Sixth Form Prospectus Insert-2016

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Contents

:

Letters from the Head, Senior Prefects and House Captains

Accommodation: map of the school

The Post-16 Curriculum

Timetable for Entry

Sixth Form Entry Procedure

Sixth Form Admission Policy

Which Subjects Should I Study?

University Course Requirements

Infographic Summary of UK Results

International Baccalaureate Diploma

10 Reasons why the IB Diploma is ideal preparation for University

About the Diploma

IB Learner Profile

Biology

Business & Management

Chemistry

Dance

English

Geography

History

Languages

Mathematics

Physics

Psychology

Theatre

Visual Arts

GCE A Levels

Art & Design

Biology

Business Studies

Chemistry

Dance

Drama & Theatre

Economics

English Language

English Literature

French; German; Spanish

Geography

Government & Politics

Graphic Products

History

Mathematics

Music

Physical Education

Physics

Psychology

Religious Studies

Sociology

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What Else?

The transition from GCSEs to Sixth Form Education

Additional Opportunities

Duke of Edinburgh Award Programme

PE / Sport : Level 2 Award in Community Sports Leadership

Other Extra-curricular Activities

LIFE!

Sixth Form Student Leadership

Private Study

Careers and Higher Education

Work Experience / Work Shadowing

Personalised Learning Department

Dress Code, Appearance and Possessions guidelines

Financial Support – 16-19 Bursary Fund

Sixth Form Study Contract

Subjects Applied For

Acceptance of Study Contract – to be returned with Application Form

Further information is available on the school’s website:

Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School - Home

Including the Parent and Student Information Pack:

Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School - Parent & Student Info Pack - Pages

This pack of information, which is supplied to all new starters provides an outline across a range of the school’s processes, procedures and policies.

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FROM THE HEAD TEACHER

Thank you for your interest in our sixth form. We are delighted that the number of young people wishing to join us at this stage of their career is growing. Our sixth form is steadily increasing in size and contains a very healthy mix of students who studied with us for their entire secondary school career and those who join us having spent Year 11 elsewhere.

We hope that our Sixth Form Prospectus contains all that you need to help you decide whether you wish to apply for a place with us. As you will see we offer two pathways - the

International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB) or a wide range of A Levels. Our IB students study six subjects and our A Level students follow three or four subjects. All students will follow a distinctive extra-curricular programme and alongside the mainstream academic curriculum we run a range of enrichment activities. The prospectus lists all the courses that we plan to offer; we do however reserve the right to cancel any course if there is insufficient demand.

Academic success is very important to us. However, we very much hope that our sixth formers will do far more than study. That is why our school offers a wide range of opportunities outside the classroom. Our sixth formers are heavily involved in debating, sports events, charity projects and enterprise activities. In fact the success of many aspects of school life depends heavily on the leadership that our senior students provide. We look to sixth formers to act as role models for younger students and to help the staff to manage the school. Our ambition is that every one of our sixth formers leaves us with the qualifications, knowledge and personal qualities that they will need to succeed in Higher Education and the workplace.

You have an important decision to make about how to spend the next two years of your life.

This period of time will undoubtedly have a very big influence on the opportunities that will be available to you in adult life. We recognise this and are very willing to spend time helping you to make the choice that is right for you. Our Open Evening is part of the process of explaining the opportunities that are available. Do take time to do your own investigations and find out all that you need to know before applying to study here (or elsewhere).

I look forward to meeting you on November 12 th

and to receiving your application.

Stephen Box

Headteacher

FROM THE SENIOR PREFECT TEAM

On behalf of everyone currently in the sixth form we would like to wish you a warm welcome to Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School and hope you enjoy looking round our school and meeting students and staff. If you join us next September you’ll become a part of a close knit community. You will be given responsibilities, be able to help run clubs for younger years and have the opportunity to become a leader of the school, as all of us on the Senior Student

Leadership Team (SSLT) are currently.

The Floyd has a great pastoral care system; if you come here you can be sure you will be supported in all you do. You have your teachers for all of your subjects, with whom you’ll enjoy relationships which are totally different to those you’ve experienced so far in secondary education. You will also have a form tutor, one of two year leaders, and the Head of Sixth

Form, Mrs Williams, who you can turn to for help and advice, especially if there is anything you are worried about.

We have been provided with some outstanding facilities. We have the Glover block with G2, a large room for independent learning during your study periods. It is fully equipped with forty computers and desks for book work; you will of course be wanting somewhere quiet to get on with your work so you can have a social life outside of school. We also have the use of the

Library with several more computers and a large selection of books, both fiction and nonfiction, and some educational magazines for you to browse and to broaden and deepen your understanding of the subjects you are studying.

You will be set up for your future very well here. The teaching is of a fantastically high standard and lessons are always fun which results in our students achieving highly.

Examination results are improving every year so you’ll be able to hand pick from the UK’s top universities if that is what you want to do. There is a lot of support in the university application process, with time given to helping you make the best application possible. In the

LIFE! programme you will be given advice on interview techniques so even if university is not for you, you will be in a great position to apply for a job or other further education courses.

However it’s not all about studying and lessons! There are countless opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities. The annual Sixth Form Ski Trip is always a highlight; all who go on it come back with stories to tell. There is the opportunity to go on a World

Challenge Expedition and experience a totally new culture and make a real impact on the lives of people in a developing country. Towards the end of the year we take part in Activities Week

(a week off timetable when you get to help out with various events and projects) or you can organise work experience to strengthen your UCAS application.

Finally, you’ll make many friends during the next couple of years should you come to the Floyd

Grammar and those friendships will last way beyond your time here. Best wishes for this important year ahead of you and we hope you choose to join ‘The Floyd Sixth Form’ to continue your education.

Maxine Thomas-Asante

Head Girl

Harry Frost

Head Boy

FROM THE HOUSE CAPTAINS

As House Captains we are pleased to write to you as a potential sixth form student of Sir

Henry Floyd Grammar School.

We would like to tell you something about an important branch of the student leadership team in our school - The House System. The school community is divided into five Houses: Ascott,

Claydon, Hartwell, Mentmore and Waddesdon. Each House follows the same leadership structure including a member of the teaching staff, a student Captain with two Vice Captains, enabling the House System within the school to be primarily student led.

Our aim is to catalyse student motivation throughout the House System and establish a sense of belonging and pride in each student’s House from day one. The House System being a vertical system allows older students to mix and work with younger students quite naturally.

This is something we are very proud of and our student relationships across the key stages are excellent and improving!

As House Captains, we organise and publicise Inter-House activities through house assemblies and competitions that occur throughout the academic year, which all students can participate in. House points will be awarded to each House for a variety of activities including: sporting events, dance, drama and music, debating and public speaking, charity fund raising and, above all, as recognition of effort made in general class work. Any examples of ‘public spirit’, contrasting from caring for the environment, demonstrating helpfulness to members of staff through to assisting at extra–curricular functions like Open Evenings also attract the reward of

House points for one’s House. These points are collected each term and collated by Mrs

Malone. The system operates as a running total: each total recorded is calculated from

September of that academic year and updates are displayed on the House notice boards in the main corridor.

At the end of the academic year a whole day is dedicated to House competition. During the

House Olympiad Day students experience a wider choice of activities; science challenges, enterprise, sport and choirs to name a few. This culminates in a celebration assembly where final performances and awards are shared with the whole school. Once again, this occasion has a vertical theme and sixth form ambassadors and students take lead roles in the activity preparation and delivery.

For years 12 and 13, students remain in the House they were in up to year 11. If you are a new student joining the sixth form, you will be allocated a House on your first day.

We hope we’ve explained the House System effectively and look forward to working with you in the forthcoming year.

Sanah Ali

Ascott

Lucas Wiggins

Claydon

Lily Cox

Hartwell

Raajpal Tanday

Mentmore

Lilly Kenyon

Waddesdon

SPORTS

HALL

Foyer

Physical Education

A

CCOMMODATION

In September 2009 the new purpose-built Sixth Form Centre was opened in the Glover Building. At all times the open area, G2, is available as a supervised study area where students have access to our computer network. There are high expectations about its usage and students are not permitted to consume food or drinks, other than water, in the area.

G2 is available for social time during breaks and lunchtime but there is also a large courtyard area with seating when the weather is fine.

MEETING

HOUSE

TENNIS & NETBALL

COURTS

Learning

Development

SPORTS

FIELD

GLOVER BLOCK

6th Form Study

Area - IB Diploma

Info. and Q&A

Modern Foreign

Languages G14

Economics G12

Government &

Politics H15

Psychology G18

Religious Studies H16

GYM

PERFORMING

ARTS

Dance

A5 & A6

COURT

YARD

HUMANITIES

BLOCK

Geography H12 & 13

History H14

Hall & Dining Area –

Refreshments

PERFORMING ARTS

CENTRE

Drama A1

Music A14, A11

Recording Studio

LIBRARY

BLOCK

Library

Religious

Studies

TOWER

BLOCK

Business T21

English T15

Maths T31 & T32

RECEPTION

VISITORS’

PARKING

STAFF

CAR PARK

COURT

YARD

LINK

CORRIDOR

STAFF

CAR PARK

STAFF

CAR PARK

STAFF CENTRE

PRACTICAL

BLOCK

Biology P11

Chemistry P16

Physics P15

Art P5

Graphics P2

Sociology P3

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URRICULUM

As a grammar school, we aim to provide challenging and enjoyable courses for able, well-motivated students which can qualify them for the most competitive courses in Higher Education and progression to the most demanding and rewarding careers. An adult atmosphere prevails and the strong work ethic makes a significant contribution to the academic success of our students. We strive to build excellent relationships between staff and students. ‘In a nutshell’, we believe our sixth form can offer you an education of the highest quality. A number of our students go to Oxbridge every year and typically, the

Russell research and ‘Red Brick’ universities are where we pitch the majority of our applications. A significant number of Year 13 leavers forge careers in medicine, dentistry or veterinary science as well as other vocational professions such as law, teaching or highly competitive fields such as journalism or business.

Some students appreciate the opportunity to study subjects not previously studied at GCSE; some wish to include a subject for interest's sake, which may contrast with or complement others selected in a combination to ensure progression to the next chosen destination or prospective career path.

Students will be able to choose between The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme and A Levels.

Both pathways are academically rigorous, internationally recognised, and valued by universities and employers. Both require motivation, commitment and intellectual curiosity. Neither is inherently more or less difficult than the other; nor is one or the other more suited to academically strong or less able students. They do offer different approaches to 16+ education so parents and students should consider which of these would best suit their aspirations, style of learning and curriculum interests. Whichever route students choose, they will benefit from the guidance of our highly qualified specialist teachers. They will also have the support of their tutors, Year and Subject Leaders.

We also include opportunities to engage in supercurricular activities, some of which provide qualifications, which are intended to develop personal attributes as well as academic qualities.

THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA –

a broad, balanced, international and socially engaged education for the whole person

The Diploma offers students a world class education as preparation for university and the rapidly changing world beyond. All students are required to study six subjects over the two years, as well as learning about how to learn. They are also required to show evidence of creative and voluntary pursuits outside the classroom. The programme is designed to equip students with the academic skills needed for university study, further education and their chosen profession, as well as developing key life skills for adulthood.

In the current climate of change regarding A Levels, the IB remains a stable qualification recognised globally. It also suits those students who are as yet undecided about their exact career path as its breadth keeps more career paths open, whilst also giving depth and challenge in the three Higher Level subjects.

Students take a balanced range of languages, sciences, humanities and arts along with a course in the theory of knowledge and an independent research project. Three subjects are studied at Higher Level and three at Standard Level. One subject is chosen from each of the following groups:

GROUP SUBJECT(S)

1 ENGLISH

2

3

4

FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH, GERMAN ab initio

HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT

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BIOLOGY, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY

MATHEMATICS

6 ART, THEATRE, DANCE, CHEMISTRY, PSYCHOLOGY

Please note that these are the subjects on offer with tuition in school, however the Diploma has a vast range of subjects to choose from. Please talk to Mrs Williams, the Diploma Coordinator, about this.

All the above subjects are available at either Higher level or Standard level. In group 2 there is the option of studying a beginners’ (ab initio) course in German. As with A Level subjects there is a minimum group size.

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Although assessment is primarily through examinations in the first three weeks of May in Year 13, one of the added advantages of the IB Diploma is that a significant proportion of final assessment is by course work. The Extended Essay of 4000 words in a subject chosen by the student will be completed by the

Christmas of Year 13.

The Diploma is highly regarded at top universities all around the world, including Oxbridge and Ivy

League. It has been taught in the United Kingdom since 1971; 136 schools now offer it in the UK and there are 4267 schools worldwide teaching the Diploma. This course will suit students who favour a broad and balanced curriculum, as well as the opportunity to study three Higher Level subjects in depth.

It will also suit students who are interested, self-motivated and self-disciplined, and believe in the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate organisation, which sees education as being broad based and equipping you to excel in a world of diversity and change.

For immediate queries, contact Mrs Williams, the Diploma Coordinator, Email: [email protected]

ADVANCED LEVEL GCE –

an intensive, specialist education

These courses offer a reputation of academic strength allowing students to specialise in those subjects that complement their interests and strengths.

A level examinations are in the process of change; a significant number have already updated their

specifications

(content) and examination requirements and the majority of subjects will be the new style for September 2016. These new A Levels are

linear

and will be examined in summer 2018, at the end of year 13 (and not at the end of year 12). Any subjects that are not changing in September 2016 will follow the familiar AS/A2 model for our next intake.

All students will be required to study three subjects at A Level

.

The only exception to this will be:

 students who opt for further mathematics as they will study two A levels alongside A levels in maths and further maths

 students who have a number of high GCSE grades (minimum 56 points). Such students should indicate their wish to be considered on their application form. A place on a 4 their place on the 4 th A Level course will only be offered if a student’s school reference suggests that they will achieve highly at GCSE and th A Level will only be confirmed once GCSE results are known.

A Level courses may suit students who know precisely what they wish to study at university and beyond and/or have a particular strength in a select area of the curriculum.

There is no option at this school for students to discontinue a subject at the end of year 12 (with the exception of the Further Maths AS course).

ENRICHMENT PROGRAMME

All Year 12 students studying three A Levels must participate in an Enrichment Course. Any student studying four A levels may also apply to do an Enrichment Course, although this is not compulsory.

Students should express their preferences for their selected Enrichment Course by completing the relevant section on the Confirmation Form provided on GCSE results day.

COURSE QUALIFICATION LEVEL

TAUGHT HOURS PER

FORTNIGHT

Extended Project Qualification

(EPQ)

Level 3 2

The EPQ is highly regarded by universities and employers as it enables students to acquire and put into practice a whole range of transferable skills that are relevant to successful independent learning. The course starts with the taught element – creating a research question, selecting and referencing sources, time management, academic writing, presentation skills (to name but a few). Students who have completed an EPQ say how much they enjoyed writing a project about something they are really interested in and that goes beyond the A Level specifications.

Some universities are now making more favourable offers to students who gain an A grade in their EPQ and it makes a great discussion point in university applications.

Each student will have a supervisor to help them reflect on their learning and assess their project; their role is not to chase for work, so the EPQ is only suitable for students really motivated to study a topic at depth and gain this qualification. It is equivalent to half an A level and as it is A2 standard, students must be prepared to carry on into year 13 when they will complete their writing up and do their presentation. http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/projects/aqa-certificate/EPQ-7993

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English Studies NA 1

Any student who does not have a B grade or better in either English Language or English Literature GCSE should definitely opt for this course. Good written and spoken communication skills are essential for success at A level and beyond. The course is designed to teach you how to communicate more confidently and effectively. Active workshops to help you develop speaking and listening skills will cover creating and delivering presentations, debating, and presenting yourself professionally in interviews. Practical writing sessions will focus on reporting, reviewing, analysis and evaluation skills, structuring essays, and how to compile a curriculum vitae and write a letter of application. Newspapers and on-line media resources will form the basis of a critical examination of a topical, controversial issue. Students will be expected to carry out preparation for the lessons, averaging approximately one hour per fortnight.

Maths Studies NA 2

This course will cover some modules from the IB Maths Studies course but will not be examined externally.

Any student who does not have a B grade or better in Mathematics GCSE should definitely opt for this course. Good numeracy skills are essential for success at A level and beyond; many of the new A Levels have increased their maths skills content.

It is particularly relevant to those students following courses with a high maths content but who are not doing an A level in maths.

In outline:

Sciences use a lot of equations, formulae, graph work and statistics such as standard deviation, the concept of error and %change

Geography uses correlation and trend analysis

Business Studies and Economics use a number of ratios

Psychology uses a lot of statistics to analyse data

Other skills you will learn are approximation, standard form and the use of statistical tests like Chi squared.

There will be some homework set to enable students to apply what they have covered in class and prepare for the next lesson.

Modern Foreign Language IB Course 4

For students who wish to carry on with a language alongside their A Levels. Employers and universities are very keen to recruit students with a proficiency in a modern language; many universities offer a placement abroad and keeping up with a language or learning a new one will give you the edge.

You will be joining the IB Year 12 courses at either Standard or

ab initio (beginner)

level. French, German and Spanish are available to those having a relevant GCSE and German

ab initio

is offered for those wishing to take up a new language. You will be expected to work as hard as those students studying the language for the IB and complete the work outside the classroom that is set. The workload is the equivalent of half an A level.

Course Content

At Standard Level, students will study the core topics of:

· Social relationships (family, friends, marriage etc.)

· Communication and media (internet, mobiles, TV, radio etc.)

· Global issues (wealth and poverty, environment, immigration etc.)

And two topics from this list of options:

Leisure / health / science and technology / cultural diversity / customs & traditions

For

ab initio

the topics are:

Individual and society (daily routines, education, food and drink, personal details, physical health, relationships, shopping

Leisure and work (employment, entertainment, holidays, media, sport, technology, transport)

Urban and rural environment (environmental problems, global issues, neighbourhood, physical geography, town and services, weather)

Further details can be found on the school website as follows: http://www.sirhenryfloyd.bucks.sch.uk/assets/Uploads/SIXTH-FORM-PROSPECTUS-2015.pdf

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Sports Leader Qualification Level 2 2

The Community Sports Leadership Award is a nationally recognised qualification that enables successful candidates to lead groups of people in sport/activity, under indirect supervision. The qualification teaches generic leadership skills such as organisation, planning, communication and teamwork through the medium of sport. It is a fun and practical qualification with no entrance requirements or final examinations to sit. The course content provides a structured training scheme designed to develop qualities of leadership, responsibility and self-confidence through practical experience.

The course content includes:

• Plan, lead and evaluate a sport/activity session

• Developing leadership skills

• Lead a session to improve fitness

• Adapting sports activities

• Establish and maintain a safe sport/activity session

• Organise and deliver a sports event or competition

• Pathways in sport and recreation

Assessment is continuous. A final interview (by an external moderator) may be requested at the end of the course, and a lower school lesson is taught by the candidate in Year 13. A log book of activities/evidence file must be maintained and kept up to date by the student. Course certificates are awarded to successful candidates.

A financial contribution (approximately £35) will be necessary to cover liability insurance, course log book and evidence sheets. http://www.sportsleaders.org/courses/qualifications/qcf-qualifications/level-2-award-in-community-sportsleadership/

Our Sports Leaders always play a key role on Sports Day in the summer term and many are appointed to the senior prefect roles of Sports Ambassadors or House Captains in the spring term.

Duke of Edinburgh Silver or Gold 1

This is offered at Silver Level for those who have a Bronze Award or are starting for the first time. Those students who have completed Silver may go on to the Gold award. As well as the opportunity afforded by the award for personal development, universities and employers value the scheme highly, especially at gold level.

The award will take approximately eighteen months to complete, dependent upon the commitment of the participant. Students will be supported by an external provider, Mr David Goss, www.zest-foradventure.co.uk

and school staff.

Students must be prepared to work independently on their award, using the designated school time* available plus their own time.

(*Meetings may be held at lunchtimes and not necessarily during lessons).

