EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I

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VOLUME I
SECTION B 4d.
COURSE OUTLINES
Electrical Engineering Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology
Submitted by
The Pennsylvania State University, Altoona College
July 1, 2006
to the
Technology Accreditation Commission
of the
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
6-12-2006
Volume I
Engineering Technology Programs
Course Outlines
Table of Contents
Page
Electrical Engineering Technology............................................................................................................ 1
EE T 101 – Electrical Circuits I ....................................................................................................... 2
EE T 109 – Electrical Circuits I Laboratory .................................................................................... 5
EE T 114 – Electrical Circuits II...................................................................................................... 8
EE T 117 – Digital Electronics ...................................................................................................... 11
EE T 118 – Electrical Circuits Laboratory II ................................................................................. 14
EE T 120 – Digital Electronics Laboratory.................................................................................... 16
EE T 205 – Semiconductor Laboratory.......................................................................................... 19
EE T 210 – Fundamentals of Semiconductors ............................................................................... 22
EE T 211 – Microprocessors.......................................................................................................... 24
EE T 213W – Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills ................................... 27
EE T 216 – Linear Electronic Circuits ........................................................................................... 32
EE T 220 – Programmable Logic Controllers................................................................................ 34
EE T 221 – Linear Electronics Laboratory .................................................................................... 37
ET 2 – Engineering Technology Orientation ................................................................................. 40
ET 5 – Engineering Methods in Engineering Technology............................................................. 42
Mechanical Engineering Technology ...................................................................................................... 45
EG T 101 – Technical Drawing Fundamentals.............................................................................. 46
EG T 102 – Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting.................................................................. 48
EG T 114 – Spatial Analysis and Computer-Aided Drafting......................................................... 50
EG T 201 – Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting ......................................................................... 52
IE T 101 – Manufacturing Materials, Processes, and Laboratory.................................................. 56
IE T 215 – Production Design........................................................................................................ 59
IE T 216 – Production Design Laboratory ..................................................................................... 61
MCH T 111 – Mechanics for Technology: Statics ....................................................................... 64
MCH T 213 – Strength and Properties of Materials ...................................................................... 66
MCH T 214 – Strength and Properties of Materials Laboratory.................................................... 68
ME T 206 – Dynamics and Machine Elements.............................................................................. 71
ME T 210W – Product Design....................................................................................................... 73
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology......................................................................................... 76
EMET 310 – Digital Electronics.................................................................................................... 77
EMET 311 – Spatial Analysis and Advanced CAD ...................................................................... 80
EMET 320 – Analog Electronics ................................................................................................... 82
EMET 321W – Electric Machines ................................................................................................. 86
EMET 322 – Mechanics for Technology....................................................................................... 91
EMET 330 – Measurement Theory and Instrumentation............................................................... 94
EMET 350 – Quality Control, Inspection and Design ................................................................... 98
EMET 405 – Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics ................................................................. 101
EMET 410 – Automatic Control Systems.................................................................................... 104
EMET 430 – Programmable Logic Controls II............................................................................ 107
EMET 440 – Electro-Mechanical Project Design........................................................................ 110
IE T 105 – Economics of Industry...................................................................................112
Electrical Engineering Technology
Course Outlines
1
EET 101 – Electrical Circuits I
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 101: Electrical Circuits I
(3 credits). Fundamental theory of resistance, impedance, current, voltage, power,
capacitance and inductance. Direct and alternating current concepts through
series/parallel circuits.
Course prerequisites: Math 81 (co-requisite)
Goals of the Course:
Electrical Circuits I is a required course for freshmen students in both the Electrical
Engineering Technology (2EET) and Mechanical Engineering Technology (2MET)
associate degree programs. The purpose of the course is to teach the fundamentals of
both DC and AC series/parallel circuit analysis. Methods of analysis, Branch Current
Analysis and Mesh or Nodal Analysis, are performed on DC circuits. Concepts of
voltage, current, power, resistance, capacitance, inductance, impedance, conductance
and susceptance are covered. (AC methods of analysis are covered in EET 114.)
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 101 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers.(Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1
• For single source circuits, students will correctly calculate total resistance and
total impedance as seen by the source as well as compute current(s) and
voltage(s) associated with each device in the circuit.
• For DC multisource circuits, students will correctly compute current(s) using
Branch Current Analysis and Mesh Analysis or Nodal Analysis. AC
multisource circuits will be covered in EET 114 (Electrical Circuits II).
OUTCOME 3
• Students will correctly calculate current, voltage, resistance, impedance and
power by applying algebra, complex algebra and to a limited degree geometry
and trigonometry to DC and AC quantities. A preprogrammed scientific
calculator will be used to solve simultaneous equations and compute impedance
in polar and rectangular form.
• Students will be able to correctly employ the following laws, rules and methods
to analyze circuits:
1. Laws
a. Ohm’s Law
b. Kirchhoff’s Current Law
c. Kirchhoff’s Voltage Law
2. Rules
a. Current Divider Rule
b. Voltage Divider Rule
c. Series Resistance Rule
d. Parallel Resistance Rule
2
•
3. Methods of analysis
a. Branch Current Analysis (DC)
b. Mesh Analysis OR Nodal Analysis (DC)
Students will be able to correctly determine electrical resistance, capacitance and
inductance, respectively from: resistivity, dielectric permittivity, and core
permeability as well as geometric properties of each element.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Boylestad, Introductry Circuit Analysis, Prentice Hall (Text)
• Bartkowiak, Electric Circuit Analysis, Wiley (Text)
(Supplement with circuit simulator)
• Floyd, Principles of Electric Circuits, (Text)
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Basic arithmetic and algebra
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
Chapter and sections shown in brackets are from Boylestad, 10th edition, Introductory
Circuit Analysis.
Course Topics: Suggested topical coverage by week (3 hours per each week).
Some instructors prefer to include chapters 1&2 instead of integrating the topics as
needed in the course presentation.
1. Introduction, Calculator usage, Ohm’s Law, Power and Energy [4.1-4.6]
2. Resistance [3.1-3.8]
3. Resistance, Series Circuits [3.9-3.13], [5.1-5.6]
4. Series Circuits, Parallel Circuits [5.7-5.10], [6.1-6.4]
5. Parallel Circuits, Series-Parallel Circuits [6.5-6.10], [7.1-7.4]
6. Methods of Analysis & Selected Topics [DC] [8.1-8.5]
7. Methods of Analysis and Simulation Method of Analysis [8.6-8.8, and 1.12,
Software 4.9, 5.12]
8. Simulation Method of Analysis (PSPICE) [6.12, 8.9, 8.14]
9. Capacitors [10.1-10.15] ((Information essential to AC simple circuit analysis,
definitions, and one transient calculation))
10. Inductors [12.1-12.14] ((Information essential to AC simple circuit analysis,
definitions, and one transient calculation))
11. Sinusoidal Alternating Waveforms: generation, definitions, phase, average and
rms [13.1-13.8]
12. The Basic Elements and Phasors (R, L, and C in AC, power, power factor) [14.114.5]
13. The Basic Elements and Phasors (Complex and polar numbers)[14.6-14.12]
[14.11 calculator only]
14. Series and Parallel AC Circuits [15.1-15.6]
15. Series and Parallel AC Circuits [15.7-15.13]
Calculator Use:
Students are expected to own and learn how to use a scientific calculator.
Computer Use:
Computer Use: Students are expected to use PSPICE, Electronic Workbench or
equivalent software to calculate currents, voltage and power in single source and
3
multisource DC circuits. At the instructors discretion this may be performed in EET
109.
Course Grading:
Course Grading: policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Comments &
Suggestions:
The same person should teach both EET 101 and EET 109.
Every effort should be made to co-ordinate EET 101/109 with Math 81. However some
mathematics topics must be covered in EET 101/109. A good calculator, programmed to
solve simultaneous equations and capable of handling complex algebra is essential for
instructor and students (the same calculator for instructor and student is very desirable).
The instructor should include PSPICE (or similar software) and calculator solutions of
simultaneous equations into all appropriate topics after the fifth week of the course. The
instructor should feel free to change the order in which materials are presented.
However, the instructor must cover all of the material listed above. The latest edition of
Boylestad-Introductory Circuit Analysis is the recommended text for this course.
However, the instructor may select another text if it is at the appropriate level and it
covers the required course material.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes above:
• Assessment method #1 Exams (Locally Developed)
• Assessment method #2 Quizzes (Locally Developed)
• Assessment method #3 Required Homework Problems (From text)
Course Coordinator:
Richard Snyder, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College, [email protected]
4
EET 109 – Electrical Circuits I Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 109 – Electrical Circuits I Laboratory
(1 credit). Use of basic electrical instruments to measure AC and DC voltage, current,
power, and resistance. Introduction to report writing.
Course prerequisites:
EET 101 (co-requisite)
ET 2 (co-requisite)
Goals of the Course:
Electrical Circuits I Laboratory is a required course for freshmen students in both the
Electrical Engineering Technology (2EET) and Mechanical Engineering Technology
(2MET) associate degree programs. The purpose of the course is to teach the student the
basic requirements for building simple DC/AC series, parallel, and series/parallel
circuits. Furthermore, students will employ power supplies as well as measure electrical
parameters of current, voltage, resistance and impedance with multimeters and
oscilloscopes. In addition, students will learn to write well organized lab reports. Lastly,
they must learn the fundamentals of a circuit simulator (such as PSPICE), so that they
can evaluate DC/AC circuits with the aid of a computer.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 109 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret
data. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to work effectively in teams. (Outcome 6)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 2
• Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot and make fully functional,
DC/AC circuits, which are simple series combinations of resistance or
impedance.
• Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot and make fully functional,
DC/AC circuits, which are simple parallel combinations of resistance or
impedance.
• Students will be able to construct and troubleshoot and make fully functional,
DC/AC circuits, which are simple series/parallel combinations of resistance or
impedance.
• Students will be able to use analog & digital multimeters and scopes to correctly
measure, record, tabulate and interpret measurements of circuit voltage,
resistance and impedance.
• Students will be able to use analog and digital multimeters and oscilloscopes to
record, tabulate and interpret measurements of circuit voltage, resistance and
impedance.
OUTCOME 6
• Students will be able to function in a team setting, learning to share the group
responsibilities of circuit construction, troubleshooting, data measurement and
data presentation.
• Students will be able to correctly employ a circuit simulator (such as PSPICE) in
solving multisource simple circuits for DC, RC transient simulation and single
source AC simulation.
Suggested Texts:
Suggested Texts: The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
5
•
•
•
•
EET 109 Dc/Ac Circuits I Lab Guide, by B.L. Guss, August 1995. (Text)
Electrical Engineering Technology, EET-109, Laboratory Exercises, by Niranjan
S. Idgunji, August 1993, (Text) (Supplement with AC experiments.)
Experiments In Circuit Analysis To Accompany Introductory Circuit Analysis,
Tenth Edition, by Boylestad, and Kousourov, 2003, (Text) (Prentice Hall)
Introductory Circuit Analysis, by Boylestad, 2003, (Prentice Hall) (Reference)
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Prerequisites by Topic: Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge
upon entering this course:
• Basic Arithmetic
• Basic Algebra
Computer Use:
Students must learn to use PSPICE (or equivalent software) to evaluate DC and AC
circuits. At the discretion of the instructor, when students are proficient with word
processing and spreadsheets, the students may be required to word process some reports
as well as use spreadsheets to analyze, tabulate and organize data. The instructor may
opt to have students utilize word processing and spreadsheets in later semesters since
ET2 (Computer skills) is taught simultaneously.
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following circuits would be
appropriate for this course:
Course Topics:
Course Topics:
1. Circuit tracing, color code and ohmmeter
2. Ohm’s Law
3. Resistors in series and parallel circuits
4. Series, parallel and series-parallel circuits
5. Voltage and current measurements and power calculations
6. Kirchoff’s Laws and calculator solutions of simultaneous equations
7. Kirchoff’s Laws and PSPICE DC demonstration
8. Capacitors: charging and discharging
9. PSPICE transient demonstration (capacitor).
10. Oscilloscope and signal generator (demonstration & experimentation)
11. Series RC circuit, constant frequency
12. Series RC circuit, variable frequency
13. Series – parallel AC circuit analysis
14. Series RLC circuit constant frequency
15. PSPICE AC demonstration
Required Equipment: Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment needed to conduct this
course:
1. Analog multimeters
2. Digital multimeters
3. Dual trace oscilloscopes
4. Signal generators
5. Frequency counters
6. Dual output, variable DC supplies
7. Windows based PC with windows PSPICE
Course Grading:
Course grading: Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual
instructor.
6
Course Assessment:
Course Assessment: The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of
this course in achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
Assessment Method #1 Laboratory Reports
OUTCOMES #2 & 6 are partially met by this requirement. Weekly or biweekly lab
reports are written into a pre-numbered duplicating notebook. Each report contains six
parts: title, objective, fundamental principle, equipment list, procedure/data and
conclusion. Instructors may later opt to have all students step up to electronic reports,
word processed reports with spreadsheets and database software used, when the students
are proficient in these from the co-requisite ET2. Otherwise, written laboratory reports
are sufficient for this course.
Assessment Method #2 Measurements and Construction
OUTCOMES 2 & 6 are partially met by having each student connect and measure
parameters in simple DC and AC series/parallel circuits. On an individual basis,
students construct a DC series/parallel three resistor element circuit and measure
current, voltage and compute power. Later the student constructs a two element RC
circuit and demonstrates AC voltage and current measurement with the oscilloscope and
multimeter.
Comments &
Suggestions:
Comments & Suggestions:
• The same person should teach EET 101 and EET 109.
• The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations
of circuits into laboratory reports.
• The instructor should feel free to change the order in which material is covered.
However, the instructor should make every effort to cover all the material.
• The instructor should begin every two period laboratory class with a lecture that
lasts at least 15 minutes. Most experiments can be completed in one period or
less, especially if the laboratory class begins with a short lecture describing the
procedures and purpose of the lab.
• As noted earlier, most instructors will find it necessary to develop some
handouts. They may also find it necessary to develop laboratory experiments,
including laboratory exercise sheets of descriptions. The course coordinator
would appreciate receiving copies of all course materials that are used so that
they can be integrated into the course as appropriate and distributed to all
campuses.
Course Coordinator:
Richard Snyder, Instructor in Engineering/Altoona College [email protected]
7
EET 114 – Electric Circuits II
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description: EET 114: Electrical Circuits II
(4 credits) ) Direct and alternating current circuit analysis including Thevenin and
Norton theorems, Mesh and Node analysis, capacitance, inductance, resonance, power,
and polyphase circuits. Prerequisites: EET101, MATH 081.
Goals of the Course: Electrical Circuits II completes the circuit sequence of course material begun in EET
101. The student should have a good grasp of AC and DC circuit analysis techniques
following completion of this course. Many of the topics that are given only cursory
coverage in the previous course (capacitance, inductance, power) are expanded in this
course.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 114 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers. (Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students should be able to accurately represent AC and DC currents and
voltages in a circuit using Network Analysis; Mesh and Nodal Analysis.
• Students should be able to accurately represent AC and DC currents and
voltages in a circuit using Network Theorems; Superposition, Thevenin, and
Norton Theorems.
• Students should be able to accurately determine transient response for simple
capacitive and/or inductive circuit.
• Students should be able to accurately represent real, reactive, and apparent
power by applying the power triangle method.
• Students should be able to accurately represent the resonance frequency (fr),
and quality factor (Q) by applying series or parallel resonance method.
• Students should be able to accurately determine three phase currents and
voltages for; delta-wye, wye-delta, wye-wye, delta-delta connection.
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to apply concepts in algebra, complex numbers,
simultaneous equation and phasors to calculate accurate solutions to AC and
DC circuits using the methods indicated in outcome #1
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Boylestad, Introductory Circuit Analysis, Prentice Hall
• Bartkowiak, Electric Circuit Analysis, John Wiley & Sons
• Jackson, Introduction to Electric Circuits, Prentice Hall
• Floyd, Electric Circuits Fundamentals, Prentice Hall
• Floyd, Principles of Electric Circuits, Prentice Hall
Prerequisites by
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
8
Topic:
course:
• Students should have a good understanding of algebra and trigonometry
fundamentals, or to be taken concurrently. Math 81 or its equivalent is a
prerequisite.
• DC and AC circuit analysis through series/parallel circuits. EET 101 or its
equivalent is a prerequisite for this course.
• Some rudimentary computer literacy is helpful but not necessary. Most
students will have experience with PSPICE or equivalent software for circuit
solutions in EET 101.
Some EET lab experience is helpful. The lab course that accompanies this course is
EET 118. Students taking EET 118 must have previous lab experience.
Course Topics:
Computer Use:
The following weekly topics are taken from the Boylestad text. Coverage times shown
in parentheses are suggestions only. Note - one hour indicated here represents a single
50-minute class period.
• Course orientation, review of basic DC and AC topics covered previously. (1
hour)
• Capacitors, definitions, transient analysis, series/parallel capacitors, stored
energy, capacitors in DC circuits (6 hours)
• Magnetic circuit overview (1 hour)
• Inductors, definitions, transient analysis, series/parallel inductors, stored
energy, inductors & capacitors in DC circuits (6 hours)
• AC/DC circuits analysis techniques, mesh & nodal analysis, phasor diagrams
(12hours)
• AC/DC network theorems, superposition, Thevenin & Norton theorems,
maximum power transfer (12 hours)
• AC power, power triangle; real, reactive, and apparent power, power factor
correction (6 hours)
• Series and parallel resonance (6 hours)
• Polyphase systems (6 hours)
• Major exams (4 hours)
•
•
Laboratory
Exercises:
Students typically will be taking this course during the second semester of the
EET program. Most students will have some experience using PSPICE or
equivalent software to solve simple circuits.
The Boylestad text includes PSPICE solutions for most topics in this course.
The other texts provide similar solution techniques. This course, along with the
accompanying EET 118 lab, should require the use of computers to analyze the
AC and DC circuits covered in the course.
Associated EET 118 lab class:
• A separate laboratory course, EET 118, Electrical Circuits Lab II, is offered
concurrently with EET 114. The same instructor should teach both EET 114
and EET 118.
• The lab exercises in EET 118 should support and mirror the topics covered in
the lecture course. Some computer usage in circuit analysis should be a part of
the lab experience during the semester
9
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Outcomes 1 and 3: Traditional exams, quizzes, and homework assignments
covering lecture material can be used to assess these outcomes.
Course Coordinator: Maryam Ghorieshi, Instructor of Engineering, Hazleton Campus [email protected]
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
10
EET 117 – Digital Electronics
Standard Course Outline (Updated: September 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 117: Digital Electronics
(3 credits). Fundamentals of digital circuits, including logic circuits, Boolean algebra,
Karnaugh maps, counters, and registers. Prerequisite: EET101.
Goals of the Course:
Digital Electronics is a required course for freshman students in the Electrical
Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of the course is
to teach principles of digital electronics. The material covers a variety of topics
including Boolean algebra, basic gates, logic circuits, flip-flops, registers, arithmetic
circuits, counters, interfacing with analog devices, and computer memory.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 117 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers. (Outcome 1)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the EET program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will be able to represent numerical values in various number systems
and perform number conversions between different number systems.
• Students will demonstrate the knowledge of:
o operation of logic gates (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, XNOR) using
IEEE/ANSI standard symbols
o Boolean algebra including algebraic manipulation/simplification, and
application of DeMorgan’s theorems
o Karnaugh map reduction method.
• Students will demonstrate the knowledge of operation of basic types of flipflops, registers, counters, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and de-multiplexers.
• Students will be able to analyze and design digital combinational circuits
including arithmetic circuits (half adder, full adder, multiplier).
• Students will be able to analyze sequential digital circuits.
• Students will demonstrate knowledge of the nomenclature and technology in the
area of memory devices: ROM, RAM, PROM, PLD, FPGAs, etc.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts for this course:
• R.J. Tocci., N.S.Widmer, G.L. Moss. Digital Systems, Principles and
Applications, Pearson/Prentice Hall.
• T.L.Floyd. Digital Fundamentals, 8th Ed. Prentice Hall.
• N.P. Cook. Practical Digital Electronics, Pearson/Prentice Hall.
•
•
W. Kleitz. Digital Electronics. A Practical Approach. Prentice Hall.
W. Kleitz. Digital Electronics with VHDL, Pearson/Prentice Hall.
The following are useful references for this course:
• R.K. Dueck. Digital Design with CPLD Applications and VHDL, Delmar.
• Roy W. Goody. OrCAD PSPICE for Windows. 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall
Prerequisites by
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
11
Topic:
course:
• Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamentals of DC circuits.
