.
.
UNIT V MODELING OF PROCESS VARIATION AND QUALITY ASSURANCE OF MOSFET
MODELS
9
Introduction- The Influence of Process Variation and Device Mismatch, Modeling of Device Mismatch
for Analog/RF Applications. Introduction, Motivation, Benchmark Circuits, and Automation of the
Tests.
Total: 45 Hours
TEXT BOOK:
1. Trond Ytterdal, Yuhua Cheng and Tor A. FjeldlyWayne Wolf, “Device Modeling for Analog and
RF CMOS Circuit Design”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd,. 2003.
REFERENCES:
1. Grasser, T., “Advanced Device Modeling and Simulation”, World Scientific Publishing Company,
2003.
2. Ben.G.Streetman, “Solid State Devices”, Prentice Hall , 1997.
3. Arora, N., “MOSFET Models for VLSI Circuit Simulation”, Springer-Verlag, 1993.
P14VLD106
TESTING OF VLSI CIRCUITS
3 0 0 3 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1. Know how to test the faults and modeling of faults and types of simulation.
2. Know about the test generation of combinational circuits and design them.
3. Describe the different testability designs of sequential circuits and scan based designs.
4. Know how to generate the test patterns for BIST.
5. Describe different types of logical level diagnosis and system level diagnosis.
UNIT I TESTING AND FAULT MODELLING
9
Introduction to Testing - Faults in digital circuits - Modeling of faults - Logical Fault Models – Fault
detection - Fault location - Fault dominance - Logic Simulation - Types of simulation - Delay models Gate level Event-driven simulation.
UNIT II TEST GENERATION OF COMBINATIONAL CIRCUITS
9
Test generation of combinational logic circuits: One dimensional path sensitization – Boolean Difference
– D- Algorithm – PODEM. Testable combinational logic circuit design: The Reed Muller expansion
techniques – Three level OR – AND- OR design – Use of control logic- syndrome testable design.
UNIT III TEST GENERATION OF SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS
9
Test generation of sequential circuits: Testing of sequential circuits as Iterative combinational circuits,
State table verification. Design of testable sequential circuits, Generic scan based design.
UNIT IV SELF – TEST AND TEST ALGORITHMS
9
Built – In self Test – Test pattern generation for BIST – exhaustive testing-pseudorandom testing,
pseudo-exhaustive testing. Specific BIST architectures (BEST, RTS, LOCST, STUMPS).
UNIT V FAULT DIAGNOSIS
9
Logic level Diagnosis – Diagnosis by UUT reduction, fault diagnosis for combinational circuits. System
level diagnosis – A simple model of system level diagnosis, Generalization of the PMC model.
Total: 45 Hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Lala P.K, "Fault Tolerant and Fault Testable Hardware Design", BS Publications, 2009.
2. Abramovici M, Breuer M.A. and Friedman A.D., "Digital Systems and Testable Design", Jaico
Publishing House, 2004.
REFERENCES:
1. Bushnell M.L and Agrawal V.D, "Essentials of Electronic Testing for Digital, Memory and
Mixed-Signal VLSI Circuits", Kluwar Academic Publishers, 2002.
2. Crouch A.L, "Design for Test for Digital IC's and Embedded Core Systems", Prentice Hall
International, 2002.
P14VLD107
VLSI DESIGN LAB I
0 0 4 2 100
COURSE OBJECTIVES
To enable students to,
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Design sequential Digital system using VHDL, Verilog.
Verify the characteristics of MOSFET using different method.
Implement the FIR filter in FPGA.
Understand the NMOS, CMOS and Logic circuits.
Design the FFT and DSP algorithms.
EXPERIMENTS
1. Design of NMOS and CMOS Inverters - DC and transient characteristics and switching times.
2. Estimation of Resistance, Capacitance and Inductance for MOSFET models.
3. Design of Multiplexers, Decoders and comparators using VHDL/Verilog.
4. Analytical Modeling and simulation of I-V characteristics of a p channel/n channel
MOSFET using Newton-Raphson method.
5. Analytical Modeling and simulation of potential distribution/field of the MOSFET using finite
difference method.
6. Modeling and analysis of MOS capacitor - Small signal Analysis.
Designing FIR filters using FPGA.
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Computer Science Engineering
Branch: M.E. Computer Science and Engineering
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14CSE101
Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science
3
1
0
4
2
P14CSE102
Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
3
0
0
3
3
P14CSE103
Advanced Operating Systems
3
0
0
3
4
P14CSE104
Ethical Hacking and Digital Forensics
3
0
0
3
5
P14CSE105
Network Engineering and Management
3
0
0
3
6
P14CSE106
Computer Architecture
3
0
0
3
Practical
7
P14CSE107
Advanced Programming Laboratory
0
0
3
2
8
P14CSE108
Soft Skills
0
0
2
1
Total Credits
22
Approved by
Chairperson, Computer Science and Engineering BOS
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Dr.M.Usha
Copy to:Dean/CSE, First Semester ME CSE Students and Staff, COE
Prof.G.Prakash
Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14CSE101 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
LTP310 4
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to
 Describe the concepts of Set Theory, Relations and Functions to solve problems
 Explain Symbolic logic, Construct truth tables and verify the validity of arguments
 Explain the basic concepts of advanced counting techniques to solve problems
 Explain Automata, Formal languages and Construct Turing machines for simple arithmetic
operations
 Explain the basic concept of Graph Theory, Paths, Connectivity, Spanning Trees, Rooted and
Binary Trees
UNIT – I
Fundamental Structures
(12)
Set theory - Relationships between sets – Operations on sets – Set identities - Principle of inclusion and
exclusion – Minsets. Relations:– Binary relations – Partial orderings – Equivalence relations.
Functions:– Properties of functions – Composition of functions – Inverse functions – Permutation
functions
UNIT - II
Logic
(12)
Propositional logic – Logical connectives – Truth tables – Normal forms (conjunctive and disjunctive) –
Predicate logic – Universal and existential quantifiers – Proof techniques – direct and indirect – Proof by
contradiction
Unit – III
Combinatorics
(12)
Sum-rule, Product-rule, Permutations, Combinations, Mathematical Induction, Pigeon-hole Principle,
Principle of inclusion- exclusion, Recurrence Relations, Generating Functions
UNIT – IV
Modeling Computation and Languages
(12)
Finite state machines – Deterministic and Non- deterministic finite state machines – Turing Machines –
Formal Languages – Classes of Grammars – Type 0 – Context Sensitive – Context Free – Regular
Grammars – Ambiguity
UNIT – V
Graphs
(12)
Introduction to Graphs-Graph terminology-Representation of Graphs-Graph Isomorphism-ConnectivityEuler and Hamilton Paths-Connectedness in Directed Graphs-Shortest Path Algorithms-Spanning TreesMinimum Spanning Tree-Rooted and Binary Trees
Tutorial: 15 hours
Lecture: 45 hours
Total: 60 hours
TEXT BOOK
1. Judith L.Gersting, “Mathematical Structures for Computer Science”, W.H. Freeman and
Company, NY, 2006.
Reference Books:
1. Kenneth H. Rosen, “Discrete Mathematics and its Applications”, Fifth Edition, TMH, 2003.
2. M.K. Venkataraman, N. Sridharan and N.Chandrasekaran, “Discrete Mathematics”, the
National Publishing Company, 2003.
3. Ralph, P. Grimaldi, “Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics”, Pearson Education 2006.
4. T.Veerarajan, “Discrete Mathematics”, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, New
Delhi, 13th Reprint 2011.
Internet References:
The following URL (Universal Resource Locator) can also be contacted for Lecture Notes on Discrete
Mathematics.
(a) http://www.mhhe.com/math/advmath/rosen/index.mhtml#aboutau.
(b) http://www.cs.stedwards.edu/-phil/Math24/Lectures/index.htm.
(c) http://www.ms.uky.edu/-jlee/DiscreteMath.html
P14CSE102 ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS L T P C 3 0 0 3
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Basic ability to analyze algorithms and to determine algorithm correctness and time efficiency
class.
 Master a variety of advanced data structures and their implementations.
 Master different algorithm design techniques in computational geometry and in parallel
algorithms.
 Ability to apply and implement learned algorithm design techniques and data structures to solve
problems.
UNIT I
FUNDAMENTALS
(9)
Mathematical Induction - Asymptotic Notations – Properties of Big-oh Notation – Conditional
Asymptotic Notation – Algorithm Analysis – Amortized Analysis – NP Completeness – NP-Hard
– Recurrence Equations – Solving Recurrence Equations – Memory Representation of Multidimensional Arrays – Time-Space Tradeoff.
UNIT II
HEAP STRUCTURES
(9)
Min/Max heaps – Deaps – Leftist Heaps – Binomial Heaps – Fibonacci Heaps – Skew Heaps –
Lazy-Binomial Heaps.
UNIT III
SEARCH STRUCTURES
(9)
Binary Search Trees – AVL Trees – Red-Black trees – Multi-way Search Trees –B-Trees –
Splay Trees – Tries.
UNIT IV
MEDIA STRUCTURES
(9)
Segment Trees – k-d Trees – Point Quad Trees – MX-Quad Trees – R-Trees – TV Trees.
UNIT V
PARALLEL ALGORITHMS
(9)
Flynn’s Classifications – List Ranking – Prefix computation – Array Max – Sorting on EREW PRAM –
Sorting on Mesh and Butterfly – Prefix sum on Mesh and Butterfly – Sum on mesh and butterfly –
Matrix Multiplication – Data Distribution on EREW, Mesh and Butterfly.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. E. Horowitz, S.Sahni and Dinesh Mehta, Fundamentals of Data structures in C++, Uiversity Press,
2007.
2. G. Brassard and P. Bratley, Algorithmics: Theory and Practice, Printice –Hall, 1(9)88.
3. V.S. Subramanian, Principles of Multimedia Database systems, Morgan Kaufman, 1(9)(9)8.
4. Mark de Berg, Otfried Cheong, Marc van Kreveld, Mark Overmars, Computational Geometry
Algorithms and Applications, Third Edition, 2008
5. James A. Storer, An Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms, Springer, New York, 2002.
6. Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest and Clifford Stein Introduction to
Al,200(9).
P14CSE103 ADVANCED OPERATING SYSTEMS L T P C
3003
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to
 Basic ability to analyze various scheduling algorithms and to solve scheduling problems using
the various scheduling algorithms.
 Analyze the deadlock model and can able to solve problems of deadlock using any of the
techniques stated in that topic.
 Comprehend the various memory management techniques such as paging, segmentation and
segmentation with paging
 Analyze and solve problems in virtual memory technique
 Analyze the design issues in file management and disk management policies.
 Analyze the various algorithms used for Mutual Exclusion in Distributed systems
 Comprehend and analyze the various concepts and algorithms used in distributed operating
systems
UNIT I
PROCESS MANAGEMENT
(9)
Operating system and services - Process structure and PCB - Threads – Inter process communication –
CPU scheduling approaches - Process synchronization –– Deadlocks.
UNIT II
MEMORY AND FILE MANAGEMENT
(9)
Memory management- Paging- Segmentation-Virtual memory- Demand paging – Page replacement
algorithms- File systems – Access methods – Directory structure and implementation– File system
mounting – File sharing – Protection - File System structure and implementation – Allocation methods.
UNIT III
DISTRIBUTED OPERATING SYSTEM
(9)
System Architecture- Issues in Distributed OS – Communication Primitives – Distributed Mutual
Exclusion- classification of mutual exclusion – Non-token based algorithm – Token based algorithmcomparative performance analysis- Distributed Deadlock- Deadlock handling strategies- Issues – control
organization – centralized deadlock detection algorithm – Distributed deadlock detection algorithm.
UNIT IV
DISTRIBUTED SCHEDULING AND MEMORY
(9)
Distributed scheduling- Issues in load distributing – component – stability- load distributing –
performance comparison Distributed shared memory- Architecture and motivation – Algorithms –
memory – coherence protocols – design issues- Distributed file system – Architecture- mechanism –
design issues.
UNIT V
REAL TIME AND MOBILE OPERATING SYSTEMS
(9)
Basic Model of Real Time Systems - Characteristics- Applications of Real Time Systems – Real Time
Task Scheduling - Handling Resource Sharing - Mobile Operating Systems –Micro Kernel Design Client Server Resource Access – Processes and Threads - Memory Management – File system- Case
studies.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B. Galvin and Greg Gagne, Operating System Concepts. New
Delhi: AddisonWesley Publishing Company, 200(9)
2. M Singhal and NG Shivaratri , Advanced Concepts in Operating Systems, Tata McGrawHill Inc,
2001
3. A S Tanenbaum, Distributed Operating Systems, Pearson Education Asia, 2001
4. Rajib Mall, “Real-Time Systems: Theory and Practice”, Pearson Education India, 2006.
P14CSE104
ETHICAL HACKING AND DIGITAL FORENSICS L T P C
30 03
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,