The award involves the expedition section over three weekends in year 12:

 Locally in the Chilterns – 2 day training

Cotswolds – 3 day practice

Derbyshire Peak District – 3 day qualifying

There will be a cost for these weekends to include supervision and assessment. Further information about the programme, including costs for the 2015 – 16 programme, can be found on the website. http://www.sirhenryfloyd.bucks.sch.uk/students/duke-of-edinburgh/

A parents and students Silver and Gold information evening will be held in September 2016. Students signing up will be required to complete an application form that will be available in the DofE section of the website after this meeting.

This course is open to any student wishing to gain the award and can be taken as the only Enrichment course or in addition to any other course.

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Community

Service/Volunteering

- 1 or 2

All students will benefit from some time spent volunteering and contributing in a purposeful way to their local community. Many of our students do this outside the school day but they are also permitted to set aside one private study period per week for this purpose. Students will need to organise their placement, especially if they are doing this off site, but there will also be opportunities to support learning in school, such as helping to run a social club for students with communication difficulties or helping out regularly in a class.

All students are encouraged to pursue a period of work shadowing / work experience relevant to their chosen career. This is particularly important in areas such as accountancy, law, teaching, physiotherapy, medicine, dentistry or veterinary science where competition for places is high. We do have a well established link with a local primary school and special school for students interested in teaching or educational psychology.

Activities week is set aside at the end of the summer term for 4-5 days work experience for all year 12 students but those students aspiring to study medicine or dentistry are encouraged to volunteer over a longer period of time to show a level of commitment to their chosen career, such as working in a care home.

Healthy Life Style NA 2

Leaving home to go off to university or training can be a challenge for many young adults! Will they be able to look after themselves properly? Can they cook a healthy meal and live within their means?

The practical and theoretical course will cover cooking on a budget and with minimal ingredients, analysing nutrition in food and drink. You will learn easy ways to cook to impress! Students will be expected to bring ingredients for their dishes and be responsible for maintaining good hygiene and safety standards in all lessons.

Based in the Food Technology room, this course is going to be very popular so we will be running it in blocks of 8 lessons (4 weeks) to give as many students as possible the opportunity to gain these ‘survival skills’!

For further information contact Mrs Williams Email: [email protected]

UCAS

(Universities and Colleges Admissions Service)

Most students apply to university at the start of year 13. Successful applicants receive conditional offers based on the

IB Diploma or A Level grades

they are predicted to achieve.

University Points Tariff

Some universities make offers using points scores – for entries into university from September 2017 these are changing. Please follow this link for further information https://www.ucas.com/sites/default/files/new-tariff-tables.pdf

Destinations

Last year 90 students progressed to the leading Russell and 1994 Group universities, including seven to

Oxford and Cambridge, three to Imperial College London and two to the London School of Economics.

4 out of 7 IB students and 3 out of 12 A Level students who applied to Oxford or Cambridge received an offer and gained an Oxbridge place.

Below are details of university destinations for all of our students who applied last year.

Aberdeen Accounting & Finance

Aberystwyth – 2 students Financial Mathematics, Creative Writing & Film and Television

Studies

Anglia Ruskin – 2 students

Arts University, Bournemouth

Aston – 3 students

Bangor

Bath – 2 students

Psychology, 3D Games Art & Design

Film Production

Economics, Business & Management, Chemical Engineering

Zoology

Politics & International Relations, Mechanical Engineering

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Birkbeck

Birmingham

Bournemouth

Brighton – 3 students

Brighton Institute of Modern Music

Brunel – 2 students

Cambridge – 3 students

Leicester – 9 students

English

Mathematics

International Hospitality Management

English Literature, English Literature, Civil Engineering

Songwriting

Games Design & Development, Theatre & Film & TV Studies

Human Social & Political Sciences, Modern & Medieval Languages,

Engineering

Cardiff – 2 students

Central Lancashire

Chester

De Montfort

East Anglia – 4 students

Edinburgh – 2 students

Exeter – 3 students

Gloucester

Hertfordshire

Optometry, Physics

Psychology

International Business

Politics

Biochemistry, Psychology, Accounting & Finance, American

Literature with Creative Writing

English Language, Neuroscience

Zoology, English & Drama, English

Primary Education

Paramedic Science

Hull Computer Science

Imperial College, London – 3 students Chemistry, Mathematics, Aeronautical Engineering

Kent – 5 students Computer Science, Anthropology, History & Politics, English &

American Literature, Psychology

King’s College, London – 2 students

Lancaster

Leeds – 3 students

English, Global Health & Social Medicine

Fine Art

Economics, French & International Development, Japanese &

Spanish

Mechanical Engineering, Biological Sciences, English, Medical

Biochemistry, Criminology, Medical Biochemistry, English,

Psychology, History

Biochemistry, English with History

Law, History & International Relations

Lincoln – 2 students

London School of Economics -

2 students

London South Bank – 2 students

Loughborough – 2 students

Macpherson College, Kansas USA

Manchester – 8 students

Middlesex

Milan, Italy

Newcastle - 2 students

Nottingham – 8 students

Photography, Psychology (Child Development)

Sports Technology, Economics & Management

Health & Physical Education

Medicine, French Studies, Sociology, Chemical Engineering,

Mathematics & Statistics, Economics, Neuroscience, Anthropology

Biochemistry

Economics

Biomedical Sciences, Dentistry

Law, Modern Languages, Music, Music, International Relations,

Criminology, Physics, Psychology

Nottingham Trent – 3 students

Oxford – 4 students

Oxford Brookes – 6 students

Business & Management, Astrophysics, Fashion Communication &

Promotion

Physics, Biomedical Sciences, Medicine, Theology & Religion

Geography, City & Regional Planning, Geography, Science

Foundation, Architecture, Foundation Engineering

Pearson College

Plymouth

Portsmouth – 5 students

Queen Mary, London – 2 students

Reading – 2 students

Royal Holloway College, London

– 2 students

Sheffield – 3 students

Business & Enterprise

Marine Biology

Biochemistry, Politics, Mechanical Engineering, English Literature,

Media Studies & Entertainment

Chemistry, Mathematics & Statistics

Marketing, English & Beginners’ Spanish

English, English & Italian

Chemistry, Politics, Aerospace Engineering

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Sheffield Hallam

SOAS

Southampton – 6 students

Southampton Solent – 2 students

St George’s London

Surrey – 2 students

Sussex

Swansea – 3 students

University College, London

University of East London

University of the Arts, London

University of West of England

Warwick – 7 students

Worcester

York – 3 students

Aeronautical Engineering

Japanese

Electronic Engineering, Chemistry with Mathematics, Biology,

Biology, Computer Science, Politics

Fashion Promotion & Communication, Fashion Journalism

Medicine

Business & Management, International Hospitality Management

Criminology

Psychology, Economics, Business & Management

Medicine

Professional Dance & Musical Theatre

Art Foundation

Architecture

American Studies, Mathematics, English Literature, Physics,

Modern Languages, Mathematics, Law

Creative Digital Media

Linguistics, Philosophy, Foundation Electronic Engineering

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T

IMETABLE

F

OR

E

NTRY

NOVEMBER-

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

JANUARY

Start

researching the subjects

that would best suit your higher education and career aspirations.

Attend the Open Evening on

Thursday 12 th November 2015.

Read the Sixth Form Prospectus carefully.

Look at how your predicted GCSE grades fit in with the sixth form

requirements

e.g. A/A* or B grades.

Discuss your

subject suitability for the IB Diploma or A Level courses

interested in with staff at your school. you are

At Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School this will happen during the Year 11 student interviews in January. All internal students will meet with a member of the

Senior Staff to discuss choices post-16, here or elsewhere. Predicted GCSE grades and your attitude to learning will be used to assess your suitability for our sixth form.

Talk to the present sixth form students about courses they follow and discuss your plans with your parents/carers.

FEBRUARY – Spring

Term

MARCH

Submit your application and contract by

29

Mrs Williams, Head of Sixth Form. th January 2016 at the latest, to

It will take time for your application to be processed.

For external applicants no decisions can be made until a reference has been received from their present school with predicted grades. Please bear in mind that we receive far more applications from external candidates than we have places for, so carefully considered selection is necessary.

All students, internal and external applicants, should get a response in writing in

March.

Some students will receive a

conditional offer -

they will have a place providing they achieve certain GCSE/BTech examination results.

Some students will not be offered a place at this point.

Some of these students do achieve more highly than their teachers predict and we welcome re-applications after GCSE results are known.

The minimum point score for entry is 48 from the best 8 results which must include English Language and mathematics at a minimum of a grade C. Please note that it is likely that a prediction of more than 48 points will be required for a student to be made a conditional offer as more suitably qualified students apply than there are places available.

JUNE/JULY

AUGUST 26 th 2016

All students holding a conditional offer are invited to an Induction Day on

Wednesday 22 nd June 2016. There will also be an additional IB Induction Day on Thursday 23 rd June (provisional date) for all those selecting this course.

Students will have the opportunity on these days to meet and work with prospective and present sixth formers, as well as the staff likely to be teaching and tutoring them.

Internal candidates with a conditional offer will know on GCSE results day whether they have qualified for a place in the sixth form.

External applicants

who have been offered a conditional place are invited into school

on GCSE results day from 11.00 am

to confirm their offer and to take up their place. They should bring a copy of all their results with them, including any GCSEs sat earlier than June 2016, and proof of eligibility to study documents.

SEPTEMBER

All applicants must check that they qualify for their specific subject choices when they confirm their place.

The first day of term is a further induction day; meeting tutors and participating in the ‘Wet and Wild’ team-building activities.

14

S

IXTH

F

ORM

E

NTRY

P

ROCEDURE

The application form sets out the subject that we expect to offer next year.

However, please note that:

(i) Courses will run only if group numbers are viable and if we have the staffing available.

Where there are insufficient numbers for a subject to run, we reserve the right to ask students to re-select and choose another subject

. Alternatively the course may be offered but on a reduced number of lessons. We will also endeavour to keep class sizes manageable in the most popular subjects.

(ii) The IB and linear A Level courses last for the full two years and so, once started, the subjects will be guaranteed. We expect all subjects that students pick at modular A Level to be available for study to the full A Level over two years.

(iii)

(iv)

Late applicants may not get their first choice of subjects due to teaching groups being full.

If a student changes their subject choice after submitting the application form, we may not be able to accommodate the revised subjects due to the fact that teaching groups, and staffing, will have already been organised.

Completing the application form

This can be downloaded from the school’s website www.sirhenryfloyd.bucks.sch.uk or a hard copy is provided with the prospectus at the Sixth Form Open Evening.

Please indicate your choice of subjects in the following way, having read all the relevant information first.

THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA

Complete the appropriate table on the application form, listing three subjects at Higher Level and three subjects at Standard Level.

Please note that students selecting HL maths must select three other HL subjects.

A LEVEL COURSES

Complete the appropriate table on the application form. Tick the subjects you have chosen to study.

IMPORTANT: choose three subjects from the table, irrespective of which column they are in.

If your predicted grades are equivalent to 56 points or more we will include in your offer letter an invitation to take a fourth subject if you wish.

If you have any questions once you have had a chance to read through the prospectus, telephone the school on 01296 424781 and ask for either Mrs Williams or Mrs Chapman.

Please return the application form with the signed Study Contract agreement

by

29 th January

2016

, marking your envelope

Sixth Form Entry and for the attention of Mrs Williams

. We suggest you also complete the form at the back of the prospectus for your own reference as a record of your subject choices.

For internal applicants, a tray will be available at Reception in January for application forms and study contracts.

All applications will be acknowledged by email. If you have not received such an acknowledgement by

5 th February 2016 please check with Mrs Thompson in the library ([email protected] for external applicants) that your application has been received.

15

S

IXTH

F

ORM

A

DMISSION

P

OLICY

1

The school’s external admission number into Year 12 is 40

. This guarantees a minimum number of places to suitably qualified external candidates.

2

Entry to the sixth form is conditional and dependent on all of the following:

attaining the minimum point score

(see 4 below)

meeting the GCSE grade requirements in all chosen subjects

(see pages on individual subjects).

attaining at least a C grade in both English Language and mathematics. providing proof of eligibility to study in the UK (suitable documents include birth certificate, British passport)

Students are required to study either the IB Diploma or three A levels.

In addition, students will follow the LIFE! programme which will include preparation for life after school including university and the world of work. (See also the “What Else?” section of this prospectus).

3 Acceptance for

external applicants

is additionally dependent on references (predicted GCSE/BTECH grades), which suggest a student is academically suited to study the IB Diploma or A Levels in a grammar school sixth form. Some external applicants may be asked to attend a meeting to discuss their subject choices with the Head of Sixth Form.

Internal applications

from Year 11 students will be considered in conjunction with their progress and effort reports and evidence of hard work. Students will receive feedback on their suitability to study specific subjects at parents’ evening and their meeting with a senior member of staff to consider 16+ choices.

4

Given that students will be studying six IB or three A level subjects, a minimum entry requirement for the sixth form is 48 points at GCSE, based on the best 8 subjects

(including English and mathematics). Note also the additional grade requirements for each subject.

Credit will be given to those with vocational qualifications, with equivalent points apportioned according to levels achieved at full or part award (see table below).

Tariff for Qualifications including BTEC

(as determined by the school)

Full Course GCSE BTEC Certificate/Diploma GCSE Equivalent

A*

A

8

7 D* 7 / 14 A / AA

B

C

6

5

D 6 / 12

M 5 / 10

B / BB

C / CC

D 4 P 5 / 8 D / DD

5 If there are more applications from external students than places available then the conditional offers

given will be awarded to those with the highest predicted point scores. A prediction of 48 points or

more does not guarantee a conditional offer.

6. The progress of sixth form students is reviewed at certain checkpoints by the Effort Codes given by their subject teachers. [1 = exceptional effort, 2 = expected effort, 3 = specific concern].

Rarely is a student asked to leave the sixth form, however if a student’s performance falls short of expectations it may be necessary.

For example:

Consistently poor Effort Codes (3s)

Poor attendance (<85%)

Non-compliance with the Dress Code / Code of Conduct

Failure to make appropriate use of study facilities (G2 and Library)

Consistent underperformance in comparison with targets (ALIS estimates)

16

Note: Transition from Year 1 IB to Year 2 IB: a student must have minimum of 21 points comprising a minimum of 4 points in 3 x HL subjects and a minimum of 3 points in 3 x SL subjects

. The point scores will be determined by individual subject teachers based on the Year 12 IB internal Trial examinations. Students who do not qualify for Year 13 IB will be informed in writing by the end of the summer term of Year 1.

Transition from Year 1 A Level to Year 2 A Level: a student must attain at least a D grade in their end of Year 12 Trial Examinations in order to progress onto the Year 13 course.

Thus Year 12 students who do not achieve the minimum requirement of three D grades at the end of their first year at A Level will not qualify for a place in Year 13.

7.

Applications to repeat Year 12

are rare.

It is very rare for a student to repeat a year 12 course for the following reason.

The government’s Funding Agency consider that 'the activity has already been funded'.

Only where there are 'exceptional circumstances outside the control of the student or the institution, such as a long term period of sickness' can funding be claimed by the school.

In summary, t

here is currently no funding available for students to repeat the same subject(s)

So it is unlikely that this option will be available.

Decisions on these ‘out of age’ applications will be made taking all factors into account and will be made after all standard applications have been dealt with. Even if a student has met the above criteria, places may not be available in the light of the number of applicants who have met their conditional offers, sixth form capacity and availability of specific courses.

Over-subscription criteria will be as for standard applications.

End of Year 12 examination results will be used to rank candidates rather than GCSE scores.

17

W

HICH

S

UBJECTS

S

HOULD

I S

TUDY ?

5

4

3

1

The first decision to make is which subjects to study in Year 12. Some students find it very difficult to choose their IB Diploma or A Level subjects. There are several points that you should bear in mind.

Am I academically capable of studying this subject

?

Your current teachers will advise you about this. Also, read the entry requirements for each course.

At the Sixth Form Open Evening and on Induction Days ask current sixth formers about the subjects you are interested in - they will give you an honest view of the demands of the subject. Attend any

‘taster’ lessons on offer and, if you are choosing a new subject, make sure you opt for these so you can get some idea of the course.

2

Is the combination of subjects I am considering appropriate to my future Higher

Education/career aspirations?

Complementary combinations might be biology/chemistry/physics or mathematics, or English literature/politics/sociology or history. The subjects involve similar study-skills and work patterns, as well as having some concepts or procedures in common. A word of warning, though - some subjects have so much in common that it may be advisable to study only one or at least not both at A Level.

The IB course automatically has a broader spectrum of subjects and this is one of its strengths.

If you do not see such a pattern, it may be worth reviewing your choices, although it is better to choose individual subjects rather than ‘areas’ in the first instance.

Again, you can obtain advice on this from the Sixth Form Team. In addition, university and college prospectuses and the UCAS website (Course Search) will give a clear indication of the A Level or IB subjects required for specific courses. Prospectuses are located in the careers section of G2, as well as on-line. It is an excellent idea to do some research and plan ahead for your future. If you know what you wish to study, or career path you wish to pursue, you can match your subject choices to your aspirations.

Can I study a subject at IB or A Level that I have not studied before?

In several cases the answer is - yes. Read the page on the subject you are interested in and then speak to the relevant teacher. Some subjects, such as sociology, psychology, economics and government and politics, are not offered lower down the school. It is important that you find out as much as you can about a new subject so you can be sure you will like it.

We advise you not to take more than two unfamiliar courses at IB or A Level, unless there are clear reasons related to progression to a particular career or Higher Education course. You could find too much novelty unsettling.

Must I include the subject I wish to study at university?

The majority of our sixth form students proceed to Higher Education where an enormous variety of courses are available. The good spread of IB or A Level subjects we offer allows access to all courses, provided the correct choices are made at the end of Year 11.

For some courses at university you must have studied the relevant IB Higher Level or A Level: for instance, biology to read for a straight biology degree. However, it is important to realise that for many courses an IB Higher Level or A Level in that subject is not necessary. For instance, a degree course in media studies or law does not assume study of that subject at IB or A Level; in fact, the early part of the course could be repetitive for those who have done so.

So how should I make my choice?

Ability and motivation to study at depth is important. You will find all sixth form subjects significantly harder than anything you did at GCSE.

If you are struggling with a subject at GCSE you will not cope with it at IB Higher Level or A Level.

Check that the chosen subjects are useful combinations, so that skills can be transferred. In this way, work in one subject can help with others.

18

And, enjoyment is crucial!

You will be studying each subject for several hours each week, and for two years. It is therefore important to choose subjects you think you will like, especially as you may continue one or more of these subjects at university level for three or four years.

6

Can I study an IB course (single subject) alongside A Levels?

In rare cases we do have A level students who opt for an IB course in a subject that is not offered that year at A Level e.g. German. This is only possible if the timetable permits this and the IB course does not clash with their A Level subjects. It is always preferable to study for the full IB diploma rather than a mixture of the two programmes.

THE IMPORTANT THING IS TO SEEK ADVICE

Listen to what your teachers say and do not be afraid to ask for guidance.

U

NIVERSITY

C

OURSE

R

EQUIREMENTS

The majority of our students progress to university after studying in our sixth form, so we do advise students to consider the combination of subjects that will enable them to keep their options open for a range of degree courses they may wish to follow. The table below is by no means exhaustive but will provide some entry requirements.

University course

guidance. The UCAS website http://www.ucas.com/ and

Subject(s) required or preferred, with additional comments

Unistats http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjects/ both provide a wealth of information regarding higher education

Accountancy, Finance &

Management

Agriculture

Archaeology &

Anthropology

Architecture

Mathematics might be preferred and is sometimes required.

Art & Design

Biochemistry

Biological Sciences

Business Management

Chemistry

Chemical Engineering

Classics

Computer Sciences

Dentistry

Economics

Engineering

English

Geography

Geology

History

Human, Social &

Political Science

Land Economy

Law

Mathematics

Materials Science

Metallurgy

Medicine

Two sciences: chemistry often required, biology often preferred.