• Basic understanding of algebra.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Unsigned number systems including decimal, binary, octal, hex and base
conversion. (3 class hours)
• Codes - BCD, Gray, ASCII and parity. (1 class hour)
• Basic digital logic gates (AND / OR) and truth tables. (2 class hours)
• Boolean Algebra – Postulate and theorems, equation reductions and circuit
implementations. (5 class hours)
• DeMorgan’s theorems - NAND and NOR gates and implementation. (1 class
hour)
• Sum of Product circuits. (1 class hour)
• Karnaugh map and circuit simplification. (3 class hours)
• Multiplexers, demultiplexers, decoders and other MSI circuits. (3 class hours)
• Basic SR Flip-Flops - NAND & NOR implementations and limitations. (1 class
hour)
• D Latch, Clocked and Edge Triggered D Flip-Flops. (2 class hours)
• Edge Triggered JK Flip-Flop. (1 class hours)
• One Shot Multivibrators and 555 type timers. (2 class hour)
• Ripple Counter. (1 class hour)
• Sequential Logic - Synchronous Counters, Shift Registers and basic State
Machine concepts. (6 class hours)
• Memory Systems - RAM, ROM, PROM, EPROM etc. (3 class hours)
• Programmable Logic - an extension of the PROM - PAL, PLA, and other PLD
devices. FPGAs. (6 class hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or
equivalent software for the purpose of analysis and design of digital circuits.
Laboratory Exercises: None. There is an accompanying laboratory course EET120
Required Equipment: None. The following equipment can be used by an instructor for demonstration
purposes:
• Digital training board
• Digital Analyzer
• PLD programmer
• FPGA board
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcome listed above (outcome 1):
• Traditional exams covering lecture material
• Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems involving digital
circuits
12
•
Course Coordinator:
A library-based research project, with accompanying written and oral
presentation of results, to examine history, design, operation, or application of
digital devices/circuits.
Andrzej J. Gapinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Engineering, Fayette Campus
([email protected])
13
EET 118 – Electrical Circuits II Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 118 – Electrical Circuits II Laboratory
(1 credit) Continuation of EET 109 with emphasis on student familiarization with basic
electrical instruments and report writing. Prerequisite: EET 109. Concurrent EET 114
Goals of the Course:
Electrical Circuits II Laboratory continues the student experience in the electrical
laboratory. Students will use various electrical test instruments to measure voltage,
current, power, etc. in DC and AC circuits. The experiments in this course will
demonstrate empirically the concepts introduced in the companion lecture course, EET
114. Report writing will be an integral part of the course.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 118 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret results.(Outcome 2)
• Work effectively in teams.(Outcome 6)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will be able to construct circuits correctly by following the laboratory
experimental procedure.
• Students will be able to correctly measure and successfully troubleshoot circuits
by taking accurate data and interpret results.
OUTCOME 6:
• Students will be able to work as team members during various phases of
implementing, troubleshooting and analyzing experimental exercises.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Boylestad/Kousourou, Experiments in Circuit Analysis, , Prentice Hall
• Guss, EET 118 Circuits Laboratory Guide, Penn State Bookstore
• Lab Exercise Set for EET 118, Penn State Printing Services
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Student must have previous electrical lab experience. This would most likely be
in EET 109.
• Student should have taken (or be taking) EET 114.
• Knowledge of PSPICE or other computer circuit analysis software.
• Student should have lab report writing experience
Computer Use:
Students should have been introduced to PSPICE or similar software for solving DC and
AC circuits in previous courses. The Boylestad text introduces PSPICE at an
introductory level. The other texts cover similar circuit solution techniques. At least
one lab exercise should be devoted to the use of circuit simulation software to solve DC
and/or AC circuits.
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following would be appropriate for this course:
• Mesh and Node Analysis
14
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Thevenin’s Theorem and Maximum Power Transfer
Superposition
Norton’s Theorem and Source Conversions
RC transient analysis
RL transient analysis
Phasor analysis
Series Resonant Circuits
Parallel Resonant Circuits
Polyphase circuits
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Analog voltmeters and ammeters
• Digital Multimeter
• Dual-trace oscilloscope
• Signal generator
• Frequency counter
• Dual-output, variable DC power supply
• Breadboard and miscellaneous components
• Windows-based PC capable of running PSPICE or equivalent software
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of
laboratory and oral reports. At the instructor’s discretion, one or more oral reports may
be incorporated in this class to enhance students’ oral presentation skills. When
possible, these activities should involve a significant component of library research into
topics covered by the course, which would encourage and enhance students’ research
skills.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Outcomes 2 and 6: Record of laboratory experiments performance and
laboratory examination can be used to assess these outcomes.
Course Coordinator:
Maryam Ghorieshi, Instructor of Engineering, Hazleton Campus [email protected]
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
15
EET 120 – Digital Electronics Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 120: Digital Electronics
(1 credit). Laboratory study of solid-state pulse, digital, industrial, and motor control
circuits. Prerequisite: EET109. Concurrent EET117.
Goals of the Course:
Digital Electronics Laboratory is a required course for freshman students in the
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of
the course is to provide students with an understanding of how to analyze, build, and
troubleshoot digital circuits. Student should become proficient in using oscilloscopes,
signal analyzers, and similar equipment to test digital circuits. In addition students must
learn to write well-organized reports using a word processor. Students must learn to
apply PSPICE for Windows (or similar programs) to evaluate the potential performance
of these circuits. Students should also learn current technologies in the area of
programmable memories.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 120 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to conduct experiments, and then analyze and interpret
results. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in
writing. (Outcome 5)
• Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based
work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the EET program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will demonstrate that theoretical device/circuit operation can be
implemented in properly constructed digital circuits.
• Students will be able to correctly operate standard electronic test equipment
such as oscilloscopes, signal analyzers, digital multi-meters, power supplies,
frequency meters, and programmable memories programmers to analyze, test,
and implement digital circuits.
• Students will be able to correctly analyze a circuit and compare its theoretical
performance to actual performance.
• Students will be able to apply troubleshooting techniques to test digital circuits.
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to prepare and present an organized written engineering
report on electronic testing of digital circuits.
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will demonstrate proficiency in digital circuits analysis and design
methods by designing, implementing, and testing project-based digital circuits.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts for this course:
• Michael Wiesner. Digital Electronics. A practical Approach, Prentice Hall.
• Patrick Kane. Xilinx Laboratory Manual to accompany Cook’s Digital
Electronics with PLD Integration, Prentice Hall.
The following are useful reference for this course:
• Roy W. Goody. OrCAD PSPICE for Windows. 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall
16
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamentals of DC circuits.
• Basic understanding of algebra.
Course Topics:
The listed below laboratory exercises should be considered as suggested topics to be
supplemented or modified by locally developed exercises:
• Introduction to laboratory and review of lab policies
• IC families, TTL electrical characteristics
• DeMorgan’s theorem
• Logic circuit simplification
• Design of combinational circuit
• Introduction to flip-flops
• Application of flip-flops
• Memory systems
• Programmable logic
• Final project presentations
Computer Use:
•
•
Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or
equivalent software for the purpose of analysis and design of digital circuits.
Students should learn how to implement a design using programmable logic
(specific hardware and software tools depend on local availability.)
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum list of the equipment and devices required to conduct
this course:
• Oscilloscope
• Digital training board
• IC Discrete chips
• Universal Programmer and/or PLD board
• Window-based PC
Course Grading:
Comments &
Suggestions:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. However,
the mixture of informal and formal lab reports is recommended. Part of the laboratory
work should include a final project accompanied by oral presentation and written
report. A suggested grading strategy is:
• Formal reports – 30%
• Informal reports – 30%
• Lab work and participation – 10%
• Lab project – 30%
•
•
•
•
The same person should teach EET117 and EET120
Students should work in teams, preferable two to a team
Laboratory exercises in the area of PLDs should be selected based on local
hardware/software availability.
Information about PLDs: CPLDs, FPGAs, hardware & software, board
manufacturers can be accessed from following web sites:
o http://www.xilinx.com
o http://www.altera.com
17
o
o
http://www.xess.com
http://www.digilentinc.com
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOME 2, 5, 10: Student completion and instructor grading of laboratory
experiments.
• OUTCOME 5, 10: Student design and preparation of the laboratory testing
procedures. Team-based assignments, which necessitate effective
communication and good time management, can be useful in evaluation of team
success.
Course Coordinator:
Andrzej J. Gapinski, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Engineering, Fayette Campus
([email protected])
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
18
EET 205 – Semiconductor Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Data:
EET 205: Semiconductor Laboratory
(1 credit). Use of electrical instruments to test and measure linear devices. Introduction
to report writing. Prerequisite EET109 and concurrent: EET210.
Goals of the Course:
Semiconductor Laboratory is a required course for sophomore students in the
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of
the course is to teach students how to build circuits based primarily on operational
amplifiers and how to use digital multimeters, signal generators, frequency meters and
oscilloscopes to test these circuits. In addition, students must learn to write well
organized reports using a word processor. Lastly, they must learn to apply PSPICE for
Windows (or equivalent software) to evaluate the potential performance of these
circuits.
Relationship of EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 205 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to conduct experiments and then analyze and interpret
results. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually and in
writing. (Outcome 5)
• Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based
work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will demonstrate that theoretical device operation can be achieved in
properly constructed circuits.
• Students will be able to construct breadboard or prototype circuits.
• Students will be able to use standard electronic test equipment such as
oscilloscopes, function generators, digital multimeters, power supplies, and
frequency counters.
• Students will be able to analyze a circuit and compare theoretical performance to
actual performance.
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to present an organized written engineering analysis on
electronic testing of a circuit.
OUTCOME 10:
• Using both devices theoretical performance knowledge and analytical skills,
students will be able to design formal test procedures that exercise and test
circuit performance capabilities to demonstrate relationship to required
performance.
Suggested Text:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Buchla, Laboratory Exercises for Electronic Devices, 7th edition, Pearson
Prentice Hall
• Goody, ORCAD PSPICE for Windows, 3rd edition, Pearson Prentice Hall
The instructor may need to supplement any of the above with notes and handouts.
19
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the
course:
• Basic arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry.
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use electronic simulation software (PSPICE, Electronics
Workbench, etc.) to evaluate linear device circuits, and to gain experience using word
processing software to prepare reports.
Laboratory Exercises: Weekly lab exercises listed below are from the Buchla. Exercise numbers are indicated.
(This listing is provided as only a guide to lab exercises that might be covered in this
course. All may be supplemented by locally developed exercises.)
1. Lab 23: Op-Amp Characteristics
2. Lab 24: Linear Op-Amp Circuits
3. Lab 25: Op-Amp Frequency Response
4. Lab 26: Comparators and Schmitt Triggers
5. Lab 27: Summing Amplifiers
6. Lab 29: The Instrumentation Amplifier
7. Lab 1: The Diode Characteristics
8. Lab 3: Diode Limiting and Clamping Circuits
9. Lab 4: The Zener Regulator
10. Lab circuit design selection
11. Lab experimentation design
12. Lab software simulation (PSPICE or equivalent)
13. Completion of write-up
14. Class presentation
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• DMM
• Dual-trace oscilloscope
• Signal generator
• Frequency counter
• Dual-output, variable DC power supply
• Breadboard and miscellaneous components
• Windows-based PC capable of running PSPICE or equivalent software
The following equipment is also useful:
• Digital scope
• Data acquisition system
Course Grading:
Comments &
Suggestions:
Course Assessment:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. It is
recommended that the students complete a lab report for each experiment done. A final
project is suggested by the student, paper designed, analyzed in PSPICE and a report
submitted.
•
•
The same person should teach EET 205 and EET 210.
The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations
of circuits into laboratory reports.
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
20
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Student completion and instructor grading of experiments from laboratory
manuals.
• Student design and preparation of a laboratory testing procedure.
Course Coordinator:
Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus ([email protected])
21
EET 210 – Fundamentals of Semiconductors
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Data:
EET 210: Fundamentals of Semiconductors
(2 credits). Study of the theory and application of linear electronic devices and circuits,
including integrated circuits and operational amplifiers. Prerequisites: MATH 81 and
EET 101 and EET 109.
Goals:
Fundamentals of Semiconductors is a required course for sophomore students in the
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of
the course is to teach students to analyze and design amplifiers using operational
amplifiers. The student will also master the application of operational amplifiers and
other integrated circuits to create oscillators, communications systems, and data
conversion systems.
Relationship of EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 210 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers (Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving (Outcome 3)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will understand concept of three terminal devices with dependent
sources and be able to analyze operation.
• Students will understand the construction of diodes (p-n junctions) and be able
to analyze operation of rectification circuits.
• Students will understand the basic operation of operational amplifiers and be
able to design and analyze simple comparators.
• Students will understand the use of negative feedback in operational amplifiers
circuits and be able to analyze voltage, current, resistance and conductance
amplifiers and simple active filters.
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will apply concepts in algebra in conjunction with network theorems to
simplify and quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing diodes and
operational amplifiers.
• Students will apply concepts in algebra and complex algebra in conjunction with
fundamental electronic laws to quantitatively analyze electronic circuits
containing diodes and operational amplifiers.
Suggested Text:
Paynter, Introductory Electronic Devices and Circuits, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall
Alternate Texts:
Prerequisites by
Topic:
•
•
Malvino, Electronic Principles, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill
Floyd, Electronic Devices, 7th edition, Merrill
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the
course:
• Algebra and introductory trigonometry.
22
•
DC and AC circuit analysis.
Course Topics:
Suggested topical coverage by week for Paynter, 6th edition.
1. Operational Amplifiers: an overview (15-1 to 15-2)
2. Negative and positive feedback (15-8) and Inverting Amplifiers (15-4)
3. Non-inverting Amplifiers (15-5) and Frequency Effects, (15-7)
4. Chapter Summary and Problem Session
EXAM I,
5. Summing Amplifiers (16-3) and Instrumentation Amplifiers (16-)
6. Voltage Comparators (16-1)
7. Schmitt Triggers (19-3)
8. Tuned Amplifier Characteristics (17-1)
9. Low pass and High Pass Filters (17-2 to 17-3)
10. Band-pass and Notch Filters (17-4), Chapter Summary and Problem Session
EXAM II
11. Introduction to P/N junction and the Ideal Diode (2-1 to 2-2) and Practical diode
models and the Complete Model (2.3 to 2.5)
12. Zener & Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (2-7 and 2-9)
13. Half-Wave, Full-Wave and Bridge Rectifiers (3-2 to 3-4)
14. Zener Voltage Regulators (3.7), Summary and Problem Session
EXAM III,
15. Clippers, Clampers and Multipliers (4.1 to 4.4)
Final Exam
Calculator Use:
Students are expected to own and know how to use a scientific calculator, such as the
TI-85/86 or equivalent.
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronic Workbench, or
equivalent software, especially for calculating and presenting the frequency response of
amplifiers.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Comments &
Suggestions:
•
•
•
Students should also be enrolled in EET 205, the lab associated with this class.
The lab should be taught by the same instructor.
The troubleshooting portions of the text are best discussed in the lab.
If pressed for time, instructors may skip material on communications systems.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Outcomes 1&3: Traditional exams covering lecture material
• Outcomes 1&3: Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems
involving more complex applications of fundamental models
• Outcomes 1&3: Operational circuit analysis using circuit performance data
Course Coordinator:
Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus ([email protected])
23
EET 211 – Microprocessors
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 211: Microprocessors
(3 credits). A study of machine language programming, architecture, and interfacing for
microprocessor-based systems emphasizing engineering applications of
microprocessors and microcontrollers.
Course prerequisites: EET117.
Goals of the Course:
Microprocessors is a required course for sophomore-level students in the Electrical
Engineering Technology program. The purpose of this course to teach students the
fundamentals of microprocessor and microcontroller systems. The student will be able
to incorporate these concepts into their electronic designs for other courses where
control can be achieved via a microprocessor/controller implementation. Although
assembly language programming is a large component of the course, this course is
extremely hardware-oriented. Students will comprehend the basic requirements and
layout for building a microcomputer and applying those concepts to achieve a dedicated
“embedded” controller as a component of a larger system. Much of the experiments
will be using a laboratory trainers based on the instructor choice of processor. Real
world control problems will be solved as applications of embedded controllers, as
outlined in the laboratory exercises.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 211 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers. (Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and
computer usage, including the use of one or more computer software packages
for technical problem solving. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based
work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students should be able to solve basic binary math operations using the
microprocessor.
• Students should be able to demonstrate programming proficiency using the
various addressing modes and data transfer instructions of the target
microprocessor.
• Students should be able to program using the capabilities of the stack, the
program counter, and the status register and show how these are used to execute
a machine code program.
OUTCOME 4:
• Students should be able to apply knowledge of the microprocessor’s internal
registers and operations by use of a PC based microprocessor simulator.
• Students should be able to write assemble assembly language programs,
assemble into machine a cross assembler utility and download and run their
program on the training boards.
OUTCOME 10:
• Students should be able to design electrical circuitry to the Microprocessor I/O
ports in order to interface the processor to external devices.
24
•
Students should be able to write assembly language programs and download the
machine code that will provide solutions real-world control problems such as
fluid level control, temperature control, and batch processes.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• The 8051 Microcontroller and Embedded Systems, Mazidi, M.,Prentice Hall.
• Introduction to the Intel Family of Microprocessors, Antonakos, Prentice Hall.
• Microprocessors and Programmed Logic, Short, K.,Prentice Hall.
• Embedded Microcomputer Systems: Motorola 6811/6812, Valvano,J.,ThomsonBrooks/Cole.
• The 68HC11 Microcontroller, Greenfield, Saunders College Publications.
• The 68000 Microprocessor, 5/e, Antonakos, Prentice-Hall
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Satisfactory completion of basic digital electronics courses.
• Ability to convert decimal number into binary, octal, and hexadecimal, and visa
versa.
• Ability to perform arithmetic operations in binary, octal and hexadecimal.
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Microprocessor system architecture, incl. memory and I/O. (2 hours)
• Microprocessor programming model. (2 hours)
• Addressing modes. (3 hours)
• Program loop constructs - Jump and Branch instructions. (1 hour)
• Subroutines. (1 hour)
• Basic math programs - single and multi-byte signed addition & subtraction and
unsigned multiplication & division. (4 hours)
• BCD arithmetic - addition and subtraction. (1 hour)
• Timing loops. (1 hour)
• Control, polling and sensing loops. (1 hour)
• Basic parallel port operation and interfacing (LED's, relays, D/A and A/D, etc).
(4 hours)
• Basic serial port operation and interfacing. (2 hours)
• Interrupts. (2 hours)
• Assembly language programming. (4 hours)
• Overview of other processor families. (1 hour)
• Overview of special interface circuits such as Disk Controllers, Video
Controllers, DMA controllers, etc. (1 hour)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use the computer to write and assemble assembly language
programs and also run them by downloading them to the target microprocessor.
Students will also use a microprocessor software simulator that runs on the personal
computer. Students will also prepare lab reports and conduct out-of-class assignments
using the computer.
25
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following topics would be appropriate for this course:
• Memory Chips & Systems
• Analog to Digital and Digital to Analog Conversions
• Introduction to Using the Processor Board
• Programming Using Various Addressing Modes
• Simple Input/Output Interfacing
• Loops and Decision Making
• Timers and Interrupts
• Subroutines &Structured Programming
• Arithmetic and Logical Instruction Programming
• Project
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• A suitable microprocessor trainer or development board using the target
microprocessor
• Dual trace oscilloscopes
• Digital multi-meters
• Adjustable, multi-output DC power supplies
• Appropriate integrated circuits to build memory systems, I/O interfacing, and
other electronic components
• Suitable prototyping boards or electronic trainers
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources and/or internet sources
in the preparation of laboratory and oral reports. Also students should be encouraged to
conduct research in alternate microprocessors not used in the course to enhance their
understanding and sharpen their research skills. The results of this research can be
presented either orally or by written report.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOME 1: Traditional exams, quizzes and out-of-class problem
assignments covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess this
outcome.
• OUTCOME 4: Computer files of assembly language and compiled machine
code programs included in formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive
research-based projects. These reports, both written and oral utilize available
computer based applications are effective methods of demonstrating
achievement of this outcome.
• OUTCOME 10: Team-based assignments (viz. in lab exercises) in which
success (i.e., team-based rather than individually-based grades) requires are
effective student interaction and effective work-load sharing can be useful for
assessing success with respect to this outcome.
Course Coordinator:
Kenneth Dudeck, Associate Professor of Engineering, Hazleton Campus
([email protected])
26
EET 213W – Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
213W: Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills
(5 credits). AC and DC machinery principles and applications; introduction to magnetic
circuits, transformers, and electrical machines, including laboratory applications.
Prerequisites: ENGL 015, EET114.
Goals of the Course:
Fundamentals of Electrical Machines Using Writing Skills is a required course for
sophomore-level students in the Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate
degree program. The purpose of the course is to teach principles of AC and DC motors
and generators, and AC transformers and how they work. Basic concepts of
electromagnetic circuits as they relate to voltages, currents, and physical forces induced
in conductors are covered, including application to practical problems of machine
design. Practical analytical models for most types of motors, generators, and
transformers commonly used in industry are developed, and the models are used to
analyze power requirements, power capability, efficiency, operating characteristics,
control requirements, and electrical demands of these machines. EET 213W is also a
"writing-intensive" course that teaches students to prepare formal, written technical
documents. This goal is accomplished through extensive writing exercises performed
in the context of laboratory exercises that accompany the course.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 213W contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical
circuit analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers. (Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)
• Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in
writing. (Outcome 5)
• Students should be able to work effectively in teams. (Outcome 6)
• Students should understand professional, ethical and social responsibilities.
(Outcome 7)
• Students should have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous
improvement. (Outcome 11)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will be able to use standard methods to determine accurate
modeling/simulation parameters for various general-purpose electrical
machines and transformers.
