MATM Modules Handbook 2015-2016

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Durham University
MA
Theology and Ministry
in partnership with
Cranmer Hall
St John’s College, Durham
Handbook of MATM
Module Descriptors
2015—2016
Contents
Page
THMN40130 Theological and Practical Reflection on Ministry and Mission
3
THMN40230 Preaching from the Old Testament
9
THMN40330 Mission and Ministry in the Acts of the Apostles
12
THMN40430 The History and Theology of the Charismatic Movement
15
THMN40530 Issues of Authority within Anglicanism
18
THMN40930 Story and the narrative mode in Christian mission and liturgy
21
THMN41030 Intellect and Imagination: Apologetics in the Mass Media
25
THMN41230 Psychology and Christian Ministry
29
THMN41330 Chaplaincy
32
THMN41830 Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels
35
THMN41930 The Quest for the Jesus of History and the Mission of the Church
39
THMN42130 Changing Worship
43
THMN42230 Leadership in Christian Ministry
46
THMN42630 Theological Approaches to Spiritual Direction
51
THMN42730 Scripture and Hermeneutics
55
THMN42930 The Dialogue of Science and Theology in Mission and Ministry
58
THMN43630 How Mission can Shape the Church. Mission and Ecclesiology in the contemporary
context
62
THMN44130 Biblical Literacy in a Media Culture
65
THMN44230 Growth and Decline in British Christianity from 1945 to
the present day
68
THMN44330 Forgiveness in Pastoral Ministry Today
71
THMN44430 Holiness, Wholeness and Mission
75
THMN 44530 Practices in Spiritual Formation In The Catholic Tradition
78
THMN 44630 Money Matters and the Church
82
THMN 44730 Ministerial Formation in Trintarian Perspective
86
THMN49960 Dissertation
90
2
THMN40130 Theological and Practical Reflection on Ministry and Mission
1
Module type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module size:
3
Rationale
30 UCUs
Compulsory
Single module
Among the key disciplines of ministerial life are the ability to integrate the study of theology and
the practice of ministry; to reflect theologically on a wide range of practical and pastoral
situations and to enable others to engage in that reflection. This module, taken by every student
in the MATM, enables the building of the skills and habits of reflection to postgraduate level
through both its content and educational method.
Postgraduate students are able to call on a developed and extensive understanding of the
Christian scriptures and tradition as resources for reflection upon mission and ministry. At
postgraduate level, students are expected to be more critical in their use of sources and have a
more developed understanding of the methodology of theological reflection than students
studying the related module in the BA in Theology and Ministry.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules None
7
Module aims and objectives
Aim: to enable the building of the skill and habit of theological reflection (including familiarity
with a range of methodologies) and the integration of theology and the practice of ministry.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge:
Upon completion of the module students should have knowledge of:
•
The history of applied and practical theology
•
The pastoral cycle and other methodologies in British Practical Theology
•
The use of the Bible and Tradition in Practical Theology
•
The use of other disciplines in Practical Theology
•
The research methods used in Practical Theology
Subject Skills
3
Upon completion of the module students should have
•
a developed, systematic and critical understanding of and ability to deploy a variety of
methodologies in the discipline of practical theology
•
experience both of engaging in theological reflection individually and facilitating that
reflection as part of a peer group using the full range of theological resources
•
the ability both to critique existing practice and plan for the development of ministry in
complex and unpredictable contexts.
Key Transferable skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have
•
The capacity to communicate research findings (in a clear and orderly way) and
interdisciplinary ideas, both orally and in written form that includes complex information
and detailed argument to specialists and non-specialists.
•
Developed research based skills
•
Demonstrated their ability as reflective and critically aware practitioners.
•
Skills in using critically a variety of disciplines, particularly the human sciences, to
understand and describe a range of situations
8
Module content
A series of introductory sessions at the beginning of the module will cover an introduction to the
methodology of theological and practical reflection. This will be delivered in different ways
according to whether students are on the term-time or block route. Sample student-led seminars
by previous students are also included in this methodology teaching.
The outline content for the methodology section is as follows:
1)
The history of applied and practical theology
2)
The pastoral cycle and other methodologies in British practical theology
3)
Practical Theology and Pastoral Care
4)
The use of the Bible in Practical Theology
5)
Practical Theology and other disciplines: the Social Sciences, Education, Psychology.
6)
Practical Theology and empirical research
4
Thereafter students will work in small groups of normally up to ten students. Each class session
of approximately two hours will consist of a ninety minute seminar, led by one of the students
followed by approximately fifteen minutes group reflection facilitated by the tutor. Each group
will be ecumenically mixed and led by staff from different institutions where possible.
Subjects for the seminars will be agreed by the course leaders using as a guide an indicative list
of issues relating to ministry and mission. An initial bibliography and seminar outline will be
supplied by the students and commented on by the course leaders. Preparatory reading and
reflection upon their own experience is expected from each member of the group.
An indicative list of subjects covered in such seminars is given below: •
•
Homosexuality and Parish Ministry
•
The interplay of theological and psychological factors in the choice of church music
•
The theological and pastoral implications of dementia
•
The ethics of fund-raising
•
Divorce and re-marriage: marriage discipline in the C. of E.
•
Theological, ethical and pastoral issues raised by Forces Chaplaincy
•
“Church and Night-club”: exclusive spiritual communities?
•
Spirituality and Mental health Care
•
The theological and pastoral issues raised by the emergency baptism of infants in
hospital
In working with post-graduates it is more appropriate to allow the exercise of initiative in choice
of subject rather than to work from a prescribed list. However, all subjects selected must be
within the following parameters:
•
Relatively narrow in scope so as to be allow effective coverage within a 90 minute
seminar
•
Engage with the interface between the theological tradition and the practise of ministry
•
An area in which the seminar leader either has some experience or is prepared to
undertake some research
9
Indicative Bibliography - theological method
5
Anderson, Ray, The Shape of Practical Theology, (Downers Grove, Illinois: IVP, 2001).
Ballard, Paul (ed.), The Foundations of Pastoral and Practical Theology, (Cardiff Faculty of
Theology, 1986).
Ballard, Paul and Pritchard, John, Practical Theology in Action, (London: SPCK, 2006, 2nd ed.).
Helen Cameron, Deborah Bhatti, Catherine Duce, James Sweeney & Clare Watkins Talking About
God in Practice: Theological Action, Research and Practical Theology (London: SCM, 2010)
Cartledge, M.J., Practical Theology: Charismatic and Empirical Perspectives (Paternoster, Carlisle,
2003).
Graham, E., Transforming Practice, (Eugene OR, Wipf and Stock, 2002, 2nd ed.).
Graham, E., Walton, H., Ward, F., Theological Reflection: Methods (London: SCM, 2005).
Heitink, G., Practical Theology: history, theory, action domains: manual for practical theology,
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999).
Woodward, James and Pattison, Stephen, (ed.) The Blackwell Reader in Pastoral and Practical
Theology, (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000).
Miller-McLemore, B.J. (ed) The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Practical Theology (Chichester,
Wiley-Blackwell 2012)
Miller-McLemore, B.J. Christian Theology in Practice: Discovering A Discipline (Grand
Rapids:William B Eerdmans, 2012)
McAlpin, K. Ministry That Transforms: A Contemplative Process of Theological Reflection.
(Collegeville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 2009)
John Swinton and Harriet Mowat Practical Theology and Qualitative Research (London: SCM
Press 2006)
Note on Bibliography - theology and practice
In preparation for seminars students will be expected to engage with a wide range of reading and
other material which will vary according to the topic chosen but which will include:
a)
material from the human sciences and from contemporary culture and experience
b)
insights from Scripture and the theological tradition.
10
Teaching methods
Induction
Half day
Beginning of the academic year
6
3 hours
Tutorials
Individual meetings to
discuss seminar proposal.
Seminars
8 staff led
Weekly, Term 1
2 hours each
5-10 student led
Weekly Term 2
2 hours each
OR
In blocks 1,2 and 3.
e-learning
Students on the block route will be
required to take part in on-line
discussion work between the periods of
residence.
The core module will be taught by an ecumenical team of staff working with the whole group of
students which will be co-led by Dr Jocelyn Bryan and Revd Professor Chris Cook. Others will be
involved in the Theological and Practical Reflection Seminars. Where a member of staff has a
specialism or research interest they will normally be drawn in for the seminar and will act as
second marker, thus exposing the group to a wider range of teaching styles. The Programme
Directors for the MA Programme will be involved in the initial induction days and will share in
some teaching of the TPR Seminars.
11
Formative and Summative assessment
Students submit a TPR seminar proposal document (on the form issued for this purpose – see
Appendix 3) after Reading Week in the Michaelmas Term or just after the January block. This is
returned to them with comments from the core staff, with tutorial support, and the revised
proposal document is issued to the seminar marker(s) so that they can check whether the
student has incorporated these reflections in their seminar delivery.
Students then prepare and lead a 90 minute seminar on this issue previously agreed with the
staff. At the heart of the seminar will be a piece of theological reflection on the central issue
chosen. The seminar will be assessed on the basis of:
(a)
Content (description of human or natural condition making appropriate use of insights of
theology, human sciences and arts, individual experience and contemporary culture; quality and
depth of creative theological reflection including especially awareness and use of practical
7
theology methodology; appropriate, wise and imaginative suggestions for practical action and
facilitation of group learning)
and
(b)
Process (educational and management skills)
A precise marking scale can be found in Appendix 3 which also includes detailed advice on the
practicalities of running such a seminar – see TPR Seminar Processes – and also guidelines on
how to choose a topic – see Guidelines on TPR Seminars.
The student will complete and hand in at the seminar two complete copies of their full working
papers. This portfolio will be used as information for the assessment of the seminar for 40% of
the mark of the module. Following the seminar, the staff member(s) present will give written
and normally verbal feedback on both content and process. This, together with feedback during
the session, will feed into the student's revision of the content of the seminar into a 4,000 word
essay. The essay will be a critical evaluation of the seminar as a piece of practical theology which
includes an identification of the key learning for further research and development and is
assessed for 60% of the mark of the module. See the document TPR Seminar Processes for a
fuller description of the relationship between essay and seminar.
NOTE that the marking criteria for the essay differ significantly from those for the seminar with
greater stress on the essay being on demonstration of critical evaluation of method, further
learning, theological reflection and the identification of further research and development.
8
THMN40230 Preaching from the Old Testament
1
Module type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
3
Rationale
Preaching remains one of the core skills of lay and ordained ministry. The introduction of the
ecumenical Revised Common Lectionary has extended the range of texts that might be used in
Sunday worship. In developing the practice and reflection on preaching, ministers and those in
training need to develop the skills to preach on the whole of scripture. This module seeks to
assist that development by focussing on key texts from the Old Testament - especially those
passages which require comment from those in ministry. This will be integrated with practical
exploration of current hermeneutical methods and contemporary homiletical theory, paying
particular attention to sermons preached in local church contexts.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
None
7
Module aims and objectives
Aim: to enable students to reflect critically on and to exercise the skill of preaching, particularly
on key passages from the Old Testament, with competence and in a way which is faithful both to
biblical scholarship and the contemporary context.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
 A critical awareness of hermeneutic and homiletics.
 Detailed knowledge through exegesis of some key OT texts
 Detailed understanding of the theological significance of some key OT texts and how
these impact on homiletic methodology
Subject Skills
 An ability to exegete a variety of (relatively well known) texts from the OT and to
demonstrate a critical understanding of their complexity and dynamics.
 An ability to articulate and carry through in practice a self-aware hermeneutical method
when handling a variety of texts.
 Preach with careful scholarship, clarity and conviction to a non-specialist audience
expressing complex ideas with simplicity and depth and demonstrating a sophisticated
capacity to understand their audiences.
 Construct a sermon which is biblically rooted, pastoral aware and deals appropriately
with the interface between text and context.
Key transferable skills
 demonstrate their ability as self-reflective, critically-aware practitioners;
 effectively communicate ideas orally to both specialist and non-specialist audiencesin a
clear, concise, and engaging manner;
 acquire and synthesise information through reading and research, and to present that
information clearly and effectively in written format
9
8
Module content
The module will consist of three main sections:
A) Hermeneutics and Homiletics - the task of preaching wisely from scripture
B) Old Testament Exegesis - handling key passages in detail
C) Preaching the Old Testament - the practice of OT preaching
Sections (A) and (B) will be taught in the launch block of the module. Section (A) will explore
contemporary issues in homiletics as well as offering a practical perspective on the
hermeneutical task of handling texts for preaching. Section (B) will explore a selection of key OT
texts in exegetical detail. The class will be able to select focal texts from a list of 10-12 texts
offered. An indicative list is given below, selected on the principle that they should either be
famous texts which will occur in most forms of preaching ministry (e.g. from the RCL), or that
they are particularly prominent and difficult texts which a preacher might be expected to be able
to comment on in ministry. Section (C) will be taught in the concluding block of the module, and
will seek to integrate student reflection and practice on the material from (A) and (B), peer group
and module staff input, and further analysis of the practical task of preaching.
Indicative list of OT texts to be considered:
Genesis 22:1-19, Genesis 32, Exodus 15, Joshua 10-11, 1 Kings 3, 1 Kings 18, Psalm 23, Psalm
137, Isaiah 6, Isaiah 52:13-53:12, Jeremiah 31:31-37, Ezekiel 37:1-14, Daniel 6
9
Indicative Bibliography
Barth, Karl, Homiletics (Louisville, KY: WJKP, 1991)
Brueggemann, Walter, The Threat of Life: Sermons on Pain, Power, and Weakness (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 1996)
Brueggemann, Walter, Cadences of Home: Preaching among Exiles (Louisville, KY: WJKP, 1998)
**Davis, Ellen F., Wondrous Depth: Preaching the Old Testament (Louisville, KY: Westminster John
Knox Press, 2005)
**Day, David, Embodying the Word: A Preacher’s Guide (London: SPCK, 2005)
Greidanus, Sydney, Preaching Christ from the Old Testament: A Contemporary Hermeneutical
Method (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999)
Lowry, Eugene L., The Homiletical Plot: The Sermon as Narrative Art Form (Louisville, KY: WJKP,
rev.ed. 2001)
Powell, Mark Allan, What Do They Hear? Bridging the Gap between Pulpit and Pew (Nashville:
Abingdon, 2007)
von Rad, Gerhard, Biblical Interpretations in Preaching (tr. John E. Seely; Nashville: Abingdon,
1977)
Stevenson, Geoffrey and Stephen Wright, Preaching with Humanity. A Practical Guide for Today’s
Church (London: Church House Publishing, 2008)
10
Troeger, Thomas H., Imagining a Sermon (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1990)
**Wright, Stephen I., Alive to the Word: A Practical Theology of Preaching for the Whole Church
(London: SCM, 2010)
+ select commentaries on specific passages.
10
Teaching methods
Number
Frequency Duration
Lectures and Guided Discussion
9
Block 1
2 hours
Seminars
8
Block 2
1.5 hours
Contact time: 30 hours of staff input in either lecture or guided seminar format. Note that this
module is unusual in having a longer 1st block in order to lay the exegetical and homiletic
foundations more securely before sending the students back to their ‘home’ situations to work
on specific passages.
11
Summative assessment
The assessment is in two parts:
•
A videotaped exegetical sermon approximately twenty minutes in length together with a
written self-reflection of c. 1,000 words (60%). Instead of assessing a videoed sermon preached
in a studio context, we will require a videoed sermon but preached in a ‘live’ context. Students
should note that they will need to be able to provide a video of a ‘live’ sermon - this is a nonnegotiable requirement of the module. They will be assisted in the provision of technical
equipment and such training as is necessary. Specific assessment guidelines are issued for the
sermon and self-reflection.
•
A 2,500 word essay (40%) on a topic relating specifically to homiletics and the biblical
(OT) text.
12
Formative assessment
Two formative assessments: a 2,500 word exegetical study of a specific OT passage; and a first
version of the sermon, delivered live to a ‘preaching class’ during the second block, which will
then be discussed in class and with the staff. Staff will also be available for individual
consultation regarding their in-class sermon.
11
THMN40330 Mission and Ministry in the Acts of the Apostles
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
The Book of Acts has contributed to the shaping of Christian ministry and mission in each period
of the church’s life and continues to be a source of inspiration and renewal to contemporary
Christians. A reflective understanding of this particular New Testament text is therefore of great
relevance to those reflecting upon the practice of ministry in a church in a mission context.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
None
7
Module aims and objectives
Aims: to provide a systematic and critical study of the Book of Acts and of the ways in which the
text has informed and continues to inform the mission and ministry of the church.
Objectives
At the end of the module students will have gained or developed:
Subject Knowledge
•
A systematic knowledge of the Book of Acts with the tradition of interpretation
within the Christian church including contemporary scholarship which will act as a
foundation for teaching and further study.
•
A critical appreciation of models of mission and ministry demonstrated in Acts both
in respect of their historical and social contexts and their place within the Christian
tradition.
•
A comprehensive understanding of hermeneutical questions involved in seeking to
apply lessons from Acts to the contemporary church.
Subject skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should be able to:
•
Reflect on mission and ministry in complex and unpredictable contexts in a way
which demonstrates critical awareness of the biblical tradition.
•
Plan for the development of mission and ministry in complex and unpredictable
contexts
•
Engage with the hermeneutical questions necessary in the application of scripture to
the contemporary church.
Key Transferable Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
•
developed their ability to communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively both
orally and in written format.
•
developed research based skills
•
demonstrated their ability as reflective practitioners
12
8
Module content
The major themes and issues to be explored will include:
•
A general introduction to Acts: its genre; origins and purpose.
•
The influence of Acts upon contemporary mission and ministry
•
Issues in contemporary interpretation
•
The apostolic preaching: lessons of content and method
•
Christian initiation in Acts
•
The role and gift of the Spirit in mission
•
Patterns of ministry in the early church
•
Questions of vision and strategy
•
Acts as an early Christian apologetic
•
Role models for ministers: the study of character in Acts
•
Acts and models of the Church
9
Indicative Bibliography
Barrett C.K., Acts of the Apostles (ICC 2vols, Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1994, 1998).
Conzelmann H., The Acts of the Apostles (Philadelphia: Fortress, 1987).
Croft S.J.L., Missionary Journeys, Missionary Church (Acts 13-20) (London: CHP, 2002).
Dunn J.D.G., The Acts of the Apostles (Peterborough: Epworth, 1996).
Esler P.F., Community and Gospel in Luke-Acts: The Social and Political Motivations of Lukan
Theology, SNTSMS 57. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).
Gallagher R.L. and Hertig P. (eds.), Mission in Acts: Ancient Narratives in Contemporary Context
(Maryknoll: Orbis, 2004).
Gooding D., True to the Faith (London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1990).
Green M., 30 Years that Changed the World (Leicester: IVP, 2001).
Haenchen E., The Acts of the Apostles (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1971).
Hengel M., Acts and the History of Earliest Christianity (London: SCM Press, 1979).
Johnson L.T., The Acts of the Apostles (Sacra Pagina 5, Collegeville, Minnesota: Michael Glazier,
1992).
Kee H.C., Good News to the Ends of the Earth: The Theology of Acts (London: SCM Press, 1990).
Kee H.C., To Every Nation under Heaven: the Acts of the Apostles (Harrisburg: Trinity Press
International, 1997).
Levine A.J., with Blickenstaff M. (eds.), The Feminist Companion to the Acts of the Apostles
(Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2004).
Marshall I.H., The Acts of the Apostles (NT Guides, Sheffield: Sheffield UP, 1992).
Penney J.M., The Missionary Emphasis of Lukan Eschatology (JPTS 12, Sheffield: Sheffield UP,
1997).
Powell M.A., What are they Saying about Acts? (New York: Paulist Press, 1991).
Turner M.M.B., Power from on High: The Spirit in Israel's Restoration and Witness in Luke-Acts
(JPTS 9, Sheffield: 1996).
Wall R.W., ‘The Acts of the Apostles’ in The New Interpreter's Bible. Volume Ten: The Acts of the
Apostles; Introduction to Epistolary Literature; The Letter to the Romans; The First Letter to the
Corinthians (ed. Keck L.E., Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2002), 3-368.
Witherington B., The Acts of the Apostles: a Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 1998).
13
10
Teaching methods
The course will be a combination of 30 hours of research based lectures and student led
seminars and discussions, based on extensive primary and secondary reading, included in two
periods of residence in Durham. In preparation for the seminars students will be expected to
examine in detail a section of Acts and undertake secondary reading, research and reflection
around the text or a related theme. Study of the text in the original Greek will be encouraged but
not required. The course is taught by Dr Mark Bonnington.
11
Summative assessment
A 5,000-word essay which contains a detailed study of a particular text or theme in the Acts of
the Apostles, a discussion of hermeneutical questions and of the ways in which that theme or text
has influenced the church in the past and should affect contemporary practice.
Examples might include:
•
a study of Paul’s speech to the Ephesian elders in Acts 20 and its influence on the ordinals
including contemporary revision
•
the missionary journeys of Paul and his companions as applied by Roland Allen to the
contemporary mission of the church.
•
a study of the Holy Spirit in Acts with reference to the contemporary charismatic
movement.
12
Formative assessment
Two formative assessments: a 2,500-word exegesis and a student-led seminar preparatory to the
summative essay. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in seminars, and written
feedback on formative work. Staff will also be available for individual consultation.
14
THMN40430 The History and Theology of the Charismatic Movement
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
Arguably the Charismatic Movement has been the most influential popular movement in
the world Church in the last half century. Its roots in reflection on Scripture, the periodic
emergence of charismatic movements in the life of the Church down the centuries and the
ecumenical significance of the late 20th century movement all deserve serious attention
for their own sake. Knowledge of the theology, historical roots and spirituality of the
movement are an important component in active ministry in any contemporary context.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to identify and analyse the historical roots, phenomena, spirituality and theologies
of the 'charismatic' movements.
Objectives:
Students will gain
Subject Knowledge