Defend hacking attacks and protect data assets.
Defend a computer against a variety of different types of security attacks using a number of handson techniques.
Defend a LAN against a variety of different types of security attacks using a number of hands-on
techniques.
Practice and use safe techniques on the World Wide Web.
Analyze computer Digital forensics.
UNIT I
(9)
Hacking windows – Network hacking – Web hacking – Password hacking. A study on various attacks –
Input validation attacks – SQL injection attacks – Buffer overflow attacks - Privacy attacks.
UNIT II
(9)
TCP / IP – Checksums – IP Spoofing port scanning, DNS Spoofing. Dos attacks – SYN attacks, Smurf
attacks, UDP flooding, DDOS – Models. Firewalls – Packet filter firewalls, Packet Inspection firewalls –
Application Proxy Firewalls. Batch File Programming.
UNIT III
(9)
Fundamentals of Computer Fraud – Threat concepts – Framework for predicting inside attacks –
Managing the threat – Strategic Planning Process.
UNIT IV
(9)
Architecture strategies for computer fraud prevention – Protection of Web sites – Intrusion detection
system – NIDS, HIDS – Penetrating testing process – Web Services – Reducing transaction risks.
UNIT V
(9)
Key Fraud Indicator selection process customized taxonomies – Key fraud signature selection process –
Accounting Forensics – Computer Forensics – Journaling and it requirements – Standardized logging
criteria – Journal risk and control matrix – Neural networks – Misuse detection and Novelty detection.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Kenneth C.Brancik “Insider Computer Fraud” Auerbach Publications Taylor & Francis Group–2008.
2. Ankit Fadia “Ethical Hacking” second edition Macmillan India Ltd, 2006.
P14CSE105 NETWORK ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT L T P C
3 0 0 3
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Comprehend the basic concepts of networking
 Analyze the various characteristics of network and transport layers
 Analyze the various network design strategies
 Test the various network design strategies
 Analyze the working principle and performance of various network management protocols.
UNIT – I
FOUNDATIONS OF NETWORKING
(9)
Introduction to networks: Definition of layers, services, interfaces and protocols – OSI reference
model – Physical layer: Networking elements, Multiplexing, Switching – Data link Layer: Framing,
Flow control, Error Control, Channel Access: SDMA, FDMA, TDMA and CDMA.
UNIT II
ROUTING AND QUALITY OF SERVICE
(9)
Network Layer: Addressing: IPv4, IPv6 - Routing Protocols: RIP, OSPF and BGP - QoS: Integrated
and Differentiated Services. Transport Layer: TCP header, TCP Flow Control and TCP congestion
control
UNIT III
NETWORK DESIGN
(9)
Analyzing top-down network design methodologies, technical goals and tradeoffs – scalability,
reliability, availability, Network performance, security, Characterizing the existing internetwork,
characterizing network traffic, developing network security strategies.
UNIT IV
TESTING AND OPTIMIZING SYSTEM DESIGN
(9)
Selecting technologies and devices for network design, testing network design – using industry tests,
building a prototype network system, writing and implementing test plan, tools for testing, optimizing
network design – network performance to meet quality of service (QoS)
UNIT V
NETWORK MANAGEMENT
(9)
SNMP– SNMPv2 and SNMPv3 – Remote monitoring – RMON SMI and MIB
otal: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Larry L Peterson and Bruce S Davie, ‘Computer Networks: A Systems Approach’, Fourth
Edition, Morgan Kaufman Publishers, 2007.
2. James F. Kurose, Keith W. Ross, “Computer Networking, A Top-Down Approach
Featuring the Internet”, Third Edition, Pearson Education, 2006.
3. Priscilla Oppenheimer, “Top-Down network Design”, Third Edition, Cisco press, 2012.
(UNIT III & IV).
4. William Stallings, ‘High Speed Networks: Performance and Quality of Service’, 2nd Edition,
Pearson Education, 2002.
5. Mani Subramaniam, ‘Network Management: Principles and Practices’, Pearson Education, 2000.
(UNIT V)
P14CSE106
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE L T P C
3 00 3
COURSE OUTCOMES
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to