• Students will be able to use modeling/simulation parameters with standard
equivalent circuit models to predict correctly the expected performance of
various general-purpose electrical machines and transformers.
• Students will be able use accepted national and international standards (such as
NEMA) to select appropriate electrical machines to meet specified performance
requirements.
• Students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental control
practices associated with AC and DC machines (starting, reversing, braking,
plugging, etc.)
27
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to use concepts in trigonometry, complex algebra, and
phasors to find correct solutions to electrical machine performance questions.
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to use standard word-processing and mathematical
analysis software to prepare professional quality written reports.
• Students will be able to prepare professional quality graphical presentations of
laboratory data and computational results, incorporating accepted data analysis
and synthesis methods.
• Students will be able to use suitable visual and graphic aids to prepare and give
professional quality presentations on technical subjects.
OUTCOME 6:
• Students will work in teams to conduct experiments, analyze results, and
develop technically sound reports of outcomes.
OUTCOME 7:
• Primarily via team-based laboratory activities, students will demonstrate the
ability to interact effectively on a social and interpersonal level with fellow
students, and will demonstrate the ability to divide up and share task
responsibilities to complete assignments.
• Students will be required to investigate various social, ethical, and professional
responsibilities in the controversial use of technology and defend a suitable
solution.
OUTCOME 11:
• Via required writing assignments, students will demonstrate the ability to
prepare, according to a prescribed schedule, revisions of written documents of
increasing quality.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Hubert, Electrical Machines-Theory, Operation, Applications, & Control,
Prentice Hall.
• Sen, Principles of Electric Machines & Power Electronics, Wiley
• Ryff, Electric Machinery, Prentice Hall
• Pearman, Electrical Machinery & Transformer Technology, Saunders
• Guru & Hiziroglu, Electric Machinery & Transformers, Saunders
• Wildi, Electrical Machines, Drives, and Power Systems, Prentice Hall
The following are useful references for this course:
• Kosow, Electric Machinery and Control, Prentice-Hall
• Siskind, Electrical Machines, McGraw-Hill
• Chapman, Electric Machinery Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Satisfactory completion of basic circuits courses, including AC circuit
concepts.
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
• Basic understanding of algebra, trigonometry, complex numbers, and phasors.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
28
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class. 14 week semester
allows 56 hours total.
• Magnetics: field properties, materials, hysteresis & saturation, magnetic
circuits, induction, motor & generator action. (3 hours)
• Transformers: construction, ideal & practical models, polarity, impedance,
parameter testing, regulation, efficiency, ratings, parallel operation & load
sharing. (7 hours)
• Specialty transformers: auto, 3φ, and instrument transformers. (2 hours)
• 3φ Induction Motors: construction, synchronous speed & slip, rotor & stator
circuit models, developed & output power, torque, efficiency, torque-speed
curves, classification standards, stall & starting torque, parameter measurement,
starting methods, reversing, plugging. (13 hours)
• 1φ Induction Motors: quadrature fields &/or rotating field theory, starting
methods, torque equations. (2 hours)
• Specialty Motors: brushless DC, stepper, hysteresis, and reluctance motors. (2
hours)
• Synchronous Motors: construction, operating concepts, starting methods, torque
& torque angle, armature reaction, circuit models & phasor diagrams, V-curves,
power factor control, pull-out torque, parameter testing, losses & efficiency. (8
hours)
• Synchronous Generators: motor-generator transition, phasor diagrams,
synchronizing, power factor control, voltage regulation, operation on infinite
grid. (8 hours)
• DC Machines: commutation, shunt, series, and compound motor models,
developed power & torque, losses & efficiency, starting, braking, and speed
control. (8 hours)
• In-class examinations (3 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers both to prepare lab reports and conduct some
out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to analyze lab data, prepare
engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of transformer, motor, and
generator performance. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet, and mathematical
analysis software (viz., Mathcad, Matlab, TKSolver, etc.) is required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
Typical laboratory exercises include the following:
• Transformer basics (V-I relationships, polarity testing, voltage regulation)
• Autotransformers (kVA amplification, step-up & step-down operation) or 3phase transformers (Constructing 3-phase banks from single-phase
transformers, wye/delta connections)
• 3φ squirrel-cage (or wound-rotor) induction motor performance (reversing,
torque-speed curves, start & stall torque, efficiency, power factor, & effects of
rotor resistance)
• Single-phase induction motor performance (starting & running torque, power
factor)
• Synchronous motor performance (start & pull-out torque, power factor ctrl, Vcurves)
• Synchronous alternator performance (synchronizing, regulation, power factor
ctrl)
• Shunt, series, & compound DC motor performance
• DC motor starting methods / controls
29
Required
Equipment:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• AC and DC voltage, current, and 1φ and 3φ power meters
• 1φ power transformers (1kVA or larger recommended)
• 3φ squirrel-cage induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)
• 1φ induction motors (split-phase, capacitor-start & -run, universal
recommended)
• 3φ synchronous motor/generators (0.25kW or larger recommended)
• Rotary dynamometer or prony brake appropriate for measuring motor torque
• Tachometers
• Resistive, capacitive, and inductive 3φ loads suitable for generator outputs
The following equipment is also useful:
• 3φ wound-rotor induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)
• Transformers with buck-boost and T-connections
• Phase angle meters
• Watt-var meters
• DC motor starters
• SCR speed controllers
• Synchroscope or synchronizing lamps
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor with the
stipulation that at least 25% of the course grade must be determined from the writing
component (see following item).
Communication
Skills:
The "W" designation on this course means that writing assignments must be a
fundamental part of the course. This goal is most easily met by requiring lab reports to
be formal, written reports. The reports must follow an accepted technical writing style
and must be concise, technically correct, and grammatically sound. Reports must be
prepared using a word processor and printed in an accepted professional format. As
required by the University "W" designation, (1) grading of written exercises will give
comparable weight to grammatical quality and technical merit, and (2) grades on
written material will represent at least 25% of the class grade.
The "W" designation also requires that this course teach students good oral
communication skills. Therefore, the course also requires students to prepare and
present oral reports of their technical work. Reports are graded, and these grades are
included in the overall class grade.
Library
Use/Research
Requirements:
Students should be required to use library technical resources and electronic-based data
sources in the preparation of at least one lab/research report assigned in this course.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOMES 1 & 3: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments
covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess these outcomes.
• OUTCOMES 5, 6 & 11: Formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive
research-based projects, created using any of a variety of typical professional
formats (research/test report, business letter, technical memo, lab notebook,
etc.), accompanied by oral presentation of results, are effective methods of
demonstrating achievement of this outcome.
30
•
OUTCOME 7: Team-based assignments (viz. in lab exercises) in which
success (i.e., team-based rather than individually-based grades) requires are
effective student interaction and effective work-load sharing can be useful for
assessing success with respect to this outcome.
Course Coordinator: Todd Batzel, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Altoona College
([email protected])
31
EET 216 – Linear Electronic Circuits
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Data:
EET 216: Linear Electronic Circuits
(3 credits) Theoretical study of linear electronic devices and circuits, including field effect
transistors, frequency response of amplifiers. Prerequisites: EET210.
Goals of the Course:
Linear Electronic Circuits The goal of the course is to teach students to analyze and
design small signal and power amplifiers and power supplies using electronic devices such
as diodes, transistors and integrated circuits. Students will also learn to analyze
MOSFETS, diacs, thyristors, and triacs.
Relationship of EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 216 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit
analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic controllers
(Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving (Outcome 3)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will understand the effect of operating point on the performance of BJT
and FET amplifiers and be able to select and design for proper bias.
• Students will understand the small signal operation of BJT and FET amplifiers and
be able to analyze operation.
• Students will understand the concept of frequency response and be able to develop
a Bode plot for a given circuit.
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will apply concepts of algebra in conjunction with network theorems to
simplify and quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing bipolar or field
effect transistors.
• Students will apply concepts of algebra and complex algebra in conjunction with
fundamental electronic laws to quantitatively analyze electronic circuits containing
bipolar or field effect transistors.
• Students will be able to construct Bode plots to depict amplifier frequency
response.
Suggested Text:
Paynter, Introductory Electronic Devices and Circuits, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall
Alternate Texts:
Malvino, Electronic Principles, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill
Floyd, Electronic Devices, 7th edition, Merrill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the course:
• Basic characteristics of diodes and op-amps
• Characteristics of linear voltage, current, resistance, and conductance amplifiers
• Concepts of feedback in amplifier circuits
• Operation, analysis, and design of practical linear and specialty non-linear circuits
using op-amps
• Basics of filter and oscillator circuits
32
Course Topics:
Suggested topical coverage by weeks [Chap. references for Paynter text]:
1. Review of diodes, diode applications (rectifiers & filters) [2.1-2.7, 3.2-3.6]
2. Limiters, clampers, multipliers [4.1-4.4]
3. JFETs and JFET biasing [12.1-12.2]
4. Small-signal JFET amplifiers (CS, CD, and CG designs) [12.3-12.4]
5. MOSFETS [13.1-13.5]
6. EXAM I
7. BJT biasing [6.1-6.3, 7.1-7.4]
8. Small-signal BJT amplifiers (CE, CB, and CC designs) [8.1-8.4, 9.1-9.7]
9. Small-signal BJT amplifiers (CB, and CC designs) [10.1-10.5]
10. Power amplifiers [11.-11.6]
11. Review and EXAM II
12. Lead-lag networks, half-power response, dB notation [notes supplied by instructor]
13. Low frequency response of BJT and FET amplifiers, Miller's theorem, high
frequency response of amplifiers, Bode plots [14.2-14.3, notes supplied by
instructor]
14. Review and Exam III
15. Review of op amp amplifier filters[17-1 to 17-6]
Final Exam
Calculator Use:
Students are expected to own and know how to use a scientific calculator, such as the TI85/86 or equivalent.
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows, Electronics Workbench, or equivalent
software, especially for calculating and presenting the frequency response of amplifiers as
well as MOSFETS. EET 216 students should also be enrolled in the associated lab, EET
221. EET 221 should be taught by the same instructor.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving
the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOMES 1&3: Traditional exams covering lecture material
• OUTCOMES 1&3: Assignment of quantitative design and analysis problems
involving more complex applications of fundamental models
• OUTCOMES 1&3: Operational circuit analysis using circuit performance data
Course Coordinator:
Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus ([email protected])
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
33
EET 220 – Programmable Logic Controllers
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EET 220: Programmable Logic Controllers
(2 credits) An introduction to programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Topics covered
include PLC programming, troubleshooting, networking, and industrial applications.
Prerequisite: EET 117.
Goals of the Course:
Programmable logic controllers is a required course for sophomore-level students in the
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) program and for junior-level students who enter
the Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program
with a background in mechanical engineering technology. The goal of the course is to
teach students fundamentals of programming, installation and use, troubleshooting, and
networking of current technology PLCs. Programming instruction is based on standard
ladder logic concepts and covers the use of relay logic for I/O and memory control;
applications of timers, counters, sequencers; and the effective use of program flow control
instructions to manage PLC operations. Data manipulation using standard digital and
arithmetic programming instructions are also covered, as are concepts in analog data I/O
and advanced programming methods. Classroom instruction is supported by laboratory
activities in which students use PLCs to perform typical industrial control functions. Lab
exercises are designed to ensure that students learn the practical aspects of installing,
programming, troubleshooting, and networking PLCs in situations typical of industrial
use.
Upon completing this course, students will be able to recognize industrial control
problems suitable for PLC control, conceptualizing solutions to those problems, and use
modern programming software to develop, enter, and debug programs to solve those
problems. They will also be able to install PLC units, interface them with I/O channels
and standard data networks, and troubleshoot I/O and networking problems to produce
functional control systems.
Relationship to EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 220 contributes to the following outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic knowledge in electronics, electrical circuit
analysis, electrical machines, microprocessors, and programmable logic
controllers. (Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of drafting and
computer usage, including the use of one or more computer software packages for
technical problem solving. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in writing.
(Outcome 5)
• Students should be able to work effectively in teams. (Outcome 6)
• Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based work
to the design of circuits, systems, or processes. (Outcome 10)
• Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement (Outcome
11)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the EET program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1
• Students will be able to use PLC digital and analog input modules to accurately
monitor and record the state of switches, pushbuttons, relays, and other digital and
analog indicators typical of PLC applications.
34
•
Students will be able to use PLC digital and analog output modules to correctly
operate relays, lights, display modules, alarms, operate meters, actuators, motors,
and control circuits typical of PLC applications.
OUTCOME 4
• Students will be able to produce working drawings of PLC based control systems
using appropriate CAD software.
• Students will be able to use modern PLC programming tools and software to
develop functional ladder diagrams and programs to monitor and control sequential
processes suitable for PLC control.
OUTCOME 5
• Students will be able to prepare high quality reports describing PLC control
problem solutions and implementations.
OUTCOME 6
• Students will be able to work together effectively in teams to carry out PLC
projects.
OUTCOME 10
• Students will be able to use appropriate technology and apply principles of
engineering design to come up with solutions that meet the functional requirements
of the design projects.
OUTCOME 11
• Students will be able to complete lab reports, assignments, and project reports in a
timely manner.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Petruzella, Programmable Logic Controllers, Glencoe McGraw-Hill.
• Petruzella, Activities Manual for Programmable Logic Controllers, Glencoe
McGraw-Hill.
• Swainston, A Systems Approach to Programmable Controllers, Delmar Publishers.
• Cox, Technician's Guide to Programmable Controllers, Delmar Publishers.
• Geller, Programmable Controllers Using the Allen-Bradley SLC-500 Family,
Prentice-Hall, Inc.
• Webb and Reis, Programmable Logic Controllers: Principles and Applications,
Prentice-Hall, Inc.
• Hackworth, Programmable Logic Controllers: Programming Methods and
Applications, Prentice-Hall, Inc.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
EET 117 (Digital Electronics) or EMET 310 (Digital Electronics).
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note: One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
1. Overview of PLCs. (1 hour)
2. PLC hardware. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
3. Fundamentals of PLC programming. (3 hours of lecture, 4 hours of lab)
4. Timers and counters. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
5. Program control instructions. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
6. Data manipulation instructions. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
7. Arithmetic instructions. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
8. I/O modules and wiring. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
9. Advanced PLC programming. (2 hours of lecture, 4 hours of lab)
10. PLC installation and troubleshooting. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
35
11. Process control & data acquisition systems. (1 hour of lecture, 2 hours of lab)
12. PLC project. (7 hours of lab)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers and PLC software to create and debug PLC
programs, upload and download programs between computers and PLCs, and set up
communication links between computers, PLCs and various I/O devices.
Required Equipment:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Appropriate industrial-quality PLCs with communication linkage with networked
personal computers
• A variety of PLC-compatible I/O devices
• Digital multimeter
• Appropriate PLC programming software
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in achieving
intended outcomes listed above:
• Traditional exams covering lecture material.
• Formal and informal lab reports documenting programming
• Project report documenting project development, implementation, and testing.
Course Coordinator:
Sohail Anwar, Associate Professor of Engineering, Altoona College ([email protected])
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
36
EET 221 – Linear Electronics Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Data:
EET 221: Linear Electronics Laboratory
(1 credit). Laboratory study of diodes, BJT and JFET transistors, power supplies,
small and large signal amplifiers, voltage regulators. Prerequisite EET205 and
concurrent: EET216.
Goals of the Course:
Linear Electronics Laboratory is a required course for sophomore students in the
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) associate degree program. The purpose of
the course is to teach students how to build circuits based primarily on diodes, BJTS
and FETs and how to use digital multimeters, signal generators, frequency meters and
oscilloscopes to test these circuits. In addition, students must learn to write wellorganized reports using a word processor. Lastly, they must learn to apply PSPICE
for Windows (or similar programs) to evaluate the potential performance of these
circuits with the aid of a computer.
Relationship of EET
Program Outcomes:
EET 221 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to conduct experiments and then analyze and interpret
results. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually and in
writing. (Outcome 5)
• Students should be able to apply creativity through the use of project-based
work to the design of circuits, systems or processes. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will demonstrate that theoretical device operation can be achieved in
properly constructed circuits.
• Students will be able to construct breadboard or prototype circuits.
• Students will be able to use standard electronic test equipment such as
oscilloscopes, function generators, digital multimeters, power supplies, and
frequency counters.
• Students will be able to analyze a circuit and compare theoretical performance
to actual performance.
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to present an organized written engineering analysis on
electronic testing of a circuit.
OUTCOME 10:
• Using both devices theoretical performance knowledge and analytical skills,
students will be able to design formal test procedures that exercise and test
circuit performance capabilities to demonstrate relationship to required
performance.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Buchla, Laboratory Exercises for Electronic Devices, 7th edition, Pearson
Prentice Hall
• Goody, ORCAD PSPICE for Windows, 3rd edition, Pearson Prentice Hall
The instructor may need to supplement any of the above with notes and handouts.
37
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering the
course:
• Basic arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry skills.
• An understanding of the concepts and theories of linear amplifiers
• The capability of using standard electronic laboratory testing equipment.
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use PSPICE for Windows (or equivalent software) to analyze
electronic circuits tested in the lab, especially when calculating and presenting
frequency response of amplifiers, and to use word processing software to write all
reports.
Laboratory Exercises: Suggested lab exercises listed below are from the Buchla book. Exercise numbers are
indicated. (This listing is provided as only a guide to lab exercises that might be
covered in this course. All may be supplemented by locally developed exercises.)
1. Introduction to lab and review of lab policies
2. JFET Characteristics (12)
3. JFET Biasing (13)
4. JFET Amplifiers (14)
5. JFET Applications (15)
6. BJT Characteristics (6)
7. Transistor Switches (7)
8. BJT Biasing (8)
9. The CE Amplifier (9)
10. The CC Amplifier (10)
11. Multistage Amplifier (11)
12. Class A Power Amplifier (16 – PSPICE)
13. Class B Push-Pull Amplifier (17 – PSPICE)
14. Amplifier Low Frequency Response (18 – PSPICE)
15. Amplifier High Frequency Response (19- PSPICE)
Required Equipment:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• DMM
• Dual-trace oscilloscope
• Signal generator
• Frequency counter
• Dual-output, variable DC power supply
• Breadboard and miscellaneous components
• Windows-based PC
The following equipment is also useful:
• Digital scope
• Data acquisition system
Course Grading:
•
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. It
is recommended that the students complete a lab report for each experiment
done. A final project is suggested by the student, paper designed, analyzed in
PSPICE and a report submitted
Comments &
Suggestions:
•
•
The same person should teach EET 221 and EET 216.
The instructor should blend calculator use and electronic simulation evaluations
38
•
•
of circuits into laboratory reports.
Students should work in teams, preferably two to a team.
If used, lab projects can be assigned by the instructor, or students may select
them from technical magazines. In either case, projects should begin early in
the semester. Preliminary presentations of project plans should occur no later
than the 6th week of classes, and all projects should conclude with a formal
report and presentation.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Student completion and instructor grading of experiments from laboratory
manuals.
• Student design and preparation of a laboratory testing procedure.
Course Coordinator:
Gerry Cano, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer, New Kensington Campus ([email protected])
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
39
ET 002 – Engineering Technology Orientation
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
ET 002: Engineering Technology Orientation
(1 credits). Introduction to computer methods for analyzing and solving engineering
technology problems. Covers microcomputer fundamentals, word processing,
spreadsheets, and fundamentals of Visual Basic programming.
Goals of the Course:
Engineering Technology Orientation is a required course for students in the common
first of the 2EET and 2MET semester degree program. The primary goals for the
course are to teach basic computer skills and the use of basic computer word processing
and spreadsheet applications. More specifically, students learn to use Microsoft Word
(word processor) and Excel (spreadsheet) for the preparation of laboratory reports and
business documentation. In addition to these applications, the course also addresses the
following topics:
• Windows operating system
• Communication through electronic mail (email)
• Use of the World Wide Web for information gathering
• Integration of various files and objects (viz., Cad files, images, spreadsheets,
charts, etc.) into word processing documents
Engineers and technicians are problem solvers, and ET 002 focuses on using the
computer as a tool for problem solving and document generation.
Relationship to 2EET
Program Outcomes:
•
•
Apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering concepts to technical
problem solving (Program outcome 3)
Students should be able to communicate effectively orally, visually, and in
writing. (Program outcome 5)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to plan and develop Excel spreadsheets using spreadsheet
mathematical operators and functions to analyze problems with data.
• Students will be able to select the most appropriate graphing technique to
display computational results.
• Students will be able to analyze and interpret experimental results using Excel
spreadsheets.
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to use word processing, spreadsheets and CAD software to
develop a formal laboratory or technical report
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts for this course:
• Office XP Introductory Concepts and Techniques Enhanced Edition by Shelly
Cashman Vermaat.
• Microsoft Office XP Illustrated Brief by Michael Halverson & Marjorie S. Hunt.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are not expected to have any previous knowledge related to computers, word
processing, spreadsheets, or CAD applications upon entering this course:
Course Topics:
The following coverage by weeks are suggestions only.