Courses are typically sufficiently flexible to allow any subject background; however, some programmes do require a science.

Mathematics or physics might be required, along with a portfolio of creative work. Art is helpful.

Art or DT required, with portfolio of work.

Chemistry and biology often required, with mathematics often preferred.

Biology and chemistry often required.

Business or economics might be preferred. For IB, this can be at HL or SL.

Chemistry required; with two of mathematics, biology and physics preferred.

Chemistry and mathematics often required, and physics preferred.

English literature and a modern foreign language preferred; classical language not necessary as ab initio routes are available.

Mathematics and sometimes physics required

Chemistry, with two of biology, physics and mathematics required.

Most universities require or prefer mathematics.

Mathematics and physics are required. IB maths HL/further maths A Level may be helpful.

English literature required; a modern or classical language might be helpful.

Geography required.

Two or three of geography, chemistry, physics, mathematics, biology required.

History required; a modern language might be helpful for modern history.

No specific requirements but a mixture of arts, sciences & humanities is preferred.

No specific requirements, but mathematics, geography and / or economics may be advantageous.

High grades are more important than specific subjects: in fact, all subjects welcomed. Essay writing subjects may be advantageous.

Mathematics required; physics preferred. For those doing A Level, further maths is advantageous.

Physics and mathematics required; chemistry might be useful.

Chemistry, physics and mathematics often required.

For IB students: Chemistry is required by most; an additional science is preferred, with biology required by many. For A Level students: chemistry and biology are required, mathematics, physics, English or RS may be helpful.

19

Modern Languages

Music

Natural Sciences

Pharmacology

Philosophy

Physics

Physiotherapy

Politics

PPE

Psychology

Social Studies

Theology

Veterinary Science

First modern language in main area of study (e. g. French, or German or

Spanish) required; a second modern language is always helpful and is a requirement of the most competitive degree courses. English literature is also helpful. More unusual languages can often be studied ab initio.

Music typically required.

Three of biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics required. (Cambridge) very high grades required.

Chemistry, with two of biology, physics and mathematics required.

No specific requirements; an arts-science mix might be useful. Some universities prefer one essay-based subject. Philosophy or religious studies can be helpful.

Mathematics and physics required.

Biology required.

No specific requirements.

No specific requirements; an arts-maths mix might be helpful. Economics can also be helpful. For most colleges mathematics is a clear advantage. (Oxford) very high grades required.

Most courses ask for GCSE mathematics owing to the statistical analysis involved. Biology can be helpful, as is psychology, but not necessary.

No specific requirements; however, maths (statistics modules) might be helpful.

No specific requirements; however, one or more of a modern language, history or religious studies might be helpful.

Chemistry and biology typically required; mathematics or physics usually required.

CURRENT SIXTH FORM COSTS

Sixth form study does incur certain costs. Many of these are linked to events, trips and visits that directly support subject learning. Where these are a core part of the curriculum we will request a voluntary contribution to cover the costs incurred. For those parents/carers whose financial circumstances make this difficult to resource, in full or part, a letter outlining the reasons will be requested for consideration, in confidence by the Headteacher. Where an event takes place outside school hours, then participation will be based on full financial contribution. For both core curriculum and supporting curriculum events if insufficient funds are forthcoming the school reserves the right to cancel.

Additionally all parents/careers are requested to make £30 deposit for the cost of curriculum text books loaned to students during their period of study. This deposit, which is only partial cover for the cost of the books loaned, is not a voluntary contribution and will be repaid in full at the end of the period of sixth form academic study when a student has returned all loaned books in a reasonable condition. This then ensures that they can be re-distributed to other students in the future.

The upfront voluntary contributions for the 2016 entry was as follows:

Challenge Day - Wet ‘n’ Wild - 4/9/15

Book Deposit - Instalment 1

Safe Drive Stay Alive presentation – 3/11/15

£22

£15

£3

£40 payable by 4 th

September 2015

Book Deposit - Instalment 2

Elevate Year 12 Study Skills Programme

£15

£10

£25 payable by 28 th

February 2016

The following course descriptions are to aid your decisions.

20

Infographic summary of UK results

21

22

23

T

HE

I

NTERNATIONAL

B

ACCALAUREATE AT

S

IR

H

ENRY

F

LOYD

G

RAMMAR

S

CHOOL

A Short Guide to the IB Diploma Programme

 The IB is a challenging, sixth form Diploma course that is increasingly seen as a very favourable alternative to the A Level courses offered.

 136 schools in the UK now offer it, many of them the most prestigious private and grammar schools in the country. Many now only offer the IB in sixth form.

 Students choose to study

SIX

subjects: English, mathematics, a modern foreign language, a science, a humanity based subject (e.g. geography, history) and a sixth subject often from the arts e.g. theatre studies, dance or a second science.

Students also study the Theory of Knowledge (TOK), write an extended essay of around 4000 words and perform various Creativity, Activity, Service activities (CAS)

The IB will particularly suit students who are strong in a number of subject areas, but will actually be of tremendous benefit to all students going onto university as it will teach them the resourcefulness and resilience required there.

 It is seen as an ideal pre-university course and is recognised by universities around the world, including all the top ones.

 For general IB queries please contact the school’s

[email protected]

IB Co-ordinator

Mrs S Williams, Email:

 Recent research* (June 2015) reveals that an

IB diploma is the most respected post-16 qualification among university admissions officers.

‘Nearly a fifth (18%) of university admissions officers cite the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) as a better preparation to thrive at university, compared to just 8% who cite A-levels, and 3% Scottish

Highers. Around a half rate the qualifications equally in this respect. Skills best provided by the

IBDP include workplace skills, cited by 57% of officers; self-management skills, 76%; an ability to cope with pressure, 72%, and an entrepreneurial or positive approach to risk taking, 23%. By contrast, A-level study appears to be regarded as the least effective with just 3% citing A-levels as good for developing workplace skills; self-managements skills, 26%; an ability to cope with pressure, 56%; and developing an entrepreneurial or positive approach to risk taking, just 4%’.

(*Commissioned by ACS International Schools - whose schools have taught the IB for more than

30 years - in conjunction this year with the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IB) and

International Baccalaureate Schools and Colleges Association (IBSCA), the survey is now in its tenth year).

The Mission Statement

 The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

 To this end the organisation works with schools, governments and international organisations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

 These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

24

What is the IB philosophy?

It can be summed up in the following SIX principles:

 Education that is broad based

 Education for problem solving

 Education for the whole person

 Education towards global citizenship

 Education for life

 Education for a better world

All IB students also complete the core of the Diploma Programme:

Extended Essay

The extended essay is an independent, self-directed piece of research, culminating in a 4,000 word paper. As a required component it provides practical preparation for the kinds of undergraduate research required at university and an opportunity for students to engage in an in-depth study of a topic of interest within a chosen subject.

Emphasis is placed on the research process and participation in this process develops the capacity to analyse, and evaluate knowledge. Students are supported throughout the process with advice and guidance from a supervisor (usually a teacher at the school).

CAS (Creativity, Activity, Service)

The CAS requirement is a fundamental part of the programme and takes seriously the importance of life outside the world of scholarship, providing a refreshing counterbalance to academic studies. Each student’s CAS programme will be individual to them and should include at least one activity with an intercultural or international element, as well as a team project. Continuous reflection on the personal development resulting from each activity is an integral part of the process.

25

Creativity includes a wide range of skills and arts activities as well as the creativity demonstrated in designing and implementing service projects.

Action can include participation in individual and team sports, as well as participation in expeditions and local or international projects.

Service encompasses community and social service activities e.g. visiting hospitals, working with younger students within the school, helping children with special needs.

Students are expected to be involved in CAS activities for the equivalent of at least three hours each week during the two years of the programme and our CAS Co-ordinator will provide a varied choice of activities for students.

For further information please contact Mrs K Chapman, Email: [email protected]

Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

The TOK requirement is central to the educational philosophy of the Diploma Programme because it makes connections between the areas of knowledge and explores the diverse ways of knowing the world in which we live.

TOK prompts students to:

Be aware of themselves as thinkers, encouraging them to become more acquainted with the complexity of knowledge.

Develop an awareness of how we acquire and use our knowledge.

Recognise the need to act responsibly and humanely in an increasingly interconnected but

 uncertain world.

Discover and share views on knowledge issues in debate and discussion.

A typical TOK lesson might look something like this: sharing TOK topics of the week in the media, an activity exploring an area of knowledge such as ‘What is science fiction?’ which might involve some film clips such as The Matrix and extracts from journals like Time magazine, collating knowledge questions that are raised and a pair presentation on the plausibility of artificial intelligence.

Students maintain a TOK journal and they bring questions to TOK lessons from the six subject areas that they study.

An essay and presentation are assessed in TOK and must be completed to a good standard. No diploma is awarded without these.

For further information please contact Mr S Box Headteacher [email protected]

IB students must complete ALL parts of the course in order to be awarded the Diploma. They need to be well organised, good at sticking to deadlines and motivated.

26

Some IB Facts

 Universities worldwide welcome applications from students who have studied the IB Diploma

Programme.

Universities such as Cambridge/Oxford/Durham/UCL/LSE/Harvard/Stanford tell us that they believe the IB Diploma equips students with valuable life skills, such as time management, as well as critical skills of enquiry as taught through Theory of Knowledge (TOK) and the extended essay, that help make the transition to university education smoother.

Many US universities offer scholarships specifically for IB students.

There are currently well over 2000 universities in 73 countries that list their IB admission policies 

 on the IB website (www.ibo.org), and these include many of the best universities in the world.

The Diploma Programme is academically challenging but there is ample research to demonstrate that students with a wide range of ability can benefit given appropriate support.

 Over 76,825 students took IB Diploma exams in May or November 2014.

Entry Requirements

In General:

Higher level subjects

will require a strong GCSE foundation and students should preferably have an

A/A* in that subject, or a closely related subject, at GCSE. They will need to pick up concepts quickly and apply existing knowledge with ease.

Standard level subjects

– a B grade in a closely related GCSE subject is required.

27

28

IB Biology

Biology is a Group 4 subject. The IB course takes 2 years and during this demanding but challenging course, students will become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. The IB syllabus will develop knowledge and understanding of key biological concepts through the study of a range of core topics from cells to human physiology. A variety of teaching and learning styles will be used along with laboratory practicals to bring the full aims of the IB course including internationalism and

TOK to life.

Entry Requirements

As on page 27.

Both GCSE biology and dual award science are acceptable qualifications.

Duration of Courses:

Standard Level (150 hours) Higher Level (240 hours)

Assessment:

External:

The external assessment consists of three written papers at the end of year 2 with an overall weighting of 76%

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

– Multiple choice (20%)

– Section A is short answer while Section B is extended response (HL 36%,

SL 40%)

– Tests Option topic knowledge (HL 24%, SL 20%) 

Internal

: Practical work is assessed throughout the course. Higher level students spend 60 hours of the course on practical work, and standard level students spend 30 hours. All practical work must be written up in a lab notebook and is internally assessed, contributing 20% of the final grade for the biology IB.

Course Content:

The syllabus is delivered in a series of topics. All students study the core topics at Standard Level (Topics

1-6) while only the Higher Level students will study the additional topics (Topics 7-11).

1.

Cell Biology 7. Nucleic acids

2.

Molecular Biology

3.

Genetics

4.

Ecology

5.

Evolution and biodiversity

8. Cell respiration and photosynthesis

9. Plant biology

10. Genetics and evolution

11. Animal physiology

6. Human physiology

Students will also study an option topic.

Group 4 Project: This is an interdisciplinary project designed to enable students to work collaboratively as scientists on creative projects and gain invaluable hands-on appreciation of scientific work.

Internationalism: Through the study of topics such as AIDS, stem cell research, sustainability of ecosystems, students will develop a global awareness of scientific issues that affect all of us no matter where we live in the world.

29

Links with Other Subjects

Biology is a diverse subject and links well with many other disciplines. It is closely associated with chemistry, mathematics and physics, most of which use data analysis, numeracy and scientific investigation. It also supports subjects such as dance.

Options after IB

Studying biology in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degree, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Biology students may like to consider the following courses among others: anatomy, animal behaviour, biological sciences, biology combined with business studies or a foreign language, biomedical science, biotechnology, marine biology, botany, microbiology, bacteriology, countryside management, crop science, dance, dentistry, environmental toxicology, equine studies, food studies, genetics, health sciences, medicine, midwifery, neuroscience, nursing, pharmacology, physiotherapy, psychology, sports and exercise science, veterinary science, zoology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

For further information please contact Dr S Richards Email: [email protected]

30

IB B

USINESS &

M

ANAGEMENT

Business & management is a Group 3 subject and as with all the learning areas of the IB. It can be studied at both Standard Level and Higher Level.

The business & management area of study contains 6 main sections, 5 of which are studied at Standard

Level plus an additional one at Higher Level. The units are as follows:

Entry Requirements

At least a grade B at GCSE in mathematics and English language, as clear, logical writing is required.

There is no pre-requisite to have studied business at Level 1 (GCSE)

Standard Level

Topic 1 : Business Organisation & Environment

Topic 2 : Human Resources

Topic 3 : Accounts & Finance

Topic 4 : Marketing

Topic 5 : Operations Management

Higher Level

 Topic 6 : Business Strategy

As well as the additional topic for Higher Level, there is additional learning material in each topic, hence the teaching time is greater.

Assessment:

Assessment is carried out by means of two examinations and an internally assessed research report which can cover any of the Standard or Higher learning areas.

The weighting of the assessment is as follows and are taken at the end of Year 13:

Standard level:

Paper 1:

Paper 2:

35%

40%

Based on a pre-seen case study: content from all 5 topics

Content from all 5 topics

25% Internally assessed report:

Higher Level:

Paper 1:

Paper 2:

40%

35%

Internally assessed report:

Based on a pre-seen case study: content from all 6 topics

Content from all 6 topics

25%

Links with Other Subjects

Business & management can complement any other IB Diploma subject.

Options after IB

Business & management is an acceptable entry route for almost all university and other Higher Education institution courses. Many European universities teach business & management courses in English. It is also a useful introduction to the corporate workplace and provides a solid skill and knowledge foundation for future entrepreneurs.

For further information please contact Mr M Fell Email: [email protected]

31

IB C

HEMISTRY

Chemistry is a Group 4 subject. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, chemistry is required for many courses in higher education, such as medicine, biological science, chemical engineering and environmental science, to name but a few. The IB course is taught over 2 years and during this demanding but challenging time, students will become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. The IB syllabus will develop knowledge and understanding of key chemical concepts through the study of a range of core topics. A variety of teaching and learning styles will be used, along with laboratory experiments to bring the full aims of the

IB course to life. This will include an emphasis on internationalism and theory of knowledge.

Entry Requirements

As on page 27.

Both GCSE chemistry and dual award science are acceptable qualifications.

Duration of Courses

:

Standard Level - SL (150 hours) Higher Level - HL (240 hours)

Assessment:

External:

The external assessment consists of three written papers at the end of year 2 with an overall weighting of 76%

 Paper 1 – Multiple choice (20%)

 Paper 2 – Section A is short answer while Section B is extended response (HL 36%, SL 32%)

 Paper 3 – Tests Option topic knowledge (HL 20%, SL 24%)

Internal:

Practical work is assessed throughout the course. Higher level students spend 60 hours of the course on practical work, and standard level students spend 30 hours. All practical work must be written up in a lab notebook and one full investigation is internally assessed, contributing 24% of the final grade for the chemistry IB.

Course Content:

The syllabus is delivered in a series of 11 topics, which are studied by all students. HL students will study topics 2-10 in more depth.

1. Quantitative Chemistry 7. Equilibrium

2. Atomic Structure

3. Periodicity

4. Bonding

5. Energetics

8. Acids and bases

9. Oxidation and Reduction

10. Organic Chemistry

11. Measurement and data processing

6. Kinetics

Students will also study one Option topic.

Group 4 Project: This is an interdisciplinary project designed to enable students to work collaboratively as scientists on creative projects and gain invaluable hands-on appreciation of scientific work.

Internationalism: Through the study of Environmental Chemistry, students will develop a global awareness of scientific issues. This will include the intense use of limited resources and human activities which produce waste products that build up in the environment to cause pollution.

Links with Other Subjects

Chemistry links with mathematics, biology, physics and geography.

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Options after IB

Studying chemistry in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degree, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Chemistry students may like to consider the following courses among others: medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, pharmacology, pharmacy, chemical engineering, biochemistry, biomedical science, material science, forensic science, engineering, environmental science, earth science, geology, agriculture, archaeology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

For further information please contact Ms L Gethins Email: [email protected]

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IB D

ANCE

Throughout the 2 year IB course participants explore dance as an art form, through aesthetic, artistic, cultural and physical exploration. The course takes a holistic approach to dance and embraces a variety of dance traditions and cultures. Performance, creative and analytical skills are mutually developed and valued whether the students are writing essays or creating/performing dances. Theory of knowledge

(TOK) is integrated into their studies by revealing interdisciplinary connections and allowing students to explore the strengths and limitations of individual and cultural perspectives. Studying the arts requires students to reflect on and question their own bases of knowledge. The curriculum provides students with a liberal arts orientation to dance. This orientation facilitates the development of students who may become choreographers, dance scholars, performers or those, more broadly, who seek life enrichment through dance.

Entry Requirements

In order to choose IB dance it is not necessary to have taken GCSE dance. You will need to have had dance classes outside of school and you may be asked to provide evidence of this. You should have at least a B grade in GCSE English.

Duration of Courses:

Standard Level (150 hours), Higher Level (240 hours)

Assessment:

External:

Composition and Analysis

- Two (SL) or Three (HL) dance works composed by the student, submitted on DVD and an analytical statement of 800 (SL) or 1000 (HL) words reflecting on the choreographic process (SL 40%, HL 35%)

Dance Investigation

- A formal written report of 1500 words (SL) or 2500 words (HL) analysing the similarities and differences between two dance styles drawn from different dance cultures, one familiar to the student, one unfamiliar. At higher level students will also have to include discussion of one short excerpt from each tradition (SL 20%, HL 25%)

Internal

:

Course Content:

Journal:

The syllabus encourages students in maintaining a journal reflecting upon performances they have seen, participatory experiences and cross cultural exposures. This should include discussion of skills and techniques relevant to the styles they are studying.

Through the journal students should be making links between the different components of the course and developing their knowledge of specialist dance vocabulary.

Performance

– One or Two (SL) or Two or Three (HL) dances in any style, performed by the student to show proficiency and expressive ability appropriate to the dance, submitted on DVD, internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated (SL 40%, HL 40%)

Composition:

Through their composition lessons students have to think creatively, looking at different sources of stimuli and looking at how to manipulate movement effectively. Alongside this students will learn choreographic principles and theory which they will embed through practical exploration. Students will develop their TOK skills through questioning movement as a symbolic language and analysing the different ways we gain knowledge through dance.

World Dance:

Students will begin by questioning the purpose of the arts in society and gaining knowledge about the history of dance. Through this areas of the course students will develop philosophical and analytical thinking skills. They will then progress to analysing familiar and unfamiliar dance traditions through theoretical and practical exploration. The study of professional works will help to underpin students understanding throughout.

Performance:

Through this component students will gain awareness of themselves as performers, developing their technical and expressive skills as a dancer. Students will be encouraged to explore a range of styles within their performance studies. Students will learn how to reflect and analyse the strengths and weaknesses in their work and that of others.

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Links with Other Subjects

Dance links with theatre studies as a creative and interpretive subject, as well as the character analysis element of English.

Options after IB

At Standard Level dance is valued as part of the well-rounded curriculum. It instils physical and mental discipline as well as fostering creativity.

Students of Higher Level dance can progress to choreography, dance and musical theatre courses at universities and specialist dance colleges. Teaching, journalism and arts administration are possible career paths as well as professional work in the entertainment field. The creative and collaborative skills acquired through dance can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as business and events management.