Analyze the potential data hazards in the given code and suggest a way to eliminate them.
Discuss how cache coherence problems are overcome in directory-based protocols.
Design a strictly non blocking multi stage Clos network for given number of channels
Explain the architecture and compare SMT processors with multi-core processors
Find average memory access time for the given hit time, miss rate and miss penalty.
Evaluate the tradeoffs of software and hardware approaches of TLB misses.
Design a unique memory system based on the concepts studied.
UNIT I
PIPELINING AND ILP
(9)
Fundamentals of Computer Design - Measuring and Reporting Performance - Instruction Level
Parallelism and Its Exploitation - Concepts and Challenges - Overcoming Data Hazards with Dynamic
Scheduling – Dynamic Branch Prediction - Speculation - Multiple Issue Processors – Case Studies.
UNIT II
TLP AND LIMITS OF ILP
(9)
Compiler Techniques for Exposing ILP - Limitations on ILP for Realizable Processors - Hardware
versus Software Speculation - Multithreading: Using ILP Support to Exploit Thread-level Parallelism Performance and Efficiency in Advanced Multiple Issue Processors - Case Studies.
UNIT III
MULTIPROCESSOR SYSTEMS
(9)
Symmetric and distributed shared memory architectures – Cache coherence issues - Performance Issues
– Synchronization issues – Models of Memory Consistency - Interconnection networks – Buses, crossbar
and multi-stage switches.
UNIT IV
MULTI-CORE ARCHITECTURES
(9)
Introduction to Multicore Architecture –SMT and CMP architectures – Multicore Vs Multithreading–
Case studies – Intel Multi-core architecture – SUN CMP architecture – IBM cell architecture.- hp
architecture.
UNIT V
MEMORY HIERARCHY DESIGN
(9)
Introduction - Optimizations of Cache Performance - Memory Technology and Optimizations Protection: Virtual Memory and Virtual Machines - Design of Memory Hierarchies - Case Studies.
Total : 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. John L. Hennessey and David A. Patterson, “Computer Architecture – A quantitative approach”,
Morgan Kaufmann / Elsevier, 4th edition, 2007.
2. Kai Hwang, “Advanced Computer Architecture: Parallelism, Scalability and
Programmability”
McGraw-Hill, 1(9)(9)3
3. William Stallings, “Computer Organization and Architecture – Designing for Performance”, Pearson
Education, Seventh Edition, 2006.
P14CSE107
ADVANCED PROGRAMMING LABORATORY
LTPC0 03 2
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to,
 Design and implement various multimedia data structures.
 Design and implement algorithms using heap structures.
 Design and implement various CPU and Page replacement algorithm to understand the OS
concepts
 Design and implement different LAN topology and evaluate the network performance
List of Exercises
1. Implementation of any two of the following Heap structures
a. Deaps (Insertion, Delete Min, Delete Max)
b. Leftist Heap (All Meldable Priority Queue operations)
c. Skew Heap (All Meldable Priority Queue operations)
d. Fibonacci Heap (All Meldable Priority Queue operations)
2. Implementation of any two of the following multimedia structures
a. 2-d Trees (Insertion, Deletion and Range Queries)
b. Point Quad-Trees (Insertion, Deletion and Range Queries)
c. Segment Trees (Insertion, Deletion – Show list of nodes where in insertion and deletion
took place).
3. Write a program to implement various CPU Scheduling algorithms
4. Write a program to implement various page replacement algorithms
5. Write a program to simulate the paging system
6. Write a program to implement Bankers algorithm for handling deadlock
7. Simulate an Ethernet LAN using N-nodes (6-10) using the following topology, change error rate and data
rate and compare the throughput using ns2/OPNET with outgoing packets statistics.
Topology:
8. Simulate an Ethernet LAN using N nodes and set multiple traffic nodes and plot congestion window
for different source/destination using NS/OPNET.
Topology:
Total: 45 hours
P14CSE108
SOFT SKILLS
LTPC
0 0 2 1
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to

Understands oneself and sets a goal also manages time& stress and deals with criticism.

Understands to work with the team, and develop the leadership qualities.

Understands how to prioritize, plan and delegate work.

Develops good presentation skills, skills to discuss effectively in a group and in public.

Demonstrate the interview techniques and manage the frequently asked questions

Understands and practice different etiquette and manners.
Unit I:
SWOT analysis and goal setting, Intra-personal skills, Interpersonal Skills,
Time Management, Stress Management, Dealing with Criticism
Unit II:
Team Work, Leadership skills, Prioritizing and Planning, and Delegation.
Unit III:
Presentations Skills, Group Discussion, Public Speaking skills.
Unit IV:
Career Planning, Resume Writing, Interview Techniques.
Unit V:
Etiquette and Manners: Workplace Etiquette, Grooming Etiquette, Social Etiquette, Table manners and
Etiquette, E-Mail Etiquette.
Total : 30 hours
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Computer Science and Engineering
Branch: M.E. Software Engineering
S. No
Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14SWE101
Applied Mathematics for Software Engineering
3
1
0
4
2
P14SWE102
Formal Methods and Requirements Engineering
3
1
0
4
3
P14SWE103
Software Architecture
3
0
0
3
4
P14SWE104
Advance in Software Engineering
3
0
0
3
5
P14SWE105
Software Documentation
3
0
0
3
6
P14SWE106
Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
3
0
0
3
Practical
7
P14SWE107
Software Requirements and Design Laboratory
0
0
3
2
8
P14SWE108
Soft Skills
0
0
2
1
Total Credits
23
Approved by
Chairperson, Computer Science and Engineering BOS Member Secretary, Academic Council Chairperson, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.M.Usha
Prof.G.Prakash
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
Copy to:Dean/CSE, First Semester ME SWE Students and Staff, COE
P14SWE101
Applied Mathematics for Software Engineering L T P C
3 10 4
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Classify the random processes with examples, describe the special types of processes and analyze
the problems
 Discuss the types of simulations and its limitations and apply simulation technique by
generating random numbers

Describe constrained and unconstrained external problems, apply Newton Raphson method
and analyze the given constraints using Lagrangian method and Kuhn Tucker conditions