40
1. Introduction to ET 002
2. Engineering Technology - What is it?
3. Computer Hardware and Software
4. Using the Internet
5. Introduction to wordprocessing
6. Introduction to PowerPoint
7. and 8. Developing a technical paper
9. and 10. Introduction to spreadsheets
11. and 12. Collecting and analyzing data (spreadsheet assignment)
13. Analysis and decision
14. and 15. Project and report writing – students will recommend and design an
improvement in a common item and then develop a report on their design project.
Computer Use:
The entire course requires the use of the computer.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use
No library use is required, but information searches on the Internet are required.
Course Assessment
Course assessment may include:
• Internet search and written report on the following topics.
• Homework exercises in word processing - development of a one page technical
document that includes graphics and a multi-page technical paper that includes
tables, graphics, footnotes, and endnotes.
• Homework exercises in spreadsheets – development of two spreadsheets that
require use of the basic mathematical operators as well as several higher-level
mathematical functions to produce prescribed analytical results and that require
the use of absolute and relative addressing, conditional and logical decision
functions, and graphing features.
• In-class examinations both written test and demonstration of proficiency using
the computer.
• A formal laboratory report that integrates word processing, spreadsheets, and
graphics into a report given empirical data.
Course Coordinator:
Sohail Anwar, Associate Professor of Engineering, Penn State University, Altoona
College ([email protected])
41
ET 005 – Engineering Methods in Engineering Technology
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
ET 005: Engineering Methods in Engineering Technology
(1 credit). Introduction to experimental and computer methods in engineering
technology; applications of experimental concepts through student involvement in
computer exercises. Lab. Prerequisites: EET101, MATH 081.
Goals of the Course:
Engineering Methods in Engineering Technology
The purpose of this course is to introduce new Electrical Engineering Technology
students to experimental and computer methods commonly used in engineering
technology. The course emphasizes the application of experimental methods and
concepts using computers by involving students in hands-on computer analysis of
technical problems based on laboratory-type data. Additionally, students are
introduced to analysis software packages such as PSpice, Electronic Workbench, or
acquisition and analysis packages such as Mathcad, Matlab, or LabView. Other topics
such as programming in Pascal, C, C++, or Visual Basic and group project activities
may be included. These are only suggested topics and may vary greatly depending on
changes in technology, needs of local industry, or situations at the various campuses.
Relationship to EET
ET 5 contributes to the following EET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply basic mathematical, scientific, and engineering
concepts to technical problem solving. (Outcome 3)
• Students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of computer usage,
including the use of one or more computer software packages for technical
problem solving. (Outcome 4)
• Have a respect for diversity and knowledge of contemporary, professional,
societal, and global issues. (Outcome 8)
Program Outcomes:
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to perform calculations using spreadsheets and use
software features to display and interpret the results.
• Students will be able to perform calculations with mathematical analysis
software and analyze and interpret the results.
• Students will be able to use electronic design and analysis software to perform
DC, AC and transient simulations of electrical and electronic circuits and
interpret the results from the analysis.
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will be able to draw, print, and save electronic schematics.
OUTCOME 8:
• Introduction of students to professional code of ethics that practitioners of
engineering & technology are expected to abide by.
• Students complete some problem/homework assignment focused on
controversial technology.
Suggested Text:
Instructors are to choose appropriate texts and or handout materials based on the
activities included in their classes.
Useful References:
•
Goody, MicroSim PSpice for Windows Volume I: DC, AC, and Devices &
Circuits, Prentice Hall.
42
•
•
Goody, PSPICE for Windows, vol. 2, (op-amps & digital circuits), Prentice Hall.
Herniter, Schematic Capture With MicroSim PSpice, Prentice Hall.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamental DC circuits.
Course Topics:
The following lists several appropriate activities for ET 005. Coverage times shown in
parentheses are suggestions only. Note – Class hours as indicated here represent a
single, 50-minute class period.
Calculations with spreadsheets: (6 hours)
• Enter and plot experimental data (single and multiple trends, multiple axes, etc.).
• Fit least squares trendlines to data and analyze errors.
• Perform exercises using scientific & engineering math functions.
• Perform exercises using data sorting and data analysis features.
• Perform calculations using complex variable functions.
• Solve engineering problems using iterative solution methods.
Calculations with mathematical analysis software: (viz., Mathcad or Matlab) (6 hours)
• Enter and plot experimental data (single and multiple trends, multipe axes, etc.).
• Determine least squares equations to fit data.
• Develop and plot parametric solutions to multi-variable problems.
• Develop simultaneous equation solvers.
• Develop solutions to engineering problems using iterative solution methods.
PSpice or equivalent software: (8 hours)
• Draw, print, and edit an electronic schematic.
• DC and AC node analysis.
• Run DC sweep analysis.
• Run transient and frequency analysis on circuits and interpret the results.
• Use Probe or similar tools to graph results.
Code of ethics and controversial technology: (2 hours)
• Students search for Engineering Code of Ethics on line and use results in Case
Study.
• Students complete some problem/homework assignment focused on
controversial technology.
Other topics: (6 hours)
Course Grading:
Comments &
Suggestions:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
•
•
•
Due to the number of topics covered in this one credit course, it is recommended
that hand out material be used to cover some of the topics.
Evaluation versions of PSPICE are available for free from Orcad at their
website.
A LabVIEW Evaluation Version CD with Guide for Graphical Programming
can be obtained from National Instruments for instructors considering
purchasing a site license.
Team projects can address any of the activities listed in the suggested course topics.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Traditional exams covering lecture material.
• Computer based exams that cover the computer exercises performed by the
43
•
•
students in the course.
Written report based on the team problem solving exercise.
A portfolio of student work may be used. (optional)
Course Coordinator: Michael Marcus, Assistant Professor of Engineering, York Campus, ([email protected])
Rev 2 / Aug 2005
44
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Course Outlines
45
EGT 101 – Technical Drawing Fundamentals
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Spring 2005)
Catalog Description:
EGT 101: Technical Drawing Fundamentals
(1credit) Technical skills and drafting room practices; fundamentals of theoretical
graphics; orthographic projection including sectional and auxiliary views;
dimensioning.
Course prerequisites: EGT 102, ET 2 and or both concurrently
Goals of the Course:
EGT 101 To give students experience in the technical skills associated with manual
drafting room practices through completion of assigned homework problems and
quizzes.
Relationship to [insert EGT 101 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
program abbreviation OUTCOME #4:
here] Program
• Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.
Outcomes:
OUTCOME #5:
• Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric solid models
as a part of the applied engineering design process.
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME #4:
• Students will successfully complete a set of Working Drawings for an assigned
Design Project using CAD computer Software and or manual drafting
techniques.
OUTCOME #5:
• Students will successfully complete assigned problems and quizzes covering
2D: Multi-view Projection, Dimensioning, Sectional Views, Auxiliary Views,
Axonometric (Isometric) Projection, Oblique Projection, and 2D Design and
Working Drawings.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon. Engineering Graphics, 8th Edition.
Prentice Hall, 2000.
• Bethune, J. Engineering Graphics with AutoCAD 2002, Upper Saddle River,
NJ; Prentice-Hall, 2002.
• Earle, Engineering Design Graphics: AutoCAD 2000. 10th ed. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2001.
• Bilen, S. Introduction to Engineering Design, Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill, 2001.
• Bertline, G. Introduction to Graphics Communications for Engineers, 2nd
Edition, McGraw Hill 2002.
• Vinson, G. Creative Engineering Graphics, Kendall/Hunt Publishing Co., 2000.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Introductory understanding of Geometry and General Mathematics
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
46
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computer Use:
Sketching and Shape Description (4 hours)
Multi-view Projection (3 hours)
Dimensioning (4 hours)
Instrumental Drawing (1 hour)
Lettering (1 hour)
Geometric Construction (1 hour)
Sectional Views (2 hours)
Auxiliary Views (2 hours)
Axonometric (Isometric) Projection (2 hours)
Oblique Projection (2 hours)
Geometric Tolerancing (1 hour)
Reading Engineering Drawings of Machine Elements and Structures (1 hour)
Threads and Fasteners (1 hour)
Design and Working Drawings (5 hours)
EGT 101 is taught in a classroom setting with each student working at his/her own
computer. Students complete various homework assignments by sketching, using
manual drafting instruments and drawing in a CAD software package.
Laboratory Exercises:
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Computer station with CAD software for each student.
• Printer/plotter, one per class.
• Approximately 20”X26” drawing board for each student.
• Drafting machine or T-square to suit drawing board dimensions for each student.
• 30X60X90 degree triangle provided by student.
• 45-degree equal lateral triangle provided by student.
• Drafting tape provided by student.
• 12” engineers scale provided by student.
• 12” architects scale provided by student.
• 12” ruler with millimeter graduation provided by student.
• Protractor provided by student.
• Eraser – pencil lead provided by student.
• Mechanical lead holder and 4H, 2H, HB equivalent pencils provided by student.
• Dividers provided by student.
• Compass provided by student.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
None
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Collect and grade assigned homework problems related to course outcomes.
• Collect and grade in class quizzes related to course outcomes.
Course Coordinator:
Eric Granlund, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College, [email protected]
47
EGT 102 – Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Summer 2005)
Catalog Description:
EGT 102: Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting
(1 credit). A first course presenting an intensive study utilizing a computer assisted
drafting and design system to obtain graphic solutions.
Course prerequisites or co-requisites: EGT 101, ET 2
Goals of the Course:
EGT 102 is taught in a computer laboratory setting with each student working at
his/her own computer. Students complete computer-aided-drafting assignments by
drawing in a CAD software package.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
EGT 102 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Outcome #4 Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer
applications.
• Outcome #5 Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric
solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process.
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOMES #4 & #5:
• Students will draw with CAD software using basic techniques.
• Students will perform basic editing techniques using CAD software.
• Students will create multi-view projections of three-dimensional objects using
CAD software.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Giesecke, Mitchell, Spencer, Hill, Dygdon, Engineering Graphics, Prentice Hall
• Bethune, Engineering Graphics with AutoCAD, Prentice-Hall
• Earle, Engineering Design Graphics: AutoCAD, Prentice-Hall
• Bilen, Introduction to Engineering Design, McGraw-Hill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Introductory understanding of Geometry and General Mathematics
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Computers & Computer Usage, CAD Software, File Manipulation, Use of
Angel Course Management System (2 hours)
• Basic Drawing (6 hours)
• Editing Commands and Options (5 hours)
• Layers, Linetypes, Template Creation, Settings (2 hours)
• Dimensioning; Tolerances (3 hours)
• Hatching and Sectional Views; Construction Lines and Rays (2 hours)
• Blocks (2 hours)
• Borders and Attribute Automation ( 2 hours)
• Isometric Drawing ( 2 hours)
• Threads ( 2 hours)
48
•
Computer Use:
Auxiliary Views ( 2 hours)
Each student will prepare class assignments using a commercial CAD package at an
individual workstation. Appropriate applications include but are not limited to
AutoCAD, I-DEAS, Mechanical Desktop, Pro/Engineer, and Solid Works.
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory exercises involving the following may be appropriate for this course:
• Basic Drawing Commands
• Basic Editing Commands
• Multiview Projection Problems
• Dimensioning and Tolerancing Exercises
• Sectional Views
• Threads and Fasteners
• Blocks and Attributes
• Axonometric (Isometric) Projection
• Auxiliary Views
• Design and Working Drawings
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Computer station and with CAD software for each student.
• Network Printer
• Internet Access
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
none
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Collect and grade assigned homework problems related to course outcomes.
• Collect and grade quizzes related to course outcomes.
Course Coordinator:
Irene Ferrara, Instructor in Engineering, Altoona College, [email protected]
Rev 0 / Summer 2005
49
EGT 114 – Spatial Analysis and Computer-Aided Drafting
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
Goals of the Course:
EGT 114: Spatial Analysis and Computer-Aided Drafting
( 2 credits ) Spatial relations of applications in engineering technology, with more
advanced functionality of computer-aided drafting and design systems. Prerequisites:
EGT101, EGT 102
1. To teach students to obtain information from technical drawings: true length of
lines, true area of plane surfaces, intersection of a line and a plane, intersection
of two planes, true angle between two planar surfaces.
2. To continues development of skills of technical drawings: assemblies, assembly
sections, Bill of Materials, more complex geometries such as rounds, fillets,
runouts, representation of a helix as in threads.
3. Introduce geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.
Relationship to 2MET EGT114 contributes to the following 2MET program outcomes:
Program Outcomes: OUTCOME 5
• Students should be able to produce 2D drawings and 3D parametric solid
models as a part of the applied engineering design process.
OUTCOME 4
• Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are (this is dependent
upon what software is being used):
2D or 3D Parametric Solid Model Outcome
• Students will be able to obtain true shape – true size, distance, area, and angle
data using methods of conventional descriptive geometry or the analysis tools
of a parametric solid modeler adhering to ANSI Y14 standards.
Demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications Outcome
• Students will be able to successfully create and modify complex geometry
using 2D software or 3D parametric solid modeling software adhering to ANSI
Y14 standards
• Students will be able to successfully create and modify assemblies of three or
more unique parts using the 2D software or 3D parametric solid modeling
software adhering to ANSI Y14 standards
Suggested Texts:
Texts and/or references for this course:
Since the software used at each campus location where this course is taught varies, the
instructor shall use the text for that software which is appropriate to the coverage of
the course material stated above.
• Digital Product Definition Data Practices, ASME Y14-41-2003, The American
Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 2003. ISBN 0-7918-2810-7.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course depending upon what software is being used:
• Create orthographic and pictorial sketches
• Apply dimensional annotations to drawings or models
50
•
Create and modify orthographic multiview drawings, auxiliary drawings, and
sectional drawings
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Multiview, auxiliary view and sectional view projections (10 hours)
• Dimensioning, tolerancing and annotating (10 hours)
• Working drawings and document control (10 hours)
• Creating and modifying 3D models (20 hours)
• Examinations and projects (10 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are to use the software available a that campus location
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Personal computer 1.8gig, 256K mem, HD, FD, CDRW
• 3 button mouse
• 20 inch screen
• Color plotter
• Projection system
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Performance appraisal: drawing projects completed
• Local developed exams
Course Coordinator:
Dan Styduhar, Senior Instructor, Shenango Campus, [email protected]
51
EG T 201 – Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting
Standard Course Outline (Update: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EG T 201: Advanced Computer-Aided Drafting (2 credits).
Application of the principles of engineering graphics; preparation of working drawings;
details, examples, and bill of material using CAD.
Course prerequisites: EG T 101, 102, & 114
Preface:
With respect to the four course Engineering Graphics sequence there is a broad diversity
in needs and thinking from Campus to Campus. This Course Outline presumes one
particular thought process and sequence but many others are perfectly acceptable:
• EG T 101: Sketching and Graphical Theory, i.e., Geometric Constructions,
Orthographic Projection, and Dimensioning, which are required to create
Working Drawings with 2D C.A.D.
• EG T 102: 2D Computer-Aided Drafting
• EG T 114: 3D Parametric Solid Modeling of Part Mode files with an emphasis
at the end of the course on features which are skewed in space (or otherwise
geometrically complex ) and/or cannot be created without the use of construction
points, lines and planes
Goals of the Course:
Professional parametric solid modeling software will be applied to produce complete,
industry-typical and -standard working drawings, including part detail drawings and
various types of assembly drawings; to implement the appropriately toleranced design of
interfacing components; and to explore advanced productivity-enhancing add-in
modules. Additionally, students will be introduced to the variety and relative precedence
of specifications for feature tolerances and to the basic differences between form and
size tolerancing.
Relationship to 2MET Pursuant to the corresponding 2MET program outcomes, satisfactory completion of the
Program Outcomes: EG T 201 course requires that students should be able to:
• Apply concepts of applied mathematics and science in solving technical
problems (Outcome 3).
• Demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications (Outcome 4).
• Produce two-dimensional (2.D.) drawings and three-dimensional (3.D.)
parametric solid models as a part of the applied engineering design process
(Outcome 5).
• To matriculate in a baccalaureate Engineering Technology (4M.E.T.) degree
program (Outcome 6).
Course Outcomes:
Using the provided computer hardware, CAD software, lectures, software
demonstrations, and reference materials the student will produce acceptable calculations
and CAD outputs (sample CCQ Conditions).
For example, acceptable CAD drawings will contain seven (or fewer) incorrect
dimensions, seven (or fewer) incorrect line weights, one (or fewer) incorrect or
misplaced drawing views, seven (or fewer) incorrectly cross-hatched parts in an
assembly drawing, three (or fewer) detail omissions for purchased standard parts in an
assembly drawings, or specific combinations of these types of errors. For example,
tolerance stack up and other calculations will be completed to within 70% correctness
and accuracy (sample CCQ Qualities).
52
Given Qualities and Conditions similar to those stated above, students will be able to
(sample CCQ Criteria):
OUTCOME 3:
• Use one or more algebra-based or geometry-enhanced method(s) to validate their
designs, e.g., tolerance stack-up calculation or Geometric Dimensioning and
Tolerancing (G.D. & T.).
OUTCOME 4:
• Produce part-, drawing-, and assembly-mode files using 3D parametric solid
modeling software while employing advanced, accurate and careful file
management.
• Understand how one or more advanced capability(ies) of 3D parametric solid
modeling software; e.g., sheet metal forming, part and/or assembly
configurations, or welding; improve(s) the speed of the design process and
efficiency of designers.
OUTCOME 5:
• Produce part detail and assembly drawings using fully associative drawing and
dimensioning, assembly functionality, or both, while satisfying national standard
ANSI Y14.5.
• Precisely tolerance individual part features which interact between parts and subassemblies.
OUTCOME 6:
• Meet the CAD-related admissions criteria of a baccalaureate Engineering
Technology program.
Suggested Texts:
Prerequisites by
Topic:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Graphics Concepts with SolidWorks, 2nd ed., Lueptow and Minbiole; Prentice
Hall, 2004.
• Technical Drawing, 12th ed., Giesecke et al; Prentice Hall, 2003.
• Technical Graphics Communication, 3rd ed., Bertoline et al.; McGraw Hill,
2003.
• SolidWorks User's Guide, version specific, SolidWorks Corporation.
• Descriptive Geometry, 9th ed., Paré and Hill; Prentice Hall, 1997.
• Machinery's Handbook, 26th ed., Oberg, Jones, Horton, Ryfell; Industrial Press,
Inc., 2000.
• Dimensioning and Tolerancing, standard number Y14.5M-1994, American
Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1994.
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:
• A thorough understanding of the principles of orthographic projection
• An understanding of auxiliary drawing views and why they are used
• An understanding of sectional views and why they are used
• An understanding of CAD application software to the extent that accuratelydimensioned 2D drawings can be constructed, saved, retrieved and printed or
plotted.
3D Parametric solid (part) modeling capabilities:
• Revolved & Extruded Base,
• Basic Editing of Sketches and
Boss and Cut
Feature Definition
• Swept Base, Boss and Cut
• Use of Patterns, Feature Mirroring
and the Hole Wizard
• Lofted Base, Boss and Cut
• Use of Reference Geometry to solve
Spatial Analysis problems
53
Since thorough part modeling skills are prerequisite the instructor may wish to provide
sets of pre-created part files to the students for the drawing and assembly assignments in
EG T 201.
Course Topics:
Topics generally correspond directly to the list of laboratory exercises in the next
section.
Introductory Software Demonstrations
Necessarily, introductory demonstrations for software functionality that is new to the
student should be conducted in conjunction with each specific assignment. Generally,
demonstrations should be projected onto a highly visible screen, timely and limited to
one hour of demonstration time per 2-3 hours of open laboratory time.
Theoretical Lectures
A total of 3-4 lecture periods (at 50 minutes each) can be used to introduce the following
topics (separate from the computer laboratory):
• Unilateral, bilateral and symmetric size tolerances
• Form control and tolerances
• Calculations for critical fits
• Specification precedence for tolerances, e.g., stock size vs. size directly specified
in the drawing field vs. title block tolerances vs. drawing notes, etc.
Laboratory Exercises: The following laboratory assignments would be appropriate for this course (these may
overlap and alternative assignments, based upon the prefatory comments, may be
substituted):
• Part drawing with standard three orthographic views, complete dimensions, and a
Section View
• Part drawing with complete dimensions and a Broken View
• Part drawing with complete dimensions and a Primary Auxiliary View
• Part drawing with complete dimensions and a Secondary Auxiliary View
• Part drawing with complete dimensions and removed Detail View(s)
• Detail drawing with correct limit tolerances on features which are critical for fit
and function
• Assembly file with separate sub-assemblies
• Assembly Drawing (with part identification balloons and a bill-of-material)
which uses Sectional Views to expose fine internal detail and part
interrelationships
• Assembly Drawing (with part identification balloons and a bill-of-material)
which is based upon an Exploded View
• Assembly Drawing of a tooling fixture (with part identification balloons and a
bill-of-material) which shows the subject work piece transparently with phantom
lines.
• Configured part file with tabulated drawing
• Welding of an assembly using advanced software capabilities and production of a
welding drawing with correct symbols
• Production of an injection mold cavity from the subject part file
• Exploration of the functionality of sheet metal modules
• Applications of Top Down Design and Layout Sketches
• Application of motion-simulating modules and functionality
54
Computer Use:
Intensive use of 3D parametric solid modeling software is integral to this course.