A comprehensive understanding of the range of ways of theologising the common
phenomena of charismatic experience
A critical analysis of the internal apologetic claim of modern charismatic movements
to historical precedents within the Church going back to the New Testament.
An in depth understanding of the sociological discussion which emphasises the
function of charismatic movements as responses to concurrent ecclesial and
mundane realities.
Subject Skills



The ability to identify and locate (historically, theologically and sociologically) the
'charismatic' movements in the history of the Church.
The ability to evaluate critically the ideas and contributions of these movements.
A re-examination of their own pre-suppositions, ideas and pastoral practice
concerning charismatic issues.
Key transferable Skills


Developed their ability as self-reflective practitioners.
Developed research based skills
15

8
Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and presented
that information clearly and effectively in written and oral format.
Module content
The module has three main elements.
First, a study of the search for an adequate way to theologise about the charismatic
experience of the Church in the light of the relevant biblical material. Students will be
familiarised with the range of ways of theologising about the common phenomena of
charismatic experience - including Spirit-baptism, glossolalia, prophecy and miraculous
healing - especially in relation to the context of broader ecclesiological and theological
frameworks. Consideration will also be given to the anti-charismatic arguments of those
who have opposed the movements.
Second, an analysis of the internal apologetic claim of modern charismatic movements to
historical precedents within the Church going back to the New Testament. This will
include discussion of Montanism, Quakerism, the Methodist revival, Holiness movements,
the Irvingites and classical twentieth century Pentecostalism. Included will be a
discussion of the unity and diversity of the theologising about the relevant phenomena
and of restorationist and other paradigms for locating the movements within broader
ecclesiologies.
Third, a consideration of recent sociological discussion which emphasises the function of
charismatic movements as responses to concurrent ecclesial and mundane realities.
9
Indicative Bibliography
Burgess S.M., McGee G.B. and Alexander P.H., Dictionary of Pentecostal and Charismatic
Movements (Grand Rapids; Zondervan, 1988).
Cox H., Fire from Heaven (London: Cassell, 1996).
Craston C., The Charismatic Movement in the Church of England (London: CIO, 1981).
Dunn J.D.G., Baptism in the Holy Spirit (London: SCM, 1970).
Dunn J.D.G., Jesus and the Spirit (London: SCM, 1975).
Hocken P., Streams of Renewal (Carlisle: Paternoster, Revised ed. 1997).
Hollenweger W., The Pentecostals (London: SCM, 1972).
Land S.J., Pentecostal Spirituality (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1993).
Middlemiss D., Interpreting Charismatic Experience (London: SCM, 1996).
Moltmann J., The Spirit of Life: A Universal Affirmation (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1992).
Percy M., Words, Wonders and Power (London: SPCK, 1996).
Strachan G., The Pentecostal Theology of Edward Irving (Peabody: Hendrickson, 1973).
Suurmond J-J., Word and Spirit at Play: Towards a Charismatic Theology (SCM: London,
1994).
Taylor J.V., The Go-Between God (London: SCM, 1972).
Turner M.B., The Holy Spirit and Spiritual Gifts: Then and Now (Carlisle: Paternoster,
1999).
Walker A., Restoring the Kingdom (2ed Guildford: Eagle, 1996).
10
Teaching methods
30 hours of lectures and seminars comprising twenty sessions of 90mins. Each, spread
over the first two terms of the academic year together with some tutorial support. The
course is taught by Dr Mark Bonnington.
16
11
Summative assessment
One 5,000-word essay.
12
Formative assessment
One formative assessment of a 5,000-word essay. Students may also lead a seminar in
preparation for their summative essay. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in
seminars, and written feedback on formative work. Staff will also be available for
individual consultation.
17
THMN40530 Issues of Authority within Anglicanism
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
The disciplined theological study of Anglicanism is a relatively rare phenomenon in the
UK and this course enables participants both to study materials from the core texts of
English and international Anglicanism but also to use this knowledge to reflect on current
issues in Anglican ecclesiology and theological method from an informed perspective.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: using the question of ‘authority’ as a focus, to enable students to immerse
themselves in
the historic content of Anglicanism and selected issues of current importance, so that
they will
reflect on these for themselves and so may contribute to the continuing discussions about
the
nature of ‘authority’ within Anglicanism.
Objectives:
By the end of the module the student will gain:
Subject Knowledge
 a systematic knowledge of the historical development of Anglicanism
 an in depth understanding of the issues raised by the discussion of theological
and ecclesiological authority within Anglicanism
 a critical awareness of contemporary issues of authority in Anglicanism
 an analysis of the collision of theological and ecclesiological authority within
Anglicanism.
Subject Specific Skills
Upon successful completion of the modules students should have:
1) A critical awareness of the different interpretations of the development of
Anglicanism and of the methodologies used to develop these interpretations;
2) Evaluated thoroughly and professionally current recommendations about
‘authority’ within Anglicanism;
3) Written constructively, with originality, in respect of issues of ‘authority’ within
Anglicanism and so to undertake teaching or publication or communication at a
public level within the Anglican Communion.
18
Key Transferrable Skills


Developed research based skills
Acquired and integrated knowledge through reading and research and presented
that information clearly and effectively in oral and written form.
8
Module Content:
The module begins with a detailed, textually based, and comparative analysis of the
historical
development of Anglicanism. This would normally comprise study of the following
selected
key texts and periods: the Tudor formularies; Jewel; Hooker; the Caroline Divines;
Latitudinarianism; the Oxford Movement and its opponents; the development of
Liberalism; the growth of the Anglican Communion; Michael Ramsey and 20th.Century
Anglo-Catholicism. Questions about the conception and deployment of theological and
ecclesiological ‘authority’ act as a focusing mechanism during this historical study.
The second half of the module comprises a series of studies of contemporary issues
where
9
questions of theological and ecclesiological ‘authority’ coincide. These topics will vary
according to current issues in the life of the Anglican Communion. Recently covered
topics include: Anglicanism as it portrays itself in ecumenical dialogue; the coherence of
Anglican views of episcopacy in the light of the ‘Act of Synod’; the viability of the Anglican
Communion given the tensions between liberal and conservative provinces; the
complications involved in the increasing contributions made by Evangelicals to the life of
the Church of England.
Indicative Bibliography
Avis, P., Anglicanism and the Christian Church (Edinburgh:, 2nd.ed. 2002).
Avis, P., The Identity of Anglicanism (London: T. and T. Clark 2007).
Avis, P. In Search of Authority (London: Bloomsbury, 2014)
Bartlett A., A Passionate Balance (London: DLT, 2007)
Bray, G. (ed.), Documents of the English Reformation (Cambridge: James Clarke, 1994).
Chapman, M., Anglican Theology (London: T&T Clark, 2012)
Driver, J.W., A Polity of Persuasion (Cambridge: Lutterworth, 2014)
Evans, G.R. and Wright, J.R. (eds.), The Anglican Tradition (London: SPCK, 1991).
Greer, R.A., Anglican Approaches to Scripture (New York: Crossroads, 2006|)
Kaye, B., An Introduction to World Anglicanism Cambridge: CUP 2008)
Locke, K.A., The Church in Anglican Theology (Ashgate: Farnham, 2009)
Neill S., Anglicanism (London: Mowbrays, 1977 4th.ed.).
Percy, M., Anglicanism. Confidence, Commitment and Communion (Ashgate: Farnham,
2013)
Platten, S., Augustine's legacy: authority and leadership in the Anglican Communion
(London: DLT, 1997).
Platten S. (ed.), Anglicanism and the western Christian tradition: continuity, change and the
search for communion (Norwich: Canterbury Press, 2003).
Podmore, C., Aspects of Anglican Identity (London: CHP 2005)
Rowell, G., The English Religious Tradition and the Genius of Anglicanism (Wantage: Ikon,
1992).
Slocum, R.B., The Anglican Imagination (Farnham: Ashgate, 2015)
19
Spencer, S., Anglicanism (London: SCM, 2010)
Sykes, S.W., The Integrity of Anglicanism (London: Mowbrays, 1978).
Sykes, S.W. Authority in the Anglican Communion (Toronto: Anglican Book Centre, 1978)
Sykes, S.W., Unashamed Anglicanism (London: DLT, 1995)
Sykes, S.W., Booty, J. and Knight, J. (eds.), The Study of Anglicanism (London: SPCK, 1998
rev.ed.).
Ward, K., A History of Global Anglicanism (Cambridge: CUP 2006)
Williams, R., Anglican Identities (London: DLT, 2004).
Sample Seminar Bibliography



S.SYKES: The Integrity of Anglicanism 1978 (pp.1-25, 36-52)
A cry of rage provoked by the 1976 Doctrine Commission Report, which exposes some of the
inner contradictions of Anglicanism.
P.AVIS: Anglicanism and the Christian Church 2002 (rev.ed.)
(Preface pp.xiii – xx)
An attempt to give a brief theological and historical account of the essence of
Anglicanism.
Extract from A.BARTLETT ‘A Passionate Balance’ 2007 (pp.31-36)
Some preliminary thoughts about how to use historical material theologically.
 Act in Restraint of Appeals 1534, Act for the Submission of the Clergy and Restraint of
Appeals 1534, The Ecclesiastical Licenses Act 1534, the Abjuration of Papal Supremacy
by the Clergy 1534, The Act of Supremacy 1534.
 Election of Bishops Act 1547
 1549 and 1552 Prayer Books, esp. the Preface to the 1549 Prayer Book, inc. Cranmer’s
essay ‘Of Ceremonies’, and Ordinal with Preface.
 1549 and 1552 Acts of Uniformity and Supremacy
10
Teaching methods
30 hours of lectures and seminars comprising twenty sessions of 90mins. each spread
over the first two terms of the academic year together with some tutorial support. The
course is taught by the Revd Canon Dr Alan Bartlett.
11
Summative assessment
One 5,000-word essay.
12
Formative assessment
Two formative assessments: a 2,500 book review and a student led seminar which could
be preparatory to the summative essay. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in
seminars, and written feedback on formative work. Staff will also be available for
individual consultation.
20
THMN40930 Story and the narrative mode in Christian mission and liturgy
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
This module has been conceived as a revision of the successful and well-subscribed
module taught in previous years, The Communication of Faith in Narrative Culture. Many
of the theoretical and theological underpinnings of that module remain and will be taught
here. There is an increased emphasis on oral storytelling as a skill to be developed with
technique, understanding, heart and enthusiasm.
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
The theology of communication derives from a God who is a communicating God and
from an Incarnation that is itself the supreme act of communication. The theology of story
recognises that narrative has anthropological and sociological significance, and that it has
been and still is a prime vehicle for religious communication.
The concept of community entails communication. Culture – understood as the various
expressions of the social fabric of our lives – involves myriad ‘story acts’, from the mass
media to the interpersonal. Media literacy and an appreciation of the complex
interweaving of culture and the way story happens – both within and without the church
– is necessary for pastoral and liturgical as well as apologetic / missionary purposes.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives
None
Aim: To enable theological reflection on the narrative mode of communication in
contemporary Christian witness and worship, engaging critically with appropriate
scholarship; to develop relevant communication skills for today’s post-literate culture,
with a particular emphasis on creating and presenting story in several forms; to acquire a
basic familiarity with the structure and process of developing a personal narrative, and
employ sophisticated tools for crafting personal stories in a spiritually formative
environment.
.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the course students will have:



A comprehensive knowledge of storytelling, the Bible and Western Culture and the place
of narrative the transmission of faith and values
A systematic understanding of the use of parables and Metaphor in Religious Discourse
An in depth awareness of the range of story telling genres
21


A developed understanding of how to communicate stories with intelligence, clarity and
conviction, expressing Christian themes in ways appropriate to context.
A critical understanding of a range of strategies for incorporating personal narratives
into preaching and teaching
Subject Skills
By the end of the course students will have:
 Reflected theologically upon different forms of narrative communication in a secular and
a Christian context
 Heard read and analysed storytelling forms, demonstrating a critical understanding of
their complexity and dynamics.
 Analysed and evaluated the role of narrative in theology.
 Modelled good practice and be able to supervise the development of storytelling ability in
others.
Key Transferable Skills
By the end of the course students will have