For further information please contact Mrs S Durose Email: [email protected]

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IB E

NGLISH

The aims of this course are varied and wide-reaching – the primary focus is to expose all students studying the IB course to a variety of literature in order to enable them to understand their own culture, that of other parts of the world and explore the human condition through literature. In addition to this, students will analyse the nature of language and literature, and improve their ability to express themselves both in written form and orally.

The course involves the study of 15 texts (poetry, prose and drama) for Higher Level studies and 12 texts for Standard Level, with two orally assessed units which take place roughly half way through the two year course. In addition, there are two pieces of written coursework. Texts studied are chosen from a much larger range of texts than at A Level, forming a truly international scope.

Final examination takes the form of two papers, one on an unseen text and one asking students to discuss texts previously studied.

It is obligatory for all students to study this course, either at Higher or Standard level.

Entry Requirements

As on page 27.

Term 1

Options Unit: THREE

texts of teacher’s choice.

You will be required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of at least ONE of the above through a self-chosen task and presentation e.g. class presentation, role play, organised debate, etc.

Some of the topics you could focus on are cultural setting, themes, characterisation, techniques

 and style, author’s attitudes and values.

This IOP (Individual Oral Presentation) should last 10-15 minutes and is worth 15% of the course.

Discussion and questions can then take place, however you are only assessed on your presentation.

Term 2

Works in Translation

: Selection of two Standard and three Higher Level texts written in a language other than English.

You will produce a formal piece of writing that explores a literary aspect of

ONE

work.

Term 3

Interactive Oral and discussion (not assessed)

A reflective statement of 300-400 words on each of the texts under exam conditions.

Write an essay between 1200-1500 words under exam conditions on

ONE

text.

Essay submitted for marking along with reflective statement.

Detailed Study

Two Standard and three Higher Level works, each of a different genre chosen by the teacher.

This is assessed by an Individual Oral Commentary. At HL the assessment is on poetry-20-30 lines.

You will have 20 minutes to prepare and you speak for approximately 8 minutes with 2 minutes of questions at the end.

Then 10 minutes of discussion with the teacher on one other work studied-20 minutes in total. 

Term 4

Literary Genres

Three Standard and four Higher Level texts, all of the same genre.

Assessed through two exams:

Paper 1-A Literary commentary on a previously unseen texts-choice of prose or poetry.

Paper 2-One essay based on two of the works studied in Literary Genres.

Standard Level has all the above units, but ONE less text for each unit.

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Links with Other Subjects

English complements every other subject but especially history, theatre studies, modern foreign languages and fine art.

Options after IB

English is a very popular course at university and is an acceptable subject for all courses, not just those leading to an arts or humanities degree. Possible careers range from the obvious choices of journalism, media, creative and dramatic writing, publishing and librarianship to law, the Civil Service, politics, teaching and advertising.

The rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in English are highly regarded by corporate graduate employers.

For more information please contact Mrs E Brooks Email: [email protected]

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IB G

EOGRAPHY

 The International dimension of the IB programme sits very well with the global nature of contemporary geography. It describes and helps to explain the similarities and differences between spaces and places on a variety of scales and from a range of perspectives.

 As a Group 3 subject it is distinctive as it has both a scientific (physical geography) and socio – economic (human) methodology. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and respect for alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas.

 The aim of the IB programme is to develop students who recognise their shared guardianship of the planet and can help to create a more peaceful world; as is evident in the course’s issues of poverty, sustainability and climate change.

 There is one compulsory fieldwork investigation that is worth 25% of the Standard Level course.

(20% of HL)

Entry Requirements

GCSE Geography is preferable but not essential. A minimum of a grade B in mathematics and English

Language is required.

At Standard Level the four core themes are: Population, Development, Environmental and Resource patterns.

The seven optional themes are:

Freshwater

Oceans

Hazards

Extreme environments

Tourism

Food & Health

Cities.

At Higher Level there are a further seven compulsory topics.

Links with Other Subjects

Geography is particularly complemented by economics, business studies, biology and chemistry.

Options after IB

Geography students progress to a diverse range of courses including: economics, business and management, global sustainability, geography, geology, geophysics, land management, architecture, town planning, transport management, tourism, meteorology, earth science, environmental science, oceanography.

Energy and petrochemical companies, public services and international humanitarian organisations are large employers of geographers. Other careers include teaching, cartography, journalism and broadcasting.

For further information please contact Mrs C Stonham Email: [email protected]

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IB H

ISTORY

The IB Diploma History course fosters an understanding of major Nineteenth and Twentieth Century historical events in a global context. It requires students to make comparisons between similar and dissimilar solutions to common political, social and economic human situations across different countries.

This comparative and cross-regional approach is at the heart of the Standard Level history course. At

Standard Level students will study one topic,

Rights and Protest

for Paper 1. This focuses on “Civil rights movement in the United States (1954–1965)” and “Apartheid in South Africa (1948–1964)”.

Students also study two topics for Paper 2. The first is

'Causes & effects of 20 th -century Wars'

which examines not just world war which made such an impact on the century, but also guerrilla wars, wars of

uthoritarian states

examines the rise national independence and wars of revolution. The second topic,

‘A

of powerful 20 th -century dictators, including Hitler, Stalin and Mao. The papers will test a range of skills including historical content, critical evaluation of sources, historiography, synthesis and judgement.

At Higher Level the focus is much more clearly European based. In addition to the topics covered at

Standard Level, topics include ‘Imperial Russia, revolution and the establishment of the Soviet Union

(1855–1924)’

, Europe and the First World War (1871–1918)’ and ‘European states in the inter-war years

(1918–1939)’.

The course content deliberately provides overlap to encourage confident depth rather than superficial breadth of understanding.

All IB historians will also write a 2,200 word essay (the Internal Assessment) which is internally marked and externally moderated. The international perspective of the course provides a sound platform for the promotion of international understanding and, inherently, the intercultural awareness necessary to prepare students for global citizenship in modern society. Above all, it helps to foster respect and understanding of people and events in a variety of cultures throughout the world, an ideal foundation for university life.

The content of the history course is intrinsically interesting and it is hoped that many students who follow it will become fascinated with the discipline, developing a lasting interest in it, whether or not they continue to study it formally.

Entry Requirements

As on page 27.

Links with Other Subjects

History links with English and economics, modern foreign languages and geography.

Options after IB

History is a very popular course at university and is an acceptable subject for all courses, not just those leading to an arts or humanities degree. Possible careers include journalism, archaeology, building conservation, museum and archive services, law, the Civil Service, politics, broadcasting and teaching.

Corporate graduate employers appreciate the rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in history.

For further information please contact Mrs J Pilkington Email: [email protected]

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IB L

ANGUAGES

A modern foreign language is an essential part of the IB, supporting the international ethos of the diploma programme. Normally, students of French, German or Spanish will choose to continue with their best GCSE language, but students who do not feel that their knowledge will be good enough to take them beyond GCSE, or those who have not studied a language at GCSE, have the option of taking an

ab initio

language (in the past our students have chosen from German or Italian in house or Mandarin on line).

The languages course lasts 2 years for both standard and higher level candidates, and during this time, students will increase in confidence in both understanding and using the language. We aim to provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through studying the language and the countries where the languages are spoken. Students will become very aware how to communicate with different target audiences, and written exercises will concentrate on producing a range of different types of text, from diary entries to formal articles or speeches. (Unlike A2, there will be no translation exercises.) All four skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing - will be developed, and students will look at articles, songs, blogs etc from around the world, wherever the language is spoken.

Entry Requirements

As on page 27, except for an

ab initio

language which has no specific entry requirements.

Assessment:

External:

There are two written papers and an oral at the end of year 2

Paper 1

Paper 2

Individual Oral test

Written Assignment

– comprehension and text handling (25%)

– written production (25%)

– 15 minute one-to-one oral test with your teacher (20%)

– produced in Year 2 (20%)

Internal:

oral skills are assessed throughout the course and a mark is given which summarises each student’s interaction and contributions in class (10%)

Course Content:

Students will study the core topics of:

Social relationships (family, friends, marriage etc.)

Communication and media (internet, mobiles, TV, radio etc.)

 Global issues (wealth and poverty, environment, immigration etc.)

Plus two topics from this list of options:

 Leisure / health / science and technology / cultural diversity / customs & traditions

HL students will also study two works of literature.

The three topic areas for

ab initio

students are

Individuals in society (personal details, daily routines, school, health)

Leisure and work ( media, entertainment, sport, holidays, employment)

 Urban and rural environment (neighbourhood, weather, countryside, towns, environment)

Ab initio

language students will concentrate on discovering the differences between life in England and a country where their language is spoken.

Internationalism:

Through the study of cultures around the world where their language is spoken, students will develop a global awareness of differing cultures and how their use of language varies.

Links with other subjects

Modern foreign languages link with English (literature), history, geography and visual arts.

Options after IB

Modern foreign languages can be studied as single subjects at university or combined with another language or many other subjects. Careers can include international relations, the Diplomatic Service, interpreting, translation, journalism, tourism, media, law, teaching, humanitarian work, international banking. The global outlook acquired through the study of a foreign language is highly regarded by corporate graduate employers.

For further information please contact Ms S Page Email: [email protected]

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IB M

ATHEMATICS

The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, as well as insisting on mathematical rigour. Students should wherever possible apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context.

We are offering Mathematics Standard Level and Maths Studies.

Entry Requirements

There is an appropriate level of mathematics within the IB for each student:

Standard Level

– this is a challenging option and is suitable for those leaning towards science based courses or those requiring a high proficiency in mathematics such as economics. A minimum of an A grade at GCSE is an essential requirement, reflecting a sound mathematical background.

Maths studies

– this option should be taken by all other students and requires a minimum of a grade B at GCSE. It is suitable for those who need to build confidence and maintain a basic working level of mathematical skills.

All students will begin year 12 following the same course (Standard level) until October half term. At this point they will be tested and split into appropriate level groups based on their test results as well as

GCSE mathematics grade and class performance in year 12.

Course Content

The course will include reference to the historical context and/or international background of various mathematical topics when appropriate. Both mathematics courses contain a wide range of topics, including:

Algebra

Functions

Calculus

Statistics

Trigonometry

Vectors.

The course is assessed by two written papers (40% each) and an internal assessment (20%):

The internal assessment consists of an ‘exploration’ or a ‘project’. This is an opportunity for students to show that they can apply mathematics to an area that interests them.

Paper 1 - 1 hr 30 min (2 hrs for Higher Level) 40%

This paper consists of section A, short-response questions, and section B, extended-response questions.

Each section will be worth 20% of the total mark. Students are not permitted access to any calculator on this paper.

Paper 2 - 1 hr 30 min (2 hr for Higher Level) 40%

This paper consists of section A, short-response questions, and section B, extended-response questions.

Each section will be worth 20% of the total mark. A GDC is required for this paper, but not every question will necessarily require its use.

Internal assessment (20%)

The purpose of the internal assessment is to provide students with opportunities to be rewarded for mathematics carried out under ordinary conditions, that is, without the time limitations and pressure associated with written examinations. Consequently, the emphasis should be on good mathematical writing and thoughtful reflection. The level of sophistication of the students’ mathematical work should be similar to that contained in the syllabus.

Graphical Calculators – compulsory at all levels

Graphical calculators are required for IB mathematics students, at all levels. The calculator paper includes many questions that can only be answered by using one. The course can only be passed by gaining good marks on both the non-calculator paper as well as the calculator paper. These are available through the school Finance Office (price in October 2015 is £58.74).

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Links with Other Subjects

Mathematics links with all three sciences, geography, economics and business studies.

Options after IB

Mathematics, and particularly statistics, is an integral part of many university and other Higher Education courses. Suitable courses include: accounting, finance, business and management, mathematics, statistics, economics, econometrics, physics, engineering, chemistry, psychology, computer science, philosophy. Mathematics can also be combined with many other subjects.

Graduates of courses with significant mathematical content are highly sought after in the corporate world, public services, global industries and international organisations with careers ranging from stockbroking to logistics to internet entrepreneurship.

For further information please contact Ms H Dickman Email: [email protected]

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IB P

HYSICS

Physics is a Group 4 subject. The IB course takes 2 years and during this demanding but challenging course, students will become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. The IB syllabus will develop knowledge and understanding of key physical concepts through the study of a range of core topics from Waves to Quantum Mechanics. A variety of teaching and learning styles will be used along with laboratory practicals to bring the full aims of the IB course including internationalism and TOK to life.

Duration of Courses: Standard Level (150 hours) Higher Level (240 hours)

Entry Requirements

As on page 27.

Both GCSE physics and dual award science are acceptable qualifications.

Assessment:

External: The external assessment consists of three written papers at the end of year 2 with an overall weighting of 76%

Paper 1 – Multiple choice (20%)

Paper 2 – Section A is short answer while Section B is extended response (HL 36%, SL 40%)

Paper 3 – Tests Option topic knowledge (HL 24%, SL 20%)

Internal: Practical work is assessed throughout the course. Higher Level students spend 60 hours of the course on practical work, and Standard Level students spend 30 hours. All practical work must be written up in a lab notebook and is internally assessed, contributing 20% of the final grade for the physics IB.

Course Content:

The syllabus is delivered in a series of topics. All students study the core topics at Standard Level (Topics

1-8) while the Higher Level students will study these generalised topics to more depth.

1.

Measurement and 5.

Electricity and Magnetism

2.

Mechanics 6.

Circular

3.

4.

Thermal Physics

Oscillations and Waves

7.

8.

Atomic, nuclear and particle physics

Energy production

Students will also study one option topic.

Group 4 Project: This is an interdisciplinary project designed to enable students to work collaboratively as scientists on creative projects and gain invaluable hands-on appreciation of scientific work.

Internationalism: Through the study of topics such as Particles, climate change and astrophysics, students will develop a global awareness of scientific issues that affect all of us and of the international collaboration that is necessary for this research to be carried out.

Links with Other Subjects

Physics links closely with mathematics. It also complements chemistry, biology and geography.

Options after IB

Studying physics in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degree, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Physics students may like to consider the following courses among others: engineering, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, electronic engineering, structural engineering, aeronautical engineering, architecture, surveying, physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics, telecommunications, oceanography, computer science, material science, environmental science, earth science, geography, geophysics, radiography, meteorology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

For further information please contact Mr C Arblaster Email: [email protected]

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IB P

SYCHOLOGY

Psychology is an IB group 3 option. The course aims to develop your understanding of human behaviour and to create an awareness of how psychological research can be applied for the benefit of human beings. Diverse methods of psychological inquiry are included.

Entry Requirements

At least a B grade at GCSE for mathematics, English language and one of the following – biology, chemistry, physics or, core and additional science.

Course Content

Three sections of understanding are covered by both Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) students, as follows: ii) iii)

Part 1: Core

- this deals with the biological level of analysis, the cognitive level of analysis and the sociocultural level of analysis – this is studied in Year 1

Part 2: Options

– SL students will follow one option, and HL students will study 2 options, from: abnormal psychology; developmental psychology; health psychology; the psychology of human relationships and sport psychology – this is covered in Year 2 iiii)

Part 4: Simple experimental study

– this provides an introduction to experimental research methodology. This takes the form of an internally assessed research project that you will complete in Year 2

In addition, HL students also complete

Part 3: Qualitative research methodology

– this is studied in

Year 2

Assessment:

Standard Level students will be assessed through two written examinations at the end of the course and through an internally assessed report of a simple experimental study, conducted by the student. Higher

Level students will sit three written examinations at the end of the course and will also be assessed internally on their report of a simple experimental study. For SL, the written papers account for 75% of the marks on offer, and for HL, they account for 80%.

Links with Other Subjects

Psychology complements subjects such as sociology, business studies, English and history which analyse the underlying truths behind human behaviour

Options after IB

Students may consider university and Higher Education courses in a wide variety of subjects, including: behavioural biology; sports science; psychology; psychiatry; psychotherapy; animal behaviour; equine studies; business & management; neuroscience; sociology; philosophy or hotel management.

Psychology graduates are highly valued by corporate employers whose businesses rely on interaction with the public. Careers can cover many fields including marketing, advertising, human resources, retail, journalism, broadcasting, policy making, speech writing and tourism as well as counselling, motivational and lifestyle industries and teaching.

For further information please contact Head of Faculty, Mrs J Morris Email: [email protected]

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IB T

HEATRE

Theatre is a dynamic, collaborative and live art form. Practical involvement with theatre demands discipline, creativity and a wide range of skills. It encompasses the taking of risks, the building of confidence and encourages discovery through play, energy and imagination.

The IB Diploma Programme theatre course (Group 6) is multifaceted. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. The course emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble.

Students experience the theatre course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to contextualise and inform their work. They are encouraged to appreciate that through the processes of creating, researching, presenting and critically reflecting on theatre—as participants and audience members—one gains a richer understanding of oneself, one’s community and the world.

Through the study of theatre, students become aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives, developing an appreciation of the diversity of theatre practices and their processes. The course promotes international mindedness and enables students to discover and engage with different forms of theatre across time, place and culture. The theatre core syllabus at HL and SL will consist of three interrelated areas: Theatre in Context; Theatre Processes; Presenting Theatre.

Theatre is a celebration of our shared humanity—a reflection on what it means to be alive.

Entry Requirements

A grade B in English or drama is required.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by means of three (HL) or two (SL) externally assessed pieces of work and one internal assessment.

The weighting of the assessment is divided between the three / four units as outlined below:

Internal Assessment:

 Exploring Performance Practices from Around the World (SL – 35% / HL – 20%)

Give a presentation on their

Practical Research into Performance

which includes a live 13

15 minute presentation about an unfamiliar practice from the perspective of performer and include a list of sources.

External Assessment:

 Examining a Play Text (SL – 30% / HL – 20%)

Produce a Director’s Notebook (20

30 pages) which explores the proposed staging of a published play text of their choice. It should include research into the cultural and theoretical context of the play.

Include a 300 word description of their vision and directorial interpretation.

 Creating Original Theatre (SL – 35% / HL – 25%)

Take part in a

Collaborative Theatre Project

, creating an original piece of theatre from a stimulus.

Submit a process portfolio (15

20 pages) to show how they have worked with others and what their contribution was. Include a 5

6 minutes unedited video recording and written commentary (400

500 words).

Theatre Theory in Practice (HL ONLY– 35%) 

At HL create and present a performance informed by a theatre theorist and an element of their theory.

The Theatre Theory in Practice assessment includes a process portfolio (7 ‐ 10 pages), a 5 ‐ 10 minutes unedited video recording of the performance and a written analysis of the selected recording (750

1000 words).

Links with Other Subjects

Theatre studies ideally complements the study of English and dance.

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Options after IB

At Standard Level theatre studies is valued as part of the well-rounded curriculum.

Students of Higher Level theatre studies can progress to many university and Higher Education courses with a creative or cultural element such as English, American studies, drama, creative writing, theatre production, stage management, dance, music, choreography, musical theatre. Studying at a specialist drama school can lead to professional work in the entertainment field. Teaching, arts administration and journalism are other possible career paths.

The creative and collaborative skills acquired through theatre studies can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as business, events management and broadcasting.

For further information please contact Mr M Sharpe Email: [email protected]

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IB V

ISUAL

A

RTS

The course will prepare students to study visual arts at university by challenging their preconceptions of what art actually is. They will be required to analyse the work of artists from a range of cultural backgrounds and periods in time. This alongside gallery visits will help them to shape and develop their own ideas which will be fully explored within the Investigation Workbook before they execute their own creative visual response.

Candidates will be required to experiment with a range of media in both two and three dimensions and encouraged to take risks at all points documenting their learning process independently. The course will culminate in an exhibition of students work in a designated gallery space within the school grounds.

Students will have the opportunity to express their own feelings or comment on societal issues through a range of visual communication techniques.

They will have control of their own learning, be expected to set their own briefs and discuss ways of taking their work forward through tutorials. Work will be consistently assessed through written and oral feedback with the correct assessment procedures taking place at the end of the course.

Visual arts will be available to students of all abilities and candidates will be expected to work hard to improve their technical ability and knowledge of the subject. Good working practices will be established from the start of the course and teachers will help students become more confident in producing visual responses whatever the chosen theme.