Explain the basic concepts of advanced counting techniques to solve problems

Explain the basic concept of Graph Theory, Paths, Connectivity, Spanning Trees, Rooted and
Binary Trees
UNIT – I
Stochastic Processes
12
Classification –Stationary and Random process – Markov process – Markov chains – Transition
probability – classification of Markov chain – Limiting distribution – First passage time – Poisson
process – Birth and death process
UNIT - II
Simulation and Applications
12
Introduction – Types of simulation – Limitations of simulation techniques – phases of simulation study –
Generation of random numbers – Monte Carlo simulation – Applications to queuing problems
UNIT – III
Classical Optimization Theory
12
Unconstrained external problem – Newton Raphson method – Equality constraints – Lagrangian method
– Kuhn Tucker conditions
UNIT - IV
Combinatorics
12
Sum-rule, Product-rule, Permutations, Combinations, Mathematical Induction, Pigeon-hole Principle,
Principle of inclusion- exclusion, Recurrence Relations, Generating Functions
UNIT -V
Graphs
12
Introduction to Graphs-Graph terminology-Representation of Graphs-Graph Isomorphism-ConnectivityEuler and Hamilton Paths-Connectedness in Directed Graphs-Shortest Path Algorithms-Spanning TreesMinimum Spanning Tree-Rooted and Binary Trees
Lecture: 45 hours; Tutorial: 15
hours; Total: 60 hours
Reference Books:
1. T.Veerarajan in ASCENT Series, “Probability, Statistics and Random processes”, Tata McGraw
Hill, July 2008, 3rd Edition.
2. Sharma S.D, “Operations Research”, Kedarnath, Ramnath & Co, 12th Edition, 1998.
3. T. Veerarajan, “Discrete Mathematics”, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited,
NewDelhi, 13th Reprint 2011.
4. Kenneth H. Rosen, “Discrete Mathematics and its Applications”, Fifth Edition, TMH, 2003.
Internet Reference:
The following URL (Universal Resource Locator) can also be contacted for Lecture Notes on Discrete
Mathematics.
(a) http://www.mhhe.com/math/advmath/rosen/index.mhtml#aboutau.
(b) http://www.cs.stedwards.edu/-phil/Math24/Lectures/index.htm.
(c) http://www.ms.uky.edu/-jlee/DiscreteMath.html
P14SWE102 FORMAL METHODS AND REQUIREMENTS ENGINEERING L T P C 3 1 0 4
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Understand basic discrete mathematics used in modeling languages (logic, sets, relations, functions,
and sequences), and to recognize properties of each construct.
 Analyze the various software tools supporting formal specification.
 Apply Z specification to model real world problems.
 Examine the various case studies involving Z specification.
 Create models of requirements using a variety of notations and techniques.
UNIT - I
INTRODUCTION TO FORMAL METHODS
(9)
Need for modeling systems-Challenges in software development-modeling computing systemsVerification-Formal Specification-Advantages and Disadvantages-Approaches to formal specificationFormal specification languages- Software tools supporting formal specification
UNIT – II
FOUNDATION OF Z SPECIFICATION
(9)
Deficiencies of less formal approaches-Mathematics in software development- Formal methods conceptZ specification-Mathematical preliminaries-First order logicsets- logic-sequences-Applying
mathematical notation for formal specification
UNIT - III
Z SCHEMA AND CASE STUDIES
(9)
Methods for reasoning-Formal proof-rigorous proof-Immanent reasoning-Reification and
Decomposition-Floyd Hoare logic-Case studies-The bill of materials problem, A route planner, Wing’s
Library problem
UNIT - IV
REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT
(9)
The Requirements Problem-Introduction to Requirements Management-Analyzing the problem-Five
steps in problem Analysis-Business Modeling-Understanding User Needs-The challenge of requirements
elicitation-Brainstroming and Idea Reduction- Applying Use cases-Prototyping
UNIT - V
DEFINING THE SYSTEM
(9)
Managing scope-Refining-Software requirements-Refining Use cases-On ambiguity and specificityBuilding the right system- From requirements to Implementation-Using traceability to support
verification-validating system
Lecture: 45 hours; Tutorial: 15
hours;
Total: 60 hours
Reference Books:
1.
2.
3.
Antoni Diller, “Z: An Introduction to Formal Methods”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd 2nd edition, 1994.
Dean Leffingwell & Don Widrig, “Managing Software Requirements: A Unified Approach”,
Addison-Wesley 5th Printing November 2000.
Roger S.Pressman, “Software Engineering, A Practitioner’s approach”, 6th Edition, McGraw-Hill
International,2005
P14SWE103
SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE
LTPC
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
3 00 3
 State the need for software architecture and identify the various approaches pertaining to the
development of software.
 Explain the various attributes needed for the development of the software.
 Describe the process of requirement management and iterative development.
 Illustrate Architecture Trade of Analysis Method and Architecture Trade of Analysis Method.
 Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of bottom up and top down architectures.
UNIT – I
INTRODUCTION
(9)
Introduction - Software Architecture - Definition – needs, approaches, roles of Software Architecture
UNIT – II
SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE AND DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
(9)
Iterative development, requirement management, effective technical meetings, pitfalls, software
activities, CASE tools, Software Architecture Approaches
UNIT – III
SIMPLE SYSTEM OVERVIEW
(9)
System interfaces, constraints, operational requirements, Software Requirements, Design Patterns and
Antipatterns, Component Design and Modelling
UNIT – IV
SYSTEM DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT TECHNIQUES
(9)
Subsystem design, Interface and layers, mapping subscripts and layers to implementation, logical data
model, transaction Design – Process and deployment design- Development techniques, Software
patterns, strategies, changeability and dependency management,
UNIT – V
ARCHITECTURE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
(9)
Architectural patterns, Integration strategies, bottom up and top down architectures-IntroductionArchitecture Trade of Analysis Method(ATAM)-Cost Benefit Analysis Method(CBAM) -Integration of
ATAM and CBAM-Enhancements.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Jeff Garland and Richard Antony, “Large scale Software Architecture – A practical guide using
UML”, Wileydreamtech India Pvt. Ltd., 2003.
2. Mary Shaw David Garlan, "Software Architectural Perspectives on an emerging discipline", EEE,
PHI. 1996.
3. Wolfgang Pree, "Design patterns for object Oriented Software Development", Addison Wesley,
1995.
4. Bachmann, F.; Bass, L.; Chastek, G.; Donohoe, P.; & Peruzzi, F. The Architecture-Based Design
Method (CMU/SEI-2000-TR-001, ADA375851). Pittsburgh, PA: Software Engineering Institute,
Carnegie
Mellon
University,
2000.
<http://www.sei.cmu.edu/publications/documents/00.reports/00tr001.html>.
P14SWE104
ADVANCES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING L T P C
3003
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Outline the underlying processes of software engineering and assess relevant models pertaining to
software development.
 Demonstrate an understanding of the proper contents of a software requirements document.
 Design and develop software applications by applying the newly emerged software engineering
models, such as agile methodology.
 Identify specific components of a software design that can be targeted for reuse.
 State the need for software configuration management.
UNIT I
INTRODUCTION
(9)
System Concepts – Software Engineering Concepts - Software Life Cycle– Development Activities –
Managing Software Development – Unified Modelling Language – Project Organization –
Communication.
UNIT II
ANALYSIS
(9)
Requirements Elicitation – Use Cases – Unified Modelling Language, Tools – Analysis Object Model
(Domain Model) – Analysis Dynamic Models – Non-functional requirements – Analysis Patterns.
UNIT III
SYSTEM DESIGN
(9)
Overview of System Design – Decomposing the system -System Design Concepts – System Design
Activities – Addressing Design Goals – Managing System Design.
UNIT IV
IMPLEMENTATION AND MANAGING CHANGE
(9)