Required Equipment: To conduct this course the following minimum hardware and software is recommended:
• One computer, capable of handling the advanced CAD software well, per student
• 3D parametric solid modeling software, such as Pro/ENGINEER® or
SolidWorks®
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor. A heavy
emphasis of 70-80% on laboratory assignments, as compared to timed examinations, is
recommended.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Traditional in-course assessment instruments, e.g., graded drawing submissions
and proficiency examinations on software skills, can be used to demonstrate
student achievement of many outcomes.
• A course outcome survey at course completion is recommended.
• Outcomes which are related to this course can be included within Senior Exit,
Alumni, Employer, Faculty, and Industrial Advisory Committee surveys.
Course Coordinator:
Donald E. Coho, York, [email protected]
55
IET 101 – Manufacturing Materials, Processes, and Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Update: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
IET 101: Manufacturing Materials, Processes, and Laboratory
(3 credits). Mechanical properties of engineering materials; primary processing methods
used in manufacturing; ferrous and non-ferrous metals; non-metallic engineering
materials; dimensional verification and measurements; statistical process control;
mechanical properties evaluation; and laboratory methods.
Course prerequisites: none
Goals of the Course:
Manufacturing Materials, Processes, and Laboratory
To introduce the student, in both a lecture and laboratory setting, to engineering
materials; properties of materials; testing techniques to obtain material properties;
manufacturing processes and systems; dimensional measurement tools, equipment, and
techniques; and statistical process control.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
IET 101 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and
analysis.
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #2 – BE ABLE TO APPLY ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESSES TO
SOME TECHNICAL PROBLEMS THROUGH EXPERIMENTATION AND ANALYSIS:
• Students will successfully describe and recommend proper destructive and nondestructive material tests to achieve the desired material properties of
engineering materials.
• Students will successfully describe and recommend proper heat treating and
alloying methods to alter a material’s atomic structure in order to achieve the
desired material properties of engineering materials.
• Students will successfully describe the proper basic manufacturing processes for
part creation and/or part feature creation.
• Students will successfully employ proper measurement tools and techniques to
achieve the desired sizes of parts and/or part features.
• Students will successfully solve empirical problems associated with Statistical
Process Control.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #6 – BE ABLE TO MATRICULATE INTO A RELATED
BACCALAUREATE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #11 – DEMONSTRATE A COMMITMENT TO QUALITY, TIMELINESS,
AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (THROUGH IMPLEMENTATION OF ESTABLISHED
STANDARDS, THROUGH COMPLETION OF LABORATORY REPORTS, PROJECT REPORTS,
ASSIGNMENTS ON A TIMELY BASIS:
• Students will successfully create quality engineering lab reports on a timely
basis.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Manufacturing Materials and Processes, latest ed., Kosher, DeGarmo and Black,
Wiley
• Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Materials, Processes and Systems,
56
latest ed., Groover, Prentice Hall
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• No prerequisites are required as this is a first course
Course Topics:
Topics include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on
regional industry needs and campus resources). Topics designated with an “*” are core
topics.
• *General characteristics of Engineering Materials such as: ferrous metals, nonferrous metals, polymers, ceramics, elastomers, and composites
• *Mechanical Properties of Engineering Materials including Stress/Strain
• *Physical Properties of Engineering Materials
• *Heat Treating
• *Alloying of Metals
• *Manufacturing Systems
• *Fundamentals of Basic Manufacturing Processes
• *Measurements and Inspection
• *Statistical Process Control (SPC)
• Material Selection Techniques
• Fundamentals of Advanced Manufacturing Processes
• Metal Casting Processes
• Glassworking
• Shaping Processes for Plastics
• Rubber Processing Technology
• Shaping Processes for Polymer Matrix Composites
• Dimensions, Tolerances, and Surfaces
• Quality Control
• Powder Metallurgy
Computer Use:
The students shall use a PC with word processing software and/or spreadsheet software
to prepare lab reports and/or presentations.
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory exercises include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics
(based on regional industry needs and campus resources). Laboratory exercises
designated with an “*” are core topics.
• *Brinell Hardness Test
• *Rockwell Hardness Test
• *Tensile Test
• *Measurements and Inspection
• *Heat Treatment
• *Impact Test
• *Non-destructive Testing
• *Manufacturing Systems
• *Fundamentals of Basic Manufacturing Processes
• *Tours of Manufacturing Facilities (can be actual, virtual, and video)
• *Statistical Process Control
• Jominy End Quench Hardenability Test
• Advanced Manufacturing Processes
57
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Metal Casting Processes
Glassworking
Shaping Processes for Plastics
Rubber Processing Technology
Shaping Processes for Polymer Matrix Composites
Dimensions, Tolerances, and Surfaces
Quality Control
Powder Metallurgy
Note: All of the above required laboratory exercises do not require the actual testing
machines. A presentation (actual, virtual, or video) of the machine is acceptable
coupled with an appropriate laboratory exercise to emphasize the test and the test
results.
Suggested
Equipment:
Course Grading:
The following is the suggested equipment required to conduct this course:
• Brinell Hardness Tester
• Rockwell Hardness Tester
• Universal Tensile Tester
• Strain indicator and strain gages w/ strain gage bonding kit
• Jominy End Quench Apparatus
• Furnace for Heat Treating
• Magnetic Particle Testing
• Dye Penetrant Testing
• Ultrasonic Tester
• Basic Manufacturing Machine Tools
• Measurements and Inspection Tools
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Local developed assignments, quizzes, and/or exams.
• Performance appraisal: oral presentation(s) and/or written report(s).
Course Coordinator:
Fred Nitterright, Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie – The Behrend College,
[email protected]
Rev 3 / 9/28/2005
58
IET 215 – Production Design
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
IET 215: Production Design
(2 credits) Production design with respect to current and advanced manufacturing
technologies such as: conventional manufacturing, joining and assembly, CNC, CAM,
and automation.
Course prerequisites: IET 101, Concurrent: IET 216
Goals of the Course:
Production Design
The study of the capability of manufacturing processes for the purpose of part creation
and/or part feature creation, manufacturing systems, production planning, and
production routing as they relate to production design including both current and
advanced technologies such as: conventional manufacturing processes,
CNC/CAM/CIM, and automation/robotics.
• To introduce the student to the capabilities of current and advanced
manufacturing processes so that the student can successfully incorporate those
capabilities in the applied design of parts and/or assemblies.
• To introduce the student to current and advanced computer applications with
regard to manufacturing processes.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
IET 215 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and
analysis
• Students shall possess an ability to communicate effectively
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #2 - BE ABLE TO APPLY ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESSES TO
SOME TECHNICAL PROBLEMS THROUGH EXPERIMENTATION AND ANALYSIS:
• Students will successfully solve production design problems that are typical of
current and advanced technologies.
• Students will successfully describe and recommend proper production tools and
equipment for part creation and/or part feature creation.
• Students will successfully develop and create route sheets that list and describe
the manufacturing operations that are needed to produce a part and/or assembly.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #6 - BE ABLE TO MATRICULATE INTO A RELATED
BACCALAUREATE ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #7 - BE ABLE TO COMMUNICATE THEIR IDEAS AND SOLUTIONS
EFFECTIVELY BOTH IN ORAL AND WRITTEN FORMAT:
• Students will prepare oral presentation(s), written report(s) and/or graphical
solution(s) with regard to production design and the study of advanced
manufacturing technologies.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Manufacturing Materials and Processes, latest ed., Kosher, DeGarmo and Black,
Wiley
• Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Materials, Processes and Systems,
latest ed., Groover, Prentice Hall
59
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Mechanical and physical properties of engineering materials and a rudimentary
understanding of manufacturing processes.
Course Topics:
Topics include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on
regional industry needs and campus resources). Topics designated with an “*” are core
topics.
• * Chip-Type Machining Operations
• * Fundamentals of Metal Forming
• * Foundry
• * Joining and Assembly
• Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working.
• Powder Metallurgy
• CNC/CAM/CIM
• Automation/Robotics
• PLC’s
• Rapid Prototyping
• Electronics Assembly and Packaging
• Microfabrication Technologies
• Group Technology and Flexible Manufacturing Systems
• Production Lines
• Manufacturing Engineering
• Production Planning and Control
• Tooling and Tool Holders
• Jig and Fixture Design
• Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes
Computer Use:
Use of computer application program(s) such as: word processing, presentation
software, spreadsheet software, CNC and/or CAM.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Local developed assignments, quizzes, and/or exams.
• Performance appraisal: oral presentation(s), written report(s), and/or graphical
solution(s).
Course Coordinator:
Fred Nitterright, Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie – The Behrend College,
[email protected]
Rev 3 / 10/28/2005
60
IET 216 – Production Design Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
IET 216: Production Design Laboratory
(2 credits) Laboratory methods in production design with respect to current and
advanced manufacturing technologies such as: conventional manufacturing, joining and
assembly, CNC, CAM, and automation.
Course prerequisites: IET101, Concurrent: IET215
Goal of the Course:
Production Design Laboratory
The applied study of manufacturing processes for the purpose of part creation and/or
part feature creation, manufacturing systems, production planning, and production
routing as they relate to production design including both current and advanced
technologies such as: conventional manufacturing processes, CNC/CAM/CIM, and
automation/robotics.
• In a laboratory setting; introduce the student to the capabilities of current and
advanced manufacturing processes so that the student can successfully
incorporate those capabilities in the applied design of parts and/or assemblies.
• In a laboratory setting; introduce the student to current and advanced computer
applications with regard to manufacturing processes.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
IET 216 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes and mechanics. This course concentrates on the
applied design and manufacturing processes aspect of this MET program
outcome.
• Students shall be able to solve technical problems through experimentation and
analysis.
• Students should demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications.
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #1 – Demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes and mechanics. This course concentrates on the applied
design and manufacturing processes aspect of this MET program outcome.
• Students will successfully set-up and operate industrial equipment and/or tooling
with respect to current and advanced manufacturing processes, so that the
student will understand how the capabilities of manufacturing processes impact
the applied design of a part and/or part feature such as: lathes, milling machines,
drill presses, foundry equipment, welding machines, sheet metal forming
equipment, EDM’s, automation/robotics, and CNC machine tools.
• Students will successfully develop and create route sheets that list the
manufacturing operations that are needed to produce a part and/or assembly.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #2 – Be able to apply engineering design processes to some
technical problems through experimentation and analysis:
• Students will successfully solve empirical problems associated with current and
advanced manufacturing processes such as: speed and feed calculations, material
removal rates, solidification shrinkage and/or developed length calculations.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #4 – Demonstrate proficiencies in computer applications
• Students will successfully use computer applications that control the movements
of machine tools, robots, and other mechanical systems such as: CNC programs,
61
CAM software, and/or PLC’s.
Students will use word processing and/or spreadsheet software to complete
problems associated with this course.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #6 – Be able to matriculate into a related baccalaureate
engineering technology program.
•
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Manufacturing Materials and Processes, latest ed., Kosher, DeGarmo and Black,
Wiley
• Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing, Materials, Processes and Systems,
latest ed., Groover, Prentice Hall
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Mechanical and physical properties of engineering materials from IET 101
Course Topics:
Topics include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics (based on
regional industry needs and campus resources). Topics designated with an “*” are core
topics.
• * Chip-Type Machining Operations
• * Fundamentals of Metal Forming
• * Foundry
• * Joining and Assembly
• Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working.
• Powder Metallurgy
• CNC/CAM/CIM
• Automation/Robotics
• PLC’s
• Rapid Prototyping
• Electronics Assembly and Packaging
• Microfabrication Technologies
• Group Technology and Flexible Manufacturing Systems
• Production Lines
• Manufacturing Engineering
• Production Planning and Control
• Tooling and Tool Holders
• Jig and Fixture Design
• Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes
Suggested Computer
Use:
•
•
•
•
•
CNC programming
CAM Software
PLC programming
Word Processing
Spreadsheets
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory exercises include both core topics (required) and additional relevant topics
(based on regional industry needs and campus resources). Laboratory exercises
designated with an “*” are core topics.
62
Suggested
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
* Set-up and operate Chip-Type Machining equipment
* Set-up and operate Metal Forming equipment
* Set-up and operate Foundry equipment
* Set-up and operate Joining and Assembly equipment
Set-up and operate Bulk Deformation Processes in Metal Working equipment
Set-up and operate Powder Metallurgy equipment
Set-up and operate CNC controlled machine tools
Set-up and operate Automation/Robotics
Set-up and operate PLC’s
•
Conventional machine tools such as: lathes, milling machines, drills, and
grinders.
CNC controlled machine tools
Foundry equipment
Welding and Brazing equipment
Sheet metal forming equipment
Robots
Automation examples
PLC’s
Nontraditional machining and thermal cutting processes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Written and/or oral reports
• Project parts and/or assemblies
Course Coordinator:
Fred Nitterright, Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie – The Behrend College,
[email protected]
Rev 3 / 10/28/2005
63
MCH T 111 – Mechanics for Technology: Statics
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)
Catalog Description:
MCH T 111: Mechanics for Technology: Statics
(3 credits) Forces; Moments; Resultants; Two and Three Dimensional Equilibrium of
force systems; friction; centroids and moment of inertia of areas. Course prerequisite:
MATH 81
Goals of the Course:
Mechanics for Technology To introduce and develop the engineering approach to
problem solving; to introduce principles and concepts of statics including forces,
moments, resultants, two-and-three-dimensional equilibrium of force systems, friction,
centroids, and moments of inertia of areas. Prerequisite: Math 81
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
MCH T 111 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics. ( Ref. Outcome 1)
• Students should demonstrate proficiency in computer applications (Ref.
Outcome 4)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
• Students shall demonstrate proficiency in applied design and mechanics
Outcome
• Students shall be able to isolate statically- determinate bodies from their
surroundings and draw their free body diagrams in order to determine the
reactions at their supports.
• Students will be able to use the method of joints or sections to determine the
forces of tension or compression in a statically determinate loaded truss.
• Students will be able to isolate members of a plane frame and determine the
forces at the joints which connect the members.
• Students will be able to use mathematical formulas to determine the location of
the centroid of a composite area.
• Students shall demonstrate proficiency in computer applications Outcome
• Students shall design a spreadsheet program to solve a statics problem of the
instructor’s choice.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Applied Mechanics for Engineering Technology, latest edition by Walker,
Prentice Hall
• Vector Mechanics for Engineers: Statics, latest edition by Beer and Johnston,
McGraw-Hill.
• Technical Mechanics: Applied Statics and Dynamics, latest edition by Granet,
HRW Publishing
• Mechanics for Engineers: Statics, latest edition by Hibbeler, Macmillan
Publishing
• Applied Engineering Mechanics, latest edition by Jensen and Chenoweth,
McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Understanding of concepts of algebra and right-angle trigonometry.
64
Course Topics:
•
•
Ability to use a spreadsheet program.
Ability to use a hand-held calculator.
•
Introduction to Scalar and Vector quantities, graphical and analytic solutions
for vector addition.
Two-dimensional equilibrium and free-body-diagrams.
Moments, couples, resultant systems, distributed loads.
Rigid body two-dimensional equilibrium.
Trusses, method of joints, method of sections.
Frames, pulleys, and machines.
Centroids and Moments of Inertia of Areas
Dry friction, slipping, tipping.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computer Use:
Students will design spreadsheet programs to solve analytical problems in Statics.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Local developed exams
• Homework Assignments
Course Coordinator:
Thomas H. Gavigan, Assistant Professor, Berks Campus, 610-396-6181 or
[email protected]
65
MCH T 213 – Strength and Properties of Materials
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2004)
Catalog Description:
MCH T 213: Strength and Properties of Materials
(3 credits) Axial stress and strain; shear, torsion; beam stresses and deflections;
combined axial and bending stresses; columns; shear and moment diagrams; Mohr’s
Circle introduction; connections. Course prerequisite: MCHT 111
Goals of the Course:
Strength and Properties of Materials To introduce the student to basic principles
and concepts of mechanics of materials including stress, strain, and deformation
associated with axial, torsional, and bending loads as well as common mechanical
properties of materials.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
MCH T 213 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics. ( Ref. Outcome 1)
• Students shall be able to demonstrate proficiency in computer applications. (
Ref Outcome 4 )
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
Students shall demonstrate proficiency in applied design and mechanics Outcome
• Using Strength of Materials analysis students shall calculate the axial stress
and deformation for a body whose axial loading and cross-sectional area are
known.
• Using Strength of Materials analysis, students shall calculate the torsional
shear stress and angle of twist for a circular shaft whose cross-section and
applied torques are known.
• Using Strength of Materials analysis, students shall calculate the bending stress
and beam deflection for a beam whose cross-section and loading are known.
• Using Strength of Materials analysis, students shall draw shear and bending
moment diagrams for statically determinate beams whose load and method of
support are known.
• Using beam tables and Strength of Materials analysis, students will correctly
select standard beams for given allowable stresses and deflections as well as
known loading and method of support.
Students shall demonstrate proficiency in computer applications Outcome
• Students shall use a spreadsheet program to solve a Strength of Materials
analysis or design problem as assigned by the instructor.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Applied Strength of Materials, latest edition by R.L. Mott, Prentice Hall
• Statics and Strength of Materials, latest edition by Fa-Hwa Cheng,
Glencoe/McGraw Hill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Understanding of concepts of forces and equilibrium
• Understanding of free body diagram concepts
• Understanding and ability to use vector algebra
66
Comment [DL1]: We need quality
requirements on these outcomes!
Comment [DL2]: These should be
written out separately.
Course Topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Basic Concepts in Strength of Materials including direct normal stress, direct
shear stress, bearing stress, axial strain
Hooke’s Law, Stress-Strain Diagrams, Mechanical Properties of Materials
Design of Axially-loaded members, Design factors, Stress Concentration
Factors
Axial Deformation, Thermal stress and strain, Statically-indeterminate axiallyloaded members
Torsional shear stress, torsional deformation, Power and Rotational speed
Shearing forces and Bending Moments in Beams, Shear and Moment
Diagrams
Centroids and Moments of Inertia of Areas
Bending stresses, Section Modulus, Beam Design
Shearing stresses in Beams,
Beam Deflections
Combined Axial and Bending stresses
Computer Use:
Students will use a spreadsheet program to plot stress-strain diagrams
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Local developed exams
• Homework Assignments
Course Coordinator:
Thomas H. Gavigan, Assistant Professor, Berks Campus, 610-396-6181 or
[email protected]
67
MCH T 214 – Strength and Properties of Materials Laboratory
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Spring 2004])
Catalog Description:
MCH T 214 – Strength and Properties of Materials Laboratory
(1) Measurement of mechanical properties of materials; structural testing, data
acquisition and analysis; technical laboratory report writing. Concurrent: MCH T 213
Goals of the Course:
Strength and Properties of Materials Laboratory. To introduce students to the
basic principles of material testing and data analysis used to obtain common
mechanical properties of materials. Testing includes hardness, tension, torsion,
bending, impact, and fatigue depending on the equipment available at the local
campus.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
MCH T 214 contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics. (Ref Outcome 1)
• Student should be able to apply engineering design processes to solve technical
problems thru experimentation and analysis. (Ref Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to communicate their ideas and solutions effectively
both orally and in written form. (Ref Outcome 7)
• Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to work as a professional in a
team environment. (Ref Outcome 8)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
• Recognize the various macro hardness systems and their applications, and
conduct Rockwell B or C hardness tests.
• Understand and operate a typical universal materials testing machine.
• Conduct a standard tensile test on a material and prepare a concise, coherent
written report of the results including strengths, modulus of elasticity, ductility,
etc.
• Conduct a torsion test to obtain the shear properties of a material and describe
the necessary specimen design.
• Understand beam normal and beam shear stresses and predict the potential
failure mode(s) from each type of stress.
• Install a typical linear strain gage.
• Conduct impact toughness tests and investigate transition temperature(s).
• Understand and predict critical column loads and the potential mode(s) of
failure.
• Describe the various standard test methods for characterizing the fatigue of
metals and relate their advantages and disadvantages.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Applied Strength of Materials, latest edition, R. L. Mott, Prentice Hall.
• Statics and Strength of Materials, latest edition, Fa-Hwa Cheng,
Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Be able to solve algebraic expressions.
68
Course Topics:
•
Understanding of concepts of forces and equilibrium.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Rockwell Hardness testing (2 hours)
Tension testing of materials (4 hours)
Torsion testing of materials (2 hours)
Strain gage installation (2 hours)
Flexure testing of materials (6 hours)
Beam deflection (2 hours)
Impact testing (2 hours)
Column testing (2 hours)
Fatigue testing (2 hours)
Strain gage (2 hours)
Exam (2 hours)
Laboratory Exercises: Typical laboratory exercise, depending on available equipment, may include:
• Perform a Rockwell (B or C) hardness test on a variety of specimens.
• Given tension test data, compute stress and strain values and create a stressstain diagram for a material. Identify yield stress, ultimate stress, and compute
the modulus of elasticity.
• Perform a tension test on specimens of various materials and write a report on
the results of the testing.
• Perform a torsion test on a variety of specimens having round cross-sections.
Write a report of the results.
• Apply specific deformations to a beam specimen in a Vishay flexor test fixture.