Entry Requirements

A minimum of a grade A for GCSE art to study Higher Level.

A minimum of a grade B for GCSE art to study Standard Level.

Links with Other Subjects

Visual arts links with modern foreign languages, English and history.

Options after IB

At Standard Level Visual arts is valued as part of the well-rounded curriculum.

Students of Higher Level Visual arts can progress to many university and Higher Education courses with a creative or cultural element such as English, American studies, Japanese studies, Chinese studies, fine art, art history, cultural studies, interior design, architecture, history. Studying at a specialist art school can lead to work as a professional artist. Entry to Art school usually follows a year’s Art Foundation course.

Art restoration, gallery management, art dealing, exhibition management, teaching, arts administration and journalism are other possible career paths.

The highly creative skills acquired through visual arts can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as advertising, events management and broadcasting.

For further information please contact Mr R Collins Email: [email protected]

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A

Level

Courses

Please note that, for courses starting in September 2016, there is a mixture of linear and modular courses. Although references may be made to “AS” and “A2” there are no AS courses on offer (except in Further

Mathematics). All students selecting a subject should expect to follow the course for two years to complete the full A Level (GCE) qualification.

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A L

EVEL

A

RT &

D

ESIGN

The course is built around the practical ‘hands on’ activity of making art to express ideas and feeling.

Closely linked to this is the study of art in a historical and cultural context. By the end of the course you will have acquired a broad appreciation of art and design and its role in society, and advanced practical artistic skills.

In the early stages the course is structured to encourage a fundamental understanding of the language of art and design: colour, line, shape, form, tone, pattern and texture. You will study drawing techniques and use a variety of colour media. You will also be doing photographic work and sculpture.

The development of observational and practical skills is supported by regular visits to exhibitions and galleries. Contextual and historical studies are integrated with practical activities. For your contextual study you will be carrying out research in an area of art which interests you. During the latter stages of

Year 12 you will be expected to develop your own ideas, style and methods of working to a greater extent.

A Level art & design is a demanding subject that requires initiative, determination and a willingness to become thoroughly involved in all aspects of the course. You will need to achieve at least GCSE grade A and show evidence of a high level of observational skill.

External students must bring a portfolio of work to show the subject leader for art.

Students will be expected to provide some of their own materials. The initial outlay is about £30.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of a grade A for GCSE art. Students with an A* in textiles or graphics would be considered.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

At A Level, the assessment pattern is very similar to that at GCSE, with a range of preparatory work underpinning the project outcomes. There are a number of coursework units and an externally set assignment involving a fifteen hour timed examination.

Edexcel Syllabus A2 9FA0

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

Art & design links closely with graphic design, textiles, English and history.

Options after A Level

Students of A Level art & design can progress to many university and Higher Education courses with a creative or cultural element such as English, American studies, Japanese studies, Chinese studies, fine art, art history, cultural studies, interior design, architecture, history. Studying at a specialist art school can lead to work as a professional artist. Entry to art school usually follows a year’s Art Foundation course.

Art restoration, digital animation, gallery management, art dealing, exhibition management, teaching, arts administration, fashion and journalism are other possible career paths.

The highly creative skills acquired through visual arts can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as advertising, events management and broadcasting.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr R Collins Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

B

IOLOGY

Biology is a very popular subject at A Level, and has enjoyed considerable examination success over the years. The OCR syllabus we follow is both interesting and challenging, stimulating most of our students into developing a wider interest in the subject. Indeed, many of them go on to study biological and biomedical sciences at university. Students considering such courses should consider taking chemistry to

A Level as many universities make this a course requirement.

In the sixth form you will have two teachers. We find that this helps to ensure that students experience an even wider range of teaching and learning methods and can benefit most from the expertise of the teaching staff.

The specification is divided into six units, each covering different key concepts in biology. Applications of biology are covered throughout the course. Further information can be found on the OCR website.

Practical skills are an important part of the course with assessed experiments occurring throughout.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A student wishing to study biology at A Level should preferably have a grade A or A* in GCSE biology or core and additional science to be confident of success but certainly no less than a B. A GCSE grade C or better in chemistry is necessary if you have studied biology as a separate science.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

A linear A Level course with examinations sat in June of Year 13.

A Level

Three written exams, two of 2¼ hours duration, one of 90 minutes.

These all test knowledge, understanding and practical skills. Candidates must also receive a ‘practical skills endorsement’ from their teacher to pass the A2 exam.

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

OCR Syllabus H420

Biology is a diverse subject and links well with many other disciplines. It is closely associated with chemistry, mathematics and physics, most of which use data analysis, numeracy and scientific investigation. It also supports other subject such as dance, PE and psychology.

Options after A Level

Studying biology in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degree, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Biology students may like to consider the following courses among others: anatomy, animal behaviour, audiology, biological sciences, biology combined with business studies or a foreign language, biomedical science, biotechnology, marine biology, botany, microbiology, bacteriology, countryside management, crop science, dance, dentistry, environmental toxicology, equine studies, food studies, genetics, health sciences, medicine, midwifery, neuroscience, nursing, pharmacology, physiotherapy, psychology, sports and exercise science, veterinary science, zoology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

Please note that for many of the above courses with a high scientific content it is a requirement to have studied chemistry at A Level. Students should bear this in mind when selecting their courses.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Dr S Richards Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

B

USINESS

S

TUDIES

A business is an organisation just like a sports club, a school or a charity. Objectives are set and followed and resources are used to meet these objectives. Business studies examines the way in which the aims and objectives of an organisation are best met.

Among the topics studied are tactical and strategic management, financial management, budgets and cash flow, operations management, marketing, human resources, and the economic environment.

The subject is developed through a case study approach; after learning the theory students are given a business situation which they must then analyse and evaluate in order to put into practice what they have learned. For example, a student starting the course, given the situation of a strike, almost invariably demands that the workers are immediately dismissed. However, as learning progresses the student will look at the causes of the strike; was the management poor or had a breakdown in communication occurred? The solution is usually found in a long-term plan for effective leadership and communication.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

At least a grade B at GCSE in mathematics and English language, as clear, logical writing is required.

There is no pre-requisite to have studied business at Level 1 (GCSE)

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

The course will be a linear A Level with three units sat in June of Year 13:

Subject Content

Year 12

1.

2.

3.

Year 13

4.

5.

What is Business?

Managers, Leadership and decision-making.

Decision-making to improve marketing, operational, financial, human resource performance.

6.

7.

Analysing the strategic position of a business.

Choosing strategic direction.

How to pursue strategies.

Managing strategic change.

Each examination will last for 2 hours and each is worth a third of the total marks.

EXAMINATION BOARD

OCR

Links with Other Subjects

Business studies can complement any other subject.

Syllabus H431/01

H431/02

H431/03

Options after A Level

Business studies is an acceptable entry route for almost all university and other Higher Education institution courses and almost every course can be studied with a business-related module. Many

European universities teach business & management courses in English.

It is also a useful introduction to the corporate workplace and provides a solid skill and knowledge foundation for future entrepreneurs.

For further information please contact

Business Studies teacher, Mr M Fell Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

C

HEMISTRY

Chemistry is the science that explains how materials behave and how new materials can be made.

Chemistry is at the forefront of advancing new technologies in these areas, as well as developing alternative energy resources and working towards reducing pollution. The course will give students an in depth understanding of current theories, offer an opportunity for developing practical skills and provide plenty of links between what is being studied and its applications.

The successful A Level chemist will be a deep thinker and an independent learner. The ability to picture and imagine behaviour of particles too small to be seen is essential. Chemistry suits a student who likes to find things out by experiment but who can also consider and evaluate evidence in arriving at a theory or solution to a problem.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A student wishing to study chemistry at A Level should preferably have a grade A or A* in GCSE chemistry or core and additional science to be confident of success but certainly no less than a B.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

The AQA linear A Level course being followed begins with a detailed study of the atom, structure and bonding, the periodic table and calculations involving relative atomic masses. Students would then go on to study a unit about chains, energy and resources. Practical skills are an important element of the course, and will be assessed in written papers at the end of the course. The theory component of the course is assessed by written examinations taken in June of Year 13. The school will provide the necessary textbooks. Students may choose to purchase a lab coat and their own personal safety glasses.

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

AQA Syllabus A2 7405

Chemistry links with mathematics, biology, physics and geography. Study of chemistry itself at

University usually requires A Level mathematics.

Options after A Level

Studying chemistry in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degrees, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Chemistry students may like to consider the following courses among others: medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, pharmacology, pharmacy, chemical engineering, biochemistry, biomedical science, material science, forensic science, engineering, environmental science, earth science, geology, agriculture, archaeology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Ms L Gethins Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

D

ANCE

The A Level dance course is designed to:

 enable students to experience performance and choreography extend students’ appreciation of dance and to develop critical thinking skills in relation to dance as an art form allow a diverse range of genres and styles to be studied, therefore looking at a range of dance works and choreographers develop a significant foundation of knowledge for the study of dance through higher education develop a healthy lifestyle through an awareness of the importance of exercise and training.

Assessment Objectives are:

 knowledge, understanding and experience of performance, choreography and appreciation of dance as an art form. This will be achieved through exploring and making connections between theory and practice, critically engaging in the analysis of professional repertoire, leading to a holistic approach to the study of the subject

 their artistic and historical knowledge of dance in the wider cultural context a range of skills relating to problem solving, organisation, team work and leadership

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

In order to choose A level dance it is not necessary to have taken GCSE dance. You will need to have had dance classes outside of school and may be asked to provide evidence of this. You should have at least a B grade in GCSE English.

EQUIPMENT

You will need black trousers and top suitable to dance in, an A4 lever arch file, file dividers and paper.

TRIPS, VISITS AND WORKSHOPS

Students will be expected to take part in at least one trip/visit and at least one workshop during each year of their A Level studies, the department usually pays for at least one of these workshops.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Component 1: Performance and Choreography (50%)

What’s assessed:

Solo performance linked to a specific practitioner within an area of study

Performance in a quartet

Group Choreography

How it’s assessed:

Practical examination

80 marks

Component 2: Critical Engagment (50%)

What’s assessed:

Knowledge, understanding and critical appreciation of a compulsory set work and its location within a corresponding area of study.

Knowledge, understanding and critical engagement of one optional set work and its location within a corresponding area of study.

How it’s assessed:

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

100 marks

EXAMINATION BOARD:

AQA Syllabus 7237

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Links with Other Subjects

Dance ideally complements the other performing arts of music and drama & theatre studies, the interpretive and analytical elements of English and contextual aspects of history.

Options after A Level

A level dance is valued as part of a well-rounded education. It instils physical and mental discipline as well as nurturing creativity.

Students of A2 dance can progress to choreography, dance and musical theatre courses at universities and specialist dance colleges. Teaching, journalism and arts administration are possible career paths as well as professional work in the entertainment field.

The creative and collaborative skills acquired through dance can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as business and events management.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Mrs S Durose Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

D

RAMA &

T

HEATRE

Drama & theatre A Level aims to extend your knowledge, imagination, sensitivity and insight into the complexities of theatre and to explore the nature of dramatic experience. You will acquire a knowledge and understanding of the language of drama and theatre as well as develop your performing and analytical skills, operating more autonomously, and with confidence, within a drama and theatre context.

To follow the course successfully, a genuine interest in the theatre and drama is necessary. You will need to be curious about issues and ideas and have a creative instinct for communicating your views through drama. You may be keen on acting, writing or on the visual and technical aspects of theatre and wish to develop your skills in some or all of these areas. Moreover, you must be able to work cooperatively within the group.

You will develop the following knowledge, understanding and skills throughout the course:

The theatrical processes and practices involved in interpreting and performing theatre.

How conventions, forms and techniques are used un drama and live theatre to create meaning.

How creative and artistic choices influence how meaning is communicated to an audience.

How performance texts are constructed to be performed, and to convey meaning.

How performance texts are informed by their social, cultural and historical contexts, and are interpreted and performed for an audience.

The connections between theory and practice in a range of periods, theatrical styles, social, historical and cultural contexts.

How relevant research, independent thought and analysis of live theatre informs decision making in their own practical work.

How theatre makers collaborate to create theatre.

Create and develop ideas to communicate meaning as part if the theatre making process.

Make connections between dramatic theory and practice.

Apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how drama and theatre is developed and performed.

Analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

In order to choose A Level drama & theatre it is not necessary to have taken GCSE drama. You will need a grade B in English or drama. You will need to be able to work well with others and have the confidence to perform in front of an audience or have the leadership ability to organise technical elements.

EQUIPMENT

You will need a black T-shirt and loose 'jogging bottoms' or the performing arts kit for all practical lessons.

VISITS

You will be expected to attend at least two theatre visits, with the drama department, in order to complete the course successfully.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Drama & theatre is a linear A Level course, meaning all assessments must be taken at the end of the course.

Structure:

Component 1: Theatre Workshop - Internally assessed practical work and written creative log. (20%)

~ Create, develop and perform a piece of theatre based on a reinterpretation of an extract from a text, based on the work of an influential theatre practitioner or a recognised theatre company. Acting or design option available.

Component 2: Text in Action - Externally assessed practical work and written process and evaluation report (40%)

~ Create, develop and perform two pieces of theatre based on a stimulus:

1.

2.

A devised piece using the techniques and working methods of either an influential theatre practitioner or a recognised theatre company (a different practitioner or company to Unit 1).

An extract from a text in a contrasting style.

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Component 3: Text in Performance - Externally assessed 2½ hour written examination (40%)

~ Section A and B are open book (clean copies) questions. Section A and B will focus on two questions, based on two different texts, one written pre 1956 and one written post-1956. Section C is a closed book question based on a specified extract from

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

EXAMINATION BOARD:

Links with Other Subjects

WJEC Eduqas Specification A690QSL

Drama & theatre ideally complements the other performing arts of music and dance, as well as English.

Options after A Level

A-Level drama & theatre is valued as part of a well-rounded education.

It instils self-confidence and nurtures creativity.

Students of A-Level drama & theatre can progress to many university and Higher Education courses with a creative or cultural element such as English, American studies, drama, creative writing, theatre production, stage management, dance, music, choreography, musical theatre. Studying at a specialist drama school can lead to professional work in the entertainment field. Teaching, arts administration and journalism are other possible career paths.

The creative and collaborative skills acquired through drama & theatre can also be useful in a wide variety of careers such as business, events management and broadcasting.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader (Key Stage 5), Mr M Sharpe Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

E

CONOMICS

With changing prospects, new global development goals, in the jobs market, an ageing population to look after and the government looking for ways to cut its expenditure and increase taxes, economics is rarely out of the news.

In addition to introducing you to analytical thinking about topical issues, economics offers you the benefit of being highly regarded by employers and universities. The department’s record in terms of grades achieved is extremely good. Many students who take up the course in Year 12 go on to study economics, or a related subject, at university.

Competitions, such as the

ifs

Student Investor Portfolio Challenge, and the Bank of England’s Target 2.0

Interest Rate Challenge are used to deepen your knowledge and understanding. Specialist economics magazines are available to subscribe to if you choose, and there are a range of digital resources to assist too.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Economics requires a clear and logical mind. Good standards of mathematics and English language are needed – at least a B grade in these subjects at GCSE is required. You will be expected to read widely and to show interest in current economic issues. Some basic calculations will be expected in the examinations, as well as demonstration of essay writing skills.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

A new linear A Level in economics was introduced in September 2015. It comprises 3 units which are all examined at the end of Year 13. Each of the units is worth a third of the total marks for the qualification, and each examination will last for 2 hours. The 3 units are as follows:

Component 1:

microeconomics

– this looks at how individuals make decisions, applied to the world in which we live. It covers the topics of: scarcity and choice; how competitive markets work; competition and power; labour markets; and market failure and government intervention

Component 2:

macroeconomics –

this looks at issues that affect economies as a whole, applied to the world in which we live. It covers the topics of: macroeconomic policy objectives and performance; aggregate demand and aggregate supply; the application of policies; the global context; and the financial sector

Component 3:

themes in economics -

this final unit draws on all the content of components 1 and 2, asking candidates to apply the theories that have been learnt to unseen real world scenarios

EXAMINATION BOARD

OCR Syllabus H460

Links with Other Subjects

Economics is a diverse subject with links to many subjects but particularly mathematics, government & politics, history and geography. Some universities require A Level mathematics in order to study for a degree in economics.

Options after A Level

Economics students may like to consider the following courses among others: economics, econometrics, economic history, accountancy, business and management, finance, politics, international relations or global sustainability. Many European universities teach economics courses in English.

International companies, banks, governments and humanitarian organisations are large employers of economics graduates.

For further information please contact

Head of Faculty, Mrs J Morris Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

E

NGLISH LANGUAGE

Once you have studied English language in sixth form, you will never again ‘take for granted’ the rich and diverse nature of the way that we communicate – both in writing and when we speak.

Have you ever thought about how the English language has developed over time and what other languages have influenced it? Have you ever wondered how children learn language and what a feral child is? Have you ever considered how sign languages work? Do you like words, have favourite ones and if so why? Is there a right and wrong way to speak and write? Can we ever break the rules in order to be creative? What is netiquette? Does gender affect language in any way? These stimulating questions all relate to areas of the course.

If you want to study this subject you should enjoy discussion and also have good analytical writing skills, although these will hone over the course. Obviously you should enjoy reading for its own sake – literature, archive materials, media texts, non-fiction, spoken transcripts, websites and the language of new technologies.

So why do students choose to study English language? For most, it is because they liked the subject at

GCSE, and usually do well at it. However, it is rather different to GCSE English language and there is a lot of new, fascinating material! For some students it is because English language complements their other choices. For others it figures as a key subject in their career choice. In fact, students each year are inspired to go on to study related courses such as linguistics or journalism.

When considering English language as an A Level choice you should bear in mind that:

 some of the texts and data sources you study will be challenging. You will need to persevere, embark on some independent reading and research to find areas of your own interest the materials will be varied: you will encounter myriad sources of communication including the spoken word as well as traditional and modern written forms you will be expected to have an open-minded approach because there will definitely be some controversial issues for debate! there will be regular written assignments and you will be expected to meet deadlines you can expect lots of group work and shared learning.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The minimum entry requirement for this course is a grade B in both English language and English literature GCSEs. (Special consideration may be given to students who did not have the opportunity to study English Literature.)

Sixth form students are expected to pay for their own textbooks although no books can be taken into the examination room. We estimate the cost to be £20 for AS and a further £20 for the A2 modules. Books to be studied will be purchased from the Finance Office and are fully endorsed by AQA.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Over the course of the two years you will complete a further three units: two 2 hour and 30 minute examinations - Language, the Individual and Society and Language Diversity and Change (80%). You will also complete a coursework module that includes an investigation and original writing (20%). This is a linear course assessed at the end of Year 13.

AQA Specification Syllabus 7702

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

English language complements lots of subjects but especially English literature, history, geography to some extent, modern foreign languages, psychology and sociology.

Options after A level

English language is an acceptable qualification for a wide range of universities to study English language, linguistics, journalism or English Studies. Students wishing to study for an English literature degree

must

take English literature A Level; this can be in addition to English language A Level for most universities, although we would advise those wishing to study English literature at the very top institutions may consider combining English literature with a wider variety of subjects.

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Possible careers range from the obvious choices of journalism, media, creative and dramatic writing, publishing and librarianship to law, the Civil Service, politics, teaching and advertising. The rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in English language are highly regarded by corporate graduate employers.

For further information please contact

Deputy Headteacher, Mrs A Hanham Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

E

NGLISH

L

ITERATURE

Do you enjoy discussing novels, plays and poems in order to analyse their meaning? Do you sometimes think a character is quite different from what other people seem to believe? Do you think words are interesting? If you answered “Yes” to these questions it could be that A Level English literature is for you. At this level you will have to think for yourself far more than you did at GCSE; any text has several interpretations and you will have the opportunity to discuss these in class. You will also be expected to have good essay writing skills. Obviously you should enjoy reading.

So why do students choose to study English literature? For most, it is because they liked the subject at

GCSE, and usually do well at it. For some it is because it complements their other choices. For others it figures as a key subject in their career choice.