Demonstrated their ability to develop, create and present a written or audio-visual
act of narrative communication.
Demonstrated their ability as self-reflective critically aware practitioners.
8
Module content
Programme Areas
 The Place of Story
 Story: Engaging the Imagination and Finding Meaning
 Narrative Theology, Parables and Metaphor in Religious Discourse
 Storytelling skills
 Narrative techniques in television, literature and the spoken word
 The Place of Narrative in Evangelism and Nurture

The course will examine a range of storytelling genres in contemporary culture. The module will
begin with three introductory sessions:
1. Storytelling, the Bible and Western Culture: The place of narrative the transmission
of faith and values;
2. Resources available to help the storyteller. Examples of good practice.
3. Learning a story: How stories are internalised so that they may be told rather than
read. The practical considerations in working with story in different media.
Students will be expected to work with storytelling in a practical and systematic way, and will
also be invited to develop, to an appropriate level, creative and technically proficient expressions
of Christian story using other contemporary media such as writing short stories, screenplays or
story in song.
9
Indicative Bibliography
Drane, J., Faith in a Changing Culture (London: Marshall Pickering, 1997).
22
Carr W., Ministry and the Media (London: SPCK, 1990).
Durber Susan and Heather Walton (eds.), Silence in Heaven: Book of Women's Preaching
(SCM, 1994).
Eagleton, Terry, Literary Theory: An Introduction (Oxford: Blackwell, 1983).
Eslinger, Richard, Narrative and Imagination: Preaching the Worlds That Shape Us
(Fortress, 1995).
Fiddes, Paul S., Freedom and Limit: A Dialogue Between Literature and Christian Doctrine
(Mercer, 1999).
Fiddes, Paul S, Faith in the Centre: Christianity and Culture (Oxford: Regent's Park College,
2001).
Fiske, John, Introduction to Communication Studies (London: Routledge, 1990).
Ford, Leighton, The Power of Story (Navpress, 1994).
Frei, Hans W., Theology and Narrative: Selected Essays Eds. George Hunsinger & William C
Placker (New York, OUP, 1993).
Green, Joel B. (Editor), Michael Pasquarello (Editor) Narrative Reading, Narrative
Preaching: Reuniting New Testament Interpretation and Proclamation (Baker Academic,
2003).
Hauerwas, Stanley & L.G. Jones, eds., Why Narrative? – Readings in Narrative Theology
(Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989).
Kraft, Charles, Communication Theory for Christian Witness (New York: Orbis, 1991).
McFague, Sallie, Speaking in Parables: A Study in Metaphor and Theology (London: SCM,
1975, New edition 2002).
Middleton, J. Richard & Brian J. Walsh, Truth is Stranger than it Used to Be (London: SPCK,
1995).
Ricoeur, Paul, Figuring the Sacred: Religion, Narrative and Imagination Trans. D. Pellauer
(Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995).
Schultze, Quentin, Communicating for Life (Grand Rapids Michigan: Baker Academic,
2000).
Shaw, Colin, Deciding What We Watch (Oxford: OUP, 1999).
Sogaard, Viggo, Media in Church and Mission (Pasadena, CA: William Carey Library, 1993).
10
Teaching methods
Staff and Student led seminars, discussion groups, joint teaching, multi-media
environment. 30 hours contact time which will be delivered in two periods of residence.
Some individual consultation will be available during these periods and on-line and
students will be expected to work in an e-learning environment between the two periods
of residence. The module is taught by Geoffrey Stevenson and Olive Fleming Drane.
Links with other modules: This module will normally be taught in alternate years with
the complementary module Apologetics in the Mass Media
11
Summative assessment
Component 1: Develop, create and present a written or audio-visual act of narrative
communication, 5-10 minutes in length if performed (up to 3000 words if it is a literary
work). 50%
Component 2: a 2000 word critical evaluation of the content and execution of the piece.
50%
23
OR
Component 1: Three video - recorded storytelling performances, approximately 5
minutes in length each, at least one of which has been written by the student. 50%
Component 2: a 2000 words critical evaluation of the content and performances. 50%
Specific assessment criteria are issued for creative work.
12
Formative assessment
Two pieces of formative assessment: a 2,500 book review and a student-led seminar,
which would be a theological reflection on practical church communication, on which
there will be written feedback. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in seminars,
and written feedback on formative work. Staff will also be available for individual
consultation.
24
THMN41030 Intellect and Imagination: Apologetics in the Mass Media
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
Apologetics is the creating of "a climate which is conducive to the birth and nurture of
faith" (A. McGrath) through defending the tradition and imaginatively building bridges
between the Christian faith and contemporary culture. As such, it is of key importance to
both theology and ministry. Apologetics is both an ingredient and outcome of theology,
and ministry should demonstrate apologetic concern both in the public role of the lay and
ordained, and in the encouragement and equipping of one another in this area. . It
involves an understanding of theological method combined with opportunities and
challenges presented by the contemporary fields of media studies, science, social sciences
and philosophy.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to enable sustained and critical theological reflection on apologetics in relation to
the mass media, and to build skills and confidence in apologetic approaches in this area.
Objectives
Candidates will gain or develop:
1. A systematic, critical and comprehensive understanding of the methods of apologetic
engagement with contemporary mass media
2. The ability to develop research methods appropriate to undertaking apologetics in
contemporary culture
3. The capacity to reflect theologically upon a range of complex contemporary issues and
situations from the perspective of defending and commending the Christian faith in the
public arena
4. Transferable skills in theological reflection, communication and apologetics through
special case studies with special reference to the performing arts, television, radio,
cinema, music, publishing and the internet
5. Confidence and inspiration in developing their own apologetic approaches and
initiatives
Learning Outcomes
Subject-specific Knowledge:
•
Candidates will gain or develop:
•
A systematic, critical and comprehensive understanding of the methods of
apologetic engagement with contemporary mass media
25
•
A detailed examination of a number of complex contemporary issues and
situations and how to defend and commend the Christian faith in the public arena
•
An in depth awareness of the subject area providing the basis for on going
research and professional development.
Subject-specific Skills:
•
The ability to develop research methods appropriate to undertaking apologetics
in contemporary culture
•
The capacity to reflect theologically upon a range of complex contemporary
issues and situations from the perspective of defending and commending the Christian
faith in the public arena
•
Transferable skills in theological reflection, communication and apologetics
through special case studies with special reference to the performing arts, television,
radio, cinema, music, publishing and the internet
•
Confidence and inspiration in developing their own apologetic approaches and
initiatives
Key Skills:
•
Ability to reflect within complex interdisciplinary context
•
Ability to work as a team to analyse material and develop a group response
•
Ability to communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively both orally and in
written format.
•
Develop research based skills
8
Module content
This module builds the skills and knowledge of the tools of apologetics to postgraduate
level through both its content and educational method.
This module will contain case studies of apologetic approaches with special emphasis on
contemporary apologetics and the mass media. Students will be also expected to develop
apologetic approaches of their own to contemporary issues in the media.
The module emphasises the national and international media as the context. The
complementary MA module, "Story and the narrative mode in Christian mission and
liturgy ", which will be taught in alternate years with this module, explores
communication and media literacy in greater depth.
Programme Outline:









Media literacy and consumption
Christian engagement with the media
Apologetics - theological base and outworking
Movies and meaning: The cinema of questions
Print journalism
Radio and the religious voice
Apologetics and establishment
Science, faith and the new atheists
Can you argue with image
Learning Outcomes
Subject-specific Knowledge:
26




9
Candidates will gain or develop:
A systematic, critical and comprehensive understanding of the methods of apologetic
engagement with contemporary mass media
A detailed examination of a number of complex contemporary issues and situations and
how to defend and commend the Christian faith in the public arena
An in depth awareness of the subject area providing the basis for on going research and
professional development.
Indicative Bibliography
R.M. Anker, Catching Light: Looking for God in the Movies (Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2004).
Bruce, S., God Is Dead: Secularization in the West: Religion in the Modern World (Oxford:
Blackwell, 2002).
Carson, D., The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan, 1996).
Davie, G., Europe the Exceptional Case:Parameters of Faith in the Modern World (London:
DLT, 2002).
Johnston, R.K., Reel Spirituality: Theology and Film in Dialogue (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic, 2001).
Le Roy Wilson, S., Mass Media/Mass Culture: An Introduction (New York: McGraw-Hill,
1994).
Levine, L., Highbrow/Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America
(Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1988).
Lynch, G., Understanding Theology and Popular Culture (Oxford: Blackwell, 2005).
McGrath, A., Bridge-Building: Effective Christian Apologetics (Leicester: IVP, 2002).
Mitchell, J. and S. Marriage, eds., Mediating Religion. (London: T. & T. Clark, 2003).
Postman, N., Amusing Ourselves to Death (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1985).
Robertson, C. K., ed., Religion in Entertainment (Peter Lang, 2002).
Romanowski, W.D., Eyes Wide Open: Looking for God in Popular Culture (Grand Rapids:
Brazos Press, 2001).
———. Pop Culture Wars (Wheaton: IVP, 1996).
Seerveld, Calvin, A Christian Critique of Art and Literature (Sioux Center, IA: Dordt College
Press, 1995).
Stackhouse, John G., Humble Apologetics: Defending the Faith Today (New York: OUP,
2002).
Wilkinson, D., ‘The Art of Apologetics in the 21st Century’. Anvil vol. 19, no. 1, 5-17
(2002).
Wilkinson, D., The Power of the Force: The Spirituality of the Star Wars Films (Oxford:
Lion, 2000).
10 Teaching methods


The module will be taught online. The module would begin in the first week of
term on Monday at 12noon. On that day the first session will be accessible within the
Course Centre which can be accessed via the internet.
A new session will be accessible on the internet every Thursday during the term by 12
noon. Upon opening each session, the student will find detailed instructions pertaining to
the particular focus of that week of study. These sessions will be found on DUO
27


In addition to posting each session on Thursday of each week, the course teachers will
normally be online for three hours each week to answer any student questions and
respond to comments
The module is assessed by a written, audio or visual apologetic project. Students will
therefore be asked to survey the issues current in mass media and choose an apologetic
issue and response. Accompanying this will be a 2000 word description of the context for
which the response is designed, why the issue was chosen and the theological approach
underlying the response.
Teaching Methods and Contact Hours
Activity
Number
Frequency
Duration
Total/Hours
Online session
8
Weekly
3 hours
24
Independent study and learning
11
276
Summative assessment
Component: Assignment
Element
Component Weighting: 100%
Length /
duration
Written, audio or visual apologetic
project
Element
Weighting
Resit
Opportunity
100%
A written, audio or visual apologetic project
Foundational to the course will be the conviction that a primary part of apologetics in western
culture is identifying the challenge or opportunity that the mass media presents. Students will
therefore be asked to survey the issues current in mass media and choose an apologetic issue
and response.
Project: ‘Identify a current issue in the mass media and present an apologetic response to it.
This response needs to be appropriate to the issue and may be presented as a video (or
storyboard for a film / video), a piece for radio, a multi-media presentation, a newspaper article,
a blog, a website or outline for a book. Accompanying this will be a 2000 word description of the
context for which the response is designed, why the issue was chosen and the theological
approach underlying the response.’
12
Formative assessment
This will comprise 2 elements: a. A team exercise comprising identifying a relevant issue in
media and producing a 500 word discussion document. b. A 20 minute seminar presentation and
discussion.
28
THMN41230 Psychology and Christian Ministry
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module introduces the application of academic psychology to Christian Ministry. It
strengthens the Pastoral Theology route through the MATM and complements the Core
Module M401 by focusing on the application of a Social Science to Theology and Ministry.
The module will focus on areas of psychology, which have been researched empirically
and will cover a range of academic psychology and the underlying concepts of human
behaviour. The exploration of psychology’s sub-disciplines will include the psychology of
personality and religion, developmental and educational psychology, the psychology of
emotion and social psychology. All of these will be applied to ministry and the communal
aspects of Christian living.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to explore the contribution academic psychology can make to our understanding of
human nature, Christian Ministry and the Church.
Learning Outcomes:
Subject Knowledge
Students will gain:
 An in depth awareness of the psychological models of human nature and behaviour
 A critical understanding of the sub disciplines of psychology which can inform an analysis
of
Christian ministry and practice
 A detailed understanding of a number of areas of academic psychology providing the
foundation for further research in the interdisciplinary field of psychology and theology.
Subject Skills
By the end of the module the student will:
 be familiar with the range of academic psychology today and its research paradigms.
 have examined research work in a number of the sub disciplines of academic psychology
and applied the findings to ministry and the church.
29
 be able to critically engage with the contribution that academic psychology makes to the
theology of Christian ministry and its practice.
 be able to identify leading research areas & research questions in this multidisciplinary
approach to theology and ministry.
Key Transferable Skills
Students will be:




8










9
Able to critically engage with and synthesise information from two disciplines through
reading and research,and to present this clearly and effectively in written format
Demonstrate their ability to analyse their practice using the perspective of another
discipline.
Effectively communicate complex ideas orally and in written format
Able to use the research skills necessary for Level 4 working
Module content
Structure of Teaching/seminars:
Psychological concepts of human nature and behaviour: theological and pastoral
implications.
Personality and Religion/ religious experience
Spirituality and selfhood
Psychology and Worship
Religion and Mental Health
Religious Development
Social Psychology of Church
The psychology of emotions and pastoral care.
Managing Church and the psychology of organisations
Psychology and Christian Ministry: The merits of an interdisciplinary approach.
Indicative bibliography
F. Watts, R, Nye, S, Savage, Psychology for Christian Ministry (Routledge, 2002).
M. Jeeves, Human Nature at the Millennium (Baker Books/Apollos, 1997).
M. Jeeves, Christianity and Psychology: the View Both Ways (IVP, 1976).
P. Vitz, Psychology as Religion (Eerdmans, 1994).
K. Loewenthal, Mental Health and Religion (Chapman and Hall, 1995).
C.D. Batson, H. Schoenrade, W.L. Ventis, Religion and the individual (OUP, 1993).
L. Pervin, O.P. John, Personality: Theory and Research, (8th ed. Chichester: Wiley, 1996).
Fowler, J.W., Stages of Faith: The Psychology of Human Development and the Quest for
Meaning, (San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1981).
Greenberg, J. and Baron, R.A., Behaviour in Organisations: Understanding and Managing
the Human Side of Work (6th ed., London: Prentice-Hall International, 1997).
Practical Theology formally Contact British Interdisciplinary Journal of Pastoral Care
Christianity and Psychology American Journal
R.F. & Park, C.L. (eds) Handbook of the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (New York,
London: Guildford Press,2005)
Roberts, R. Spiritual Emotions Reflections on Some Christian Virtues (W Eerdmans 2007)
30
Leary, M.R. & Tangney, J.P. (Eds) Handbook of Self and Identity (New York London:
Guildford Press 2003)
10
Teaching methods
The course will be a combination of 30 hours of research based lectures and student led
seminars and discussions, based on extensive primary and secondary reading. This will
involve students in building the knowledge base and appropriate skills for research study
in the field. The module is taught by Dr Jocelyn Bryan.
11
Summative assessment
5000 words written assignment.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Two formative assignments: feedback will be given on student led discussions and
seminars, and written feedback on a 2500 word essay. Staff will be available for
individual consultation.
31
THMN41330 Chaplaincy
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
To meet the perceived needs of lay and ordained chaplains in a variety of settings, and to
improve the formation offered to ordinands in this area of ministry.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
7
Excluded combination of modules
Module aims and objective
30 UCUs
Optional
Single Module
None
Aim: to provide the opportunity for people working or wishing to work in chaplaincy to
explore the nature of this ministry, to examine relevant theological issues and to develop
appropriate pastoral expertise.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge
On successful completion of this course students will be have:



A conceptual understanding of the nature of chaplaincy
Informed critical engagement with contemporary issues regarding chaplaincy
A comprehensive understanding of the historical, theological, contextual and
pastoral nature of the role of chaplains.
Subject Specific Skills
On successful completion of this course students will be have:



Evaluated the nature of a chaplaincy within the theological tradition and contemporary
society
Critically reflected on the pastoral skills necessary for this form of ministry
Analysed critically the complex theological and pastoral issues commonly faced by
chaplains so as to be better able to direct one's own ministry and plan for ministry and
mission through chaplaincy in a contemporary context
Key Transferable Skills
On successful completion of this course students will be have:

Demonstrated their awareness as self-reflective practitioners
32

Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and
presented that information clearly and effectively in written and oral form.
8
Module content
1. The mission and ministry of the chaplain.
2. The history of chaplaincy
3. Apologetics and chaplaincy
4. Ethical questions faced in chaplaincy.
5. Understanding the particular setting or institution.
6. Working collaboratively (e.g. with partners from other denominations and other
faiths)
7. Pastoral skills .
9
Indicative Bibliography
Caring for the Catholic Patient, Meeting the Pastoral Needs of Catholic Patients (London:
CTS, 2007).
Caring for the Catholic Patient, A Guide to Catholic Chaplaincy for NHS Managers & Trusts
(London: CTS, 2007).
Atherton, R., Summons to Serve (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1987).
Bishops’ Conference of England and Wales, Chaplaincy: the Change and the Challenge
(Chelmsford: Matthew James Publishing, 1996).
Catholic Education Service, Evaluating the Distinctive Nature of a Catholic School (London:
Catholic Education Service, 1999).
Church House, Pillars of the Church: Supporting Chaplaincy in Further and Higher
Education (London: Church House publishing, 2002).
Coyle, T. (ed.), Christian Ministry to the Sick (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1986).
Dyter, R., School Assemblies Need You (East Sussex: Monarch, 1997).
Gallagher, J., Our Schools and Our Faith (London: Collins, 1986).
Hospital Chaplaincies Council, Healthcare Volunteers: a Training Resource (London:
Church House Publishing, 2001).
Kubler-Ross, E., On Death and Dying (New York: Scribner Classics, 1997).
Legood, G., Chaplaincy: The Church’s Sector Ministries (London: Cassell, 1999).
McGrail, P. and Sullivan, J., Dancing on the Edge - Chaplaincy, Church and Higher
Education, (Matthew James Publishing, 2007).
McKeone, M., Wasting Time in School (Slough: St. Paul’s, 1993).
Norman, James (ed.), At the Heart of Education: School Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care
(Dublin: Veritas, 2004).
Speck, P., Being There: Pastoral Care in Time of Illness (London: SPCK, 1988).
Shockley, D., Campus Ministry: The Church Beyond Itself (Louisville: Westminster JKP,
1989).
Ward, P., S. Adams and J. Levermore, Youth Work and How To Do It (Oxford: Lynx
Communications, 1994).
10
Teaching Methods
30 hours contact time including: lectures, seminars, group exercises and tutorials. This
course will normally be taught as ablock. In addition, students would undertake a
33
practical placement (minimum 20 hours contact time) linked with the module with a
negotiated and agreed learning contract. For those already in post, this would be
supervised reflection on their ministry; for those not in post, a supervised placement
would be arranged. Some parts of the course would be taught in setting-based groups
depending on student numbers. (e.g. education chaplaincy; healthcare chaplaincy).
7
Summative assessment
One hour seminar presentation on an aspect of current chaplaincy experience (40%) and
a 4000 word essay developing the seminar topic (60%).
8
Formative assessment/Feedback to Students
2500 word reflection on critical incident or encounter in chaplaincy experience and
seminar proposal
34
THMN41830 Preaching from the Synoptic Gospels
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale This module complements the MA module Preaching from the Old Testament
(THMM40230) and offers progression from the BA courses in preaching. It enables
students to engage in critical theological reflection on preaching praxis, and encourages
excellence in preaching. It also enables students to engage critically and competently with
texts arising regularly in the Revised Common Lectionary.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: The module will enable students to reflect critically on, and exercise the skill of,
preaching in competent, imaginative and engaging ways that are faithful both to biblical
scholarship and speak into the contemporary context. Special emphasis will be placed on
selected passages from the Synoptic Gospels which present particular challenges for the
preacher (for example - Uncomfortable sayings in Mark: (1:16-20; 3:31-35; 10:1-12;
Passages difficult to read true to Matthean intent: Matthew 18:10-14; Matthew 2:1-12;
15:21-28; Over familiar parables: Luke 10.29-37;Luke 15.11-32; Luke 18.9-14)





Objectives:
to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the theological purposes behind
each of the Synoptic Gospels, in order to enable students to preach in ways faithful to
authorial intent;
to help students further develop their exegetical skills so that they can examine the
selected passages in detail;
to enable students to reflect critically upon contemporary homiletical theory and its
relationship to praxis;
to enable students to develop self-reflective awareness of their own preaching;
to model good practise and encourage the development of skills related to preaching.
Learning Outcomes:
Students will gain:
Subject knowledge
 detailed understanding of the distinctive theological concerns of each of the Synoptic
Gospels and how these impact on homiletic methodology;
35

a critical awareness of the issues arising from preaching from each of these Gospels, with
particular reference to the exegesis of particular set passages – (examples given above).
Subject Skills
 critically reflect on a key aspect of ministerial praxis;
 apply conceptual homiletic strategies to biblical texts in the movement from text to
sermon;
 practise and plan for the appropriate, wise and imaginative place of preaching in the
ongoing mission and ministry of the church;
 preach with careful scholarship, clarity and conviction to a non-specialist audience,
expressing complex ideas with simplicity and depth, demonstrating sophisticated
capacity to understand their audiences;
 construct a sermon which is biblically rooted, pastorally aware and deals appropriately
with the interface between text and context, showing awareness of the apologetic
importance of connecting with popular culture
Key Transferable Skills
 demonstrate their ability as self-reflective, critically-aware practitioners;
 effectively communicate ideas orally to both specialist and non-specialist audiences in a
clear, concise, and engaging manner;
 acquire and synthesise information through reading and research, and to present that
information clearly and effectively in written format
8
Module content
Lectures and seminars will offer an overview of the structure and theology of each of the
synoptic Gospels, looking at the particular challenges each Gospel presents to the
preacher, with exploration of the tendency to conflate material, particularly seasonal
texts. We will explore the challenges of reading each Gospel in ways faithful to the
writer’s intent, and how such reading might translate into sermon structure, content, and
delivery. We will critically examine in detail a range of homiletic strategies in moving
from text to sermon, earthing that discussion in specific passages, and in particular
contemporary contexts. Students will have the opportunity to hear lecturers preach, as
well as their peers, and to offer and receive feedback, as well as preaching a sermon
themselves.
9
Indicative bibliography
Bruce, Kate, Igniting the Heart: Preaching and Imagination (Norwich: Canterbury Press,
2015)
Brueggemann, Walter , Finally Comes the Poet (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1989)
Buttrick, D., Homiletic: Moves and Structures (London: SCM, 1987)
Craddock, F.B., As One Without Authority (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1971)
Craddock, F.B., Preaching (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1990)
Day, D., A Preaching Workbook (London: SPCK, 1998)
Eslinger, R.L., Narrative and Imagination: Preaching the worlds that shape us.
(Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995)
Lowry, E., The Sermon: Dancing the Edge of Mystery (Nashville: Abingdon, 1997)
Lowry, E. How to Preach a Parable (Nashville: Abingdon, 1989)
Mitchell, J., Visually Speaking, (Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1999).
36
Schlafer, D., Your Way with God's Word (Oxford: Cowley Publications, 1995)
Troeger, T., Imagining a Sermon (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1990)
10
Teaching and Learning Methods
Teaching and learning methods will vary, incorporating:

lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter relating to the
set texts; to promote critical awareness of the challenges of preaching each Gospel in
ways which honour the theological drive and purpose of that particular Gospel, avoiding
conflation of parallel texts. Also to developing a grasp of the range of homiletic
possibilities offered by texts through the modelling of effective preaching by course
tutors.

small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the texts, offer
opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to exegesis and homiletic
strategy and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
Preaching classes: to deepen awareness of the challenges of moving from text to sermon;
to sharpen understanding of how to plan, construct, shape and deliver a sermon; to assist
in learning to given and receive constructive critical feedback and to enable students to
develop skills in communication.
11
Assessment
The assessment is in two parts:
•
A videotaped exegetical sermon approximately twenty minutes in length together with a
written self-reflection of c. 1,000 words (60%). Instead of assessing a videoed sermon preached
in a studio context, we will require a videoed sermon but preached in a ‘live’ context. Students
should note that they will need to be able to provide a video of a ‘live’ sermon - this is a nonnegotiable requirement of the module. They will be assisted in the provision of technical
equipment and such training as is necessary. Specific assessment guidelines are issued for the
sermon and self-reflection.
•
A 2,500 word essay (40%) on a topic relating specifically to homiletics and the biblical
(Synoptic) text.
Formative assessment
There is no formally assessed formative work but written and verbal feedback is given on
the tasks outlined below.

Students are required to keep a preaching journal in which they give a detailed analysis
of 2 sermons they have listened to in a ‘live’ context based on synoptic gospel texts.
Specific guidance on areas to focus on wiill be issued. These journals will be discussed in
class enabling students to critically reflect on hermeneutic and homiletic strategies they
37
have observed, and to comment on how what they have observed will shape their future
development as preachers. The course tutors will give written feedback on this piece.

A first version of the sermon, delivered live to a ‘preaching class’ during the second block,
will be discussed in class and with the staff. Verbal feedback will be given on this sermon.
38
THMN41930 The Quest for the Jesus of History and the Mission of the Church
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
Historical reconstructions of Jesus have played and continue to play a significant role in
the shaping of Christian Mission. Some reconstructions have evoked a vigorous
apologetic response; others have deeply influenced particular understandings and
approaches to Mission. This module will provide a grounding in the ‘Quest for the
Historical Jesus’ for students, enable them to begin to develop their own historical
method, and provide scope for a critical and self-critical discussion of the relationship
between the Quest and Mission.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to enable integration of study of the ‘Quest for the Historical Jesus’ at both primary
and
secondary level with reflection and practice of the Mission of the Church.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
By the end of this module, students should have knowledge of:



the historical methods employed by some of the main contributors to the quest for
the historical Jesus
the history of the quest for the historical Jesus
the relationship of the quest to contemporary Christian mission
Subject Skills
By the end of the module students should have:




identified and evaluated the historical methods employed by some of the main
contributors to the quest for the historical Jesus
offered a critical account of their own preferred historical method for approaching
the Jesus-tradition
undertaken their own historical investigation of a part of the Jesus-tradition
reflected critically upon the implications of the various reconstructions for Christian
mission.
39
Key Transferable Skills
By the end of this module students should have:



8
Developed their researched based skills
Developed their ability to communicate complex ideas and material in written
format
Evaluate different research methodologies
Module content
Part one of this module explores the range of historical methods used since from the
alleged beginning of the quest at the end of the 18th century down to current scholarship.
It will include the following topics:

The Beginning of the Quest (Reimarus)

The Early Quest (Survey of various 19th century contributions to the Quest)

Eschatological approaches to Jesus (Weiss, Dalman, Schweitzer)

The Christ of Faith School

The Methods of the ‘New Quest’ School

The Methods of the ‘Third Quest’

Postmodern criticism of the Quest(s)
Part two will require the student to work out and present a critical account of their own
preferred method. They will then undertake an investigation of one major part of the
Jesus-tradition and offer their own historical reconstruction. The following are possible
topics:

‘Jesus’ Teaching and Praxis in relation to the Kingdom of God’

‘Jesus as Healer’

‘Jesus and Women Followers’

‘Jesus and the Political Realities of his Time’

‘The Triumphal Entry’

‘Jesus and the Last Supper’

‘The Trial and Crucifixion’

‘The Resurrection’
Students will be expected to engage with the complexity of the traditional sources related
to the topic. Those who decide that the Quest has little value for Christian theology and
mission will still be required to demonstrate understanding of the assumptions and
methods of the Quest and to relate their account of the tradition to accounts
characteristic of the Quest.
Part Three: The Quest and Christian Mission.
The final part of the module will look at the complex relationship between the Quest(s)
and Christian mission. It will include:
 apologetic or antagonistic responses to unorthodox reconstructions (e.g. Reimarus,
Strauss, Schweitzer, Jesus Seminar);
 approaches to mission that assimilate or assume particular reconstructions
1) A. Ritschl’s liberal gospel
2) Schweitzer’s own missionary career
3) The Christ of Faith School and Mission
4) Liberation Theology and New Quest reconstructions of Jesus (e.g. Boff, Gutiérrez)
40
5) Postmodern quests.
Consideration of the missiological implications of more recent (‘Third Quest’)
reconstructions will then be included. Finally, the student will be invited to write up their
work from part two in a way that demonstrates informed awareness of how their
handling of the Jesus tradition may impact upon their participation in Christian mission.
The ability to work in the primary texts of the New Testament and some background in
Synoptic and Johannine studies would be desirable, but not required.
9
Indicative bibliography
The Quest of the Historical Jesus is probably the most vigorously researched field of New
Testament Studies. The following is recommended as a way of ensuring your best
engagement with the primary sources for the course.
G.W. Dawes ed., The Historical Jesus Quest: Landmarks in the Search for the Jesus of History
(Louisville: WJKP, 1999).
Dawes has gathered readings from many of significant contributions to the Quest from
the late 17th to mid 20th Centuries. This is an essential companion as it provides access to
sources that are either no longer in print or else are expensive.
A. Schweitzer, The Quest of the historical Jesus (London: SCM, 2000; ET of 2nd edn [1913]
by W. Montgomery, J.R. Coates, Susan Cupitt, and John Bowden).
Students are strongly encouraged to obtain their own copy of this classic.
In part one of the module various units will refer to other key sources from a major
author and offer pointers to further discussions of the issues raised. We will pay close
attention to the following four recent authors whose work could be seen as exemplars of
so-called ‘Third Quest’ approach.
1) E.P. Sanders, Jesus and Judaism (London: SCM, 1985).
2) N.T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God (London: SPCK, 1997).
3) G. Theissen and A. Merz, The Historical Jesus. A Comprehensive Guide (London: SCM,
1998).
4) W.R. Herzog II, Jesus, Justice and the Reign of God. A Ministry of Liberation (Louisville:
WJK Press, 2000).
Although students should not necessarily obtain their own copies of all four volumes,
they would be strongly advised to get their own copy of Sanders’ study, not least because
it is seminal for so many recent authors. Clearly a comprehensive guide like that of
Theissen and Merz will assist you in your search for appropriate secondary literature.
And it will help you to develop that vital skill needed for postgraduate level work - the
ability to research subjects independently in the academic literature and use a library
intelligently as a research resource.
10
Teaching methods
The course will be a combination of research based lectures and student led seminars and
discussions based on extensive primary and secondary reading. This will involve students
in building their knowledge base and appropriate skills for research in this field and in
41
reflective ministry in the Church. The course is taught normally over 30 hours in 20 x
90mins sessions. It is taught by the Revd Dr David Bryan.
Lectures
Tutorials
Seminars
11
12
Number
Part 1 – 7
Part 3 - 6
Two per individual
Frequency
weekly
Duration
90mins
One early in course to prepare for 15
mins
Part 2. One to offer critique of the each
student seminar (in parts 2-3).
Part 2 – 7 (student- weekly
45led)
60mins.
Summative assessment
One 5000-word essay based on the student led seminar that also includes a critical
account of how the student perceives their reconstruction of Jesus to impact upon
Christian mission.
Formative assessment/feedback to students
One essay (2,500) that critically compares and contrasts the historical reconstructions of two
major contributors to the Quest of the Historical Jesus. One seminar (45-60 mins) that
outlines the fruit of a historical investigation of one major part of the Jesus Tradition.
Tutorials to discuss student seminar presentations.
42
THMN42130 Changing Worship
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
The introduction of this module will continue to broaden the range of options in the
MATM/MATR programmes. Study of the worshipping life of the churches and of liturgical
revision is a crucial part of both ordination training and wider theological study.
4
Prerequisites None
(Whilst there are no formal pre-requisites, a study of liturgy and/or church history to BA
level would be advantageous.)
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to examine liturgical reform and development since 1850, focusing on the Church of
England, the Methodist Church in Britain and the Roman Catholic Church so as to equip
students to undertake further research in modern liturgical history and contemporary
worship and to engage in their own creative liturgical composition.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the module, the student will have:
 a detailed knowledge and understanding of the changing patterns of worship in three
Christian traditions in the last 150 years
 a broader conceptual understanding of changes in church and society in which to
locate these changes
 Liturgical reforms in a the Methodist and Roman Catholic Church
 Developments of music in worship
Subject Skills
By the end of the module, the student will have:



identified and evaluated areas of ecumenical convergence in liturgical theology and
liturgical revision
commented critically on liturgical texts and other related documents, locating them
within a broader theological framework
used appropriate research methodology, to assess the interplay between textual
revision and ‘popular’ developments in worship
43


assessed and responded to reactions, both positive and negative, to liturgical revision
in the churches studied
engaged in creative, theologically well-informed, research-aware and effectively
communicated liturgical revision in their own denomination and ecumenically.
Key Transferable skills