Measure longitudinal and lateral strains for each deformation. Plot the strain
values and obtain Poisson’s ratio of the material from the plot.
• Install a stain gage on a beam specimen. Fixing one end of the beam, apply a
concentrated load at the other end and measure the strain at the location of the
strain gage. Compare measured strain with a computed value of strain.
• Perform a flexure test on aluminum specimens having the same general size
and different cross-sectional shapes to study the effect of moment of inertia on
bending stress. The strain measured at a given point is compared to calculated
strain values. Write a report on the results of the testing.
• Perform a flexure test on wood specimens having cross-sections optimized for
shear failure, bending failure, and simultaneous shear and bending failure.
Complete a worksheet for this activity.
• Perform a flexure test on aluminum specimens having the same general size
and different cross-sectional shapes to study the effect of moment of inertia on
beam deflection. Complete a worksheet for this activity.
• Perform impact tests on a variety of materials at various temperatures in order
to determine the transition temperature for each material. Complete a
worksheet for this activity.
• Perform compression tests on round column specimens having spherical ends.
The specimens cover a range of slenderness ratios. Plot the critical buckling
load versus slenderness ratio for the specimens and write a report of the results.
• Perform a fatigue test on a specimen recording the load and number of cycles
to failure. Create an S-N diagram for the specimen material from the data
observed and the data provide by the instructor.
Required Equipment: Equipment will vary at different campus locations and may include the following:
69
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Computer Use:
Course Grading:
Rockwell Hardness testing machine
Universal testing machine w/ extensometer
Torque testing machine
Impact testing machine
Measuring equipment includes calipers and rulers
Strain gages and strain indicating equipment
Vishay flexure equipment
Fatigue testing machine
Students will use a spreadsheet program to solve some of the following types of
problems:
• Compute stress and strain values from test data and create a stress-strain curve
for a material.
• Plot allowable torque for solid and hollow round torsion members given an
allowable stress and a range of cross-sectional areas.
• Plot beam deflection for a given loading condition as a function of moment of
inertia.
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Written reports of testing results.
• Graded worksheets completed during testing.
• Written exam.
Course Coordinator:
Edward R. Evans, Jr., Lecturer in Engineering, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College,
814-898-6138, [email protected]
70
ME T 206 – Dynamics and Machine Elements
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
ME T 206: Dynamics and Machine Elements
(3 credits). Motion of a particle; relative motion, kinetics of translation, rotation, and
plane motion; work-energy; impulse-momentum; mechanisms.
Goals of the Course:
To introduce students to the basic principles of dynamics as applied to practical
problems which include such topics as friction, kinetics of particles and rigid bodies,
laws of force and motion, work, energy and power, various mechanisms.
Relationship to MET
ME T 206 contributes to the following ME T program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics. (Ref Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply concepts of applied mathematics and science in
solving technical problems. (Ref Outcome 3)
Program Outcomes:
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
1a To describe the kinetic and kinematic quantities such as forces, moments,
position, velocity and acceleration.
1b To relate position, velocity and acceleration to on one another using the
equations of motion.
1c To create free body diagrams (FBD) of particles and rigid bodies, i.e., to
graphically display the relevant system of forces and moments acting on these
bodies at a particular and/or at a generic instant during their motion. In
general, only motions in 2D will be considered.
1d To synthesize the information contained in the FBD and mass-acceleration
diagram (MAD) to derive the equations of motion for the particular system at
hand.
1e To create the kinetic or mass-acceleration diagram (MAD) of particles and
rigid bodies. In general, only motions in 2D will be considered.
1f To apply the work-energy principle to relate the energy of the mechanical
system to it spatial configuration variables (i.e., position variables). In general,
only motions in 2D will be considered.
1g To apply the impulse-momentum principle to relate the momentum of a
mechanical system to the system of forces applied.
1h To introduce various mechanisms involved in manufacturing processes.
3a To apply elementary algebra and calculus to the solution of the equations of
motion. Except for a few elementary cases, such as motions with constant
acceleration, the solution process in question does not include the solution of
initial value problems.
Suggested Text:
The following is a suitable text for this course:
• Walker, Keith, M., Applied Mechanics for Engineering Technology, 7th Ed.,
Prentice-Hall, Inc. 2003
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Satisfactory performance in an introductory mechanics course (MCH T 111).
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
71
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction – 1 class hour
Kinematics of Particles: Rectilinear Motion – 4 class hours
Kinematics of Particles: Curvilinear Motion – 2 class hours
Kinematics of Rigid Bodies: Translation & Rotation – 2 class hours
Kinematics of Rigid Bodies: General Plan Motion – 4 class hours
Kinetics: Particles – 7 class hours
Work – 2 class hours
Energy and Power – 4 class hours
Impulse and Momentum – 3 class hours
Elastic Impact – 3 class hours
Mechanisms – 6 class hours
Review Sessions – 4 class hours
Tests – 3 class hours
Computer Use:
None required; however, any appropriate computer software for solving a variety of
motion problems as deemed useful by the instructor, is encouraged. Further, it is
suggested that students conduct research for the section on mechanisms. The
investigation should include at least an internet search with additional references
obtained from traditional library resources and possible interviews with professionals
in manufacturing and/or engineers.
Laboratory
Exercises:
None required; however, a laboratory activity to establish a relationship between
motion terms such as, Daedalon Frictionless Airtrack with Ultrasonic Measuring
System, could be useful.
Required
Equipment:
None
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use:
Students should be encouraged to use technical resources from the library, found on
the internet or supplied by vendor catalogs in preparation of any reports (i.e. laboratory
write-ups) to enhance students’ research skills. Appropriate to section on mechanisms.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Traditional examinations
• In-class course survey(s)
• Graded homework assignments
Assessment Tools:
Performance appraisal:
•
•
•
Course Coordinator:
Locally developed exams
In-class survey
Homework assignments
Ms. Joan A. Begolly, Senior Instructor, New Kensington, [email protected], 724-3346737
September 2005
72
MET 210W – Product Design
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
MET 210W: Product Design
(3 credits) Design of machine elements including levers, bearing, shafts, clutches,
springs, and gears; selection of ball bearings and belts; design of small mechanical
devices.
Course prerequisites: MCHT 213, MET 206
Goals of the Course:
MET 210W Product Design. To provide each student with the necessary concepts and
procedures to properly design machine elements commonly found in mechanical
systems. Some of these elements will include beams, columns, springs, levers, shafts,
gears and bolts. In addition, each student will be required to deliver a report on a design
project.
Relationship to MET
Program Outcomes:
MET 210W contributes to the following MET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics. (Ref. Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to communicate their ideas and solutions effectively
both in oral and written form. (Ref. Outcome 7)
• Students should be able to demonstrate an ability to work as a professional in a
team environment. (Ref. Outcome 8)
• Students should be able to recognize the need for life-long learning, be prepared
to continue their education through formal or informal study, and be able to
adapt to a continuously changing work environment. (Ref. Outcome 9)
• Students should have the ability to understand professional, ethical, and social
responsibilities in a diverse and global workplace. (Ref. Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
PROGRAM OUTCOME #1 – Demonstrate proficiency in applied design,
manufacturing processes, and mechanics.
Given the power, speeds, and function requirements for a mechanical drive,
1a. Students will select an acceptable type of design for the speed reduction.
1b. Students will select an appropriate material for the power shaft(s).
1c. Students will determine the required diameters of the stepped shaft(s) at critical
locations.
1d. Students will select the appropriate bearings and required shaft dimensions at
the bearings.
1e. The students will perform the necessary calculations and selections to achieve
the design.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #7 - Students shall be able to communicate their ideas and
solutions effectively both in oral and written form.
7a. For all homework and project assignments students will record design
calculations neatly, completely, and in an organized fashion.
7b. Students will generate a written report of a machine design project including a
design proposal, design specifications, progress reports, drawings, and a final
summary. An oral presentation of the report will be made by all students at the
end of the semester.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #8-Students shall be able to demonstrate an ability to work as
73
a professional in a team environment.
8a. For the design project, students will work in teams and will cooperate
effectively and professionally to produce a successful group design.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #9 – Students should be able to recognize the need for lifelong learning, be prepared to continue their education through formal or informal study,
and be able to adapt to a continuously changing work environment.
9a. Students will review modern mechanical design practices presented in
technical journals, periodicals, or any media as determined by the instructor.
PROGRAM OUTCOME #10 – Students shall have the ability to understand
professional, ethical, and social responsibilities in a diverse and global workplace.
10a. Students will review a case study involving an engineering ethics issue
presented in either video or paper form or any form as assigned by the course
instructor.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Mott, Robert L., Machine Elements in Mechanical Design 3rd or 4th Edition,
Prentice Hall
• Shigley, J.E., and C.R. Mischke, Mechanical Engineering Design, 6th ed.,
McGraw Hill
• Spotts, M.F., and T.E. Shoup, Design of Machine Elements, 7 ed., Prentice Hall
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Knowledge of axial, torsional, and bending deformations in addition to axial,
torsional, shear, bearing, bending and thermal stresses.
• Knowledge of kinematics, kinetics, and dynamics
• Basic programming skills
• Algebra and trigonometry skills.
Course Topics:
Suggested typical coverage
• Machine design criteria, unit systems, properties of metals, various steels and
heat treatment of steels, aluminum; and plastics
• Stress analysis, tensile and compressive stresses, shear stresses, combined
stresses, principal stresses, Mohr's circle
• Design factors, failure theories, ductile and brittle materials, static loads,
repeated and reversed loads, Discuss writing assignment
• Welded connections, bolted connections, machine frames, beam deflections
stress due to bending, eccentricity, columns, slenderness ratio, and radius of
gyration. Discuss proposal on writing assignment
• Springs, design of helical compression springs, stresses and deflection, other
types of springs
• Gear geometry gear trains, stresses in gear teeth, design of spur gears. Discuss
writing of final project report.
• Shaft design, design stresses, shafts in bending and torsion, keys, couplings,
clutches, brakes, belts and chains
Computer Use:
Students shall be required solve stress analysis problems using a spreadsheet program.
Laboratory Projects:
Design projects: Instructors will assign a design project to all students from chapter 23
74
of Mott or a similar problem from another text or from personal experience When
completed; the design project should be presented in a professional manner that
combines the engineering aspects of the project with a written and oral report. The
following guidelines are offered as a means of satisfying the "W" aspect of this course
via the design project:
• Introduce the design project and explain how writing will be used. Discuss and
explain first writing task.
• Grade, hand back, and discuss first writing assignment.
• Discuss evaluation criteria for future assignments. Discuss examples of
previous initial proposals.
• Grade, hand back, and discuss initial proposal assignment. Discuss profess
report assignment
• Grade, hand back, and discuss progress reports. Discuss next two writing tasks,
the rough draft of the project report and the final report
• Grade, hand back, and discuss rough drafts. Discuss how to use and modify
rough draft to develop the final design project report.
Required Equipment:
•
None
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
Students will use standard design references and vendor catalogues.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• Homework assignments
• Performance appraisal: oral reports, written reports
• Local developed exams
Course Coordinator:
Thomas Gavigan, Assistant Professor, Instructor, Berks Campus, 610-396-6181 or
[email protected]
75
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology
Course Outlines
76
EMET 310 – Digital Electronics
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Spring 2006)
Catalog Description: EMET 310: Digital Electronics
(3 credits) Fundamentals of digital devices and circuits including the analysis and
design of combinational and sequential logic circuits.
Course prerequisites: EE T 101 and EE T 109.
Goals of the Course:
Digital Electronics is a required course for junior-level students who enter the ElectroMechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program with a
background in mechanical engineering technology. The goal of the course is to teach
students the fundamentals of Boolean algebra, digital logic, numbering systems and
encoding schemes, and how to apply those concepts to the analysis, design, and
troubleshooting of digital circuits and devices. Both combinational circuits that rely on
conventional logic gates and sequential circuits that rely on latches, flip-flops, and
clocks are covered. Concepts of data storage, number manipulation, counting and
clocking and digital computer computations are also covered. Improving
communication skills is also a goal of this course.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 310 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices;
computers; and instrumentation systems to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will use Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps to design and analyze
properly functioning combinational logic digital systems.
• Students will use state diagrams and state tables to design and analyze properly
functioning sequential logic digital systems.
• Students will produce accurate simulations of the performance of digital
circuits using standard simulation software.
• Students will successfully construct, test, and troubleshoot digital circuits using
standard laboratory tools and equipment.
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will convey their thoughts and ideas regarding laboratory exercises to
both their lab partner(s) and the instructor via required oral presentation.
• Students will prepare high quality written reports documenting laboratory
investigations of digital devices and circuits using word processing software.
• Students will prepare high quality graphical and tabular presentations of digital
circuit performance as determined from electronic simulations and laboratory
exercises using electronic simulation software and word processing software.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Tocci, Digital Systems Principles and Applications, Prentice-Hall.
• Dueck, Fundamentals of Digital Electronics, West Publishing.
• The TTL Data Book, Texas Instruments (or similar vendor resource).(Optional)
77
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Understanding of voltage, current, resistance and fundamental DC circuits.
• Ability to use a computer to analyze electronic circuits using industry-standard
electronic design & analysis software.
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports that include graphing and
engineering data presentation.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Unsigned number systems including decimal, binary, octal and hexadecimal;
base conversion between those systems. (2 hours)
• BCD and ASCII data codes; parity & serial and parallel transmission of data.
(2 hours)
• Basic digital logic gates (AND/OR/NOT) and truth tables. (1 hour)
• Boolean algebra - postulates & theorems, equation reductions, circuit
implementation. (3 hours)
• DeMorgan's Theorem – NAND and NOR gates and their application. (1 hour)
• Sum-of-product and product-of-sums circuits. (1 hour)
• Karnaugh maps and circuit simplification. (3 hours)
• Basic SC flip-flops – NAND & NOR implementations and limitations. (1 hour)
• D latch; clocked and edge-triggered D flip-flops. (1 hour)
• Edge-triggered JK flip-flop. (1 hour)
• Data storage and transfer. (1 hour)
• One-shot multivibrators, 555 type timers, and clock generator circuits. (2
hours)
• State machine concepts and sequential logic circuit design. (2 hours)
• Representing signed numbers, 1's complement and 2's complement. (1 hour)
• Binary, BCD, and hexadecimal arithmetic operations. (3 hours)
• Parallel adder, full-adder, carry propagation, BCD adder. (1 hour)
• Counters: asychronous up & down, synchronous up & down, Johnson, shift
registers, BCD, and presettable. (5 hours)
• Counter applications: frequency counter and digital clock. (2 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to perform lab simulations and analyses, to
prepare lab reports, and to conduct out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to
analyze lab data, prepare engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of
typical digital circuits. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet and electronic
analysis software (viz., PSpice, MultiSim, MicroCap, etc.) is required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
Laboratory investigations of the following circuits and devices would be appropriate for
this course:
• AND, NAND, OR, NOR, and inverter logic gates
• Boolean and DeMorgan's theorems
• Combinational logic circuit design
• Introduction to flip-flops
• Sequential logic circuit design
• Switch debouncing
• Design of adder/subtractor circuit with accumulator register
78
•
•
Binary counters
Ring counters
Since the laboratory exercises will frequently give specific guidance on how the
investigation will take place, it is suggested that a term project be given that would
require the students to develop their own investigative process to solve a design
problem.
Required
Equipment:
Course Grading:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Dual trace oscilloscopes
• Digital multimeters
• Digital trainer with prototyping board, maintained & momentary digital inputs,
clock inputs, and LED output indicators
• Various digital components and devices for circuit design and testing
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library
Use/Research
Requirements:
Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of
laboratory and oral reports. At the instructor’s discretion, one or more oral reports may
be incorporated in this class to enhance students’ oral presentation skills. When
possible, these activities should involve a significant component of library research into
topics covered by the course, which would encourage and enhance students’ research
skills.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOME 4: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments
covering lecture materials can be used to assess this outcome.
• OUTCOME 10: Formal laboratory exercises and/or researched-based projects
that involve simulations, implementation and testing, and written and/or orally
reporting can be used to assess this outcome.
Course Coordinator: R. L. (Doc) Mueller, Associate Professor of Engineering, New Kensington Campus,
[email protected]
79
EMET 311 – Spatial Analysis and Advanced CAD
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EMET 311: Spatial Analysis and Advanced CAD
(3 credits). Spatial relations of points, lines, and solids with engineering applications;
laboratory emphasis placed on CAD and parametric analysis.
Course prerequisites: EG T 101 and EG T 102
Goals of the Course:
Spatial Analysis and Advanced CAD is a required course for junior-level students
who entered the Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology baccalaureate degree
program with a background in electrical engineering technology. The purpose of this
course is to provide students in technology with graphical language skills to solve
technical problems in spatial analysis and advanced topics in engineering graphics using
CAD. Skills are learned by applying design techniques to working drawing problems
using commercially-available computer software--creating complete, concise, and
accurate communications using detail and assembly drawings from three-dimensional
representations of objects.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 311 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply the engineering design process to solve openended problems. (Outcome 8)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Performance
Measures:
The specific performance measures for this course supporting the program outcomes
are:
OUTCOME 8:
• Students will systematically determine the size and location of part features to
satisfy the interface boundary conditions that optimize the function of a moving
assembly of parts, such as a mechanism.
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will produce working drawings, consistent with ANSI Y14 standards,
of solutions to three-dimensional spatial problems using CAD software.
Suggested Texts:
Since the goals of this course may be met using various commercial CAD software, no
single text covers all approaches. The following are suitable standards for this course:
• ASME Y14.3-2003, Multiview and Sectional View Drawings, American Society
of Mechanical Engineers
• ASME Y14.5M-1994, Dimensioning and Tolerancing, American Society of
Mechanical Engineers
• ASME Y14.41-2003, Digital Product Definition Data Practices, American
Society of Mechanical Engineers
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Fundamentals of theoretical graphics
• Orthographic projection techniques including sectional views
• Dimensioning and annotation
• CAD literacy in creating, modifying and documenting drawings
80
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are only suggestions for five contact hours per
week split between one hour of lecture and four hours of lab.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
1. Multiview projections (10 hours)
2. Dimensioning, tolerancing and specifications (10 hours)
3. Working drawings and document control (20 hours)
4. 3D Modeling (25 hours)
5. Examinations and projects (10 hours)
Computer Use:
Each student will prepare class assignments using a commercial CAD package at an
individual workstation. Appropriate applications include but are not limited to
AutoCAD, I-DEAS, Mechanical Desktop, Pro/Engineer, and SolidWorks.
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following would be appropriate for this course:
• Measure geometry of components using a scale or calipers
• Sketch pictorial views and orthographic views on graph paper
• Create multiview orthographic projections including sectional views
• Create, modify and document two-dimensional working drawings
• Annotate working drawings with notes, symbols, dimensions, a title block and a
parts list
• Create and modify three-dimensional feature based models of parts
• Create, modify and animate three-dimensional motion constrained assemblies
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
Computer workstation with CAD software
Network printer
Internet access
Machinist scale or dial calipers
Course Grading:
Library Usage:
Course Assessment
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Students should be encouraged to use technical resources from the library, found on the
internet or supplied by vendor catalogs in preparation of class assignments to enhance
students’ research skills. Oral reports should be incorporated in this class to enhance
students’ presentation skills.
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
•
•
•
Course Coordinator:
Outcome 8: Project demonstration of comprehensive solutions to problem
statements.
Outcome 8 & 10: Traditional exams and laboratory exercises covering course
material.
Outcome 10: Portfolio documentation of assignments rated using graphical
communication rubrics.
Terry Speicher, Assistant Professor of Engineering, Berks Campus, [email protected]
Revision D – June 2005
81
EMET 320 – Analog Electronics
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2005)
Catalog Description: EMET 320: Analog Electronics
(4 credits). Fundamentals of circuits using diodes, bipolar transistors, and other discrete
electronic components; introduction to integrated circuits including op-amps.
Course prerequisites: EE T 114 and Math 083 or Math 140.
Goals of the Course:
Analog Electronics is a required course for junior-level students who enter the ElectroMechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program with a
background in mechanical engineering technology. The purpose of the course is to
teach students the fundamentals of operation and design of linear electronic circuits that
are commonly used in industrial applications. Basic characteristics of key
semiconductor devices (diodes & transistors) will be covered, but the main emphasis
will be on circuits that use op-amps and linear integrated circuits. The focus of study
will be concepts, principles, procedures, models, and computations used by engineers
and technologists to analyze, select, specify, test, maintain, design, and troubleshoot
modern electronic systems, particularly those used in modern instrumentation and
control systems.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 320 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to plan and conduct experimental measurements, use
modern test and data acquisition equipment, and be able to analyze and
interpret the results. (Outcome 3)
• Students should be able to apply electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices,
computers, and instrumentation systems to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 3:
a) Students will able to assemble standard-design op-amp circuits and test their
DC and frequency-dependent performance using standard laboratory test
equipment.
b) Students will be able to use standard lab test equipment and classroom theories
to debug and troubleshoot malfunctioning op-amp circuits.
c) Students will be able to synthesize laboratory data to characterize op-amp
circuit performance in accepted graphical and written report forms.
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will be able to analyze basic DC and AC operating characteristics of
diodes and transistors and characterize this operation in accepted forms.