When considering English literature as an A Level choice you should bear in mind that:

 some of the texts you study will be difficult. You will need to persevere, because you will have to do some independent reading the texts will be varied. You will look at prose, poetry and drama and you will be expected to have an open-minded approach. You don’t have to like everything we study but you must be prepared to give it a go - whether it’s 14th century poetry or the most recent modern novel there will be regular written assignments and you will be expected to meet deadlines you will need to read and research independently you should be willing to express your views and exchange ideas freely in class. Discussion is a vital part of all lessons and we look for an informed personal response. You will be expected to form your own interpretations of the texts.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The minimum entry requirement for this course is a grade B in both English literature and English language GCSEs.

Sixth form students are expected to pay for their own texts, as all copies need to be heavily annotated, although no texts may be taken into the examination room. We estimate the cost to be £30 - £60 for the A Level course. Books to be studied will be purchased from the Finance Office.

Examination Structure

The qualification is linear meaning that you will sit all of the A Level exams at the end of your course in the

summer of Year 13.

NB: The texts listed below are included as examples, your teacher will tell you which texts you will study at the beginning of your course.

EXAMINATION BOARD

Edexcel

Paper 1: Drama (2 hour 15 minute examination: 30% of A Level)

Study of three texts: one Shakespeare (e.g.

Hamlet/Othello

), one modern text (e.g.

A Streetcar Named

Desire

by Tennessee Williams) and a Critical Anthology of essays critiquing your chosen Shakespeare play.

Paper 2: Prose (1 hour examination: 20% of A Level)

Study of two prose texts from a chosen theme, one of which must be written pre-1900. Themes include

Women in Literature (e.g.

A Thousand Splendid Suns

by Khalid Hosseini and

Tess of the D’Urbervilles

by

Thomas Hardy) and The Supernatural (e.g.

Beloved

by Toni Morrison and

The Picture of Dorian Grey

by

Oscar Wilde)

Paper 3: Poetry (2 hour and 15 minute examination: 30% of A Level)

Section A – Post-2000 Specified Poetry:

one

comparative essay question on an unseen modern poem written post 2000 and one named poem from the studied contemporary text

Section B – Specified Poetry Pre- or Post-1900:

one

essay question

Unit 4: Coursework (one 2500-3000 word essay comparing two texts)

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Links with Other Subjects

English complements every other subject but especially history, theatre studies, modern foreign languages and fine art.

Options after A Level

English is a very popular course at university and is an acceptable subject for all courses, not just those leading to an arts or humanities degree. Possible careers range from the obvious choices of journalism, media, creative and dramatic writing, publishing and librarianship to law, the Civil Service, politics, teaching and advertising. The rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in English are highly regarded by corporate graduate employers.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr G Thomas Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

F

RENCH -

G

ERMAN -

S

PANISH

To broaden your horizons and improve your communication skills, continue to study at least one foreign language at A Level if you can. You will certainly enhance your travel and job prospects in, for example, teaching, business, finance and law.

In the sixth form you will build on the basic knowledge that you already have. The minimum entry requirement is a B grade in your chosen language at GCSE and evidence of commitment and selfmotivation.

At A Level the course is not simply the study of language, but the civilisation and culture of the country as well. You must be prepared to take every opportunity to speak, read widely, listen to the radio and watch television - all in the foreign language. There is the opportunity to complement your other studies by pursuing particular areas of interest in greater depth, and developing a personal and independent response to them.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Students wanting to take French, German or Spanish to AS or A2 level must have at least a B grade at

GCSE in that language, and ideally an A or A*.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE (Modular)

Paper 1: 2 hours 30 minutes: listening, reading, translation to and from the language

(40% of total A level)

Paper 2:

Paper 3:

2 hours: writing

(30% of total A level)

21 – 23 minutes: speaking

Discussion of a stimulus card, presentation and discussion of an individual research topic

(30% of total A level)

EXAMINATION BOARD

AQA French A level syllabus 7652

German A level syllabus 7662

Spanish A level syllabus 7692

Links with Other Subjects

Modern foreign languages link with a wide range of other subjects.

Options after A Level

Modern foreign languages can be studied as single subjects at university or combined with another language or many other subjects. Careers can include international relations, the Diplomatic Service, interpreting and translation services, journalism, media, law, teaching, humanitarian work, tourism, international banking.

The fine attention to detail and global outlook acquired through the study of a foreign language are highly regarded by corporate employers.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr G Maddocks Email: [email protected]

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G

EOGRAPHY

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Geography is a fascinating subject which at A-level engages with the relationship of human populations to each other over space and time and their relationship with their physical environment at a variety of scales from the local to the global. The subject links particularly effectively to other Humanities subjects such as History and Philosophy, to social sciences such as Politics, Economics and Sociology, and also combines well with Biology, Maths, and Computer Sciences. Geographers gain a great deal of skills in

ICT, such as presentation and use of G.I.S., as well as statistical data analysis, report writing and critical evaluation.

Most importantly Geographers gain a true understanding of the world around us: of the constant changes taking place in both the human and the physical environment. As a result they are better prepared to tackle the challenges that the remainder of the 21 st century will throw at us, and will be sought after by employers for their ability to adapt to these changes. Geography teaching aims to prepare students for the problems that we will all face, and to equip them with the skills and long-sightedness to find sustainable solutions to them.

The Geography course content follows an ‘issues to impacts to responses’ theme throughout. It has a developmental structure designed to facilitate progression through the course and beyond to link with the demands of higher level study. Concepts covered at GCSE may be revisited at A-Level, but not repeated.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

In order to study Geography successfully at A level, students will ideally achieve an A* or A grade, or a minimum of B grade at GCSE Geography. It is not a requirement to have studied GCSE Geography, but you must have GCSE grades B in English language/literature to cope with the academic demands.

COURSE STRUCTURE

There will be two examinations at the end of year 13, one on the Physical Geography course, and one on

Human Geography. During the two year course students will also be required to produce a piece of coursework that is internally assessed.

Exam Paper 1: Physical Geography (40% of A-level)

Units of study: Water & Carbon Cycles; Hot Desert Environments and their Margins; Environmental

Hazards

Exam Paper 2: Human Geography (40% of A-level)

Units of Study: Global Systems and Global Governance; Changing Places; Contemporary Urban

Environments

Coursework (20% of A-level, roughly 3000-4000 words)

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation will be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content. While this is not finalised yet, data for this may be collected as part of a department field trip (see below).

VISITS – Current Plan

In year 12 we are aiming to organise a residential field trip to Swanage in order to collect data for the coursework component, however this is subject to change. The approximate cost of the trip would be

£200.00 for 4 days. We would strongly recommend that all students take part in any field trips during the course.

In year 13 we are currently organising a day trip to the London Docklands and Olympic Park site as part of the “Contemporary Urban Environments” unit. The cost of this trip would be approximately £50.

EXAMINATION BOARD

OPTIONS AFTER A-LEVEL

AQA, Syllabus 7037

Many Geography students opt to choose Geography at degree level. However, many also progress to a diverse range of university courses including: economics, politics, business and management, sociology, global sustainability, geology, geophysics, land management, architecture, town planning, transport management, tourism, meteorology, earth sciences, environmental science, and oceanography.

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Geographers find themselves in increasing demand from employers in sectors such as renewable energies, geotechnical engineering, public services, logistical and management services, and international humanitarian organisations. However, Geographers are particularly employable since they have a range of transferrable and adaptable skills that are more relevant than ever in today’s fast changing job market.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Mr M Williams Email: [email protected]

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EVEL

G

OVERNMENT &

P

OLITICS

This course looks at how the political systems of Britain and the United States operate.

It examines issues such as:

 we all can or will be able to vote, but do we live in a democracy? why are most people cynical about politicians? are our views manipulated by newspapers and TV? do Americans choose the best people to be their Presidents?

Politics will make you more aware of the society you live in and more informed about ideas and events.

You will understand the reality behind the news and you’ll be better able to see through the half-truths and propaganda that figure so much in political debate.

What you need to study government and politics:

 no previous knowledge required – you’ll get this from the course you need to be able to express your ideas clearly both orally and on paper you must be willing to read books, articles and newspapers and to watch TV News you must have an open mind and a lively interest in what’s going on around you.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

At least a grade B in English or history is expected.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE (Modular)

AS level 50% of A Level

-

-

June Year 12

June Year 12

3

4

1

2

People and Politics

Governing the UK

A2 level 50% of A Level

Representation in the USA

Governing the USA

-

-

June Year 13

June Year 13

EXAMINATION BOARD

Edexcel Syllabus

Links with Other Subjects

AS 8GP01

A2 9GP01

Government & politics links closely with history, economics and English.

Options after A Level

Government & politics is accepted as an academic subject for all university and Higher Education courses.

Students of government & politics may consider courses in: history, English, American studies, economics, international relations, political science, politics and PPE (philosophy, politics & economics).

Careers open to politics graduates include the Civil Service, the Diplomatic Service, journalism, media, law, public relations and parliamentary work.

Corporate graduate employers appreciate the rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in politics.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr F Forder Email: [email protected]

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D

ESIGN &

T

ECHNOLOGY:

P

RODUCT

D

ESIGN (

G

RAPHIC

P

RODUCTS)

Edexcel’s A Level in design & technology: product design (graphic products)

specification seeks to develop students’ knowledge, understanding, skills and application for designing graphic products.

Product design encompasses a wide range of design disciplines but is firmly rooted in the skills required to design and make high quality products. Products that are fit for purpose, satisfy wants and needs, enhance our day-today lives and, most importantly, give students the opportunity to demonstrate their design and technology capability.

All modern designers have to consider sustainable issues when designing new products. A sign of the modern technological age in which we live is that human actions have had a negative impact on our environment. New products provide solutions rather than add to the existing problems of extractions and use of natural resources, pollution from manufacturing and disposal of large amounts of waste products. These considerations form an important thread that runs through the whole course in all units.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

You will need a minimum of grade B, preferably grade A, at GCSE in graphics or a grade A in a related subject. An important element for success is a willingness to work hard both inside and outside the classroom. Enthusiastic students who can demonstrate relevant skills, but have no formal design background will be considered.

Examination Structure (Modular):

AS

Unit 1

Students will produce

one

portfolio with

three

distinct sections which will demonstrate their creativity and flair when investigating, designing and making product(s). Different products will be chosen for the

three

distinct sections as students are not being asked to carry out one large design and make exercise but three smaller and more focused tasks which build up to provide a detailed portfolio of their skills.

 This unit is internally set and marked by the centre, the end of year 12 and then externally moderated by Edexcel.

Unit 2

In this unit students will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of design and technology. Students will also learn about industrial and commercial practices, and the importance of quality checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times.

A2

1 hour 30 minute examination set and marked by Edexcel.

Unit 3

In this unit students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of modern design and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues. They must also be aware of the important contributions of designers from the past which may provide inspiration for future design. It is increasingly important that students develop an awareness of the impact of design and technological activities on the environment. Sustainable product design is a key feature of modern design practices.

2-hour examination paper set and marked by Edexcel. 

Unit 4

In this unit students are given the opportunity to apply the skills they have acquired and developed throughout this course of study, to design and make a product of their choice. In order to reach high attainment levels, students must adopt a commercial design approach to their work, reflecting how a professional designer might deal with a design problem and its resolution.

This unit is internally set and marked by the centre and externally moderated by Edexcel.

Units 2, 3 and 4 are completed by the end of year 13.

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EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

Edexcel Syllabus AS 8GR01

A2 9GR01

Product design (graphics) links closely with art & design as well as business studies, English, history, mathematics and physics.

Options after A Level

Students of A2 product design (graphics) may consider university and higher education courses in architecture, interior design, materials science, engineering, business & management and product design. The skills acquired through product design (graphics) can also be useful in a wide variety of roles in the manufacturing business world from product placement to packaging and the supply chain. It can also be a springboard for inventors and design entrepreneurs.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr R Collins Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

H

ISTORY

Studying A Level history offers you the opportunity to think for yourself about some of the people and issues that have shaped the past.

“Historians are dangerous people - they have ways of upsetting people.” (Khrushchev)

“History is a pack of lies we play on the dead.” (Voltaire)

“The past is a foreign country – they do things differently there.” (L P Hartley)

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

In order to study History successfully at A level, students will ideally achieve an A* or A grade, or a minimum of B grade at GCSE History. It is not a requirement to have studied GCSE History, but you must have GCSE grades B in English language/literature to cope with the academic demands.

Options include:

1.

2.

3.

4.

Britain transformed, 1918–97 – examining political, economic and social changes such as the rise of political challenge, creation of a welfare state and popular culture.

The USA, 1955–92; conformity and challenge – examining protest, economic, political and social changes such as civil rights, the Watergate scandal and cultural challenge.

The witch craze in Britain, Europe and North America, c1580–c1750

Coursework= 20%

What are the benefits of the course?

 As well as studying interesting topics, you will learn and develop valuable communications and critical thinking skills, such as analysing data, assessing evidence, formulating arguments and making judgements.

VISITS

There are no costs for the student, other than voluntary attendance at history conferences (around £23 per conference) and optional purchase of the textbooks. It is likely that there will be day trips to relevant historical sites within the UK.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Unit 1 and 3 are worth 30%, unit 2 is worth 20%. Unit 4 is a coursework assignment worth 20%.

Questions are set on historical enquiry, interpretation and source analysis.

Edexcel Syllabus 9H10

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

History links with English, politics, economics, religious studies, modern foreign languages and geography.

Options after A Level

History is a very popular course at university and is an acceptable subject for all courses, not just those leading to an arts or humanities degree. Possible careers include journalism, archaeology, building conservation, museum and archive services, law, the Civil Service, politics, broadcasting and teaching.

Corporate graduate employers appreciate the rigorous academic skills acquired through a degree in history.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Mrs J. Pilkington Email: [email protected]

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EVEL

M

ATHEMATICS

WHY STUDY MATHEMATICS?

Both employers and universities see mathematics as evidence of significant ability and real career potential. The study of mathematical methods greatly helps to develop logical and ordered thought and the techniques learned complement almost all combinations of A Level subjects. We offer a range of courses from the following categories:-

Pure Mathematics

will form the core of your study. You will extend your knowledge of algebra and trigonometry to a much deeper level, and meet some new ideas such as numerical analysis and calculus.

Statistics

will develop your ability to handle data confidently in order to draw conclusions about it. This study will be useful for many subjects such as business studies, economics, psychology or geography, and is a necessary skill for many future careers.

Decision Mathematics

is entirely different from the mathematics you have learned so far. You will study topics such as critical path analysis and will gain an insight into some of the newer developments in procedures for problem solving. Decision mathematics complements business studies.

All students studying mathematics in year 12 will sit the UKMT Senior Mathematics Challenge in

November. All mathematics students are also expected to give support to the school by attending a lower school class once each week to work with students who find mathematics challenging – this is coordinated by the sixth form mathematics ambassadors.

If you have enjoyed the challenge of problem solving at GCSE, then mathematics is the subject for you!

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

To succeed at an advanced level in mathematics you need to have shown an aptitude for the subject at

GCSE and in particular be able to use algebra confidently in a variety of situations. You must have followed a Higher Tier course and ideally gained GCSE grade A (or B with a strong teacher recommendation). As important as this, for anyone embarking on advanced study in Mathematics, is an enjoyment of the subject. Students will also be expected to achieve a mark of 80% in a test of GCSE algebra which they will sit during the first week of lessons in Year 12.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

The course is modular and there is no coursework element.

In Year 12, three different modules will be studied, leading to an AS qualification. Two modules will be pure mathematics and one will be statistics.

In Year 13, three more modules will be taken (two pure mathematics modules as well as decision mathematics) to complete an A2 qualification.

FURTHER MATHEMATICS AS AN ‘ADDITIONAL SUBJECT’

If you really love mathematics and are an able student (with an A* at GCSE) then you should consider joining our further mathematics course. It is also an advantage to follow this course if you are considering reading mathematics at university or taking an Oxbridge natural sciences course. Further mathematics requires the study of extra modules and consequently more lessons are offered. Further mathematics is taken alongside mathematics and is studied to A2 level.

Note: mathematics with further mathematics will have to be chosen in one specific option block, as specified on the application form. Students studying mathematics and Further mathematics are required to study two other A Level subjects in addition to these qualifications in Year 12.

EXAMINATION BOARD:

Edexcel Syllabus

Links with Other Subjects

AS 8371

A2 9371

Mathematics links with all three sciences, geography, economics and business studies.

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Options after A Level

Mathematics, and particularly statistics, is an integral part of many university and other Higher Education courses. Suitable courses include: accounting, finance, business and management, mathematics, statistics, economics, econometrics, physics, engineering, chemistry, psychology, computer science, philosophy. Mathematics can also be combined with many other subjects.

Graduates of courses with significant mathematical content are highly sought after in the corporate world, public services, global industries and international organisations with careers ranging from stockbroking to logistics to internet entrepreneurship.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mrs J Marsden Email: [email protected]

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EVEL

M

USIC

The Edexcel A Level music course allows students to develop further the composition and performance skills introduced at GCSE. Students also learn to apply more detailed background and musical knowledge and a high level of analytical skills to a range of musical scores. Students learn how to identify and describe a wide range of musical styles, and to place musical examples within a historical and social context.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A GCSE grade B in music is required to study this subject. Most students will have an A or above at

GCSE, and all students must be accomplished performers in their main instrument. Typically students should

be at least grade five standard

on their main instrument by the

start

of the course and must be

grade seven standard

before the

end

of Year 13. Other students may well be able to pursue this course if they are able to demonstrate a high degree of musical skill and involvement.

The A Level music course offers students the opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge required in preparation for university or music college, whilst also providing them the opportunity to pursue and develop their own preferred musical interests.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE AS

Component 1:

Performing Music

(30%)

This unit gives students the opportunity to extend their performance skills as soloists and/or as part of an ensemble. They are expected to give a public performance of one or more pieces, performed as a recital at the end of the A Level course. The performance must last a minimum of eight minutes and must be of

grade seven standard or above

. Any instrument/voice is acceptable and the performance may be in any style.

Component 2:

Composing

(30%)

For this unit students complete a total of two compositions: one to a brief set by Edexcel, and a second either as a free composition or also in response to a brief. The first composition must last 4 minutes in duration and is worth 40 marks. The second composition must be at least 1 minute and is worth 20 marks. The total duration across both submissions must be a minimum of 6 minutes. Both compositions are submitted at the end of the A Level course.

Component 3:

Appraising

(40%)

This unit develops students’ knowledge and understanding of musical elements, contexts and language.

It builds on the listening, appraising and analysis skills taught at GCSE. This is applied through six areas of study: Vocal music; Instrumental Music; Music for Film; Popular Music and Jazz; Fusions and New

Directions. They will also apply their knowledge to unfamiliar works in these areas. The unit is assessed as a 2 hour written paper marked out of 100. Students will answer three questions related to the set works that they have studied in detail. These questions will assess their listening skills as well as their ability to complete a short dictation question. They will also answer two essay questions where they will analyse the set works by element, place them in context and draw links from these pieces to new pieces.

Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCSE in Music (9MU0)

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

Music ideally complements the other performing arts of dance and theatre studies, as well as Maths,

English, history, and art & design. It is also an excellent ‘stand alone’ subject for students who wish to broaden their curriculum in the sixth form.

Options after A Level

Music is considered a rigorous academic subject and is valued as part of a well-rounded education. It instils physical and mental discipline as well as nurturing creativity.

Students can follow many degree courses: music, musical theatre, music technology, English, cultural studies, world music, popular music and sound recording among others. Gifted performers may consider applying to a conservatoire such as the Royal Academy of Music. Composition, music management, recording engineering, teaching, journalism and arts administration are also possible career paths as well as professional work in the entertainment field.

The creative and collaborative skills acquired through music can also be beneficial in a wide variety of careers such as business and events management.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mr V Forshaw Email: [email protected]

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P

HYSICAL

E

DUCATION

The course offers an in-depth study of sport and physical education and requires high academic standards. It is expected that students will participate in their chosen activities outside the school curriculum.