developed research based skills
demonstrated their ability to acquire, synthesise and apply complex information.
Communicated effectively research findings and reading in oral and written
format
8
Module content
1. The Liturgical Movement and its impact on Churches in Britain
2. Liturgical scholarship and its impact on liturgical revision
3. Liturgical Revision in the Church of England: the 1928/9 ‘Deposited Book’; ASB;
Common Worship (including revision leading up to these)
4. The Methodist Service Book and the Methodist Worship Book in the context of
changing patterns of Methodist worship
5. Vatican II liturgical reforms and developments in the Roman Catholic Church since
then
6. Liturgical developments outside official revision and their impact on official revision,
including All Age Worship, Charismatic Renewal; Taize and Iona, Alternative Worship,
Fresh Expressions, Feminist Theology,
7. The setting of worship, including architecture, use of symbolism and appointment of
worship space.
8. The renewal of the Christian Year.
9. Developments in the role of music in worship.
The course will include study of selected texts, both actual liturgies and documents about
liturgy (e.g. the Vatican II Declaration on liturgy); reflection on students’ and tutors’ own
experiences of worship.
9
Indicative bibliography
Liturgies and service books including:
The Book of Common Prayer 1928
The ASB 1980
Common Worship
New Patterns for Worship
The Methodist Service Book
The Methodist Worship Book
Missa Normativa (any authorized English translation)
Abbot, W., The Documents of Vatican II (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1966).
Berger, T. (ed.), Dissident Daughters (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001).
Berger, T., Women’s Ways of Worship (Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1999).
Botte, B., From Silence to Participation (Washington: Pastoral Press, 1998).
Bradshaw, P. (ed.), Companion to Common Worship, 2 vols. (London: SPCK, 2001, 2006).
44
Bugnini, A., The Reform of the Liturgy 1948-1975 (Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1990).
Caldecott, S., Beyond the Prosaic (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1998).
Chapman, David M., Born in Song: Methodist Worship in Britain (Warrington: Church in
the Market Place, 2006).
Crichton, J., English Catholic Worship (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1979).
Davies, H., Worship and Theology in England vols. 2 & 3 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1996).
Fenwick, J. & Spinks, B., Worship in Transition (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1995).
Herbert,
The Parish Communion : a book of essays (London: SPCK, 1937).
Hunsinger, George, The Eucharist and Ecumenism (Cambridge: CUP, 2008).
Irvine, C. (ed.), They Shaped Our Worship (London: SPCK, 1998).
Jasper, R., The Development of Anglican Liturgy 1662-1980 (London: SPCK, 1989).
Nichols, A., The Service of Glory (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1997).
Pecklers, Keith (ed.), Liturgy in a Postmodern World (London: Continuum, 2003).
Spinks, Bryan D., The Worship Mall: Contemporary Responses to Contemporary Culture
(London, SPCK, 2010).
Spinks, B. & Torrance, I., To Glorify God: essays on modern Reformed liturgy (Edinburgh:
T. & T. Clark, 1999).
Tuzic, R., Leaders of the liturgical Movement (Chicago: Liturgy Training publications,
1990).
Wainwright, Worship with One Accord (Oxford: OUP, 1997).
Westerfield Tucker, K., The Sunday Service of the Methodists (Nashville: Kingswood,
1996).
Yates, Nigel, Liturgical Space (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008).
9
Teaching methods
Lectures
Up to 20
Weekly over two 90 mins
terms
Seminars
Form
part
lectures
Practicals (composition Form
part
and analysis of texts)
lectures
of
of
11
Summative assessment
Project; e.g. construction of a substantial piece of liturgy / act of worship (or a series of
these) 50% along with thoroughgoing theological commentary of 2,500 words 50%.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Formative assignments: leadership of seminar with feedback from course tutors and
book review of 2,500 words with written feedback. Written feedback on summative
assessment.
45
THMN42230 Leadership in Christian Ministry
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
Optional
30 UCUs
Changes in the pattern of stipendiary Christian ministry mean that clergy are required to develop
a range of formal and intentional leadership skills and to reflect theologically on the patterns of
leadership which they offer in Church and society.
4
Prerequisites None
For students to make use of this module they need to be engaged in Christian ministry
during the teaching of the module, to enable active theological reflection.
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules None
7
Module aims and objectives:
Aim: to study in depth the nature of Christian leadership in such a way as to develop the
leadership skills of participants as they work in both church and wider society and to better
enable them to develop these skills in others.
Objectives
Students will gain:
Subject Knowledge


A broad and critical knowledge of contemporary studies in leadership and management
A working knowledge and the ability to train others to work within areas where Christian
leadership is affected by recent legislation
 A critical understanding of the contemporary literature on developing leadership in
others.
 An in depth understanding of leadership within the Christian tradition
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:


Reflected on Christian ministry and leadership in scripture and drawn on these sources
in contemporary reflection.
Reflected upon and developed their own leadership in church and society through peer
mentoring with reference to a particular area of ministry.
46

Developed their ability to develop leadership skills in others, particularly in area of
mentoring and self –management.
Key Transferable skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
By the end of the module the students will:


8
Developed their ability as self- reflective critically aware practitioners.
Effectively presented and communicated their reflections on their experience and
practice to their peers.
 Acquired and synthesised information through reading, research and presented that
information clearly and effectively in written format.
Module content
•
Leadership and the Christian Tradition
•
Leadership and Contemporary society
•
Leadership and Current Legislation
•
Developing Leadership in Others
Part 1
During Part One of the module, as well as receiving staff input on the module content, each
student chooses as a project a clearly defined piece of work which will normally be a leadership
enterprise in which they are themselves engaged. Examples might include developing a shared
ministry team; facilitating the development of small groups in the parish; enabling collaboration
in mission across a deanery or circuit; developing new vision for a particular piece of work in the
community; working at some area of personal development or developing partnerships for social
action alongside development agencies.
Before Part Two of the course each student develops this piece of work as part of their ongoing
ministry and reflects on its progress in dialogue with the module tutors.
Before Part Two each student also completes a formative essay comprising a theological
reflection on an aspect of Christian leadership utilising both secular insights and material from
Scripture and the tradition.
Part 2
During Part Two of the module, each student as well as receiving further staff input, will present
a 30 min seminar paper reflecting on the progress of the practical project. This will then be the
subject of the final written summative assignment.
47
9
Indicative bibliography
Arbuckle, Gerald A., Refounding the Church, Dissent for Leadership (Geoffrey Chapman, 1993).
Baxter, Richard, The Reformed Pastor, Banner of Truth (1656).
Behrens, James, Practical Church Management (Gracewing, 1998).
Bennett, David, Biblical Images for Leaders and Followers (Paternoster, 1993).
Blanchard, Kenneth and Johnson, Spencer, The One Minute Manager (Harper Collins: 1994).
Bosch, David, Transforming Mission (Orbis, 1995).
Covey, Stephen and Merrill, A. Roger, First Things First (Simon and Schuster, 1994).
Covey, Stephen, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (Simon and Schuster, 1990).
Croft, Steven, Ministry in Three Dimensions (DLT, 1990).
Croft, Steven, Transforming Communities (DLT, 2002).
Daft, Richard L., Leadership Theory and Practice (Dryden Press, 1999).
de Waal, Esther, A Life Giving Way (SPCK, 1995).
Drane, John, The McDonaldisation of the Church (DLT, 2000).
Dollard, Kit, Marret-Crosby, Anthony and Wright, Timothy, Doing business with Benedict, The
Rule of St. Benedict and Business Management: a conversation (Continuum, 2002).
Edmondson, Chris, Fit to Lead – Sustaining Healthy Ministry (DLT, 2002).
Finney, John, Understanding Leadership (Daybreak, 1989).
Gibbs, Eddie and Coffey, Derek, Church Next, Quantum Changes in Christian Ministry (IVP, 2001).
Gill, Robin and Burke, Derek, Strategic Church Leadership (SPCK, 1996).
Goleman, Daniel, Emotional Intelligence (Bloomsbury, 1995).
Goleman, Daniel, The New Leaders (Bloomsbury, 2001).
Handy, Charles, The Empty Raincoat (Arrow Books, 1994).
Harvey-Jones, John, Making it Happen (Collins, 1988).
Hawkins, Thomas, The Learning Congregation (Westminster John Knox, 1997).
Herrick, Vanessa and Mann, Ivan, Jesus Wept: Vulnerability in Leadership (DLT, 1998).
48
Higginson, Richard, Transforming Leadership (SPCK, 1996).
Irvine, Andrew, Between Two Worlds: Understanding and Managing Clergy Stress (Mowbray,
1997).
Jamieson, Penny, Sacrament and Solidarity in Leadership (Mowbray, 1997).
Kennedy, Carol, Guide to the Management Gurus (Century Business Books, 1998).
Nelson, John ed., Leading, Managing, Ministering (Canterbury Press, 1999).
Nelson, John, ed. Management and Ministry (Canterbury Press, 1996).
Pattison, Stephen, The faith of the Managers (Cassell, 1997).
Peters, Tom and Austin, Nancy, A Passion for Excellence (Fontana, 1986).
Peterson, Eugene, Five Smooth Stones for Pastoral Work (Eerdmans, 1980).
Peterson, Eugene, Working the Angles: the shape of Pastoral Integrity (Eerdmans, 1982).
Peterson, Eugene, Underthe unpredictable plant, the shape of vocational holiness (Eerdmans,
1992).
Putnam, Robert, Bowling Alone, The collapse and revival of American community (Simon and
Schuster, 1999).
Pytches, David, Leadership for New Life (Hodder, 1998).
Senge, Peter M., The Fifth Discipline:The art and practise of the Learning Organisation (New
York: Doubleday/Currency Books, 1990).
Warren, Rick, The Purpose Driven Church (Zondervan, 1995).
Warren, Robert, Being Human, Being Church (Marshall Pickering, 1995).
Widdecombe, Catherine, Meetings that work, A Practical Guide to Teamwork and Groups (The
Lutterworth Press, 1994, 2000).
Woodward, James and Pattison, Stephen, The Blackwell Reader in Pastoral and Practical
Theology (Blackwell, 2000).
Wright, Walter, Relational Leadership (Paternoster, 2000).
10
Teaching methods
The module is led Revd Mark Tanner & Rev Dr Calvin Samuel, assisted by a lay and ordained
ecumenical team. It is delivered during two periods of residence in Durham. This mode of
49
teaching and learning will give the opportunity both for coverage of a range of materials at depth
by the course leaders and invited speakers; engagement with complex practical issues through
the project work and opportunity to engage in a piece of practical work and to reflect on this.
Contact time c. 30 hours.
11
Summative assessment
One 5,000 word theological and practical commentary on a case study of an ongoing practical
project focussing on an area of leadership development.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
The practical projects will be agreed with the subject teachers during the initial period of block
teaching. Support and feedback will also be available on line. During the second block teaching
period each student will give a 30 minute presentation and receive written feedback from
teaching staff. In addition each student will write a 2,500 word formative essay which will be a
theological reflection on an aspect of Christian leadership utilising both secular insights and
material from Scripture and the tradition.
50
THMN42630
Theological Approaches to Spiritual Direction
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
The ministerial task of spiritual direction is increasingly in demand. High quality
validated training will be a significant local, regional and national resource for
practitioners. This module will resource candidates so that they will have a clear grasp of
a range of models of spiritual direction practised in the Christian Church. It will also
provide them with tools from an interdisciplinary range of approaches: theology,
spirituality, pastoral studies, counselling and psychology. (The module is conceived as
being either of an introductory nature but with postgraduate level academic study or as a
“refresher” for those already engaged in this ministry. It is not conceived as a selfsufficient training for this ministry just in itself.)
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim:
This module is designed to provide students with the opportunity, conceptual
understanding and depth of knowledge to reflect on their own prayer lives and the needs
and contexts of their ‘directees’, and from there to develop their proficiency in prayer
guiding and spiritual accompaniment. This development will be both in terms of the
skills used and more substantially in the theological and ministerial framework within
which those skills have been deployed in the tradition and praxis of the Church.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the module, the student will have:



Detailed knowledge of a variety of models of spiritual direction within the Christian
tradition
A comprehensive understanding of director/directee relationship in Spiritual direction
An interdisciplinary approach to religious experience and issues of discernment
Subject Skills
By the end of the module, the student will have:


reflected critically on their own prayer lives and be able to demonstrate this.
a deeper understanding of the way that prayer is shaped in the life of the Church and of
the individual, including by interaction with other disciplines such as Systematic
Theology and Psychology.
51



critiqued methods of prayer and approaches to the spiritual life as described in some of
the ‘spiritual classics’ and explore their relevance for contemporary society.
evaluated the relative merits of some of the current approaches to the work of spiritual
direction and to formulate appropriate questions for future research.
an understanding of and an ability to demonstrate some of the skills necessary in
ministry to guide and accompany others on their prayer journeys.
Key transferable skills
By the end of the module, the student will have:



8
demonstrated clear written and verbal communication of their ideas.
engaged in interdisciplinary research and integrated information through reading
and research and presented that information clearly and effectively in written format
demonstrated their ability as self reflective, critically aware practitioners
Module content
Prolegomena
Introduction to spiritual direction: what is it and what is it not; terminology.
Historical
Models of spiritual direction from the Christian tradition:
Desert Fathers and Celts
Ailred of Rievaulx and the Cistercians
The Carmelite tradition
The Ignatian tradition
The Anglican tradition
Ministerial and Professional
The relationship between director and directee.
Models of direction, e.g. teacher, midwife, host (as in hospitality).
Common problems in the director / directee relationship.
Supportive resources for the director.
Moving on in spiritual direction.
Supervision in spiritual direction
Practical Theology
Helping the directee notice and relate to God about key interior facts.
Criteria for evaluating religious experience, including insights from Systematic Theology.
Insights from other disciplines: psychology and psychotherapy
Issues of discernment: advanced work on Ignatius.
Skills Training
Listening skills.
Insights from counselling and psychotherapy.
Personal dynamics.
52
9
Indicative bibliography
Jerome Neufelder & Mary Coelho, eds., Writings on spiritual direction (New York: Seabury
Press, 1982).
Lavinia Byrne, ed., Traditions of spiritual guidance (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1990).
William Barry & William Connolly, The practice of spiritual direction (San Francisco:
Harper Collins, no date).
Kathleen Fischer, Women at the well: feminist perspectives on spiritual direction (London:
SPCK, 1989).
Margaret Guenther, Holy listening (London: DLT, 1992).
Irenee Hausherr: Spiritual direction in the early Christian East (Cistercian Studies 116,
1990)
Gordon Jeff, Spiritual direction for every Christian (London: SPCK, 1987).
Kenneth Leech, Soul friend (London: Sheldon press, 1977).
Gerald May, Care of mind, care of spirit: a psychiatrist explores spiritual direction (San
Francisco: Harper Collins, 1992).
J.T. McNeill, A history of the cure of souls (London: SCM, 1952).
Sue Pickering: Spiritual direction. A practical introduction (London, Canterbury Press
2008)
Janet Ruffing: Spiritual direction: beyond the beginnings, (New York, Paulist Press, 2000)
Martin Thornton, Spiritual direction (London: SPCK, 1984).
R. Williams, Silence and Honey Cakes (Tring: Lion, 2003).
Liz Hoare, Using the Bible in spiritual direction, (London: SPCK, 2015).
Journal: The Way
The above are general studies of spiritual direction.
An example of an in depth study of a particular model might be Ignatian direction and its
interpretation today with the following literature:
M Buckley: “The structure of the rules for discernment” in The Way of Ignatius Loyola:
Contemporary Approaches to the Spiritual Exercises, P. Sheldrake, (ed.), (London SPCK,
1991), pp219 – 237.
M. Ivens, Understanding the Spiritual Exercises (Leominster: Gracewing, 1998).
D. Lonsdale, Dance to the music of the Spirit: The art of discernment (London: DLT, 1992).
D. Lonsdale: ‘”The serpent’s tale.” rules for discernment’ in The way of Ignatius Loyola cf
above.
J.J. Toner, Discerning God’s will: Ignatius of Loyola’s teaching on Christian decision –making
(St Louis: Institute of Jesuit Sources, 1991).
10
Teaching methods
Teaching will be either in one residential block, from Monday lunchtime to Friday
lunchtime or as two residential blocks. Contact time in the form of lectures and seminars
will amount to 30 hours. Further details will be issued before the beginning of the course.
11
Summative assessment
One 4,000 word essay exploring a specific approach to the work of spiritual direction.
(75%).