Programming languages and coding- Human computer interaction-Reusing Pattern Solutions –
Specifying Interfaces – Mapping Models to Code – Testing Rationale Management –Configuration
Management – Project Management -real time interface design( eg: mobiledesign)
UNIT V
ASPECT ORIENTED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT
(9)
AO Design Principles -Separations of Concerns, Subject Oriented Decomposition, Traits,Aspect
Oriented Decomposition, Theme Approach, Designing Base and Crosscutting Themes,Aspect-Oriented
Programming using Aspect-J.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Bernd Bruegge, Alan H Dutoit, Object-Oriented Software Engineering, 2nd ed, Pearson Education,
2004.
2. Craig Larman, Applying UML and Patterns, 3rd ed, Pearson Education, 2005.
3. Stephen Schach, Software Engineering 7th ed, McGraw-Hill, 2007.
4. AspectJ in Action, RamnivasLaddad, Manning Publications, 2003
5. Aspect-Oriented Software Development, Robert E. Filman, TzillaElrad, Siobhan Clarke, and Mehmet
Aksit, October 2006.
6. Aspect-Oriented Software Development with Use Cases, (The Addison-Wesley Object Technology
Series), Ivar Jacobson and Pan-Wei Ng, December 2004
7.Aspect-Oriented Analysis and Design: The Theme Approach, (The Addison-Wesley Object
Technology Series), Siobhan Clarke and Elisa Baniassad, March 2005.
8. Mastering AspectJ: Aspect-Oriented Programming in Java, Joseph D. Gradecki and Nicholas
Lesiecki, March 2003.
P14SWE105 SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION
LTPC 3003
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Explain the forms of software documentation such Tutorials, procedures and references.
 Understand the type of users and the psychological differences between them.
 Understand the user analysis, planning interviews, and learn the rules when interviewing users.
 Differentiate between the different types of each document and the kind of elements that compose
the document
 Explain the process of software documentation, from user analysis through editing and fine
tuning
UNIT I
UNDERSTANDING TASK ORIENTATION
(9)
Principles of Software Documentation – Definition of Task Orientation – Theory – Forms of Software
Documentation – Procedural – Reference – Process of Software of Documentation – Seven Rules for
Sound Documentation.
UNIT II
FORMS AND MODULE OF SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION
(9)
Designing Tutorials – Elaborative Approach – Minimalist Approach – Writing to Guide – Procedure –
Writing to Support – Reference – Module View type - Styles of Module View Type – Component and
Connector View type – Styles of Component and Connector View type – Allocation View type and
styles.
UNIT III
PROCESS OF SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION
(9)
Analyzing your Users – Planning and Writing your Documents – Getting Useful Reviews – Conducting
Usability Tests – Editing and Fine Tuning.
UNIT IV
SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE DOCUMENTATION IN PRACTICE
(9)
Chunking Information: View Packets, Refinement and Descriptive Completeness – using Context
Diagrams – Combined views – Documenting Variability and Dynamism – Documenting
Software Interfaces.
UNIT V
TOOLS OF SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION
(9)
Designing for Task Orientation – Laying out Pages and Screens – Getting the Language Right – Using
Graphics effectively – Designing Indexes.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
1. Paul Clements, Felix Bachman, Len Bass, David Garlan, James Ivers, Reed Little, Robert Nord,
Judith Stafford, “Documenting Software Architectures: Views and Beyond”, Second Edition,
Addison Wesley, 2010.
2. Thomas T.Barker, “Writing Software Documentation: A Task Oriented Approach”, Second
Edition, Pearson Education, 2008.
P14SWE106 ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS
LT P C 3 0 0 3
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,
 Compare and contrast various iterative and recursive algorithms and apply them to solve any given
problem
 Appraise the advantages of using optimization, apply the optimization techniques for graph search
and other applications
 Develop dynamic programming algorithms to solve any given problem.
 Solve synchronization and concurrency related issues for various applications.
 Identify suitable concurrent data structures to implement various applications
UNIT I
ITERATIVE AND RECURSIVE ALGORITHMS
(9)
Iterative Algorithms:Measures of Progress and Loop Invariants-Paradigm Shift: Sequence of Actions
versus Sequence of Assertions- Steps to Develop an Iterative Algorithm-Different Types of Iterative
Algorithms--Typical Errors-Recursion-Forward versus Backward- Towers of Hanoi- Checklist for
Recursive Algorithms-The Stack Frame-Proving Correctness with Strong Induction- Examples of
Recursive Algorithms-Sorting and Selecting Algorithms-Operations on Integers- Ackermann’s FunctionRecursion on Trees-Tree Traversals- Examples- Generalizing the Problem - Heap Sort and Priority
Queues-Representing Expressions.
UNIT II
OPTIMISATION ALGORITHMS
(9)
Optimization Problems-Graph Search Algorithms-Generic Search-Breadth-First Search- Dijkstra’s
Shortest-Weighted-Path -Depth-First Search-Recursive Depth-First Search-Linear Ordering of a Partial
Order- Network Flows and Linear Programming-Hill Climbing-Primal Dual Hill Climbing- Steepest
Ascent Hill Climbing-Linear Programming-Recursive Backtracking- Developing Recursive
Backtracking Algorithm- Pruning Branches-Satisfiability
UNIT III
DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING ALGORITHMS
(9)
Developing a Dynamic Programming Algorithm-Subtle Points- Question for the Little BirdSubinstances and Subsolutions-Set of Subinstances-Decreasing Time and Space-Number of SolutionsCode. Reductions and NP-Completeness-Satisfiability-Proving NP-Completeness- 3- Coloring- Bipartite
Matching. Randomized Algorithms-Randomness to Hide Worst Cases- Optimization Problems with a
Random Structure.
UNIT IV
SHARED OBJECTS AND CONCURRENT OBJECTS
(9)
Shared Objects and Synchronization -Properties of Mutual Exclusion-The Moral- The Producer–
Consumer Problem -The Readers–Writers Problem-Realities of Parallelization-Parallel ProgrammingPrinciples- Mutual Exclusion-Time- Critical Sections--Thread Solutions-The Filter Lock-FairnessLamport’s Bakery Algorithm-Bounded Timestamps-Lower Bounds on the Number of LocationsConcurrent Objects- Concurrency and Correctness-Sequential Objects- Quiescent ConsistencySequential Consistency-Linearizability- Formal Definitions- Progress Conditions- The Java Memory
Model
UNIT V
CONCURRENT DATA STRUCTURES
(9)
Practice-Linked Lists-The Role of Locking-List-Based Sets-Concurrent Reasoning- Coarse- Grained
Synchronization-Fine-Grained Synchronization-Optimistic Synchronization- Lazy SynchronizationNon-Blocking Synchronization-Concurrent Queues and the ABA Problem- Queues-A Bounded Partial
Queue-An Unbounded Total Queue-An Unbounded Lock-Free Queue-Memory Reclamation and the
ABA Problem- Dual Data Structures- Concurrent Stacks and Elimination- An Unbounded Lock-Free
Stack- Elimination-The Elimination Backoff Stack.
Total: 45 hours
Reference Books:
Jeff Edmonds, “How to Think about Algorithms”, Cambridge University Press, 2008.
M. Herlihy and N. Shavit, “The Art of Multiprocessor Programming”, Morgan Kaufmann, 2008.
Steven S. Skiena, “The Algorithm Design Manual”, Springer, 2008.
Peter Brass, “Advanced Data Structures”, Cambridge University Press, 2008.
S. Dasgupta, C. H. Papadimitriou, and U. V. Vazirani, “Algorithms” , McGrawHill, 2008.
J. Kleinberg and E. Tardos, "Algorithm Design“, Pearson Education, 2006.
T. H. Cormen, C. E. Leiserson, R. L. Rivest and C. Stein, “Introduction to Algorithms“, PHI
Learning Private Limited, 2012.
8. Rajeev Motwani and Prabhakar Raghavan, “Randomized Algorithms”, Cambridge University
Press, 1995.
9. A. V. Aho, J. E. Hopcroft, and J. D. Ullman, “The Design and Analysis of Computer
Algorithms”, Addison-Wesley, 1975.
10. A. V. Aho, J. E. Hopcroft, and J. D. Ullman,”Data Structures and Algorithms”, Pearson,2006.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
P14SWE107 SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN LABORATORY L T P C
0032
COURSE OUTCOMES:
After successful completion of the course, the students would be able to,