Practical participation is compulsory, and students should be pursuing their sporting prowess both in and out of school.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

To be successful in this subject students must demonstrate a high sporting

ability.

It is essential that they regularly participate in sport outside school to reach this level. A minimum of grade B in biology, or core and additional science at GCSE is required in order to study this subject at A Level.

The course content is as follows:

Component 01: Physiological factors affecting performance

1.1

1.2

1.3

Applied anatomy and physiology

Exercise physiology

Biomechanics

Component 02: Psychological factors affecting performance

2.1 Skill acquisition

Sports psychology 2.2

Component 03: Socio-cultural issues in physical activity and sport

3.1

3.2

Sport and Society

Contemporary issues in physical activity and sport

Component 04: Performance in physical education

4.1

4.2

Performance or coaching of an activity

The Evaluation and Analysis of Performance for Improvement

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

One practical performance, as either a coach or a performer in an activity.

One performance analysis task.

2 x 1 hour and 1 x 2 hour examination papers to be taken at the end of the 2 year course.

EXAMINATION BOARD

OCR Syllabus Level 3 Advanced GCE in Physical Education

H555

Links with Other Subjects

The course complements studies in biology, sociology and psychology.

Options after A Level

Students of physical education may like to consider the following university courses: sports & exercise science, physiotherapy, football studies, golf studies. For gifted sportsmen and women generous sports scholarships are available to study at US universities.

It is useful for careers in the leisure, sport, health and fitness industries; medical advisory and therapy services; the emergency services and the armed forces; teaching.

For further information please contact

Faculty Leader, Mrs R Selby Email: [email protected]

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P

HYSICS

How can light behave as both waves and particles?

How can electrons behave as both particles and waves?

What are pulsars and black holes?

These and many other questions are discussed in a wide-ranging course which includes a large amount of practical work. Physics requires determined effort and ability in science, but for those who have an aptitude and work hard, the rewards are great - a genuine scientific training, a valuable examination qualification and the opportunity to understand many of the great scientific ideas.

To undertake the course you will be expected to have shown interest and ability in the physics that you have studied so far, and to have demonstrated the capacity to work diligently.

You will need a good grasp of mathematics and will be encouraged to study A level mathematics.

The course involves a systematic approach containing careful and clear explanations, together with linked assignments and practical work. It raises and develops your understanding of electrical circuits, mechanics, radioactivity, light and heat as well as introducing you to new areas such as astrophysics.

Physics is highly desirable as a qualification for a career in engineering, medicine, dentistry, ophthalmics and pharmacy, but it also opens up opportunities in a very wide variety of other areas. Physics students are in great demand.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A student wishing to study physics at A Level should preferably have at least a grade A in GCSE physics, or core and additional science to be confident of success but certainly no less than a B.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Topic 1 : Mechanics

Topic 2 : Electrical Circuits

Topic 3 : Materials

Topic 4 : Wave and particle nature of light

Topic 5 : Further Mechanics

Topic 6 : Electric and Magnetic Fields

Topic 7 : Nuclear and particle physics

Topic 8 : Thermodynamics

Topic 9 : Space

Topic 10 : Nuclear radiation

Topic 11 : Radioactivity

Topic 12 : Oscillations

Linear examinations sat at the end of Year 13.

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

:

:

:

Advanced Physics 1

Advanced Physics I

General & Practical Principles

EXAMINATION BOARD

Assessed topics 1-7 (1.75 hours)

Assessed topics 3-12 (1.75 hours)

Assessed all (2.5 hours)

Edexcel/Pearson Syllabus

Links with Other Subjects

AS 8PH0

A2 9PH0

Physics links closely with mathematics. It also complements chemistry, biology and geography.

Options after A Level

Studying physics in the sixth form is a pathway to a wide variety of degree, HND and HNC qualifications at universities and other Higher Education institutions.

Physics students may like to consider the following courses among others: engineering, mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, electronic engineering, structural engineering, aeronautical engineering, architecture, surveying, physics, astrophysics, nuclear physics, telecommunications, oceanography, computer science, material science, environmental science, earth science, geography, geophysics, radiography, meteorology.

The transferable skills gained from a degree in a science subject are highly valued in the corporate world.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Mr C Arblaster Email: [email protected]

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P

SYCHOLOGY

This course will appeal to you if you enjoy exploring how and why people behave in certain ways. For example, how does people’s behaviour link to their environment, why do we forget some things yet remember others and what do investigations reveal about patterns of behaviour for children and adults?

During the course you will:

 develop understanding of psychological theories, research, case studies and data collection methods explore current contemporary issues explore different areas of psychology such as the cognitive, social and biological approaches conduct small psychological practicals, collecting appropriate data analyse and interpret data, evaluating the findings address ethical issues associated with psychology, particularly in research. 

Psychology requires a methodical approach. It entails the learning of detail for a large number of theories and studies, and a third of the marks awarded are for scientific methodology, therefore, you need a good background level of science knowledge.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

At least a B grade in GCSE for mathematics, English language and a science subject.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

The new linear A Level in psychology was introduced in September 2015. It comprises 3 units which are all examined at the end of Year 13. Statistical calculations are involved in the examinations, but formulae and statistical tables will be provided. The 3 units are as follows:

Paper 1:

Foundations in psychology

– this looks at the topics of social psychology, cognitive psychology, biological psychology and learning theories. It also covers questions on related issues and debates

The assessment lasts 2 hours and is worth 90 marks; the paper is 35% of the total qualification

Paper 2:

Applications of psychology –

this looks at the topics of clinical psychology, plus one application chosen from child psychology, criminological psychology or health psychology

The assessment lasts 2 hours and is worth 90 marks; the paper is 35% of the total qualification

Paper 3:

Psychological skills -

this final unit looks at methodology, plus its takes a synoptic review of studies covered in papers 1 and 2 and looks further at issues and debates in psychology

The assessment lasts 2 hours and is worth 80 marks; the paper is 30% of the total qualification

Edexcel Syllabus A2 9PS0

EXAMINATION BOARD

Links with Other Subjects

Psychology complements subjects such as religious studies, sociology, business studies, English and

History which analyse the underlying truths behind human behaviour

.

Options after A Level

Students may consider university and Higher Education courses in a wide variety of subjects: behavioural biology, sports science, psychology, psychiatry, psychotherapy, animal behaviour, equine studies, business & management, neuroscience, sociology, philosophy, hotel management.

Psychology graduates are highly valued by corporate employers whose businesses rely on interaction with the public. Careers can cover many fields including marketing, advertising, human resources, retail, journalism, broadcasting, policy making, speech writing and tourism as well as counselling, motivational and lifestyle industries and teaching.

For further information please contact

Head of Faculty, Mrs J Morris Email: [email protected]

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A L

EVEL

R

ELIGIOUS

S

TUDIES:

P

HILOSOPHY &

E

THICS

If you are looking for a subject that will train you to think logically, precisely, rigorously and humanely then this is the course for you.

Religious Studies enables you to:

 Learn to put your views across in speech and in writing in a structured and confident way

Be able to respond to complex issues maturely

Appreciate the way that thought and belief have developed.

Explore your own belief and opinion about a wide variety of topics; from the way society should be structured and the basis for valid laws and rules, to the way we understand and describe spirituality and a sense of the ‘other’.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

No prior knowledge of the subject matter is necessary; a GCSE in Religious Studies is not a requirement.

Where GCSE RS has been taken you will require a minimum of a grade B to begin the course and ideally an A or A*. In order to take this subject at A Level good essays skills are a prerequisite – you would be expected to achieve at least a grade B in GCSE English.

EXAM BOARD AND STRUCTURE

The exam board used is OCR.

Assessment of the A level is through three written papers:

Philosophy of Religion

Religion and Ethics

2 hours

2 hours

 Developments in Religious Thought 2 hours

LINKS WITH OTHER SUBJECTS

Religious Studies investigates and unpicks underlying beliefs and assumptions behind the views of society throughout history, and as such provides an excellent support for Arts subjects such as

Government and Politics, History and English Literature. In the second year the course looks further into areas such as role of the human mind, the possibility of a determined world and the function and meaning of language, drawing largely on areas of Psychology, Sociology, Biology and Physics.

OPTIONS AFTER A LEVEL

The rigorous intellectual demands and interdisciplinary nature of Religious Studies mean that it is accepted for all university and higher education courses. As the oldest taught subject at university, students will find Religious Studies an excellent grounding for any analytical degree course such as Law,

Medicine, Psychology, Business and Management, Sociology as well as Philosophy, PPE (Philosophy,

Politics and Economics) and Theology.

Career possibilities are wide ranging and include journalism, law the medical profession, accountancy, teaching, police work, the Civil and Diplomatic Services and public relations.

For further information please contact

Subject Leader, Miss F Patchett Email: [email protected]

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S

OCIOLOGY

Sociology is one of the most interesting and challenging subjects which our students can elect as a new subject at A Level. It is a theoretical subject which offers students the possibility to take a sideways look at society, groups and individuals and study how they operate.

So - is sociology for you? Yes, if you want to gain a greater understanding of your society and how it is changing; if you are interested in the problems facing the world today; if you are interested to know more about your place in an increasingly globalised world; if you are motivated, enthusiastic, organised, prepared to read widely and willing to participate actively in lessons.

The skills acquired in a sociology course can be of life-long benefit. Students are able to develop and practise the skills of informed debate and critical analysis as well as independent study, selective reading and extended formal writing. The knowledge and skills developed through this course enable a student to take a more critical and informed look at many aspects of all societies and how they relate to people’s lives.

You need to be able to write fluently and should therefore expect to achieve a minimum of grade B in at least one GCSE essay-based subject such as English literature or history. No prior knowledge is assumed, and so GCSE sociology is not a requirement.

This course is designed to encourage students to:

 develop the essential knowledge and understanding of central aspects of sociological thought and methods demonstrate the application of a range of skills consider the integration of two core sociological themes: o o socialisation, culture and identity social differentiation, power and stratification.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The only requirement for choosing sociology, aside from an interest in the subject, is evidence of competence in relevant essay based subjects at GCSE. At least a B grade (preferably an A or A*) in one such essay based subject is essential eg History, RS, English Literature.

EXAMINATION STRUCTURE

Linear (examinations at the end of year 13).

EXAMINATION BOARD

AQA

COURSE STRUCTURE

Students will acquire knowledge of contemporary social processes and social changes. Students will be encouraged to develop their own sociological awareness through active engagement with the contemporary social world with special focus on Britain today.

The AQA syllabus covers the study of education crime and deviance sociological theory and research methods.

And optional study of some topics like:

Culture and Identity

Beliefs in society

The media

Global development

Stratification and differentiation

Links to Other Subjects

Sociology combines well with English literature, history and other social sciences such as government & politics or economics.

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After A Level

Sociology is widely accepted at universities. At degree level it can be studied as a single subject, or in combination with many other subjects. Social work usually requires a postgraduate qualification following work experience.

A high proportion of sociology graduates go into jobs associated with social and welfare work, and careers involving an interest in people, such as journalism, the police and human resources. Their research skills are needed by the Civil Service, local and national government, organisations promoting equality, and charities.

For further information please contact

Deputy Headteacher, Ms J Cochrane Email: [email protected]

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What else?

78

W

HAT

E

LSE?

THE TRANSITION FROM GCSEs TO SIXTH FORM

EDUCATION

Teachers, tutors and the Sixth Form Leadership team are very aware that it is a significant step up from

GCSE to the demanding sixth form courses on offer. Our

vertical tutor group

system preserves all the advantages of the House system but also integrates year 12 and 13 students within one pastoral care unit. We believe that Year 12 can learn a great deal from Year 13 students who have experienced the demands of the first year of sixth form courses for themselves; year 13 students also gain from mentoring year 12 students. Tutors can also concentrate on ‘half a tutor group’ going through the UCAS application process each year. The vertical system also creates a far more cohesive sixth form with friendship groups extending across the two years.

ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Universities and employers are increasingly looking for young people who can offer more than just a good set of examination results. They look for demonstrable enthusiasm for the subject chosen for degree study. They want entrants who can exhibit a range of skills, particularly personal and social, and who show initiative, especially related to the chosen subject. You need to be capable of further independent study to maximise your abilities and this is developed through the Sixth Form.

In our extended studies programme our aim is to give students an opportunity to reach out beyond their sixth form subjects, trying a range of tasks and challenges.

The IB Diploma already includes extra-curricular enrichment through the CAS programme, which can encompass many of the activities described below.

Students will be required to sign up for any additional courses they wish to follow when they are enrolled at the start of the autumn term.

DUKE OF EDINBURGH AWARD PROGRAMME –

DofE

See Enrichment Activities page 8

The award will take approximately eighteen months to complete, dependent upon the commitment of the participant. Students will be supported by an external provider, Mr David Goss, www.zest-foradventure.co.uk, and school staff.

Students must be prepared to work independently on their award, using the designated school time available plus their own time.

LEVEL 2 AWARD IN COMMUNITY

SPORTS LEADERSHIP - SPORTS

LEADERS UK

The Level 2 Award in Community Sports Leadership is a nationally recognised qualification that enables successful candidates to lead groups of people in sport/activity, under indirect supervision.

See Enrichment Activities page 8

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OTHER EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Students are encouraged to participate in sport and recreation outside lessons. In addition, the sense of shared enjoyment at Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School is generated by voluntary participation in extracurricular events and activities. Many of these involve music, dance and drama including supporting local junior schools. Some productions are formal concerts and plays, while other occasions are informal and showcase the talents of our students, the Sixth Form Charity Days for example. Our Science department offers exciting opportunities for sixth formers to work on projects in school such as the Crest

Awards and within the wider community. Participation in a wide range of team and individual sports is also encouraged.

SENIOR SKI TRIP

Each year there is a Snow Sports (skiing and snowboarding) trip to Austria in February half term. The current cost is £780 (skiers) or £810 (snowboarders) including coach travel, ski school, equipment hire and half board accommodation.

For further information contact Mrs S Williams Email: [email protected]

WORLD CHALLENGE

Each summer 30-40 sixth formers participate in a month long World Challenge expedition to a developing country. Destinations include: Nepal 2011, Argentina 2012 and Silk Route (Kyrgyzstan,

Uzbekistan) 2013, Ethiopia 2014, India 2015, Costa Rica and Nicaragua 2016 and Borneo 2017.

Students joining the sixth form in 2016 will have the opportunity to attend an information evening in the autumn term outlining the proposals for the 2018 expedition, with a view to joining this 20 month personal development programme. All participants are required to raise the cost of the expedition

(currently about £3,950) and equip themselves for the adventure that includes community project work and challenging trekking in wilderness areas. Also included is a three day training expedition, 9 months before departure, in the UK e.g. Snowdonia.

For further information contact Mrs S Williams Email: [email protected]

OTHER TRIPS

These vary from year to year – further information on what is currently available can be found on the school’s website.

‘LIFE!’ PROGRAMME

In the sixth form, this course is used to deliver careers and Higher Education support, study skills, personal and social education and preparation for students’ UCAS applications and subsequent university life or the world of work.

Some of the opportunities available to sixth formers in our school are indicated in the following pages.

We are constantly looking at ways of adding to these, and will be reviewing when they will be taught and how students will be able to access them.

‘LIFE!’ lessons are compulsory; they are viewed as an enhancement of the taught curriculum and, as such, play a vital part in helping our students to become young adults who are confident in making decisions that affect the next stage in life beyond school.

In Year 12, ‘LIFE!’ sessions might include input from outside agencies such as speakers from industry, commerce and university admissions. There are also talks about Higher Education routes including GAP

Year, the world of work, career screening and guidance through the university application procedure

(preparation for our UCAS on-line application process begins early in the summer term of Year 12).

Students may also find themselves being asked (or volunteering) to help with a charity, fund-raising activities, the delivery of PSHE + lessons (to younger students as well as their peers e.g. peer drugs education) and to organise social events for their year group. Ofsted deemed us as outstanding for this type of work, particularly in Sixth Form.

In Year 13 most students focus on their university applications (UCAS) with their tutors. Information, advice and guidance is provided and general personal and social education is delivered in various ways such as through talks and group activities in class. Those students who want to take a different route rather than university are given guidance for alternative choices after the sixth form.

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SIXTH FORM STUDENT LEADERSHIP

Sixth form students are given the responsibility of running activities which affect the whole school. The

House System is organised by

House Captains

, with support from the House System

Co-ordinator, Mrs A Malone. Each year a significant number of students are appointed as Prefects and they help the staff to keep the school running smoothly, undertaking various daily tasks as well as helping out at major events. Senior Prefects, including Head Boy and Head Girl, who make up the

Senior School Leadership Team (SSLT

), hold an important office and play a significant role in the day-to-day running of the school. They are high-profile students!

In the spring term students in Year 12 take on the challenge of organising a two day Charity Fundraiser – a busy and exciting time when usually about £2,500+ is raised for the chosen charity. The younger students always refer to this as one of the highlights of their school year and the

Sixth Form Charity

Committee

has great fun co-ordinating it.

Several students elect to work in the local community, for instance helping with reading in local schools or devising projects for local youngsters.

Students with a particular flair and interest in a subject area are appointed as

Faculty Ambassadors

.

This year the Science Ambassadors have helped to run the Junior Science Club and Crest Awards,

Mathematics Ambassadors have mentored younger students in the weekly lunchtime Maths Lounge and

Humanities Ambassadors have organised trips to listen to outside speakers.

All sixth form students have a chance to be involved in some way – perhaps running the Drama Club or

Debating Society, for instance. We recognise that although academic achievement is valuable, our students will be expected to offer other skills when they enter Higher Education and the world of work.

Interpersonal skills such as communication and team working are seen as important at the Sir Henry

Floyd Grammar and sixth form students are given every opportunity to develop these fully.

PRIVATE STUDY

Your IB or A Level courses will occupy most of your sixth form time and will be the most important element of your sixth form education.

All students will have some private study time during the week; it is essential that students use this time for independent learning to support their learning in lessons.

The school library and the sixth form study area in the Glover Building (G2) are available with access to laptops or PCs. There are also several ICT suites that sixth formers can use if there are work stations available.

The following expectations outline the appropriate behaviours in these two areas.

‘Glover’ [G2] and the Library are areas for quiet study

Students should

 Work individually without discussing their work with others

Work with no more than one student to a computer

Place furniture in the correct places at the end of the session – this is especially important at

3.25pm – wheelie chairs under the computer stations, please.

Turn off monitors at the end of a session

Students may

 Listen to music as long as they are absorbed in their work [but not share ear pieces]

Students should not

 Play computer games or access websites unrelated to school work e.g. plan their next summer

 holiday!

Eat or drink in G2

Seat themselves in a crowd around one table

Arrive from timetabled lessons unaccompanied by their teacher – if their teacher is absent they should go back to their timetabled room to work

Scoot around on the wheelie chairs from one place to another!

Use their mobile phones during private study to text or make calls, although they are allowed to use them within the Glover building during breaks

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CAREERS AND HIGHER EDUCATION

There is a full programme of careers information, advice and guidance available throughout the sixth form courses. From the beginning of the summer term, Year 12 students are encouraged to consider their future options. We offer ‘Centigrade’ on-line psychometric testing on an individual basis (£19.50 in

2015) to guide students as to which courses most closely match their aptitudes, potential qualifications and interests.

The majority of our Year 13 students opt to continue into Higher Education. However, each year a small proportion of students elect to take either a year travelling overseas (a Gap year) or to gain employment locally to perhaps financially support their studies at university the following year or to broaden their experience of life.

For those who feel they need more in-depth careers guidance or university admissions, this is readily at hand in school from Mrs Chapman or Mrs Craigie, Assistant Heads of Sixth Form.

OPPORTUNITIES ON OFFER

Success in the Sixth Form evening

Parents and students are invited to attend a seminar early in year 12 to learn more about the key to success at IB and A Level. Speakers from Year 13, the Sixth Form Leadership Team and Elevate

Education share their experiences and offer practical advice to students and parents/carers on how to achieve their potential in the sixth form. A summary booklet is provided for all sixth formers and parent/carers.

