EE 221 Introduction to Electrical Engineering

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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MINERAL RESOURCES
LANE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
EE 221
Introduction to Electrical Engineering
Fall 2002
CRN # 81212
3 credit hours
Class Info:
Meeting times:
Location:
TR 11:00 - 12:15
ESB 207
Instructor:
Dr. Karl Schoder
Engineering Research Building (ERB) 219
Phone: 293-6371 Ext. 2587
Email: [email protected]
Office Hours:
TR 9:30 - 10:30 AM and 12:30 - 1:30 PM or by appointment; however, I
have an open-door policy, my office's door is always open when I am in to
answer your questions.
Prerequisites:
ENGR 102, MATH 156
Required Text:
William H. Hayt, Jack E. Kemmerly, and Steven M. Durbin, Engineering
Circuit Analysis, Sixth Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN 0-07-228364-5,
website: http://www.mhhe.com/hayt6e
Course website:
A homepage is maintained for this class:
http://www.csee.wvu.edu/~schoder/ee221.html
This homepage will contain announcements and materials related to the
class.
Objective:
To acquaint the student with electrical engineering units, circuit elements,
circuit laws, measurement principles, mesh and node equations, network
theorems, operational amplifier circuits, energy storage elements, sinusoids
and phasors, sinusoidal steady state analysis, average and RMS values,
complex power.
Outcomes:
Students will acquire fundamentals to analyze and solve basic electrical
circuits in DC and sinusoidal steady-state (EE Program Outcomes 1, 2.)
Students will be able to apply Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s Laws, voltage and
current division, Thevenin and Norton Equivalents and Power Calculation
to basic dc and ac circuits.
Lecture no.
Subject
1
Introduction
2
Circuit variables
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Circuit elements
Tentative Lecture Schedule
Topic
Resistive circuits
Techniques of circuit
analysis
11
12
13
14
15
16
Operational Amplifier
17
Inductors and
Capacitors
18
19
Sinusoidal steadystate analysis
20
21
22
23
24
Election Day
Sinusoidal steadystate power
calculations
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Class policy, introduction and overview
SI units, voltage, current, power and
energy, sources, resistance
Ohm’s Law, Nodes and branches
Kirchhoff’s Laws
Single-loop circuits
Dependent sources
Resistors in Series and Parallel
Voltage and current division
Exam #1
Introduction, node voltage method
Reading
This syllabus
Chapter 2
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Node-voltage method
Mesh-current method
Node vs. mesh comparison
Source transformations, Thevenin and
Norton equivalents
Maximum power transfer, Superposition, Delta-to-Wye equivalent circuits
Characteristics, Inverting, Summing
circuits, Non-inverting and difference
circuits
Inductor, capacitor, series and parallel
combinations
Exam #2
Sinusoidal source and phasor, Passive
circuit elements in phasor domain
Kirchhoff’s Laws in frequency domain
Node-voltage and mesh-current method
Superposition, source transformations,
Thevenin and Norton equivalents
Chapter 4
Chapter 4
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Instantaneous power, Average and
reactive power
Chapter 11
Average and reactive power, Apparent
power
Power factor, Effective (rms) value
Power calculation, maximum power
transfer
Exam #3
Chapter 11
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 10
Chapter 10
Chapter 10
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
Chapter 11
Thanksgiving Recess
Thanksgiving Recess
Review
Review
Final Exam is on Monday, December 9, 2002 from 3 PM to 5 PM
Assessment:
Grade
Boundaries:
Homework:
Quizzes:
Tests and
Exams:
Missed Test
Policy:
Honor Code:
Homework Assignments (~12 assignments) and
Quizzes
Tests
Final exam
A
B
90 %
80 %
C
D
20 %
60 % (3 @ 20% each)
20 %
70 %
60 %
There will be approximately 12 homework assignments given throughout the
semester. The homework will be a combination of problems assigned from the
book, and computer problems that may require the use of PSpice/MATLAB.
Homework will be due at the beginning of class on the assigned date. Only
write on one side of the paper, clearly label the problem number and answers,
and staple your papers with a single staple in the upper left hand corner.
On Thursday of each week, a quiz may be given which will cover the
homework material submitted during the past week. The goal of the quizzes is
to help the student prepare for the tests. Each quiz will last for approximately
10 minutes.
There will be three tests during the semester and a final exam. The tests will be
given on approximately Sept. 17, Oct. 17 and Nov. 21, and the final is on
Monday, December 9, 3:00- 5:00 PM.
You are expected to attend the quizzes, tests, and final exam at the scheduled
times and dates. If you have an unavoidable conflict, please let me know as
soon as possible, but no later than one week before the test (or quiz/exam). The
decision to give a make- up is at my discretion. If you miss the test without
first having your absence approved, then the only acceptable excuse is for
documented urgent medical reasons or approval by the appropriate university
official.
All work submitted for the quizzes, test, and final exam must be your own
unaided work. You may confer with your colleagues on interpretation and
approach to homework problems (including the computer problems), but the
final solution must be your own work. All code that you turn in for computer
problems must be well documented and entirely your own (except for code
given to you by the instructor).
Re-grading:
If you believe that the instructor or grader made a mistake or was unfair in
grading, you may request a re-grade. However, the request must be made in
writing and within one week that the assignment or exam was returned.
Attendance:
Attendance will not be taken. However, you will be responsible for all material
covered in class, even if it is not in the textbook. It is your responsibility to
make sure that you are present for all quizzes and tests, that all assignments are
turned in on time, and that you are aware of all announcements made in class.
Please arrive to class on time. If you do arrive late, please come to the front of
the classroom to pick up copies of any handouts that may have been distributed.
Social Justice
Statement:
West Virginia University is committed to social justice. I concur with that
commitment and expect to foster a nurturing learning environment, based upon
open communication, mutual respect, and non-discrimination. Our University
does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, age, disability, veteran status,
religion, sexual orientation, color or national origin. Any suggestions as to
how to further such a positive and open environment in this class will be
appreciated and given serious consideration. If you are a person with a
disability and anticipate needing any type of accommodation in order to
participate in this class, please advise me and make appropriate arrangements
with Disability Services (293-6700). If you feel that you are being treated
inappropriately or unfairly in any way, please feel free to bring your concerns
to my attention. Please be assured that doing so will not prejudice the grading
process. In return, I expect you to behave professionally and ethically.
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