• Students will be able to analyze and design practical op-amp circuits such as
inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, filters, oscillators and comparators.
• Students will be able to read specification sheets for op-amps and correctly
interpret the effects of these specifications on the operation and design
practical, functioning op-amp circuits.
• Students will be able to use electronic simulation software to create and
correctly analyze the performance of practical op-amp circuits.
82
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will prepare professional quality graphical written reports including of
laboratory data, including appropriate data analysis and synthesis.
• Students will be able to prepare professional quality graphical and tabular
written reports of computational results obtained from electronic circuit
simulations.
• Students will be able to use suitable visual and graphic aids to prepare and give
professional quality oral presentations on technical subjects to groups of faculty
and peers.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Fiore, Op Amps & Linear Integrated Circuits, Delmar, 2001.
• Gayakwad, Op Amps & Linear Integrated Circuits, Prentice-Hall
• Terrell, Op Amps: Design, Application, & Troubleshooting, ButterworthHeinemann
• Floyd & Buchla, Basic Operational Amplifiers & Linear Integrated Circuits,
Prentice-Hall
• Nelson, Operational Amplifiers: Analysis & Design, Butterworth-Heinemann
• Irvine, Operational Amplifier Characteristics & Applications, Prentice-Hall
• Stanley, Operational Amplifiers with Linear Integrated Circuits, Prentice-Hall
• Franco, Design with Operational Amplifiers & Analog Integrated Circuits,
McGraw-Hill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Satisfactory completion of basic circuit courses.
• Ability to use a computer to analyze complex electronic circuits using industrystandard electronic design & analysis software.
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Basic Electronic Devices: Diode principles, operation, & analytical modeling;
bipolar transistor principles, operation, & analytical modeling; basic diode and
transistor circuits; introduction to differential amplifiers. (6 hours)
• Op-Amp Characteristics: symbols, packaging, device IDs, open-circuit
operation, key specifications, & data sheets; ideal op-amp models. (3 hours)
• Practical Op-amp Circuits: Inverting & non-inverting amplifiers, differential
amplifiers, instrument amplifiers, summing junctions, arithmetic circuits, input
compensation circuits, AC & DC amplifiers, single-supply amplifiers, I/V &
V/I converters. (16 hours)
• Frequency Response: Open- and closed-loop frequency response, slew rate. (2
hours)
• Filter and Oscillator Circuits: Low-, high-, band-pass & band-reject filters,
higher order filters, Butterworth filter concepts, phase-shift & Wien bridge
oscillators. (6 hours)
• Non-linear Circuits: Integrators, differentiators, clippers, clampers,
comparators, limiters, peak detectors, & rectifiers. (6 hours)
• Digital circuits: A/D and D/A converters, sample-hold circuits. (3 hours)
83
•
Specialty Devices: 555 timers, F/V & V/F converters, regulators. (3 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to perform lab predictions and analyses, to
prepare lab reports, and to conduct out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to
analyze lab data, prepare engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of
typical electronic circuits. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet, and electronic
analysis software (viz., PSpice, MultiSim, MicroCap, etc.) is required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
Laboratory investigations of the following circuits would be appropriate for this course:
• Diode & Transistor Characteristics (V-I relationships, collector curves, gain
characteristics)
• Inverting & non-inverting amplifiers
• Summing junctions
• Differential and instrumentation amplifiers
• Frequency response, Bode plots, & filter circuits
• Integrators & differentiators
• Oscillator circuits
• Wave-shaping circuits
• Comparator, clipper, and peak detector circuits
• Rectifier circuits
• Timer circuits
Required
Equipment:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Dual trace oscilloscopes
• Digital multimeters
• Adjustable, multi-output DC power supplies
• Adjustable frequency generators
• Appropriate transistors, op-amps, resistors, capacitors, & other electronic
components
• Suitable prototyping boards or electronic trainers
Course Grading:
Library
Use/Research
Requirements:
Course Assessment
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of
laboratory and oral reports. At the instructor’s discretion, one or more oral reports may
be incorporated in this class to enhance students’ oral presentation skills. When
possible, these activities should involve a significant component of library research into
topics covered by the course, which would encourage and enhance students’ research
skills.
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
•
•
•
OUTCOME 3: Hands-on practicum exams focused on the set up, operation,
and measurement of laboratory equipment can be used to assess this outcome.
OUTCOME 4: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments
covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess this outcome.
OUTCOME 10: Formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive, researchbased projects, prepared in any of a variety of professional formats
(research/test report, business letter, technical memo, lab notebook, etc.),
involving simulations, implementation and testing, and/or computational
84
analyses of practical circuits, and accompanied by oral presentation of results,
are effective methods of demonstrating achievement of this outcome.
Course Coordinator: Dr. Dale Litwhiler, Assistant Professor of Engineering, Penn State Berks,
[email protected]
85
EMET 321W – Electric Machines
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2005)
Catalog Description: EMET 321W: Electric Machines
(4 credits). Electro-mechanical energy conversion, AC and DC rotating machines,
transformers, system protective devices, and solid state power control. Prerequisites:
EE T 114.
Goals of the Course:
Electric Machines is a required course for junior-level students who enter the ElectroMechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program with a
background in mechanical engineering technology. The purpose of the course is to
teach principles of AC and DC motors and generators, and AC transformers and how
they work. Basic concepts of electromagnetic circuits as they relate to voltages,
currents, and physical forces induced in conductors are covered, including application
to practical problems of machine design. Practical analytical models for most types of
motors, generators, and transformers commonly used in industry are developed, and the
models are used to analyze power requirements, power capability, efficiency, operating
characteristics, control requirements, and electrical demands of these machines. EMET
321W is also a "writing-intensive" course that teaches students to prepare formal,
written technical documents. This goal is accomplished through extensive writing
exercises performed in the context of laboratory exercises that accompany the course.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 321W contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to plan and conduct experimental measurements, use
modern test and data acquisition equipment, and be able to analyze and
interpret the results. (Outcome 3)
• Students should be able to apply electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices;
computers; and instrumentation systems to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to choose appropriate technology to solve problems.
(Outcome 7)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to correctly connect DC, single-phase AC, and 3-phase
AC sources to various electrical machines and transformers to operate the
apparatus.
• Students will be able to use standard measuring equipment (viz., voltmeters,
ammeters, wattmeters, tachometers, and dynamometers) to measure the
mechanical and electrical operating characteristics of typical electromechanical
power conversion devices, i.e., single- and three-phase transformers, AC
induction and synchronous motors, DC series and shunt motors, and AC
synchronous generators.
• Students will be able to synthesize laboratory data to characterize correctly the
performance of various machine using accepted standard formats.
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will be able to use standard methods to determine accurate
modeling/simulation parameters for various general-purpose electrical
machines and transformers.
86
•
•
•
Students will be able to use modeling/simulation parameters with standard
equivalent circuit models to predict correctly the expected performance of
various general-purpose electrical machines and transformers.
Students will be able to use accepted national and international standards (such
as NEMA) to select appropriate electrical machines to meet specified
performance requirements.
Students will understand the fundamental control practices associated with AC
and DC machines (starting, reversing, braking, plugging, etc.).
OUTCOME 7:
• Students will be able to correctly determine torque, speed, and power
requirements of an electrical machine to perform in an electromechanical
system.
• Students will be able to select an appropriate electrical machine and drive
technology for an application based on the required operating specifications and
constraints.
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will be able to use standard word processing and mathematical
analysis software to prepare professional quality written reports.
• Students will be able to prepare professional quality graphical presentations of
laboratory data and computational results, incorporating accepted data analysis
and synthesis methods.
• Students will be able to use suitable visual and graphic aids to prepare and give
professional quality presentations on technical subjects.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Hubert, Electrical Machines-Theory, Operation, Applications, & Control,
Prentice Hall.
• Sen, Principles of Electric Machines & Power Electronics, Wiley
• Ryff, Electric Machinery, Prentice Hall
• Pearman, Electrical Machinery & Transformer Technology, Saunders
• Guru & Hiziroglu, Electric Machinery & Transformers, Saunders
• Wildi, Electrical Machines, Drives and Power Systems, Prentice Hall
The following are useful references for this course:
• Kosow, Electric Machinery and Control, Prentice-Hall
• Siskind, Electrical Machines, McGraw-Hill
• Chapman, Electric Machinery Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Satisfactory completion of basic circuits courses, including AC circuit
concepts.
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
• Basic understanding of algebra, trigonometry, complex numbers, and phasors.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class. 15 week semester
allows 60 hours total
87
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Magnetics: field properties, materials, hysteresis & saturation, magnetic
circuits, induction, motor & generator action. (3 hours)
DC Machines: commutation, shunt, series, and compound motor models,
developed power & torque, losses & efficiency, starting, braking, and speed
control. (8 hours)
Transformers: construction, ideal & practical models, polarity, impedance,
parameter testing, regulation, efficiency, ratings, parallel operation & load
sharing. (7 hours)
Specialty transformers: auto, 3φ, and instrument transformers. (2 hours)
3φ Induction Motors: construction, synchronous speed & slip, rotor & stator
circuit models, developed & output power, torque, efficiency, torque-speed
curves, stall & starting torque, parameter measurement, starting methods,
reversing, plugging. (9 hours)
1φ Induction Motors: quadrature fields &/or rotating field theory, starting
methods, torque equations. (2 hours)
Synchronous Motors: construction, operating concepts, starting methods,
torque & torque angle, armature reaction, circuit models & phasor diagrams, Vcurves, power factor control, pull-out torque, parameter testing, losses &
efficiency. (6 hours)
Synchronous Generators: motor-generator transition, phasor diagrams,
synchronizing, power factor control, voltage regulation, operation on infinite
grid. (6 hours)
Specialty Motors: Brushless DC, stepper, hysteresis, and reluctance motors. (2
hours)
In-class examinations (3 hours)
Laboratory Experiments (12 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers both to prepare lab reports and conduct some
out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to analyze lab data, prepare
engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of transformer, motor, and
generator performance. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet, and mathematical
analysis software (viz., Mathcad, Matlab, TKSolver, etc.) is required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
Typical laboratory exercises should include the following:
• Transformer basics (V-I relationships, polarity testing, voltage regulation)
• Autotransformers (kVA amplification, step-up & step-down operation) or 3phase transformers (constructing 3-phase banks from single-phase transformers,
wye-delta connections).
• 3φ squirrel-cage & wound-rotor induction motor performance (torque-speed
curves, start & stall torque, efficiency, power factor, & effects of rotor
resistance)
• 1φ induction motor performance (starting & running torque, power factor)
• Synchronous motor performance (start & pull-out torque, power factor ctrl, Vcurves)
• Synchronous alternator performance (synchronizing, regulation, power factor
ctrl)
• Shunt, series, & compound DC motor performance
• DC motor starting methods
Required
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
88
Equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AC and DC voltage, current, and 1φ and 3φ power meters
1φ power transformers (1kVA or larger recommended)
3φ squirrel-cage induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)
1φ induction motors (split-phase, capacitor-start & -run, universal
recommended)
3φ synchronous motor/generators (0.25kW or larger recommended)
Rotary dynamometer or prony brake appropriate for measuring motor torque
Tachometers
Resistive, capacitive, and inductive 3φ loads suitable for generator outputs
The following equipment is also useful:
• 3φ wound-rotor induction motors (0.25kW or larger recommended)
• Transformers with buck-boost and T-connections
• Phase angle meters
• Watt-var meters
• DC motor starters
• SCR speed controllers
• Synchroscope or synchronizing lamps
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor with the
stipulation that at least 25% of the course grade must be determined from the writing
component (see following item).
Communication
Skills:
The "W" designation on this course means that writing assignments must be a
fundamental part of the course. This goal is most easily met by requiring lab reports to
be formal, written reports. The reports must follow an accepted technical writing style
and must be concise, technically correct, and grammatically sound. Reports must be
prepared using a word processor and printed in an accepted professional format. As
required by the University "W" designation, (1) grading of written exercises will give
comparable weight to grammatical quality and technical merit, and (2) grades on
written material will represent at least 25% of the class grade.
The "W" designation also requires that this course teach students good oral
communication skills. Therefore, the course also requires students to prepare and
present oral reports of their technical work. Reports are graded, and these grades are
included in the overall class grade.
Library
Use/Research
Requirements:
Students should be required to use library technical resources and electronic-based data
sources in the preparation of at least one lab/research report assigned in this course.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOME 3: Hands-on practicum exams focused on the set up, operation,
and measurement of laboratory equipment can be used to assess this outcome.
• OUTCOME 4: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments
covering lecture materials generally can be used to assess this outcome.
• OUTCOME 7: Traditional exams, laboratory exercises, and laboratory reports
generally can be used to assess this outcome.
• OUTCOME 10: Formal laboratory reports and/or comprehensive researchbased projects, created using any of a variety of typical professional formats
89
(research/test report, business letter, technical memo, lab notebook, etc.),
accompanied by oral presentation of results, are effective methods of
demonstrating achievement of this outcome.
Course Coordinator: Todd Batzel, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Penn State Altoona College,
[email protected]
90
EMET 322 – Mechanics for Technology
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EMET 322: Mechanics for Technology
(4 credits). Strength of materials and dynamics, including axial, shear, torsion, and
bending stresses, beam deflection, kinematics, and kinetics of rigid bodies.
Prerequisites: MCH T 111, Math 083 or Math 140.
Goals of the Course:
Mechanics for Technology is a required course for junior-level students who enter the
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program
with a background in Electrical Engineering Technology (EET). The purpose of this
course is to give students the ability to calculate engineering stresses, strains, and
deflections using the applied forces and reactions obtained from static equilibrium
calculations. It also teaches students how to determine the displacement, velocity, and
acceleration of some particle and rigid body motions.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 322 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply concepts of calculus, differential equations,
and probability and statistics to the design and analysis of electromechanical
systems. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to apply engineering mechanics, engineering materials,
machine design, and fluid mechanics to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 5)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcome are presented below
(numbers in parentheses refer to specific course assessment methods used for
measurement of these course outcomes):
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will use the laws of beam diagrams to relate the load, shearing force,
and bending moment diagrams to each other and to draw complete shear and
bending moment diagrams for beams carrying a variety of loading patterns and
with a variety of support conditions. Assessment tools: homework problem
sets, examinations. (Assessment methods 1 & 2)
• Students will be able to apply the differential calculus relationships between
displacement, velocity, and acceleration to calculate kinematic and kinetic
quantities for rectilinear and curvilinear motion. Assessment tools: homework
problem sets, examinations. (Assessment methods 1 & 2)
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to calculate normal stresses, shear stresses, bearing
stresses in axially loaded structural members. Assessment tools: homework
problem sets, examinations. (Assessment methods 1 & 2)
• Students will be able to compute the maximum shear stress and angle of twist of
members loaded in torsion. Assessment tools: homework problem sets,
examinations. (Assessment methods 1 & 2)
• Students will be able to compute the stress at any point within the cross-section
of a transversely loaded member and to describe the variation of stress with
position in the beam. Assessment tools: homework problem sets, examinations
(Assessment methods 1 & 2)
• Students will be able to determine the required dimension of various key
mechanical and structural components based upon the principles of static
analysis of forces/moments and the determination of force induced
tension/compression and shear stresses. The applicable material failure stresses
91
will be used as a basis for determining the required safe dimensions.
(Assessment methods 1 & 2)
Suggested Texts:
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Course Topics:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Walker, Applied Mechanics for Engineering Technology, Prentice-Hall
• Mott, Applied Strength of Materials, Prentice-Hall
•
•
•
•
•
Understanding of force vectors, moments, and couples.
Understanding of equilibrium.
Understanding friction.
Understanding of centers of gravity and centroids.
Understanding of moments of inertia of areas and solids.
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
1. Strength of Materials:
• Stress (normal, shear, allowable stress, design) (1 hour)
• Strain (deformation) (1 hour)
• Mechanical properties of materials (tension test, stress-strain diagram,
Hooke's law, Poisson's ratio) (1 hour)
• Axial loads (Saint-Venant's principle, elastic deformation constant cross
section, superposition, statically indeterminant axially loaded member,
thermal stress, stress concentration) (4 hours)
• Torsion (deformation of circular shaft, torsion formula, power transmission,
angle of twist, stress concentrations) (4 hours)
• Bending (shear and moment diagrams, bending stress, flexure formula,
stress concentrations) (8 hours)
• Transverse shear (straight members, shear formula, beams) (4 hours)
• Combined loadings (thin-walled pressure vessels, state of stress) (3 hours)
• Stress transformation (plane-stress, general equations, principal stresses,
Mohr's circle-plane stress) (8 hours)
• Beam deflection (elastic curve, slope and displacement, superposition) (4
hours)
2. Dynamics:
• Kinematics of particles (4 hours)
• Kinetics of particles (4 hours)
• Kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies (translation, rotation) (8 hours)
• Work and energy (particle) (4 hours)
3. Examinations (6 hours)
Computer Use:
None required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
None
Required
Equipment:
None
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
Students are expected to use course reference materials that are maintained in the
92
library
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcome listed above:
1. Traditional exams covering lecture material
2. Graded assignments which support outcomes
Course Coordinator:
John J. Gavigan, Assistant Professor of Engineering, Berks Campus, [email protected]
93
EMET 330 – Measurement Theory and Instrumentation
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EMET 330: Measurement Theory & Instrumentation
(3 Credits). Fundamentals of measuring, transmitting, and recording temperatures,
pressure, flow, force, displacement, and velocity; laboratory component emphasizes
systems used in manufacturing.
Course Prerequisites: EMET 320 or EET 216; and EMET 322 or MET 206;
Concurrent: Math 250
Goals of the Course:
Measurement Theory & Instrumentation is a required course for junior-level
students who enter the Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (EMET)
baccalaureate degree program. The purpose of this course is to teach students the
fundamental concepts, principle, procedures, and computations used by engineers and
technologists to analyze, select, specify, design, and maintain modern instrumentation
and control systems. Students will gain a sound understanding of the language used to
describe modern instrumentation, measurement, and control systems and an
appreciation of the various types of systems in common use in industry. Particular
emphasis will be given to electrical, mechanical, flow, and thermal measurement
systems. The course will also cover statistical tests to evaluate quality of
measurements, standard methods of characterizing measurement results, and methods
for characterizing measurement system response. Finally, the course will provide a
sound understanding of the important characteristics of a range of modern process
sensors, transmitters, and signal conditioning equipment.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 330 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to identify, analyze, and solve technical problems
related to integration of electrical, mechanical, instrumentation, computers, and
control components to perform industrial and manufacturing functions.
(Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply concepts of calculus, differential equations,
and probability and statistics to the design and analysis of electromechanical
systems. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to plan and conduct experimental measurements, use
modern test and data acquisition equipment, and be able to analyze and interpret
the results. (Outcome 3)
• Students should be able to apply electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices;
computers; and instrumentation systems to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 4)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcome are presented below
(numbers in parentheses refer to specific course assessment methods used for
measurement of these course outcomes):
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will be able to correctly predict the key performance characteristics of
commonly used sensors such as resistive devices, RTDs, thermistors,
thermocouples, variable inductance/reluctance devices, semiconductor based
sensors, and piezoelectric devices using standard component models and
assumptions. (Assessment methods 1&3)
• Students will be able to correctly predict the key performance characteristics of
94
signal conditioning equipment such as ballast circuits, voltage divider circuits,
and voltage and current sensitive bridge circuits using standard component
models and assumptions. (Assessment methods 1 & 3)
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will be able to correctly calculate the quality of their measurements
including concepts of data error, propagation of uncertainty, data samples and
data populations using standard statistical methods including Gaussian, 2 ,
,
Student’s-t distributions, confidence intervals, standard deviations, and
uncertainty analysis. (Assessment methods 1 & 3)
• Students will be able to correctly calculate a system’s amplitude, frequency, and
phase response using standard methods of frequency spectrum and harmonic
Fourier analysis. (Assessment methods 1 & 3)
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able correctly set up and test/analyze the performance of
commonly used sensors and signal conditioning equipment using standard
laboratory test equipment. (Assessment method 2)
• Students will be able to correctly acquire, interpret, and synthesize laboratory
data to characterize sensor/signal conditioning circuit performance in accepted
standard forms. (Assessment method 2)
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will be able to correctly apply temperature, displacement, pressure and
flow sensors to the design and operation of electromechanical systems using
standard electrical and electromechanical models. (Assessment methods 1, 2, &
3)
• Students will be able to correctly apply signal conditioning circuits, including
ballast circuits, voltage divider circuits, and voltage and current sensitive bridge
circuits, to the design and operation of electromechanical systems using
standard circuit models. (Assessment methods 1, 2, & 3)
OUTCOME 10:
• Students will be able to correctly prepare high quality written reports that
document laboratory investigations of sensors, transmitters, and signal
conditioning systems. (Assessment methods 2)
• Students will be able to correctly prepare high quality graphical and tabular
presentations based on the appropriate data analysis and synthesis of data taken
from laboratory experiments with sensors commonly encountered in industry.
(Assessment method 2)
Suggested Texts:
Prerequisites by
Topic:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Beckwith, et. al., Mechanical Measurements, Addison Wesley (distributed by
Prentice-Hall)
• Doebelin, Measurement Systems; Application and Design, McGraw-Hill
• Figliola & Beasley, Theory and Design for Mechanical Measurements, Wiley
• Keithley, Low Level Measurements Handbook, Keithley Instruments, Inc.