53

12
One 30mins. videotaped role play of a spiritual direction session, supported by a written
self-evaluation. Specific criteria for postgraduate-level assessment of this mode of
assessment will be developed. (25%)
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Formative assessment will include a 2,500 word review of a spiritual “classic” with
written feedback. Students will also be required to lead seminars on which there will be
verbal feedback. Students will also receive verbal feedback on their performance in the
skills workshops. Students will also receive written feedback on all their summative
assessment.
54
THMN42730
Scripture and Hermeneutics
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
The wise handling of biblical texts is essential to the practice of Christian ministry. While
other MA modules focus either on the interpretation of biblical texts or theological
aspects of ministry, this module aims to bridge the gap between a ‘doctrine of scripture’
and the practice of interpreting the Bible. It therefore explores questions of the nature
and role of scripture, and of hermeneutics and truth, from a variety of perspectives,
including Christian theological ones.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: To integrate critical theological reflection on the doctrine of scripture with interdisciplinary hermeneutical reflection on the interpretation of the Bible, in order to
explore the nature and role of the Bible as Christian scripture.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the module students will gain an in depth understanding of



Hermeneutics with perspectives from theology and ethics
The contemporary hermeneutical debate
Biblical interpretation in doctrinal and hermeneutical perspectives
Subject Skills
By the end of the module students will
 be able to state and critique constructively both traditional and contemporary
articulations of a doctrine of scripture
 have analysed some of the many conflicting voices in contemporary
hermeneutical debate
 be able to utilise contemporary hermeneutical reflection in their interpretation
of the Bible
 have experience of exploring what difference hermeneutics makes in using the
Bible by way of ‘case studies’ of interpretation of one key biblical passage
(currently either Genesis 1-3; or the ten commandments with the beatitudes)
Key Transferable Skills
By the end of the module students will
55



8
be able to identify and articulate possible areas of research.
develop their ability to communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively both
orally and in written format.
develop research based skills
Module content
The module will have four main sections:
I - Reading Scripture: Orientations
Topics may include: introduction to hermeneutics; history and truth; character and
virtue
II - Reading Scripture: Doctrinal Considerations
Topics may include: revelation; inspiration and authority; clarity and sufficiency; canon
III - Hermeneutics: Key Issues for Wise Reading
Topics may include: what is hermeneutics?; speech acts; meaning; readers
IV - Biblical Interpretation in Doctrinal & Hermeneutical Perspective
Topics may include: textual criticism; historical criticism; biblical theology; canonical
approaches; reception history; theological interpretation; literary readings; feminist
interpretation; postcolonial interpretation; evangelical interpretation; postmodern
interpretation; all focused around a set passage as a test case
9
Indicative bibliography
Augustine, On Christian Teaching (Oxford World’s Classics; Oxford: OUP, 1997)
Bartholomew, Craig, et al (eds.), Scripture & Hermeneutics Series (Grand Rapids:
Zondervan & Carlisle: Paternoster, 2000–7) a series of 8 vols
Barton, John, The Nature of Biblical Criticism (Louisville, KY: WJKP, 2007)
Briggs, Richard S., The Virtuous Reader (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2010)
Brueggemann, Walter, The Book That Breathes New Life (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2005)
Davis, Ellen F. & Richard B. Hays (eds.), The Art of Reading Scripture (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2003)
Leithart, Peter J., Deep Exegesis. The Mystery of Reading Scripture (Waco, TX: Baylor
University Press, 2009)
Powell. Mark Allan, Chasing the Eastern Star: Adventures in Biblical Reader-Response
Criticism (Louisville, KY: WJKP, 2001)
Thiselton, Anthony C., New Horizons in Hermeneutics (London: HarperCollins, 1992)
Treier, Daniel J., Introducing Theological Interpretation of Scripture (Grand Rapids: Baker
Academic, 2008)
56
Vanhoozer, Kevin J., et al (eds.), Dictionary of Theological Interpretation of the Bible
(Grand Rapids: Baker Academic & London: SPCK, 2005)
Work. Telford, Living and Active: Scripture in the Economy of Salvation (Grand Rapids:
Eerdmans, 2001)
10
Teaching methods
Lectures/Seminars
Number
16
Frequency
Weekly for 2 terms
Duration
1hr 45mins
11
Summative assessment
One 5,000 word essay.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
One 2500 word essay (normally a book critique); as well as seminar leading on a topic
which will (normally) contribute to the summative essay. Feedback will be given on
student presentations and seminar involvement, as well as written feedback on formative
and summative essays.
57
THMN42930 The Dialogue of Science and Theology in Mission and Ministry
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
Current scientific insights pose both questions and challenges to Christian theology in its
understanding of creation, the human person, providence and eschatology. At the same
time theology offers questions and challenges to the practice and conclusions of
contemporary science. This dialogue has immense importance for the church’s mission
and ministry.
Further, building on the success of earlier courses offered by Dr. Wilkinson via the
internet through other institutions this course enhances the MATM programme in terms
of wider access, diversity in learning styles and the importance of the local context for
mission and ministry.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
Aim: to explore a number of different aspects of the dialogue between science and
Christian
theology through key contemporary scientific discoveries and recent theological
responses.
Objectives
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the course students will:



have a developed and critical understanding of how Christian theology has engaged with
current scientific advances in the physical and biological sciences;
a critical awareness of research work in the dialogue of science and Christian theology;
have an in depth knowledge of how dialogue of science and theology affects mission and
ministry, in particular in the area of apologetics
Subject Skills
By the end of the course students will have:




identified and explained different models for the relationship of science and theology;
have examined research work in the dialogue of science and Christian theology;
identified leading research areas & research questions and be equipped to undertake
research in this field
provided clear, effective and appropriate communication on a specified topic and in a
relevant context
58
Key Transferable Skills


8










Developed research based skills
Acquired and integrated knowledge through reading and research and presented
that information clearly and effectively in oral and written form to specialist and
non specialists.
Module content
Structure of Teaching
From Hubble to Spirit: Introduction and the nature of the Universe
Creator and Creation: Biblical understandings
God, time and Stephen Hawking: Cosmic Origins
Image, Design and SETI: Human beings in cosmic perspective
Quantum theory and chaos: Demolishing the clockwork Universe
Gene Therapy, Dolly and AI: Matters of life and death
Global warming and ripe tomatoes: Caring for the planet
From Huxley to the rise of Creationism: The troubled waters of evolution
Accelerating Universes and Comet Impacts: The End of the Universe
The Place of the Dialogue of Science and Theology in Christian Apologetics
Across these sessions there will be attention to systematic issues such as how the Bible is
interpreted and the strengths and weaknesses of models of the relationship of science
and religion.
9
Indicative bibliography
Polkinghorne, J. Theology in the Context of Science, (London: SPCK, London, 2008).
Harrison, P. The Cambridge companion to science and religion (Cambridge ; New York
: Cambridge University Press, 2010)
Giberson, K., Oracles of science : celebrity scientists versus God and religion ( New York
: Oxford University Press, 2007).
Barbour, Ian, When Science Meets Religion Enemies, Strangers or Partners? (London:
SPCK, 2000).
Barton, S. & Wilkinson, D. eds Reading Genesis After Darwin, (New York: OUP, 2009)
Bentley, Alex, (ed.) The Edge of Reason? Science and Religion in Modern Society.
(London: Continuum 2008).
Brooke, J.H., Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives. (Cambridge: CUP,
1991).
Green, J.B., (ed.) What About the Soul? Neuroscience and Christian Anthropology.
(Nashville: Abingdon 2004).
Harrison, P., The Bible, Protestantism and the Rise of Natural Science. (Cambridge:
CUP, 1998).
Murray, P., and D. Wilkinson. The Significance of the Theology of Creation Within
Christian Tradition: Systematic Considerations. In C. Southgate (ed.)God, Humanity
and Cosmos, (London: T&T Clark, 2005).
Numbers, R.L., The Creationists: The Evolution of Scientific Creationism. (New York:
59
Knopf, 1992).
Polkinghorne, J., Science and the Trinity: The Christian Encounter With Reality.
(London: SPCK, 2004).
Wilkinson, D., God, Time and Stephen Hawking. (Crowborough: Monarch, 2001).
———, Creation, The Bible Speaks Today Bible Themes. (Leicester: IVP, 2002).
-------- Christian Eschatology and the Physical Universe (London: T&T Clark, 2010)
--------- Science, Religion and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (OUP, 2013)
Witham, Larry, Where Darwin meets the Bible : creationists and evolutionists in
America. (Oxford ; New York: Oxford University Press, 2005).
Specialist bibliographies will be supplied with each topic
10
Teaching methods
Number
Internet based modules
10
Frequency
Duration
Weekly for one 3 hours
term
The course will be a combination of internet based learning materials including video,
audio and text, on-line discussion between the students and course teacher based on the
course materials and extensive primary and secondary reading. This will involve
students in building an in-depth knowledge base, learning transferable skills in
apologetics and appropriate skills for research study in the field.
The module would begin in the first week of term on Monday at 12 noon. On that day
the first session will be accessible within the Course Centre which can be accessed via the
internet.
Sessions
A new session will be accessible on the internet every Thursday during the term by 12
noon. Upon opening each session, the student will find detailed instructions pertaining to
the particular focus of that week of study. These sessions will consistently be found
within the Course Centre.
In addition to posting each session on Thursday of each week, the course teacher will
normally be online for three hours each week to answer any student questions and
respond to comments.
Each session will consist of teaching material (either text, audio or video), discussion
questions and assignments.
The assignments will be clearly labelled with dates for completion.
Responses to the discussion questions will be expected by a clearly stated time - the
time of the end of the session, normally in 10 days time.
So the term will look like the following
Session
deadline
1
2
Date posted (12 noon)
Monday Week 1
Thursday Week 1
Module ends (5pm)
Monday Week 2
Monday Week 3
60
Assignment
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Thursday Week 2
Thursday Week 3
Thursday Week 4
Thursday Week 5
Thursday Week 7
Thursday Week 8
Thursday Week 9
Thursday Week 10
Monday Week 4
Monday Week 5
Monday Week 6
Monday Week 7
Monday Week 9
Monday Week 10
Monday Week 11
Friday Week 11
(Team Project)
(Presentation material)
(Research essay)
The course will end at 5pm on the final Friday of term which will be the final day when
the course teacher will check in on the course and be available for responses.
11
Summative assessment
One 5,000 word essay. The summative assessment will also provide them with an
extended opportunity to sustain a sophisticated conceptual argument and to
demonstrate integrated learning.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
The formative assessments will assess the students’ developing comprehension,
evaluation, research and communication skills. Feedback will be given within the internet
based discussion boards and on formative assessment comprising:
Internet based team project
Presentation given to local church or other suitable group


61
THMN43630 How Mission can Shape the Church. Mission and Ecclesiology in the
contemporary context
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
The Church of England and the Methodist Church are intentionally seeking to develop
fresh expressions of church alongside traditional parishes and circuits. The module aims
to encourage and deepen reflection by ordinands and serving ministers on these
developments. There is a particular need within the churches for those equipped to
supervise and support others beginning these ministries.
4
Prerequisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To develop reflective practitioners in the development of fresh expressions of
church who are equipped to supervise and teach others in these disciplines
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
By the end of the module, the student will have:


A detailed, in depth knowledge of the resources of the Christian tradition in
respect of missiology and ecclesiology and the interaction between the two
disciplines
A critical analysis of the particular ecclesiological issues which arise from
engaging in contextual mission and the development of new ecclesial
communities
Subject Skills
By the end of the module, the student will:

be equipped to understand, research and reflect theologically on the process of
the formation and development of fresh expressions of church within the rapidly
developing field in Great Britain.
Key Transferrable Skills
By the end of the module, the student will have:
62



Demonstrated clear written and verbal communication of their research, reading
and observations.
Developed research based skills
Observed and reflected on practice
8
Module content
Topics covered will include:
Block 1: Will set the conversation around the future shape of the Church in the wider
context of mission theology. The gospel as the basis for mission will be discussed and
recent critical perspectives of Missio Dei and social Trinitarianism will be introduced.
Students will receive training to conduct a short congregational study
Block 2: The Church will be discussed in relation to its ‘Marks”. There will be sessions
on baptism, word and sacrament and praxis. Recent perspectives on the changing nature
of religion will be used to evaluate and critique notions of post Christendom and post
modernity in ecclesiology. Recent literature on Fresh Expressions will be discussed.
Students will give short presentations based on their congregational study.
9
Indicative bibliography
Core Text
Bryan Stone 2012 A Reader in Ecclesiology Farnham: Ashgate
Archbishops Council (2004) Mission- Shaped Church: Church Planting and Fresh Expressions of
Church in a Changing Context London: Church House Publishing
Anglican and Methodist Working Party (2012) Fresh Expressions in the Mission of the Church
London: Church House Publishing
Bevans S. & Schroeder R. (2004) Constants in Context New York: Orbis Books.
Gay, D. (2011) Remixing the Church: Towards and Emerging Ecclesiology London: SCM
Gittoes J., Green, B, and Heard, J. (Eds.) (2013) A Generous Ecclesiology: Church World and the
Kingdom of God London: SCM
Goodhew, D. (Ed.) (2012) Church Growth in Britain: 1980 to the Present Faneham: Ashgate
Guder, D. (Ed.) (1998) Missional Church: A Vision for the Sending of the Church in North America
Grand Rapids: eerdmans
Hardy, D. (2001) Finding the Church London: SCM
Healy, N. M. (2000) Church, World and the Christian Life Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Holmes, S. (2006) Trinitarian Missiology: Towards a Theology of God as Missionary International
Journal of Systematic Theology Volume 8 Number 1 January 2006
Holmes, S. (2009) Three Versus One? Some Problems of Social
Trinitarianism Journal of Reformed Theology 3 (2009) 77-89
Kilby, K. (2000) Perichoresis and Projection: Problems with Social Doctrines of the Trinity
New Blackfriars October 2000
Kilby, K. (2010) Is an Apophatic Trinitarianism Possible? International Journal of Systematic
Theology Volume 12 Number 1 January 2010
Küng, H. (1967) The Church. New York: Sheed & Ward,
Manion, G. and Mudge, L. (Eds.) (2010) The Routledge Companion to the Christian Church London:
Routledge
63
Moynagh, M. (2012) Church for Every Context: An Introduction to Theology and Practice London:
SCM
Murray, S. (2004) Post-Christendom: Church and Mission in a Strange New World Authentic Media
Radford- Ruether, R. (1985) Women-Church: Theology and Practice of Feminist Liturgical
Communities San Francisco: Harper and Row,
Ramsey, A. M. (1936) The Gospel and the Catholic Church London: Longmans
Robinson, J.A.T. (1960) On Being the Church in the World London: SCM
Volf, M. (1998( After Our Likeness: The Church as the Image of the Trinity Grand Rapids: Eerdmans
Ward P. (2002) Liquid Church Carlisle: Paternoster
Ward, P (Ed.) (2012) Perspectives on Ecclesiology and Ethnography Grand Rapid; Eerdmans
Woodhead, L. and Cato, R. (2012) Religion and Change in Modern Britain (Abingdon: Routledge),
10
Teaching methods
Lectures
Seminars
Fieldwork
Number
12
10
4
Frequency
Block 1
Block 2
Between
blocks
Duration
1 hour
1.5 hours
2 hours
11
Summative assessment
5,000 word summative essay.
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Feedback will be given on a review of a 2,500 word review of a major written work in
mission or ecclesiology and a student led seminar, comprising a case study/observation
of a fresh expression of church. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in seminars,
and written feedback on the book review. Staff will also be available for individual
consultation.
64
THMN44130 Biblical Literacy in a Media Culture
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module reflects the development of a new research centre at the College and an
increasingly important research area for mission and theological reflection within
practical theology. It complements existing modules on apologetics and mass media.
4
Prerequisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To enable theological reflection on biblical literacy in contemporary culture with
special emphasis on the availability of the Bible, contemporary engagement with the
Bible within the Church community and in the arts and entertainment industry; to
explore appropriate ways in which biblical literacy can be fostered within these
communities.
Objectives
Students will gain:
Subject Knowledge
 a systematic understanding of current issues, both problems and insights,
relating to biblical literacy within key contemporary Western cultures
 a critical awareness of the role of media culture in biblical literacy
 a comprehensive analytical understanding of the contextual impact of biblical
literacy on religious knowledge, social cohesion and theological understanding
 an in depth awareness of the subject area providing the basis for ongoing
research opportunities and professional development
Subject Skills
 a focussed ability to reflect theologically upon and evaluate critically different
forms of communication in a secular and a Christian context
 An ability to critically evaluate epistemology and in particular of the place of
biblical literacy within contemporary cultural identity
 Advanced ability to understand biblical literacy as it relates to opportunities and
challenges for the mission and ministry of the church and for ongoing research
and professional development
 Ability to reflect theologically within an interdisciplinary environment on both
on the context of contemporary society and the importance of and interpretation
65
of biblical texts within the Church and wider society.
Key Transferable Skills
 Ability to reflect within an interdisciplinary environment
 Demonstration of self-direction and originality in tackling and solving complex
issues
 Group analysis and discussion, developing communication of ideas and research
outcomes to specialist and non-specialist audiences
8
Module content
Lectures and seminars will offer an overview of key themes in biblical literacy within key
contemporary western cultures and the perceived decrease in biblical literacy within
current studies. We will explore the perceived affects of the decrease in biblical literacy
in terms of social exclusion and contemporary epistemology. We will explore various
ways in which biblical literacy is present within and continues to influence media culture
and appropriate ways in which to analyse and reflect on this influence. In group sessions,
we will focus on the importance of biblical literacy and explore appropriate strategies to
promote biblical literacy in contemporary western cultures. The overall aim is to enable
students to develop their own understanding of biblical literacy and it importance within
the mission of the church in tomorrow’s world.
9
Indicative bibliography
Bauckham, Richard J., The Bible and Mission: Christian Witness in a Postmodern World
(Carlisle: Paternoster, 2003)
Brueggemann, W. Cadences from Home (Westminster John Knox, 1997)
Collins, John J., The Bible after Babel (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005)
Mitchell, J. Visually Speaking (Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1999)
Postman, N., Amusing Ourselves to Death, (Harmondsworth, Penguin 1985)
Romanowski, W. D. Eyes Wide Open: Looking for God in Popular Culture (Grand Rapids:
Brazos Press, 2001)
Sogaard, V. Media in Church and Mission (Pasadena, CA, William Carey Library 1993)
Volf, Miroslav, Free of Charge (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2005)
Walsh, B. and S. Keesmaat, Colossians Remixed (Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP, 2004)
Wright, N. T., Simply Christian (London: SPCK, 2006)
10
Teaching and Learning Methods
The unit will be taught either as a residential ‘Summer School’ (Monday lunchtime to
Friday lunchtime) or over two periods of residence offering 30 hours of contact time.
This time will focus on developing an understanding of biblical literacy within media
culture, through staff-led and student-led seminars, discussion groups, joint teaching, and
within a multi-media environment. Specific attention will be given to exploration of
biblical literacy through contemporary media output (films, television, theatre) and
include a group opportunity to critically assess a live performance. Some individual
consultation will be available during these periods and on-line.
11
Summative Assessment
The development of a resource for encouraging engagement with the Bible aimed at
either a Church or non-Church context including a 20 minute presentation and
66
accompanied by a critical evaluation of up to 2,500 words. The subject area of the
presentation will be determined in a tutorial with the course leader and agreed between
the course leader and student. The student will meet with the course tutor on a
minimum of two occasions between the initial tutorial and submission of the final
presentation to determine progress and ensure compatibility.
Component
1 20 minute presentation
2 2,500 word Theological Reflection
12
Weighting (%)
40%
60%
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Two pieces of formative assessment:


2,500 book review and
Student-led seminar, which would be a theological reflection on biblical literacy
within a specific aspect of contemporary media, on which there will be written
feedback. Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in seminars, and written
feedback on formative work. Staff will also be available for individual
consultation.
67
THMN44230 Growth and Decline in British Christianity from 1945 to the present
day
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
Through exploration at level 4 of the recent history of British Christianity, the module
will offer students advanced interdisciplinary study of patterns of growth and decline
within the contemporary church, relating them to theological debates about growth and
contextualising academic study within study of a specific local context.
The module will enable participants to engage in level 4 study and research, laying a
platform of research skills for further research. It will resource and critically inform the
practice of leading local churches and will provide a mode of study in which skills of
attending and critical research are exercised in imaginative integration.
4
Prerequisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To gain in depth understanding of the nature and patterns of growth and decline of
British and global Christianity within recent history and apply that understanding to the
context of the contemporary local church: to think globally and locally about the nature
of the church.
To engage in a piece of research in the history of contemporary British Christianity,
enabling students to engage in such research in future, particularly with regard to the
local church
To acquire the research skills which will be of use both in the practice of Christian
ministry and for future study beyond level 4.
Objectives
Students will gain:
Subject Knowledge
 an advanced grasp of patterns of growth and decline in contemporary
Christianity within local, national and global contexts
 an in depth understanding of interdisciplinary study of contemporary Christian
history
Subject Skills
 the ability to evaluate critically growth and decline within a scriptural
framework
68

the ability to uncover and appreciate critically the history of the grassroots
church
Key Transferable Skills
 the research skills required for level four study of contemporary Christian
history
 the ability to use primary sources in an academically rigorous manner
 an understanding of how churches can turn a cycle of decline into a cycle of
growth
8




Module content
Patterns of growth and decline within British Christianity since 1945
The global context within which such movements have happened
Exploration of the local dynamics of such changes, with particular use of the techniques
of ‘history from below’
The situating of this discussion within the broader historical, theological and sociological
discussion of what constitutes growth within an ecclesiastical context
9
Indicative bibliography
Bowie, Fiona (ed.) Women and Missions: Past and Present, (Oxford: Berg, 1993)
Brown, Callum, The Death of Christian Britain, (London: Routledge, 2001)
Gifford, Paul, African Christianity: its Public Role, (London: Hurst & Co., 1998)
Grass, Tim, Modern Church History, (London: SCM, 2008)
Greeley, Andrew, Religion and Europe at the End of the Second Millennium, (New Jersey:
Transaction, 2003)
Heelas, Paul and Linda Woodhead, The Spiritual Revolution: Why Religion is Giving Way to
Spirituality, (Malden, Mass: Blackwell, 2005)
Jackson, Bob, Hope for the Church: Contemporary Strategies for Growth, (London:
Church House Publishing, 2002)
McLeod, Hugh, The Religious Crisis of the 1960s, (Oxford: OUP, 2007)
Parker, Simon, Faith on the Home Front: Aspects of Church Life and Popular Religion in
Birmingham, 1939-45, (Oxford: Peter Lang, 2005)
Stark, Rodney and A. Finke, The Churching of America, (New Brunswick: Rutgers, 1992)
Winter, Bruce (series editor), The Book of Acts in its First Century Setting, (Grand
Rapids: Eerdemans, 1993)
10
Teaching and Learning Methods
Number
Frequency
Lectures
9
weekly
Seminars
9
weekly
Fieldwork
1
Summative Assessment
5000 word essay on a title agreed between course tutors and student
11
69
Duration
2 hours
1 hour
3 hours
12
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Two formative assessments:
- a 2500 word review of a key text
a student led seminar which focuses on a particular local church context, utilising
a variety of historical sources, which could be preparatory to the summative
essay.
Feedback to students will comprise dialogue in seminars and written feedback on
formative work. Staff will be available for individual consultation.
70
THMN44330 Forgiveness in Pastoral Ministry Today
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module considers work on forgiveness and reconciliation in an interdisciplinary
way, critically reflecting both on the Christian Tradition and secular work on the topic. It
considers practical applications of the Christian tradition of forgiveness and
reconciliation to real life situations.
4
Pre requisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To enable critical reflection on Christian pastoral practices as to forgiveness and
reconciliation; to suggest new approaches to pastoral practices in view of critical
reflection and contemporary research; to provide an in depth understanding of the
development of the Christian tradition of forgiveness and reconciliation and to enable
critical reflection on personal experience and relate this to the module.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful completion of the module students should have knowledge of:




the biblical approach(es) to forgiveness and reconciliation
the post-biblical approach(es) to forgiveness and reconciliation in the Christian
tradition
secular contributions to the field and the implications of these for Christian
theology
Christian pastoral practices as to forgiveness and reconciliation
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:

Reflected critically on the varieties of Christian practice of forgiveness and
reconciliation in practical and academically responsible ways.

Set that tradition in the wider context of interdisciplinary research on forgiveness and
reconciliation

Developed skills of critical reflection on primary and secondary literature; on the extent
of the diversity and congruence in the different approaches to forgiveness and
71
reconciliation; on the gap, if any, between the findings of scholars and contemporary
pastoral practices as to forgiveness and reconciliation.

Practised and planned for the appropriate, wise and imaginative application of
principles of forgiveness and reconciliation to pastoral situations
Key Transferable Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
8

Demonstrated their ability as self reflective, critically aware practitioners

Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and presented that
information clearly and effectively in written format

Developed research based skills

Effectively communicated complex interdisciplinary ideas orally in a clear, concise and
engaging manner
Module content
The module will
(a) examine research on forgiveness and reconciliation in other disciplines (such as
psychology, philosophy and political science);
(b)
consider the implications of the findings of research in other disciplines for a
Christian understanding of forgiveness;
(c) explore related notions and practices (such as restorative justice and truth
commissions ) and distinguish them from forgiveness;
(d)
trace the development of Christian thinking about forgiveness and reconciliation
from the period of the New Testament and beyond.
Below is an indicative summary of topics that may be covered in the module:
1. Models of Forgiveness and their application
(a) R D Enright and the HDSG; E. Worthington
(b) Models of Christian practice
2. Contemporary ethical debates and application
(a) Forgiveness and justice
(b) ‘Unconditional’ forgiveness
(c) Forgiveness of the dead
(d) Proxy forgiveness
(e) Forgiveness as a virtue or duty
(f) Can groups forgive and be forgiven?
(g) John-Paul II and corporate forgiveness
3. The Hebrew and Christian Scriptures
(a) The Hebrew Scriptures on forgiveness, repentance
(b) The Jesus tradition and forgiveness
(c) The Pauline developments
(d) The post Pauline period
72
(e) Relationship of forgiveness and reconciliation.
4. The Historical Story of Forgiveness
(a) The development of forgiveness in the patristic period
(b) Forgiveness in medieval Catholic theology
(c) Forgiveness in the Reformation
(d) Bishop Butler
(e) Forgiveness in the 20th century
(f) The Coventry Cathedral Story
(g) The truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa
5. Liturgy, Spirituality and Forgiveness
6. Reflections on Contemporary Stories
a) Real case studies
b) In fiction and drama
9
Indicative bibliography
Bash, A. Just Forgiveness (SPCK, 2011)
Bash, A. Forgiveness and Christian Ethics. (New Studies in Christian Ethics: 29)
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007)
Bash, A. ‘Forgiveness: A re-appraisal’, Studies in Christian Ethics 24.2 (2011) pp. 133-146
Bash, A. Forgiveness: A Theology, (Eugene, OR: Cascade, 2015)
Cherry, S. Healing Agony: Re-Imagining Forgiveness (London: Continuum, 2012).
Enright, R. D. and North, J.
Exploring Forgiveness (London: Wisconsin Press, 1998).
Garrard, Eve and McNaughton, D.
Forgiveness (Durham: Acumen, 2010).
Griswold, C Forgiveness: A Philosophical Exploration (Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press, 2007).
Jones, L. G. Embodying Forgiveness (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995)
Lamb, S. and Murphy, J. G. (eds)
Before Forgiving (New York, Oxford University Press, 2002)
McFadyen, A. and Sarot, M.
Forgiveness and Truth, (Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 2001)
Murphy, J. G. and Hampton, J.
Forgiveness and Mercy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988).
Spencer, G. (ed.)
Forgiving and Remembering in Northern Ireland (London: Continuum, 2011)
Swinton, J. Raging with Compassion (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2007)
Volf, M. Exclusion and Embrace (Nashville: Abingdon, 1996)
Tutu, D. The Book of Forgiving. (London: Collins, 2015)
Watts, F. N. and Gulliford E. Z. ,
Forgiveness in Context: Theology and Psychology in Creative Dialogue ed. (Edinburgh, T &
T Clark) (2004)
73
10
Teaching and Learning Methods
The module will be taught over two residential blocks with normally 30 hours of contact
time.
The teaching methods will vary, incorporating:
1. Lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter
2. Small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the subject, to
offer opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to the subject-matter of
the course and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
3. Critical reflection in small group discussions on ‘real life’ examples. Use will be made of
contemporary films, news items and other ‘real life’ examples to explore and illustrate
issues to do with forgiveness.
11
Summative Assessment
1. An essay on a topic relating specifically to forgiveness and reconciliation in an
interdisciplinary context (Module Aims 1 and 2)
2. A seminar presentation to include theological and personal reflection on a personal
experience of forgiveness (or non-forgiveness), set in the context of Christian pastoral
practice as to forgiveness and reconciliation, that is related to the student’s learning
through the module (Module Aims 3 and 4).
COMPONENT 1:
Element
Essay
COMPONENT 2:
Element
Seminar
12
Length/duration
3000 words
Length/duration
45 minutes
Weighting
(%)
60%
Weighting (%)
40%
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Book reviews of three scholarly articles or one scholarly book on forgiveness and
reconciliation. The review(s) to be taken from a select bibliography or of a book(s)
agreed with the module co-ordinator. The assignment to be in note form of 3,000 words –
weighting 100%
74
THMN44430 Holiness, Wholeness and Mission
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module offers the opportunity for sustained reflection on questions relating to
holiness and their implications for mission. It explores biblical models of holiness,
holiness in tradition, holiness in experience and holiness in mission.
4
Pre requisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To offer sustained reflection on models of holiness in scripture in both the Old and
New Testament; to provide an in depth understanding of the development of holiness
thought in a range of Christian traditions; to reflect critically on the inherent links
between ideas of holiness, wholeness and misio dei and to reflect and learn from
personal experience of the practice and pursuit of holiness in the context of Christian
ministry.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful completion of the module students should have knowledge of:



A range of models of holiness
Post-biblical approaches to holiness and wholeness in the Christian tradition
Some of the key issues relating to holiness, spirituality and the mission of the
church
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:

Reflected critically on a range of biblical models and approaches to the idea of holiness.

Developed skills of critical reflection on primary and secondary literature on holiness and
mission

Engaged in theological reflection on the nature of holiness and implications for the
ongoing life of the local church

Explored contexts in which the corporate and social justice elements of holiness thought
might relate to ongoing ministerial praxis
Key Transferable Skills
75
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
8

Developed research based skills

Demonstrated their ability as self-reflective, critically aware practitioners

Acquired and integrated information through reading and research, and presented that
information clearly and effectively in written format

Developed their ability to communicate complex ideas orally
Module content
The module will explore research in the following areas:
Holiness in Scripture
 Holiness in the OT
 Holiness in the NT – Gospels, Paul, Peter & Hebrews
Holiness in Tradition
 Patristic understanding of incarnation, kenosis, theosis
 Wesleyan understanding of holiness, sanctification, perfection
Holiness in Experience
 The struggle to be holy
 Holiness as primarily a corporate and not individual pursuit
 Spiritual practices and sanctification by grace
Holiness in Mission
 A light to the nations
 Holiness as a dynamic rather than static concept
Works of piety, social justice & advocacy
9
10
Indicative bibliography
Flew, R. N. (1934). The Idea of Perfection in Christian Theology. Oxford : OUP
Law, W. ( 1729) A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life Bridge-Logos Publishing; Pap/Com
edition (Jan 2008)
Lindstrom, H. (1950). Wesley and Sanctification. Epworth Press.
Sangster, W.E.( 1943) The Path to Perfection London: Hodder & Stoughton
Tyson, J. R. (1986). Charles Wesley on Sanctification: A Biographical and Theological Study.
Grand Rapids M.I., Zondervan Press.
Wesley, John A Plain Account of Christian Perfection
Wesley, John, Sermons
‘The One Thing Needful’
‘On Christian Perfection’,
‘The Circumcision of the Heart’
Teaching and Learning Methods
76
The module will be taught in term time but may in due course be offered as two
residential blocks with normally 30 hours of contact time.
The teaching methods will vary, incorporating:
1. Lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter
2. Small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the subject, to
offer opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to the subject-matter of
the course and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
3. Seminar presentations
11
Summative Assessment
1. A 3000 word essay
2. A seminar presentation on missional aspects of holiness
Component:
3000 Word essay
Weighting (%):
60
Seminar Presentation
12
40
Formative assessment/feedback to students
1. Book reviews of three scholarly articles or one scholarly book on holiness. The review(s)
to be taken from a select bibliography or of a book(s) agreed with the module tutor.
77
THMN44530 Practices in Spiritual Formation In The Catholic Tradition
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module introduces students to a growing and important area of interest and
research and offer support to the Catholic Studies Pathway in the MATM. It also
complements the existing modules offered in the MATR.
4
Pre requisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim: To provide thorough engagement with Christian formation in the Catholic Tradition
by introducing scholarly discussion of Christian formation in historical perspective and
an overview of the literature in this area. It aims to encourage an interdisciplinary
approach drawing on systematic, practical and pastoral theology, church history, biblical
studies and spirituality. The relationship between doctrine and formation in spiritual
practice will be explored and the diversity of forms of spiritual practices of formation
within the broader Catholic tradition demonstrated.
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful comp;letion of the module students should have knowledge of:
 The biblical foundations of practices of formation in Benedictine, Ignatian and
Carmelite practice
 The historical development of practices of spiritual formation in Benedictine,
Ignatian and Carmelite practice
 The theological framework by which we understand and evaluate practices of
formation
 The scholarly discussion of formation in the Catholic tradition, with a view to
practices of formation in the wider church
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:

Reflected critically on the varieties of practices of formation in the Catholic tradition in
practical and academically responsible ways.