Analyse the requirement of the project to be developed using the SRS.
Design the ERP model for the project to be developed.
Model the requirements using UML.
Trace the consistency between models.
Develop the traceabilty matrix for the given set of requirements.
Document the Requirements and Design Outcomes.
ONLINE SHOPPING MALL
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Online Shopping Mall (OSM) application enables vendors to set up online shops, customers to
browse through the shops, and a system administrator to approve and reject requests for new shops and
maintain lists of shop categories. Also on the agenda is designing an online shopping site to manage the
items in the shop and also help customers purchase them online without having to visit the shop
physically. The online shopping mall will showcase a complete shopping experience in a small package.
This project envisages bridging the gap between the seller, the retailer and the customer. A very high
flexibility is being maintained in the design process so that this project can take the following path: 

A multiple merchant venue with each merchant having his/her own window which the customer
can visit to browse and subsequently buy the products.
Maintaining the deliverable goods as well as services through single or multiple windows is also
on the agenda.
Target Users:
Mall Administrator:
The Mall Administrator is the super user and has complete control over all the activities that can be
performed. The application notifies the administrator of all shop creation requests, and the administrator
can then approve or reject them. The administrator also manages the list of available product categories.
The administrator can also view and delete entries in the guestbook.
Shop Owner:
Any user can submit a shop creation request through the application. When the request is approved by
the Mall Administrator, the requester is notified, and from there on is given the role of Shop Owner. The
Shop Owner is responsible for setting up the shop and maintaining it. The job involves managing the
sub-categories of the items in the shop. Also, the shop owner can add or remove items from his shop.
The Shop Owner can view different reports that give details of the sales and orders specific to his shop.
The Shop Owner can also decide to close shop and remove it from the mall.
Mall Customer/Guests:
A Mall Customer can browse through the shops and choose products to place in a virtual shopping cart.
The shopping cart details can be viewed and items can be removed from the cart. To proceed with the
purchase, the customer is prompted to login. Also, the customer can modify personal profile information
(such as phone number and shipping address) stored by the application. The customer can also view the
status of any previous orders.
EMPLOYEES:



Purchase department under a Purchase manager to overlook purchasing activities if warehousing
needs arise.
Sales department under a Sales manager who will look after the sale of products and services.
Accounts department under an Accounts manager to look after the accounting activities of the
enterprise.
BANKING SYSTEM
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
A bank has several automated teller machines (ATMs), which are geographically distributed and
connected via a wide area network to a central server. Each ATM machine has a card reader, a cash
dispenser, a keyboard/display, and a receipt printer. By using the ATM machine, a customer can
withdraw cash from either checking or savings account, query the balance of an account, or transfer
funds from one account to another. A transaction is initiated when a customer inserts an ATM card into
the card reader. Encoded on the magnetic strip on the back of the ATM card are the card number, the
start date, and the expiration date.
Assuming the card is recognized, the system validates the ATM card to determine that the expiration
date has not passed, that the user-entered PIN (personal identification number) matches the PIN
maintained by the system, and that the card is not lost or stolen. The customer is allowed three attempts
to enter the correct PIN; the card is confiscated if the third attempt fails. Cards that have been reported
lost or stolen are also confiscated.
If the PIN is validated satisfactorily, the customer is prompted for a withdrawal, query, or transfer
transaction. Before withdrawal transaction can be approved, the system determines that sufficient funds
exist in the requested account, that the maximum daily limit will not be exceeded, and that there are
sufficient funds available at the local cash dispenser.
If the transaction is approved, the requested amount of cash is dispensed, a receipt is printed containing
information about the transaction, and the card is ejected. Before a transfer transaction can be approved,
the system determines that the customer has at least two accounts and that there are sufficient funds in
the account to be debited. For approved query and transfer requests, a receipt is printed and card ejected.
A customer may cancel a transaction at any time; the transaction is terminated and the card is ejected.
Customer records, account records, and debit card records are all maintained at the server.
CAMPUS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
The Campus Management System; is fully computerized information organization, storage and retrieval
system that could provide us any information about an Institute just at the click of a mouse. The most
fascinating asset about a computerized College fee Manager is that it enables us to explore any institute
related information at any time on demand and that too in an absolutely user friendly environment that
could be accessed even by a layman very easily
OBJECTIVES AND GOALS:













To automate the functions at a Higher Education Institute, the main missions of this software are
as under
To provide user-friendly interface to the college administrator
To minimize the typing errors during data entry
To search record of a particular object (course, student, faculty etc.)
To update the record of an object
To generate various reports for management
To print various reports
To reduce the typing work by keeping maximum information available on the screen
To reduce the expenditure involving stationery items such as paper, ledgers, fee receipt book etc.
To provide consistent, updated and reliable data at any time on demand.
To analyse, plan and forecast the inflation or recession graph of the in college in the near future
based on the college’s record of revenue sources and expenditure.
To provide the most important feature of maintaining the valuable back-up of the critical data.
To be bestowed with the latest security facilities provided by the modern computerized DBMS.
PROJECT BUILDING BLOCKS:
Enrolment Management , Portal management , Admissions/Recruiting , Faculty Information, Student
Services, Student Portal, Hostel management, Parking and Security, Student Health , Student Placement
,Campus Incidents, Faculty Portal , Forum Portal , Student Billing ,Alumni Portal.
AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEM
Air traffic control is a closed loop activity in which pilots state the intent by filing flight plans.
Controllers then plan traffic flow based on the total number of flight plans and, when possible, given
clearance to pilots to fly according to their plans. When planning conflicts arise, controllers resolve them
by clearing pilots to fly alternatives to their plans to avoid the conflicts. If unpredicted atmospheric
conditions (e.g., wind speed or direction) or pilot actions cause deviations from conflict-free planned
routings, controllers issue clearances for tactical maneuvers that solve any resultant problem, albeit not
necessarily in a way that furthers the pilot's goal of reaching the planned destination at a certain time.
PROBLEM FORMULATION:
Design an air traffic control system (ATCS) that is fault tolerant and scalable, according to the specific
requirements listed in the following sections. The primary objective of the ATCS is to provide separation
services for aircraft that are flying in controlled air space, or where poor visibility prevents from
maintaining visual separation. Aircraft are separated from one another and from terrain hazards.
SPECIFIC SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS:
The requirements of ATCSs include real-time aspects. The ATCS is a "dynamic" real-time system. Its
loading will vary significantly over time, and has no upper bound. Loading scenarios can vary
significantly; hence the average loading of the ATCS is not a highly useful metric for schedulability and
other analyses. Although an upper bound could possibly be imposed artificially, this may not be a costeffective solution, since pre-allocation of computing resources for such a worst case would lead to very
poor resource utilization. A dynamic resource management policy is thus preferred.
CAFETERIA ORDERING SYSTEM
The Cafeteria Ordering System is a new system that replaces the current manual and telephone processes
for ordering and picking up lunches in the Process Impact cafeteria.
Patron: A Patron is a Process Impact employee at the corporate campus in TidalPark, Chennai, who
wishes to order meals to be delivered from the company cafeteria. There are about 600 potential Patrons,
of which an estimated 400 are expected to use the Cafeteria Ordering System .Patrons will sometimes
order multiple meals for group events or guests. An estimated 90 percent of orders will be placed using
the corporate Intranet, with 10 percent of orders being placed from home. All Patrons have Intranet
access from their offices. Some Patrons will wish to set up meal subscriptions, either to have the same
meal to be delivered every day or to have the day’s meal special delivered automatically. A Patron must
be able to override a subscription for a specific day.
Cafeteria Staff: The Process Impact cafeteria currently employs about 20 Cafeteria Staff, who will
receive orders from the Cafeteria Ordering System, prepare meals, and package them for delivery, print
delivery instructions, and request delivery. Most of the Cafeteria Staff will need to be trained in the use
of the computer, the Web browser, and the Cafeteria Ordering System.
Menu Manager: The Menu Manager is a cafeteria employee, perhaps the cafeteria manager, who is
responsible for establishing and maintaining daily menus of the food items available from the cafeteria
and the times of day that each item is available. Some menu items may not be available for delivery. The
Menu Manager will also define the cafeteria’s daily specials. The Menu Manager will need to edit the
menus periodically to reflect planned food items that are not available or price changes.
Meal Deliverer: As the Cafeteria Staff prepare orders for delivery, they will print delivery instructions
and issue delivery requests to the Meal Deliverer, who is either another cafeteria employee or a
contractor. The Meal Deliverer will pick up food and delivery instructions for each meal and deliver it to
the Patron. The Meal Deliverer’s primary interactions with the system will be to reprint the
deliveryinstructions on occasion and to confirm that a meal was (or was not) delivered
Total: 45 hours
P14SWE108
SOFT SKILLS
LTPC
0 0 2 1
COURSE OUTCOMES:
Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to

Understands oneself and sets a goal also manages time& stress and deals with criticism.