Early Applicants Group

Each year students in Year 12 are invited to apply to join this group. It is aimed at those who have achieved a high number of A* grades at GCSE and who are considering applying to Oxford or Cambridge

Universities in Year 13. It also includes students intending to make an application to courses in medicine, veterinary science or dentistry. Students will be prepared to make a strong application for these highly competitive courses by the early deadline of 15 th October in Year 13. The Head of Sixth

Form co-ordinates the writing of the school reference and supports individuals in the group when they write their personal statements and prepare for interview.

Oxbridge Applicants University Fair

This is usually held in March. Students who have previously expressed an interest in, or have been identified by their teachers as being suitable for, applying to Oxford or Cambridge attend as a group.

UCAS Information Evening for Parents and Students

Held early in the spring of year 12, this evening outlines the preparation and application process and timeline. It includes a comprehensive presentation from a university undergraduate admissions officer plus information on studying abroad and student finance.

Birmingham University Open Day

This trip, accompanied by members of the Sixth Form Team, is arranged in late June of year 12. It is suitable for all students, whether or not they are likely to apply to this particular university, as a good example of a campus university. The day gives students a flavour of university life and they can select the talks they attend to suit their interests. Students will be required to pay for transport costs by coach.

Next Steps Day (includes UCAS preparation)

A compulsory whole day’s programme at the end of June includes presentations from external speakers and staff covering diverse topics such as Student Life, Student Finance and Studying Abroad, higher level apprenticeships, gap year opportunities and placement year courses. A regular highlight is the Question

& Answer session with recent former Floydians who have just completed their first year at university.

At the end of the day every student is given a detailed booklet which helps them to prepare their personal statement ready for their university application form in the autumn.

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University Open Days and Taster Days

Students are encouraged to visit several universities before narrowing down their selection. Although many events now take place on Saturdays students are also allowed up to three school days for these visits.

Apprenticeships and Employment – ‘Not going to Uni Group’

Students who decide not to go to university are given support to apply for apprenticeships or employment straight from school. We try to feature a number of school leaver programmes in the LIFE!

Sessions over the course of Year 12, as well as promoting careers fairs such as Skills London. The Next

Steps Day at the end of Year 12 includes presentations relevant to these pathways.

Enrichment Week

Year 12 students are expected to organise larger blocks of work shadowing / work experience during this week. See below for further details. Preparation for this begins in the autumn term.

Vacation and Weekend Residential Courses

Opportunities are also available for students to attend residential courses/conferences at various universities. Details of these are displayed on notice boards in the Glover Building or emailed to students as appropriate.

Interview Preparation and Entrance Tests

Students applying for courses requiring an interview, such as medicine and Oxbridge, will attend specific

LIFE! sessions in the autumn term of Year 13. Many entrance tests such as BMAT and Oxbridge papers are taken in school in early November, others including UKCAT, LNAT and SATs for entrance to US universities are taken at external centres.

In addition there are many private courses available covering both the interview process and entrance test strategies and practice, which are advertised on the University Notice Board in the Glover Building.

Progression Post-18

Continuing support is available for students who wish to apply to university following a gap year or for

Year 14 re-applicants who were unsuccessful the first time around. For students who are no longer on roll, the school reserves the right to levy an administration charge (£30-50, depending on circumstances) in addition to the costs of the UCAS application and/or resit examination entries.

Resources

A full range of reading material, reference books, university and college prospectuses are housed in the sixth form study area G2.

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WORK EXPERIENCE / WORK SHADOWING

Students are encouraged to pursue a period of work shadowing / work experience relevant to their chosen career outside lesson times. This is particularly important in areas such as accountancy, law, teaching, physiotherapy, medicine, dentistry or veterinary science where competition for places is high.

We do have a well-established link with a local primary school and special school for students interested in teaching or educational psychology.

Students are expected to organise individual placements themselves and the ideal time to do this is during Activities Week. If necessary staff will provide support such as providing a reference.

For ideas of suitable organisations to approach, please speak to the librarian, Mrs F Thompson [email protected] or Mrs K Chapman [email protected]

PERSONALISED LEARNING DEPARTMENT

The Personalised Learning Department works with students who have special educational needs or disabilities as well as with other students who, from time to time, need support to help them with their studies. This covers students whom have specific medical needs that may arise throughout their time studying with us. It is important that students who have identified special educational needs or disability make their requirements known to the school when they submit their application so that any specific measures can be put in place when they join. This includes any previous entitlement to access arrangements for examinations and other assessments. Whilst regulations state that assessments must be carried out for each new examination series, this information proves useful when applying for specific access arrangements. This can be done by completing the relevant section on the application form or speaking directly with the SENDCo.

The Personalised Learning Department also welcomes sixth form students who would like to support students who attend the lunchtime Social Group, Art Group or Sports Group. This experience is very rewarding and contributes to CAS hours for those studying the IB and supports UCAS applications to courses such as medicine, psychology or social work.

For further information relating to special educational needs please contact the

SENDCo, Mr M Sharpe Email: [email protected]

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SIXTH FORM DRESS CODE, APPEARANCE &

POSSESSIONS GUIDELINES

Please note:

 We have a Dress Code and clear expectations in the sixth form to ensure that personal appearance does not detract from the purpose of being in the Sixth Form, namely to achieve academic success and prepare you for life beyond school.

 It should also be noted that all members of the sixth form are expected to set an example to younger students through their appearance as well as through their behaviour. Students are expected to dress modestly at all times and under no circumstances should underwear be visible.

 The Dress Code applies at all times whilst a student is in school. This includes examination and study leave periods. The only exceptions to this will be communicated in advance by staff, e.g. mufti days, Activities Week, weekend rehearsals.

The Dress Code also applies for trips and visits away from the school unless communication by staff in advance advises this is not the case.

All students sign an agreement to comply with the published Dress Code on entry into the sixth form.

If a student is found not adhering to the dress-code the following staged response will be applied: o o o

First occasion - Student given a warning and a Student Concern recorded.

Second occasion – as above – detained in PREP after school

Subsequent occasions will result in a student being sent home and/or excluded and on their return placed on Dress Code Report.

The same sanctions will apply to a student wearing additional items, such as a hoodie.

Non-uniform items will be temporarily confiscated.

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DAYWEAR

Compulsory for all students

Jacket

ITEMS

Tailored, smart style

- to be worn at all times

STYLE

plus

Trousers

Skirt

Suit

Dress

Tailored – ankle-length or longer, and not tight fitting

or

Tailored, gathered or pleated, smart style

- either plain or patterned

- no shorter than mid-thigh at all times - skirts

that ‘ride up’ are not acceptable

or

Tailored

or

Smart, long or short sleeved

- No shorter than mid-thigh

- Smart, sleeveless pinafore dresses may be worn but only with a shirt or blouse with sleeves

plus

Shirt

Blouse

Collared - long or short sleeved

- buttoned up and tucked in

or

Smart - long or short sleeved - optional collar or sleeveless with a collar

plus

Tie

Shoes / Boots

For males only

- fastened at the collar

Smart, formal

For safety reasons

-

heels must not be higher than 4cms

- no open backs,

i.e. without straps

Hats and warm woollen scarves

Optional items that can be worn with the items listed above – knitwear is not a substitute for a jacket but may be worn underneath

ITEMS

Jumper or Cardigan

STYLE

These can only be worn with a jacket and in addition to a shirt or blouse and not as a single item

Belt

Light weight scarves

- smart style, not overlong or baggy

- allows the tie to be visible for males

Plain colour, small buckle

Cotton/silk scarves worn as accessories are permitted in school

Items that can be worn to/from school and when in external areas on the site

ITEMS STYLE

Coat or outer jacket Pain

– leather or denim coats and jackets are NOT permitted

May NOT be worn inside school

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All items of clothing, materials or styles listed below are specifically excluded from the Sixth Form Dress Code i.e. NOT PERMITTED

This applies to travel between home and school and not just during the school day.

‘TOPS’

Tops with logos or bold statements

T shirts or any garment made of T-shirt style material

Shirts that are unbuttoned to reveal clothing worn underneath

Revealing clothing of any type e.g. low cut, sleeveless or crop tops

Blouses made of sheer fabric must be worn with a vest top underneath

Hoodies/sweatshirts – these are not an alternative to an outdoor coat or jumper

‘BOTTOMS’

 Tight-fitting ‘Lycra’-type short skirts / dresses

Leather, denim, corduroy or combat styles of any description

Trousers reflecting jeans styling, i.e. patch pockets, metal studs/trim and revealed stitching, e.g. black jeans

Skinny fit, drain-pipe style trousers that are tight-fitting

Leggings/jeggings

Cropped style trousers or shorts

Trousers tucked into boots

 Long socks worn with skirts or patterned tights with similar effect

For safety reasons

 Long/maxi dresses/skirts i.e. over ankle length

‘FOOTWEAR’

 ‘Doc Martin’ style boots, trainers, footwear open at the back such as flip-flops or mules

PERFORMING ARTS

Items are not to be worn when attending other lessons.

Students studying Dance and/or Drama will be advised of clothing requirements however they are likely to include:

ITEMS

T-shirt

Jogger/tracksuit trousers

Leggings

STYLE

Loose fitting, plain, black colour, without logos

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Students are expected to wear sports appropriate clothing for physical activities.

ITEMS STYLE COLOUR Comments

Unisex

All Sixth Form Students

Any No bold logos or statements Sleeved T shirt or polo shirt

Shorts and /or full length track suit bottoms

Football boots

Shin pads

Any

Screw-in or moulded sole

Any studs

Mandatory for safety reasons

Standard design shorts will generally not be suitable for rugby

For football, hockey, rugby

For football, hockey, rugby

Trainers Proper training shoe with instep support and nonmarking sole - no fashion pump

Any

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Gum Shield

style shoes

Recommended for safety reasons Optional

All Sixth Form Students – the following are not permitted

Sleeveless T shirts, strappy vest tops, three quarter length trousers

PERSONAL APPEARANCE

ITEMS

Hair

STYLE

No ‘extreme’ or unconventional styles

Facial Hair Beards are acceptable.

Beard style/growth should reflect expectations for boys to be smart and wellgroomed.

Facial piercing These should not be noticeable.

One discrete nose stud,

2mm or less in diameter may be worn.

COLOUR

Natural hair colours only

OTHER INFORMATION

To leave face clear - may need to be tied back for safety reasons

Exemptions on cultural grounds are to be agreed with the

Headteacher in writing in advance

Rings in facial piercings (nose, lip, eye brow) are not permitted.

Jewellery

Makeup

Earrings should not be excessive in size, long or with large hoops.

Should be discreet

Certain items may need to be removed for safety reasons

There should be no more than two studs/earrings per ear.

Students may be asked to remove it if excessively overt

POSSESSIONS GUIDELINES

Please note that disregarding the information below will lead to confiscation of the item(s).

Personal possessions brought into school are at the owner’s risk.

The school does not have insurance to cover loss, theft or damage to personal possessions.

Students should check that valuable items are insured by personal/home insurance.

All students are requested to hand in items for safe-keeping prior to PE and Performing Arts lessons/shows/matches when they are using the changing rooms.

Mobile phones, iPods, mp3 players, etc.

During a Study Period in the designated study areas students may listen to music via headphones.

Lap tops and tablet computers

Watch

Students are also permitted to use phones at break or lunchtime but only in the Sixth Form Study area, G2

At all other times to be switched off and not to be used during the school day,

with the exception of when a teacher requests their use during a lesson.

Their use is permitted and students may apply to the ICT

Support Team to connect to the school’s WiFi.

May be worn except during PE lessons

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PLEASE NOTE

No apparel of any description will be allowed which in the opinion of the

Headteacher and Governors would impede the need for teachers and students to relate well together and communicate effectively.

If parents/carers wish an exception to the dress code, appearance and possessions guidelines to be made for their child they should state their case in writing, in advance, to the Headteacher

Persistent breaches of the dress code will result in students being sent home and/or excluded.

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F

INANCIAL

S

UPPORT, 16-19 BURSARY FUND

We will be operating three levels of bursary funding: High, Medium and Low priority groups.

£1200 Bursary (High priority group)

You could be entitled to a grant or bursary of £1,200 if you, the student (not your parents or guardian), are in one of the following categories:

You are living in care, or have recently left living in care

You, the student, are receiving income support

You, the student, are disabled and receiving both Employment Support Allowance and Disability

Living Allowance

Payments will be made on a termly basis (i.e. 3 times a year) - £600 in term 1, £300 in terms 2 and

£300 in term 3. Payments will be subject to review by the Bursary Fund Committee.

Medium priority group

You could receive this level of funding if:

You have a gross annual household income of below £20,000 

OR

OR

You are in receipt of Free School Meals

 Your household is in receipt of other income based means tested benefits.

This is intended as a contribution towards the following specific educational purposes (receipts will be required):

The cost of transport, essential course equipment, meals in school, course related trips, UCAS fee, travel to open days, course related sporting activities, uniform or other school resources

Financial support towards childcare costs and exam re-sit fees if aged 19 or under

Payments will be made on a termly basis (i.e. 3 times per year). Maximum of £400 in term 1, maximum of £200 in term 2 and maximum of £200 in term 3. Payments will subject to review by the Bursary Fund

Committee.

Low priority group

You could receive this level of funding if:

OR

You have a gross annual household income of between £20,000 and £25,000

You have an identifiable financial need and do not fall into high and medium priority groups 

Up to £200 per annum support could be available towards the cost of transport, essential course equipment, meals in school, course related trips, UCAS fee, travel to open days, course related sporting activities, uniform or other school resources

Those in the Low priority group will be considered for funding based on the school’s allocation and subject to available funding after those in the High and Medium priority groups have been awarded.

Payments may not be made until after 31 December 2014.

Payments will be made on an as needed basis after consideration by the Bursary Fund Committee.

Sixth form students will be given details of the application process in mid September each year.

Free School Meals

An application form for these will available in the Admissions Pack for external students. Internal students can obtain the form from Mrs C Wiles ([email protected]) who can also supply further information on eligibility.

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SIR HENRY FLOYD GRAMMAR SCHOOL

SIXTH FORM STUDY CONTRACT

THE SCHOOL WILL PROVIDE…

 a programme of teaching, ongoing tutorial support and supervised study usually eight hours per fortnight of study for each of three compulsory Advanced level courses

or

four hours per fortnight for each IB subject studied at Standard Level and seven hours per fortnight for each IB subject studied at Higher Level over the full two-year programme. appropriate homework tasks that enhance learning (expect 3 – 4 hours per week per subject) a Key Stage 5 student planner to aid personal organisation an enrichment programme including one period of ‘LIFE!’ per fortnight to further personal, social and health and academic development

 opportunities to take other qualifications or, sometimes, work shadowing if appropriate for a chosen degree and career path continued Information, Advice and Guidance [IAG] (careers guidance) opportunities to participate in shared events: Open Evenings and Mornings, ‘Wet and Wild’ teambuilding Day, Charity Fundraising, supporting younger students, sport and recreation, House activities, Young Enterprise and competitions, performances and shows, Debating Club and public speaking and other trips and visits

 systems to help students develop their academic potential and inform them and their parents about progress: o setting minimum estimated grades based on GCSE performance (ALIS) o monitoring work (Effort Codes and Teacher Predictions) at set checkpoints during the year o providing parent consultation and information evenings and responding to needs for individual confidential meetings

 support from staff to provide pastoral care, references, and assistance with progression to higher education or career pathways facilities for individual study and learning in line with our Behaviour and Attendance for Learning Policies (on the school website) a system of sanctions to support study and maintain good order o warning, to modify attitude or behaviour, followed by Student Concern logged on SIMS o

PREP i.e. detention after school for further independent learning o monitoring sheets/report card (Year Leader is involved at this stage) o formal letters home o parental meeting with Year Leader and/or Mrs Williams (Head of Sixth Form) o fixed term exclusion o permanent exclusion.

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STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO…

 Attend all registrations and lessons punctually. In the morning this means by 8.45 am for registering, attending tutor time and/or assembly (and follow the regulations stipulated in the school’s Behaviour and Attendance for Learning Policies regarding punctuality and attendance).

Students are expected to attend 90% of lessons as a minimum requirement.

Make study a priority:

Independent Study Guidance

The taught curriculum is the ‘tip of the iceberg’ of students’ learning in the Sixth Form.

Independent Study Comprises: doing work set by the teacher to hand in for a deadline for marking (‘homework’) consolidating learning in the lesson and ensuring notes are of a high standard doing work set by the teacher to improve performance doing background reading/research for depth and breadth practising examination papers using platforms like the VLE

The following guides show the recommended hours of work students should be undertaking in the sixth form.

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

IB

Inside School

Private study in school per week 7 hours

ToK Theory in school per week

Private study outside school per week i.e. evenings and weekends

1 ½ hours

Outside School

15 hours i.e.

3 per HL subject and

2 per SL subject

CAS Activities per week

Extended Essay

2-4 hours

40 hours in total for researching, drafting and writing the essay.

Supervisors can spend up to 6 hours with each student offering encouragement, support and reassurance during the preparation and writing of the extended essay.

A LEVELS

Private study in school

Private study outside school i.e. evenings and weekends

STUDY HOURS PER WEEK

Year 12

INSIDE SCHOOL

Year 13

8 - 12 hours

12 hours

(will include Home Study)

OUTSIDE SCHOOL

12 hours i.e. 3 - 4 per subject

15 hours i.e. 5 per subject

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Be in school throughout every day unless specifically given permission to use the Aylesbury reference library by the Year Leader or Mrs Williams or an agreement has been made with a member of staff to leave school because of illness. Students are, at any other time, not permitted to leave the premises except at break or lunch time. If there is a Fire Drill for example, we have to be able to account for all sixth form students.

In Year 13 only - if Home Study is allocated, students must return to school in time for lessons and use the time out of school for study (and not paid work or driving lessons).

 In Year 12 - provide a note from a parent/carer or medical appointment card explaining any absence.

A parent/carer may ring the school on the first day to authorise; thereafter a signed note will be accepted.

 Sign in and out of school at the late desk in G2 if arriving or leaving at times other than registration

(exceptional circumstances).

 Restrict paid employment to the equivalent of 1 evening and 1 week-end day per week – about 10 hours maximum

Do not take holidays in term time unless in exceptional circumstances (which do not include securing lower prices). Details must be provided on a Leave of Absence Request form at least one month in advance and returned to the Year Leader.

Be smartly dressed in school and abide by the Dress Code. Students who flout the smart requirements will be sanctioned according to the published staged response.

 Adhere to standards of behaviour set out in the Behaviour for Learning Policy applicable to all students in the school, and set an example to younger students by calm and adult conduct.

 Use the sixth form accommodation and/or library in lesson time for quiet, private study and respect each others’ right to study in an atmosphere that is conducive to learning. Adhere to the expectations for use of G2 as displayed in the Glover Building.

If appointed as a Prefect, Ambassador or House Captain, attend key events out of school hours, such as Open Evenings or live performances

Accept the expectations for good conduct and potential sanctions as outlined in the Behaviour for

Learning and Anti-bullying Policies (available on the website). This includes the use/misuse of ICT facilities in school.

PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU SIGN AND RETURN

THE ACCCEPTANCE OF THIS STUDY CONTRACT WITH THE APPLICATION FORM

MARKING THE ENVELOPE

‘FOR THE ATTENTION OF MRS WILLIAMS’

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Subjects applied for

Please complete this and retain it for your records.

Name ....................................................................

I have applied for:

A Level subject 1 ....................................................

A Level subject 2 ....................................................

A Level subject 3 ....................................................

I am a high achiever

A Level subject 4 ....................................................

........................................ IB Higher Level subject 1

IB Higher Level subject 2

IB Higher Level subject 3

........................................

........................................

IB Higher Level subject 4 (if studying HL maths)

........................................

IB Standard level subject 1 ........................................

IB Standard Level subject 2 ........................................

IB Standard Level subject 3 ........................................

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