Set those practices in their historical location within the development of practices of
spiritual formation in Catholic tradition

Developed skills of critical reflection on primary and secondary literature with a view to
assessing the relationship between theory and practice in spiritual formation
78

Connected their academic work in spiritual formation to the assessment of spiritual
needs in pastoral situations
Key Transferable Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
8

Demonstrated their ability as self reflective, critically aware practitioners

Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and presented that
information clearly and effectively in written format

Developed research based skills

Effectively communicated complex interdisciplinary ideas orally in a clear, concise and
engaging manner
Module content
The module will examine theory and practice in the area of Christian formation:
focussing on three models of spiritual formation within the Catholic tradition:
Benedictine, Ignation and Carmelite.
Below is an indicative summary of topics that may be covered in the module:
Background: Christian asceticism and the development of monasticism
Models of Christian practice:
Benedictine practice, focusing on the Rule of Benedict, the rhythm of Benedictine life,
including prayer, work, and lectio divina; the application of Benedictine practices of
spiritual formation in lay spiritual practice;
Ignatian practice, including study of the Spiritual Exercises; discussion of the lives of St
Ignatius and St Francis Xavier;; the application of Ignatian spiritual practice in in spiritual
direction/formation of the laity;
Carmelite practice, including study of the works of St John of the Cross and St Teresa of
Avila; tracing the development of Carmelite practices of spiritual formation in historical
perspective; study of the life and works of St Theresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein);
exploration of the relationship between philosophy and spiritual practice in Carmelite
tradition from St John of the Cross to St Theresa Benedicta of the Cross; exploration of the
uses of Carmelite spiritual practice in formative practices in the church more broadly;
Practices of Spiritual formation in conversation:
Exploration of the similarities and differences of the three styles of practice within the
broader context of spiritual formation in the Catholic tradition; analysis of the uses of
varieties of practices of spiritual formation in the training and strengthening of both
clergy and laity.
9
Indicative bibliography
79
Perfectae caritatis: Decree on the adaptation and renewal of religious life (Pope Paul VI)
St John of the Cross and Kieran Kavanaugh. John of the Cross: Selected Writings. New York:
Paulist Press, 1991.
St John Cassian. Conferences, translated by Colm Luibheid, Introduction by Owen
Chadwick. New York: Paulist Press, 1985.
St Teresa of Avila. The Way of Perfection. Dover Publications, 2012.
Barry, Patrick, Richard Yeo and Kathleen Norris. Wisdom from the Monastery: The Rule of
St Benedict for Everyday Life. Norwich: Canterbury Press, 2003.
Hughes, Gerald W., Ignatius of Loyola, and Michael Ivens (translator). Spiritual Exercises
of St Ignatius of Loyola. Leominster: Gracewing, 2004
Barry, William. Finding God in all Things: A companion to the Spiritual Exercises of St
Ignatius. New York: Continuum, 2004.
Casey, Michael. Truthful Living: St Benedict's Teaching on Humility. Leominster:
Gracewing, 2001.
de Chardin, Pierre Teilhard. The Divine Milieu, translated by Sion Cowell. Sussex: Sussex
Academic Press, 2004.
de Vogüé (OSB), Adalbert. Reading St Benedict: Reflections on the Rule. Kalamazoo:
Cistercian Publications, 1994.
de Vogüé (OSB), Adalbert. The Rule of St Benedict: A Doctrinal and Spiritual Commentary.
Kalamazoo: Cistercian Publications, 1983.
Driot (OSB), Marcel. Fathers of the Desert: Life and Spirituality. Slough: St Paul
Publications, 1992.
Stein, Edith. Essential Writings. New York: Orbis Books, 2002.
Williams, Rowan. Teresa of Avila. New York: Continuum, 2004.
10
Teaching and Learning Methods
The module will be taught in term time but may in due course be offered as two
residential blocks with normally 30 hours of contact time.
The teaching methods will vary, incorporating:
1. Lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter
2. Small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the subject, to
offer opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to the subject-matter of
the course and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
3. Critical reflection in small group discussion on ‘real life’ examples
11
Summative Assessment
1. A 3000 word essay on an aspect of spiritual formation within one of the practices being
studied
2. A retreat plan for a small group or church that the student might lead as a part of his/her
future ministry using the practices of formation we have ben studying together. While the
format of the retreat is up to the student, it should include some materials (Scripture and
a selection from the literature we will cover) to be studied together as a group, some
input that the student might offer (or might invite an outside speaker to give). The plan
must be accompanied by a 2000-word statement that describes in detail the kinds of
spiritual practices to be encouraged or facilitated during the weekend and provides the
theological and rationale for the input and practices that comprise the retreat. It may be
that the student develops a plan for a weekend focused on prayer that introduces
80
members of his/her congregation to forms of spiritual practice to encourage them to
pursue a retreat in one of the styles being explored.
Component:
3000 Word essay
Weighting (%):
100
A retreat plan 2000 words
12
100
Formative assessment/feedback to students
1. Two brief presentations. Students will be asked to make two brief (10 minute)
presentations to the class, one that will provide a summary of a scholarly essay in the
field and a second that will address the spiritual formation of one of the figures we will be
studying. Both the essay and the figure will be chosen in consultation with the lecturer.
81
THMN44630 Money Matters and the Church
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
Rationale
This module reflects on the integration of theology and secular disciplines to inform
practice in the systems of governance in the church and develops integrity between
theology and practice in this vital area of the institutional church. It also considers the
implications of good governance for mission.
4
Pre requisites
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
None
None
Aim:
To enable students to reflect critically on the Christian response to wealth and money
and how it is managed by the Church, in dialogue with secular disciplines of financial
management and charity law:
to enable students to suggest new approaches to governance and financial management
which will facilitate mission in the light of their own critical reflection on current
practice.
To provide students with an in depth understanding of the development of the Christian
tradition of stewardship, wealth, the appropriate use of money and charity and enable
students to reflect critically on their personal experience of handling money and that of
their local church and to relate this experience to the learning from the module.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful completion of the module students should have knowledge of:
Upon successful completion of the module the students should have knowledge of :
•
The biblical approaches to money, wealth and stewardship
•
The way Christian ethics address the issue of wealth
•
The Church as a registered charity and the legal obligations this entails
•
Strategic financial planning and management for the church
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
•
Reflected critically on attitudes concerning money and wealth within the
Christian Tradition.
•
Set the tradition within the contemporary context and explored the implications
of this for stewardship and governance within the Church
•
Critically evaluated financial management and planning in at least two case
studies and examined the congruence and diversity between these and
82
•
•
contemporary research and understanding from biblical teaching and Christian
ethics
Demonstrated their ability to critically evaluate current financial management
models and understand and apply an accounting framework to church and
ministerial practice.
Understand financial accounts, interpreted them correctly and developed a
business plan involving financial planning and risk assessment in the context of
the mission and practice of the church.
Key Transferable Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
•
Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and
presented it clearly and effectively in written format.
•
Developed research based skills
•
Effectively communicated orally complex theological and ethical ideas, the
evaluation of practice in a clear, concise and engaging manner.
13
Module content
The module will
a)
Trace the development of Christian thinking concerning money, wealth and
stewardship from Biblical scholarship, Christian ethics, Church history and missiology.
b)
Consider the implications of this for the contemporary financial management in
the governance of the Church at all levels.
c)
Examine the Church as a charity, exploring how this relates to the relationship
between Church and State, politics and the new charity framework.
d)
Explore related notions of fund raising, giving, social benefit and the ‘Big Society’.
e)
Examine the relationship between faith, risk and mission
Below is an indicative summary of topics which may be included:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
14
Biblical perspectives on money, property and wealth. Old and New Testament
approaches. Stewardship, wisdom, the nature of the Kingdom of God.
God as provider, divine providence.
The history of Church and its attitude towards money and use of money. The
social gospel and serving the poor.
Discipleship and personal use of money.
Christian Ethics and wealth creation, attitudes to money, saving and spending.
Church and State. The Charity framework and Church accounting, trusteeship.
Effective fund raising – the issues
Mission, risk and money
Business planning and wise governance
Macro business planning in the dioceses, districts, regions.
Indicative bibliography
Hanson, K.C., and D.E.Oakman, Palestine in the Time of Jesus. Social structures and social
conflicts (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1998). [See especially chapters 3 (‘Pyramids of
Power’) and 4 (‘The Denarius Stops Here’).]
Herzog II, W.R., Jesus, Justice and the Reign of God. A Ministry of Liberation
83
(Louisville: WJK Press, 2000).
Oakman, D.E., Jesus and the Economic Questions of His Day (Studies in the Bible and Early
Christinaity, 8; Lewiston – Queenston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1986). [Seminal and
influential study of the subject.]
Richardson, Peter, Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans (Columbia:
University of South Carolina Press, 1996) [Who financed Herod’s building programme?
See especially pp 236-37 on the question whether Herod’s taxation was heavy or not.]
Udoh, Fabian E., To Caesar What is Caesar’s: Tribute, Taxes, and Imperial Administration
in Early Roman Palestine, 63 BCE – 70 CE (Providence: Brown Judaic Studies, 2005). [See
especially pp. 180-206; and 279-85.]
Alexander, D. and Nobes, C Financial Accounting: An International Introduction 2007, 3rd
Edition, FT Prentice Hall.
Atrill, P. and McLaney, E. Accounting and Finance for Non-Specialists 2009, 6th Edition,
FT Prentice Hall.
Arnold, G. Essentials of Corporate Financial Management 2007, FT Prentice Hall.
McLaney, E., Atrill, P. And McLaney, E.J., Accounting: An Introduction 2010, FT Prentice
Hall.
Weetman, P. Financial Accounting: An Introduction 2010, 5th Edition, FT Prentice Hall.
Anthony Rice Accounts Demystfied Pearson Educational
Dyson J.R. Accounting for Non-Accounting Students Prentice Hall
15
Teaching and Learning Methods
The methods will vary, incorporating
1. Lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter
2. Small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the subject, to
offer opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to the subject-matter of
the course and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
3. Critical reflection in small group discussions on ‘real life’ examples.
16
Summative Assessment
Component:
1 Essay
2
Weighting (%):
60
Seminar Presentation
40
84
For each component please define the elements of assessment and the percentage
contribution to the component. N.B. the weightings of the elements for each component
should add up to 100%.
COMPONENT 1:
Element
Essay
(Click here and type)
Length/duration
Weighting (%)
3000 words
100%
Length/duration
Weighting (%)
90 minutes
100%
Resit
opportunity
As normal
COMPONENT 2:
Element
Seminar
(Click here and type)
Resit
opportunity
As normal
The seminar is assessed for description and observation of the church’s financial plan
including a critique, depth and quality of theological reflection, implications for mission
and clarity of presentation. The student is required to submit seminar notes, but the
presentation itself is assessed.
17
Formative assessment/feedback to students
To create a business plan for the local church with reasoned commentary
85
THMN44730 Ministerial Development in Trinitarian Perspective
1
Module Type (i.e. compulsory or optional)
2
Module Size
3
4
30 UCUs
Optional
Single module
Rationale
1. This module applies Trinitarian insights to a vision for pastoral work that recognises the
paradox, ambiguity and mystery implicit in Christian ministry. It presents an
interpretation of Christian ministry as participation in the relational life of the triune God
of grace who is continuously working in his creation through his Spirit to reconcile all
things under Christ. It also introduces conceptual tools enabling students to engage in
theologia viatorum as they wrestle with contemporary issues at the cutting edge of
pastoral ministry.
Pre requisites
None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives:
None
Aims:
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
To enable students to discuss the value and importance of ‘doing theology’ as they
wrestle with contemporary issues at the cutting edge of pastoral ministry.
To enable students to readily appreciate the dynamic relational core of ministry,
grounded in an understanding of God as a transcendent immanent Trinity of grace.
To enable students to reflect critically on the essence of the gospel in terms of both its
exclusive claims and its inclusive embrace of all humanity.
To enable students to appreciate the contextual nature of the church in both its
traditional and emerging forms, and to appreciate the tension between alternative
approaches to pastoral leadership.
Objectives:
Subject Knowledge
Upon successful completion of the module students should have knowledge of:
1.
2.
3.
4.
The contribution of Trinitarian thinking to the practice of pastoral ministry.
The presence of paradox, ambiguity and mystery implicit in Christian ministry.
The essence of ministry as participation in all that God is doing in his world.
Insights into the nature of God, the gospel and pastoral ministry grounded in a
paradigm of ‘both-and’ rather than the narrow perspective of ‘either-or’.
Subject Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
86
1.
Developed skills in critically evaluating alternative theological approaches to
Christian ministry, resulting in the development of new insights and perspectives within
the framework of the doctrine of the Trinity.
2.
Reflected theologically on selected doctrinal and ethical issues in formulating a
coherent and systematic understanding of their significance in a clearly-articulated
theology of ministry.
3.
Learned how to apply conceptual tools in a wide range of ministry contexts,
enabling personal ministry growth in addressing contemporary issues at the cutting edge
of pastoral ministry.
4.
Learned how to apply knowledge and skills in a variety of practical ministry
settings, demonstrating a mature judgment, independent decision-making and personal
accountability.
Key Transferable Skills
Upon successful completion of the module students should have:
1.
Demonstrated their ability as self reflective, critically aware practitioners
2.
Acquired and synthesised information through reading and research and
presented that information clearly and effectively in written format
3.
Effectively communicated complex theological ideas orally in a clear, concise and
engaging manner
Module content
The module will
The overarching theological framework for the module is Trinitarian, and its conceptual
core is shaped by the two key themes of participation and theologia viatorum (a theology
for pilgrims on earth).
The module challenges what might be characterised as a myopic approach to pastoral
ministry which focuses on a limited – and limiting - view of what is essentially a
multifaceted pastoral reality. It will explore a range of issues that those in pastoral
ministry today may need to address as they open their minds to different ways of
thinking theologically about the nature and practice of Christian ministry.
Below is an indicative summary of topics which may be included:
The Trinitarian shape of pastoral ministry
The value of thinking within a ‘both-and’ paradigm
Mystery, paradox and ambiguity in pastoral ministry
Theological perspectives on God and the gospel and their implications for ministry
Alternative ways of understanding the nature and role of the church
Different theological perspectives on the nature of ministry
Perspectives on the nature of pastoral leadership
The eschatological orientation of Christian ministry
a)
Indicative bibliography - To be added
87
18
Teaching and Learning Methods
The methods will vary, incorporating:
1
Lectures: to convey information and exemplify an approach to the subject-matter,
enabling students to develop a clear understanding of the subject matter.
2
Small group discussions: to promote deeper critical engagement with the subject,
to offer opportunity for developing and exploring questions relating to the subject-matter
of the course and to encourage self-reflection and modelling of good practice through
interaction with students and staff.
3
Critical reflection in small group discussions on practical ministry situations.
19
Summative Assessment
1.
A major paper demonstrating a theological understanding of Trinitarian thinking,
with particular reference to personal ministry context (Learning Outcomes a1, a2, a3, b1,
b3, b4).
2.
A minor paper or context-based project evaluating one or more contemporary
issues at the cutting edge of pastoral ministry (Learning Outcomes a4, b2, b3).
3.
A seminar-based presentation in class time, with accompanying submitted notes,
on the nature, scope and communication of the gospel in contemporary pastoral ministry
(Learning Outcomes a4, b1, b2, c3).
Component:
Major paper
Weighting (%):
50
Minor paper or context-based project
30
Seminar-based presentation + submitted notes
20
COMPONENT 1:
Element
Length/duration Weighting (%)
Essay
3000 words
100%
Resit
opportunity
As normal
COMPONENT 2:
Element
Length/duration Weighting (%)
Resit
opportunity
Minor paper or contextbased project
2,000 words
As normal
100%
COMPONENT 3:
Element
Length/duration Weighting (%)
Resit
opportunity
Seminar-based presentation
+ submitted notes
30 minutes +
1,000 words
As normal
88
100%
20
Formative assessment/feedback to students
Review of a book dealing with a theological evaluation of contemporary pastoral ministry
– the review to be taken from a select bibliography or of a book agreed with the module
co-ordinator (Learning Outcomes c2, c3).
89
THMN49960 Dissertation
1
Module type (ie compulsory or optional)
2
Module size
3
Rationale
To provide the opportunity and requirement for a sustained piece of postgraduate
research and writing and an integrated topic in theology and ministry.
4
Prerequisites None
5
Corequisites (if any) None
6
Excluded combination of modules
7
Module aims and objectives
60 UCUs
Compulsory
Double module
None
Aim:
to produce a sustained piece of theological reflection on a topic related to mission and
ministry.
Objectives:
1
to develop the skills of research, study and reflection required in a sustained
piece of work.
2
The integration of different elements of learning which form part of the MA.
3
Proficiency and expertise in the chosen area of the dissertation.
8
Module content
The subject of the dissertation must be the subject of a written proposal and be formally
agreed by the Course Director of the appropriate institution and the Board of Studies for
the institution.
The subject of the dissertation should be related to the interface between the theological
tradition and the practice of Christian mission and ministry.
In general, the dissertation should
 be relatively narrow in scope, aiming at depth of analysis rather than breadth of
coverage;
 have a clearly defined methodology;
 be clear, well-written, and orderly in arrangement;
 present the results of a well-organised investigation;
 show a thorough knowledge of major primary sources;
 show an awareness of secular as well as Christian reflection and analysis of the
subject
 show the capacity to evaluate the secondary sources
A separate Handbook is provided on the practicalities of formulating a dissertation
proposal and also for rulings about the relationship between the dissertation and other
elements of the course.
90
10
Teaching methods
A one day workshop on key skills in research, IT and presentation skills.
Normally four supervision sessions of one hour with a supervisor appointed by the
Course Director.
11
Summative assessment
A 15,000 word dissertation.
12
Feedback to students
Feedback to students will comprise comments on draft proposals from the course
directors and individual supervision from the supervisor appointed for the dissertation.
91
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