Understands to work with the team, and develop the leadership qualities.

Understands how to prioritize, plan and delegate work.

Develops good presentation skills, skills to discuss effectively in a group and in public.

Demonstrate the interview techniques and manage the frequently asked questions

Understands and practice different etiquette and manners.
Unit I:
SWOT analysis and goal setting, Intra-personal skills, Interpersonal Skills,
Time Management, Stress Management, Dealing with Criticism
Unit II:
Team Work, Leadership skills, Prioritizing and Planning, and Delegation.
Unit III:
Presentations Skills, Group Discussion, Public Speaking skills.
Unit IV:
Career Planning, Resume Writing, Interview Techniques.
Unit V:
Etiquette and Manners: Workplace Etiquette, Grooming Etiquette, Social Etiquette, Table manners and
Etiquette, E-Mail Etiquette.
Total : 30 hours
Sona College of Technology, Salem
(An Autonomous Institution)
Courses of Study for ME I Semester under Regulations 2014
Information Technology
Branch: M.Tech. Information Technology
S. No Course Code
Course Title
Lecture
Tutorial
Practical
Credit
Theory
1
P14MIT101
Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science
3
1
0
4
2
P14MIT102
Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
3
0
0
3
3
P14MIT103
Advanced Computer Architecture
3
1
0
4
4
P14MIT104
Software Engineering Methodologies
3
0
0
3
5
P14MIT105
Network Engineering
3
0
0
3
6
P14MIT106
Distributed Systems
3
0
0
3
Practical
7
P14MIT107
Data structures Laboratory
0
0
3
2
8
P14MIT108
Network Engineering Laboratory
0
0
3
2
Total Credits
24
Approved by
Chairman, Information Technology BoS
Dr.J.Akilandeswari
Member Secretary, Academic Council
Prof.G.Prakash
Copy to:HOD/IT, First Semester M.Tech IT Students and Staff, COE
Chairman, Academic Council & Principal
Dr.V.Jayaprakash
P14MIT101 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
310 4
UNIT – I
12
FUNDAMENTAL STRUCTURES
Set theory - Relationships between sets – Operations on sets – Set identities - Principle of inclusion and
exclusion – Minsets. Relations:– Binary relations – Partial orderings – Equivalence relations.
Functions:– Properties of functions – Composition of functions – Inverse functions – Permutation
functions
UNIT - II
LOGIC
12
Propositional logic – Logical connectives – Truth tables – Normal forms (conjunctive and disjunctive) –
Predicate logic – Universal and existential quantifiers – Proof techniques – direct and indirect – Proof by
contradiction
UNIT – III
COMBINATORICS
12
Sum-rule, Product-rule, Permutations, Combinations, Mathematical Induction, Pigeon-hole Principle,
Principle of inclusion- exclusion, Recurrence Relations, Generating Functions
UNIT – IV
MODELING COMPUTATION AND LANGUAGES
12
Finite state machines – Deterministic and Non- deterministic finite state machines – Turing Machines –
Formal Languages – Classes of Grammars – Type 0 – Context Sensitive – Context Free – Regular
Grammars – Ambiguity
UNIT – V
GRAPHS
12
Introduction to Graphs-Graph terminology-Representation of Graphs-Graph Isomorphism-ConnectivityEuler and Hamilton Paths-Connectedness in Directed Graphs-Shortest Path Algorithms-Spanning TreesMinimum Spanning Tree-Rooted and Binary Trees
Total: 60 hours
REFERENCES
1. Judith L.Gersting, “Mathematical Structures for Computer Science”, W.H. Freeman and
Company, NY, 2006.
2. Kenneth H. Rosen, “Discrete Mathematics and its Applications”, Fifth Edition, TMH, 2003.
2. M.K. Venkataraman, N. Sridharan and N.Chandrasekaran,“ Discrete Maths.”, The National
Publishing Company, 2003.
3. Ralph, P. Grimaldi, “Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics”, Pearson Education 2006.
4. T.Veerarajan, “Discrete Mathematics”, Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited, New
Delhi, 13th Reprint 2011.
P14MIT102 ADVANCED DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS
UNIT I
3 0 0 3
ROLE OF ALGORITHMS IN COMPUTING
9
Algorithms – Algorithms as a Technology- Insertion Sort – Analyzing Algorithms – Designing
Algorithms- Growth of Functions: Asymptotic Notation – Standard Notations –Divide and
Conquer- Maximum-subarray problem- Strassen’s algorithm- Common Functions- Recurrences: The
Substitution Method – The Recursion-Tree Method-The Master method
UNIT II
HIERARCHICAL DATA STRUCTURES
9
Binary Search Trees: Basics – Querying a Binary search tree – Insertion and Deletion- Red-Black trees:
Properties of Red-Black Trees – Rotations – Insertion – Deletion- B-Trees: Definition of B trees –
Basic operations on B-Trees – Deleting a key from a B-Tree- Fibonacci Heaps: Structure – Heap
operations – Decreasing a key and deleting a node – Bounding the maximum degree
UNIT III GRAPHS
9
Elementary Graph Algorithms: Representations of Graphs – Breadth-First Search – Depth-First
Search – Topological Sort – Strongly Connected Components- Minimum Spanning Trees: Growing a
Minimum Spanning Tree – Kruskal and Prim- Single-Source Shortest Paths: The Bellman-Ford
algorithm – Single-Source Shortest paths in Directed Acyclic Graphs – Dijkstra’s Algorithm; All
Pairs Shortest Paths: Shortest Paths and Matrix Multiplication – The Floyd-Warshall Algorithm
UNIT IV ALGORITHM DESIGN TECHNIQUES
9
Dynamic Programming: Matrix-Chain Multiplication – Elements of Dynamic Programming –
Longest Common Subsequence- Greedy Algorithms: An Activity-Selection Problem – Elements of the
Greedy Strategy – Huffman Codes
UNIT V NP COMPLETENESS AND APPROXIMATION ALGORITHMS
9
NP-Completeness: Polynomial Time – Polynomial-Time Verification – NP-Completeness and
Reducability – NP-Completeness Proofs – NP-Complete Problems- Approximation Algorithms: VertexCover problem- Travelling-Salesman problem – Subset-sum problem
Total : 45 hours
REFERENCES
1. Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, Clifford Stein, “Introduction to
Algorithms”, Third Edition, Prentice-Hall 2009.
2. Robert Sedgewick and Kevin Wayne, “Algorithms”, Fourth Edition, Pearson Education.
3. Alfred V. Aho, John E. Hopcroft, Jeffrey D. Ullman, “Data Structures and Algorithms”,
Pearson Education, Reprint 2006.
4. Donald E Knuth, “Art of Computer Programming-Volume I- Fundamental Algorithms”,
Third edition, Addison Wesley, 2008.
P14MIT103 ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE
UNIT I
3 1 0 4
PIPELINING AND ILP
9
Fundamentals of Computer Design - Measuring and Reporting Performance - Instruction Level
Parallelism and Its Exploitation - Concepts and Challenges - Overcoming Data Hazards with Dynamic
Scheduling – Dynamic Branch Prediction - Speculation - Multiple Issue Processors – Case Studies.
UNIT II
TLP AND LIMITS OF ILP
9
Compiler Techniques for Exposing ILP - Limitations on ILP for Realizable Processors - Hardware
versus Software Speculation - Multithreading: Using ILP Support to Exploit Thread-level Parallelism Performance and Efficiency in Advanced Multiple Issue Processors - Case Studies.
UNIT III
MULTIPROCESSOR SYSTEMS
9
Symmetric and distributed shared memory architectures – Cache coherence issues - Performance Issues
– Synchronization issues – Models of Memory Consistency - Interconnection networks – Buses, crossbar
and multi-stage switches.
UNIT IV
MULTI-CORE ARCHITECTURES
9
Introduction to Multicore Architecture –SMT and CMP architectures – Multicore Vs Multithreading–
Case studies – Intel Multi-core architecture – SUN CMP architecture – IBM cell architecture.- hp
architecture.
UNIT V
MEMORY HIERARCHY DESIGN
9
Introduction - Optimizations of Cache Performance - Memory Technology and Optimizations Protection: Virtual Memory and Virtual Machines - Design of Memory Hierarchies - Case Studies.
Total: 45 hours
REFERNCES
1. John L. Hennessey and David A. Patterson, “ Computer Architecture – A Quantitative
Approach”, Morgan Kaufmann / Elsevier, 4th. edition, 2007.
2. William Stallings, “Computer Organization and Architecture – Designing for
Pearson Education, Seventh Edition, 2006.
Performance”,
3. D. Sima, T. Fountain and P. Kacsuk, “Advanced Computer Architectures: A Design Space
Approach”, Addison Wesley, 2000.
4. Kai Hwang “Advanced Computer Architecture: Parallelism, Scalability, Programmability” Tata
McGraw Hill Edition, 2001.
5. Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic and Safwat Zaky, “Computer Organization”, Fifth Edition,
Tata McGraw Hill, 2002.
P14MIT104 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING METHODOLOGIES
UNIT I
3 0 03
THE PROCESS
9
Software Engineering the nature of Software -Software Process Models: Waterfall Model-Incremental
process models- Evolutionary process models: Prototyping-Spiral model – Concurrent modelComparison study of Software Process Models -Introduction to Agile process
UNIT II
REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS
9
Requirements Engineering- tasks – Initialization the Requirement Engineering process - Eliciting
requirements-Building the requirements model-Validating Requirements - Requirements analysis-Model
Approaches – Data Modeling Concepts- Class Based Modeling - Behavioral Model
UNIT III
DESIGN CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES
9
The Design concepts - The Design model-Architectural design-Designing Class Based Components User interface design: user analysis and design, Interface analysis, Interface design steps- Software risk
management,
UNIT IV
TESTING TECHNIQUES AND MANAGEMENT
9
Software testing – Path testing – Control structures testing – Black Box testing – Unit, Integration,
Validation and system testing – SCM
UNIT V
TRENDS IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
9
Software Re-engineering– Metrics for Process and Projects- Case Study of CASE tools.
Total : 45 hours
REFERENCES
1. Roger S Pressman,” Software Engineering – A Practitioner’s Approach”, McGraw Hill,
USA, 2010.
2. Ian Sommerville, Software Engineering, Addison-Wesley, Ninth Edition, 2010.
3. Gopalswamy Ramesh and Srinivasan Desikan, “Software Testing: Principles and Practices”,
Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2006.
4. Fairley, Software Engineering Concepts, McGraw-Hill, 2009.
P14MIT105
UNIT I
NETWORK ENGINEERING
3 0 0 3
FOUNDATIONS OF NETWORKING
9
Introduction – data and telecommunication network – Network Elements- ISO/OSI model – TCP/IP
protocol suite – Functions of layers – communication protocols and standards - Error and Flow Control
– Congestion Control
UNIT II
QUALITY OF SERVICE
9
Traffic Characteristics and Descriptors – Quality of Service and Metrics – Best Effort model and
Guaranteed Service Model – Limitations of IP networks – Traffic Shaping algorithms – End to End
solutions – Possible improvements in TCP – Significance of UDP in inelastic traffic
UNIT III
HIGH PERFORMANCE NETWORKS
9
Integrated Services Architecture – Components and Services – Differentiated Services Networks – Per
Hop Behaviour – Admission Control – MPLS Networks – Principles and Mechanisms – RSVP –
RTP/RTCP
UNIT IV
NETWORK MANAGEMENT
9
ICMP the Forerunner – Monitoring and Control – Network Management Systems – SNMP
Communication Model – SNMP MIB Group – Functional Model – Major changes in SNMPv2 and
SNMPv3 – Remote monitoring – RMON SMI and MIB
UNIT V
MANAGEMENT TOOLS AND SYSTEMS
9
Network Management Tools - Network statistics Measurement Systems - Network Management
Systems - Commercial Network Management Systems - Web Interface and Embedded Web-Based
Management
Total : 45 hours
REFERENCES
1. Mahbub Hassan and Raj Jain, ‘High Performance TCP/IP Networking’, Pearson
Education, 2005.
2. Larry L Peterson and Bruce S Davie, ‘Computer Networks: A Systems
Approach’, Fourth Edition, Morgan Kaufman Publishers, 2011.
3. Jean Warland and Pravin Vareya, ‘High Performance Networks’,
Morgan
Kauffman Publishers, 2009
4. William Stallings, ‘High Speed Networks: Performance and Quality of Service’,
2nd Edition, Pearson Education, 2008.
5. Mani Subramaniam, ‘Network Management: Principles and Practices’, Pearson
Education, 2010
P14MIT106
UNIT I
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM
3 0 0 3
INTRODUCTION AND PROCESSES
9
Definition – Goals – Types of Distributed Systems – Architectures – Architectural Styles – Architectures
Vs Middleware – Self Management in Distributed Systems – Processes – Threads – Virtualization –
Clients – Servers – Code Migration.
UNIT II
COMMUNICATION AND NAMING
9
Fundamentals – Remote Procedure Call – Message-Oriented Communication – Stream-Oriented
Communication – Multicast Communication – Naming – Names, Identifies and Addresses – Flat
Naming – Structured Naming – Attribute-based Naming.
UNIT III
SYNCHRONIZATION AND CONSISTENCY AND REPLICATION 9
Clock Synchronization – Logical clocks – Mutual Exclusion – Global Positioning of Nodes – Election
Algorithms – Consistency and Replication – Introduction – Data Centric – Client Centric Consistency
Model s- Replica Management – Consistency Protocols.
UNIT IV
FAULT TOLERANCE AND SECURITY
9
Introduction – Process Resilience - Reliable Client-Server Communication - Reliable Group
Communication - Distributed Commit – Recovery – Security - Introduction to Security - Secure
Channels - Access Control - Security Management.
UNIT V
CASE STUDIES
9
Distributed File Systems - Distributed Web-Based Systems
REFERENCES:
1. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Maarten and
Van Steen, “ Distributed Systems:
Principles and
Paradigms”, Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007.
2. Mukesh Singhal and N. G. Shivaratri, “Advanced Concepts in Operating Systems”, McGrawHill, 2008.
3. Abraham Silberschatz, Peter B. Galvin, G. Gagne, “Operating System Concepts”, Sixth Edition,
Addison Wesley Publishing Co., 2012.
4. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, “Modern Operating Systems”, Second Edition, Addison Wesley, 2011.
5. George Coulouris, Jean Dollimore, Tim Kindberg, Gordon Blair, “Distributed Systems: Concepts
and Design Addison-Wesley, 5th edition, 2011.
P14MIT107
DATA STRUCTURES LABORATORY
1. Implementation of Binary Search Tree
2. Implementation of Fibonacci Heaps
3. Implementation of Red-Black tree
4. Implementation of Spanning Tree
5. Implementation of Shortest Path Algorithms
6. Implementation of Graph Traversals
7. Implementation of Greedy Algorithms
8. Implementation of Approximation Algorithms
0 0 3 2
P14MIT108
NETWORK ENGINEERING LAB
0 0 3 2
1. Programs using SNMP protocols
2. Network Simulations using NS2
3. Use any packet capturing tools in a LAN to capture the packet and do a statistical analysis
such as: the number of packets (bits) flowing in/out of a designated system, a pair wise
packet flow among the given IP addresses.
4. Develop socket programs for a given scenario.
5. Configuring a firewall.
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