• Klaassen, Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation, Cambridge Press
• Bateson, Introduction to Control Systems Technology, Prentice-Hall
• Bishop, Learning with LabView, Prentice-Hall
•
•
Satisfactory completion of basic circuits and basic electronics courses.
Concurrent study of concepts and applications of ordinary differential
equations.
95
•
•
Ability to use a computer to analyze complex analytical problems using
standard analytical software such as Excel, Mathcad, Matlab, etc.
Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
1. Concepts of data error, measurement uncertainty, data samples and data
populations. (2 hours)
2. Curve fits, harmonics, frequency spectrum, sampling, and Fourier
representations. (3 hours)
3. Amplitude, frequency, phase response, system delays, & rise time; 1st and 2nd –
order systems. (3 hours)
4. Sensors & transducers: Resistive devices; RTDs, thermistors, &
thermocouples; variable inductance/reluctance devices; semiconductor devices;
& piezoelectric devices. (3 hours)
5. Signal conditioning, voltage- and current-sensing circuits, bridge circuits. (2
hours)
6. Resonant circuits, impedance matching, A/D and D/A conversion. (3 hours)
7. Temperature measurement systems. (3 hours)
8. Pressure and force measurement systems. (3 hours)
9. Flow measurement systems. (3 hours)
10. System modeling techniques, control block methods, & basics of Laplace
transforms. (6 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to perform lab predictions and analyses, to
prepare lab reports, and to conduct out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used
to analyze lab data, prepare engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic
studies of typical electronic circuits. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet, and
analysis software (i.e., Excel, MathCad, Matlab, PSpice, Electronics Workbench,
MicroCap, etc.) is required.
Laboratory
Exercises:
Typical laboratory exercises should include the following:
1. Lab orientation and safety procedures
2. Variable resistance transducers
3. Strain gage transducers
4. Bridge circuits
5. Variable capacitance transducers
6. Variable reluctance/inductance transducers
7. Thermocouples
8. Thermistors
9. Optional laboratory projects prepared at the discretion of the instructor
Required
Equipment:
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct the course:
• Dual trace oscilloscope
• Digital multimeters
• Adjustable, multi-output DC power supplies
• Adjustable frequency generators
• Appropriate transducers and sensors
• Suitable prototyping boards or electronic trainers
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
96
Library Usage:
Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of
laboratory.
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcome listed above:
1. Traditional exams covering lecture material
2. Comprehensive laboratory based sensor/signal conditioning system
characterization tests analyzed and documented in written reports
3. Graded assignments which support outcomes
Course Coordinator:
Frank Kadi, Senior Instructor of Engineering, New Kensington Campus,
[email protected]
97
EMET 350 – Quality Control, Inspection, and Design
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Spring 2006)
Catalog Description:
EMET 350: Quality Control, Inspection, and Design
(3 credits). Fundamentals of quality including statistics, probability, and design of
experiments. Course prerequisite: EMET 330.
Goals of the Course:
Quality Control, Inspection, and Design is an ancillary course in the EMET
curriculum intended to provide students with a fundamental understanding of modern
statistical quality control methods used by industry. It covers the concepts, principles,
procedures, statistical tools, and computations used to analyze and maintain statistical
control of manufacturing and production processes and systems. Standard statistical
methods are emphasized rather than the mathematical theory of statistical models.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 350 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply concepts of calculus, differential equations, and
probability and statistics, to the design and analysis of electromechanical
systems. (Outcome 2)
• Students should be able to plan and conduct experimental measurements, use
modern test and data acquisition equipment, and be able to analyze and interpret
the results. (Outcome 3)
• Students should recognize the social, economic, safety, quality, reliability, and
ethical issues in the work environment. (Outcome 9)
• Students should be able to effectively communicate their ideas and solutions
orally, in writing, and graphically. (Outcome 10)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will able to use calculators and/or computers to correctly determine
standard statistical parameters (counts, mean, median, range, standard deviation)
used to characterize variability in measured data.
• Students will able to use statistical parameters to construct standard statistical
quality control charts (Pareto, histograms, frequency, X-bar/R, X-bar/s,
Median/R, moving average, etc.) to correctly represent variability of statistical
processes.
• Students will be able to use standard probability distributions (normal, Poisson,
binomial, hypergeometric) to correctly predict the variability of random
processes and to develop appropriate quality acceptance standards.
OUTCOME 3:
• Students will be able to use standard statistical quality control tools (see above)
to analyze product data to determine whether or not processes are “in control.”
• Using calculators and/or computers, students will be able to use standard quality
control techniques (sampling procedures, operating characteristic curves,
average outgoing quality, outgoing quality limits, stipulated producer/consumer
risk, etc.) and appropriate probability theorems to design effective sampling
procedures to ensure statistical control of product quality to within specified
limits.
OUTCOME 9:
• Students will be able to correctly describe how statistical quality control
methods result in improvements in product and service quality, reductions in
production, manufacturing, and service costs, improvements in morale, and
98
increases in company efficiency and competitiveness.
Students will be able to correctly identify the accepted national and international
standards for statistical quality control and management.
OUTCOME 10:
• Using computers, students will be able to prepare high quality graphical and
tabular presentations of quality control data in standard quality control chart
forms.
•
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Besterfield, Quality Control, Pearson, Prentice-Hall
• Smith, Statistical Process Control and Quality Improvement, Prentice-Hall
• Montgomery, Introduction to Statistical Quality Control, Wiley
• Kolarik, Creating Quality, McGraw-Hill
• Summers, Quality, Prentice-Hall
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Ability to use a computer to prepare written reports and to perform basic data
reduction, graphing, and engineering data presentation.
• Ability to use a computer to perform standard statistical analyses using
spreadsheets or standard SQC design & analysis software.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Introduction to quality topics and concepts of SPC/SQC. (3 hours)
• Coverage of basic statistical concepts. (6 hours)
• Data organization methods and techniques. (3 hours)
• Normal probability distributions. (3 hours)
• Control charts of variables. (6 hours)
• Control charts of attributes. (6 hours)
• Control chart interpretation. (6 hours)
• Specialty control charts. (3 hours)
• Acceptance curves, acceptance sampling, and design of experiments. (6 hours)
• TQM concepts. (3 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to conduct out-of-class assignments.
Computers will be used to analyze data, prepare homework, and perform analytic
studies of typical quality control problems.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use/Research Students should be encouraged to use library and internet resources in the preparation of
out-of-class assignments and reports.
Requirements:
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOMES 2, 3 & 9: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem
assignments covering lecture materials can generally be used to assess these
99
•
•
Course Coordinator:
outcomes.
OUTCOMES 2, 3 & 10: Practicum exercises in which students collect product
data (simulated or real), determine its statistical character, and assess the state of
control of the process producing the data are also useful exercises to evaluate
students’ understanding of quality control tools.
OUTCOMES 3 & 10: Projects in which students are required to develop quality
acceptance procedures to satisfy prescribed statistical control requirements and
then test those procedures by sampling from pre-arranged populations of known
variability can be used to test students’ grasp of design of experiments concepts
and capabilities.
Sohail Anwar, Associate Professor of Engineering, Altoona, ([email protected])
March 31, 2006
100
EMET 405 – Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics
Standard Course Outline (Updated: Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
Goals of the Course:
EMET 405: Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics
(4 credits). Introduction to the principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat
transfer with emphasis on the application to practical problems.
Course prerequisites: Math 140, Phys 150, MCH T 111.
Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics
This course is designed to provide students with knowledge in fluid statics, fluid
dynamics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer. The emphasis of the course is to
introduce them to the fundamental laws and principles of these engineering sciences,
and to give them experience in solving problems using these laws and principles. The
instructor may employ methods of differential and integral calculus as a part of selected
topics.
The fluid mechanics portion of the course introduces the students to fluid statics (e.g.
hydrostatic pressure on submerged surfaces) and to fluid dynamics (e.g. continuity
equation, energy equation, and laminar and turbulent flow).
The thermodynamics portion of the course includes, among other things, the
introduction to the first and second laws of thermodynamics, refrigeration and power
cycles, thermodynamic properties such as entropy, and ideal gas principles. The heat
transfer portion of the course introduces the three modes heat transfer: conduction,
convection and radiation. It also covers an important type of heat transfer equipment,
the heat exchanger.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 405 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply concepts of calculus, differential equations, and
probability and statistics to the design and analysis of electromechanical
systems. (Outcome2)
• Students should be able to apply engineering mechanics, engineering materials,
machine design, and fluid mechanics to the development, operation,
troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome5)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will use mathematical integration to determine the amount of work
which is done by a compressed gas during expansion (or work done to compress
a gas). They will do this using typical pressure versus volume information and
their results to assigned exercises will be within a few percent of the exact
answer.
• Students will understand and be able to use the equations which involve the time
derivatives of functions which occur in the Thermodynamics, Fluid Flow, and
Heat Transfer disciplines. They will be able to do this to produce results to
assigned exercises to within a few percent of the exact results.
• Students will use concepts of mathematical integration in applying the equations
of fluid statics to determine the magnitude and direction of the resultant force on
a submerged surface. They will be able to do this to produce results to assigned
exercises to within a few percent of the exact results.
101
OUTCOME 5:
• Students will be able to apply the laws of thermodynamics to determine the
behavior of turbines, compressors, boilers, nozzles, etc. They will calculate the
required results using the known operating data. The results to assigned
exercises will be within a few percent of the exact results.
• Students will be to apply the laws of fluid statics to determine the resultant
pressure on submerged surfaces, and the laws of fluid dynamics to analyze the
pressures and fluid velocities in a fluid system containing turbines, pumps,
valves, etc. all connected by various lengths of pipe. They will produce these
results to assigned exercises to within a few percent of the exact answers.
• Students will use the laws of conduction, convection, and radiation to solve
problems involving the transfer of heat through various types of walls, insulated
pipes, etc. plus perform calculations based upon parallel flow, counter flow, and
shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of these calculations to assigned
exercises will be within a few percent of the exact results.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Moran, Shapiro, Munson, and DeWitt, Introduction to Thermal Systems
Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
• Esposito, A., Fluid Mechanics with Applications, Prentice-Hall, plus
• Granet and Bluestein, Thermodynamics and Heat Power, Prentice-Hall.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Ability to apply statics principles.
• Ability to apply differentiation and integration principles.
• Ability to perform complex equation solutions on an engineering calculator.
• Ability to execute software packages on a computer.
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction: Introduction; thermal systems; closed systems; control volumes;
properties; units; temperature. ( 3 hours) (Ch. 1, 2)
Thermodynamics I: Energy, work and power; expansion and compression
processes; heat; refrigeration and power cycles. ( 3 hours) (Ch. 3)
Thermodynamics II: Phase diagrams; phase change; thermodynamic properties
(internal energy, enthalpy, etc); property data, ideal gas model; specific heat;
polytropic processes; conservation of mass and energy for a control volume. (
4.5 hours) (Ch. 4, 5)
Thermodynamics III: Second law of thermodynamics; application to
refrigeration, power, and heat pump cycles; Carnot cycle efficiency. ( 2 hours )
(Ch. 6)
Thermodynamics IV: Using entropy (ideal gas, closed system, control volume);
isentropic processes; turbines, nozzles, compressors, pumps, steady flow
processes; mechanical energy equation. ( 5 hours) (Ch. 7)
Thermodynamics V: Vapor power systems, Rankine cycle, superheat, reheat,
etc.; vapor refrigeration and heat pump systems. (4.5 hours) (Ch. 8)
Thermodynamics and fluid statics: Gas power cycles; Otto, Diesel, Brayton; gas
turbine applications; fluid statics: pressure; manometers; hydrostatic force on
submerged areas; buoyancy. (5 hours) (Ch. 9, 11)
102
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fluid dynamics I: Fluid momentum equation and applications; Bernoulli and
energy equations and applications; similitude, dimensional analysis, and
modeling (similitude, etc. can be omitted if necessary). ( 4.5 hours) (Ch. 12, 13)
Fluid dynamics II: Internal flow (pipes); laminar and turbulent; head loss; minor
losses; external flow; boundary layer; flat plate; drag; lift; flow around
cylinders; airfoil; introduction to heat transfer (conduction, convection, and
radiation). (5 hours) (Ch. 14, 15)
Heat conduction: Conduction heat transfer (Fourier’s Law; steady state
conduction; conduction through composite plane walls and cylinders; fins;
transient heat conduction). (5 hours) (Ch. 16)
Convection and heat exchangers: Convection heat transfer: thermal boundary
layer; convection coefficients; forced convection (laminar and turbulent flow);
flat plates and cylinders; internal flow (laminar and turbulent); energy balance;
tube heat transfer; free convection; horizontal and vertical plates and cylinders;
heat exchanger applications. (7 hours) (Ch. 17)
Radiation: Radiation heat transfer: radiation; emissivity; blackbody; real
surfaces; absorptivity, reflectivity, and transmissivity; applications; radiation
between surfaces; view factors. (4.5 hours) (Ch. 18)
Miscellaneous: Review, examinations, special topic coverage. (7 hours)
Computer Use:
The course instructor may request that the students perform various calculations using
software supplied with the course textbook or available on campus computers.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• In-class examinations.
• Research papers involving specific topics.
• Homework problems.
Course Coordinator:
Frank J. Kadi, Senior Instructor, New Kensington Campus ([email protected])
103
EMET 410 – Automated Control Systems
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Spring 2006)
Catalog Description:
EMET 410: Automated Control Systems
(4 credits) Introduction to analog feedback control theory and computer simulation and
analysis using Matlab; laboratory study of feedback systems.
Course prerequisites: Math 250, EMET 330, and EMET 321W or EET 213W.
Goals of the Course:
Automated Control Systems is a required course for senior-level students in the
Electro-Mechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program.
The main goal of the course is to teach students the concepts of automated control by
coupling theory, industrial practices, and appropriate laboratory activities. The course
demonstrates that physical processes can be represented by differential equations and
hence, Laplace transforms. It teaches students how to measure and modify a system’s
performance in a variety of ways as well as how to make use of time-domain
techniques, root locus and Bode plots. Improving student communication skills is also
a goal of this course.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
EMET 410 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to identify, analyze, and solve technical problems
related to integration of electrical, mechanical, instrumentation, computers, and
control components to perform industrial and manufacturing functions.
(Outcome 1)
• Students should be able to apply concepts of calculus, differential equations, and
probability and statistics to the design and analysis of electromechanical
systems. (Outcome 2)
• Students should demonstrate basic knowledge of control systems, including
computer technologies and programming skills as applied to the design,
operation, troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems.
Outcome 6)
• Students should be able to apply the engineering design process to solve openended problems. (Outcome 8)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 1:
• Students will readily recognize the availability of and be able to apply electrical,
fluid and mechanical analogues for use in system models.
• In laboratory exercises, students will correctly design and test control systems as
applied to integrated electrical and mechanical systems.
OUTCOME 2:
• Students will develop linear, constant coefficient, ordinary differential equations
from electromechanical system models, and solve them using Laplace transform
techniques.
OUTCOME 6:
• Students will correctly analyze and design analog control systems to meet
performance requirements by using computer tools to perform root locus,
frequency domain, and time domain analysis and design.
OUTCOME 8:
• Students will correctly design and test analog control systems, including
proportional, integral and derivative (PID) feedback control and other
104
compensators in laboratory exercises. This includes tuning PID controllers.
Suggested Texts:
The following are suitable texts and/or references for this course:
• Stefani, Shahian, Savant, Hostetter, Design of Feedback Control Systems,
Oxford University Press.
• Nise, Control Systems Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
• Dorf & Bishop, Modern Control Systems, Addison-Wesley.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Basic understanding of electrical, electronic, and instrumentation systems
• Basic understanding of mechanical system dynamics
• Basic understanding of electrical machines
• Basic understanding of ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, and
their application to physical systems
Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Review of Laplace transforms and differential equations. (2 hours)
• System modeling – electrical, translational mechanical, rotational mechanical,
and fluid. (2 hours)
• Transfer functions, time domain response, and block diagrams. (2 hours)
• Response of 1st and 2nd order systems. Routh-Hurowitz stability criteria. (2
hours)
• Damped natural frequency, undamped natural frequency, and damping ratio.
Rise time, overshoot, and settling time. (2 hours)
• Steady-state error (SSE), initial and final value theorems, and SSE to power-oftime inputs. (2 hours)
• Power-of-time error performance, system type number, unity feedback error
coefficients. (2 hours)
• Time domain compensation, process reaction curve, and Ziegler-Nichols PID
parameters. (2 hour)
• Root locus analysis. (6 hours)
• Root locus design of compensators: cascade PI, cascade lag, and cascade lead.
(7 hours)
• Construction of Bode plots. Gain margin and phase margin. Effects of system
delay. (6 hours)
• Frequency domain design of compensators; cascade PI, cascade lag, and cascade
lead. (6 hours)
• Overview of advanced control topics or other control related topics based on the
instructor’s experience and/or knowledge. Local industry requirements may
also be a basis for these topics. Possible topics might be model predictive
control, fuzzy control, neural networks, feed-forward control, etc. (3 hours)
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to perform lab simulations and analyses, to
prepare lab reports, and to conduct out-of-class assignments. Computers will be used to
analyze lab data, prepare engineering graphs for reports, and perform analytic studies of
typical digital circuits. Knowledge of word-processing, spreadsheet and control system
analysis software (viz., Matlab, etc.) is required.
105
Laboratory Exercises: Laboratory investigations of the following circuits and devices would be appropriate for
this course:
• Introduction to control system analysis software (Matlab)
• System stability and steady-state error
• Operation of PID controllers and obtaining a process reaction curve
• Tuning of PID controllers using a process simulator
• Compensator design using gain and phase margin
• Compensator design using Bode plots
• Compensator design using root locus
Required Equipment: The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Dual trace oscilloscopes
• Digital multimeters
• Process simulators (or equivalent) of industrial processes such as flow and
temperature
• Appropriate transducers and sensors
• PID controllers
• Electronic components necessary to building compensators
• Plotter or other data recorder
• Suitable control system analysis software (viz., Matlab)
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use/Research Students should be encouraged to use library technical resources in the preparation of
laboratory and oral reports. At the instructor’s discretion, one or more oral reports may
Requirements:
be incorporated in this class to enhance students’ oral presentation skills. When
possible, these activities should involve a significant component of library research into
topics covered by the course, which would encourage and enhance students’ research
skills.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOMES 1 & 2: Traditional exams and out-of-class problem assignments
covering lecture material generally can be used to assess these outcomes.
• OUTCOME 1, 6 & 8: Hands-on practical exercises focused on the set-up,
operation, and use of laboratory equipment can be used to asses these outcomes.
Course Coordinator:
R. L. (Doc) Mueller, Associate Professor of Engineering, New Kensington Campus
([email protected])
Rev 2 – Oct 2005
106
EMET 430 – Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers
Standard Course Outline (Spring 2006)
Catalog Description:
EMET 430: Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers
(3 credits). This course addresses advanced topics related to PLC control applications,
specialized I/O, communications, network device interfacing, and closed-loop feedback
control. Topics covered include advanced programming, PLC system planning, layout,
integration, and testing considerations, PID control, and Human Machine Interface.
Advanced use of a PLC programming language such as ladder, function block
diagrams, sequential function charts, etc, will be introduced. Latitude is given to the
instructor to add relevant topics as required by the local program IAC. Lecture topics
are reinforced through lab experimentation and out of class assignments. Prerequisites:
EE T 220.
Goals of the Course:
EMET 430 is a technical elective course in the EMET curriculum intended to give
students an in-depth understanding of the advanced control, programming, I/O,
communications, and distributed processing capabilities of modern PLCs. The
objective is achieved through coordinated lecture and laboratory activities. Lectures
cover theoretical and operational concepts; laboratory exercises will require students to
apply lecture concepts to actual control problems using real equipment.
EMET 430 is a senior-level elective intended for those students who want to expand
their PLC knowledge beyond the basics covered in required courses in the EMET
curriculum.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes
The EMET 430 course contributes to the following overall EMET program outcomes:
• Students should be able to apply electrical, electronic, and mechanical devices;
computers; and instrumentation systems to the development, operation, trouble
shooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems. (Outcome 4)
• Students should demonstrate basic knowledge of control systems, including
computer technologies and programming skills as applied to the design,
operation, troubleshooting, and maintenance of electromechanical systems.
(Outcome 6)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the overall EMET program outcomes are
presented below:
OUTCOME 4:
• Students will be able to use a PLC network communication technology (such as
DH+, DH-485, DeviceNet, Foundation Fieldbus, Profibus, Ethernet IP, Sercos,
etc) based on predetermined system operational requirements.
• Students will be able to use digital or discrete PLC I/O modules appropriately to
monitor system state through inputs and facilitate system control through
outputs.
• Students will be able to use analog PLC I/O modules appropriately to monitor
analog input signals from transducers (such as temperature, flow rate, level,
speed, etc.) and facilitate system control through analog output signals to control
elements (such as VFD, pumps, servos, solenoids, valves, etc.).
OUTCOME 6:
• Students will be able to perform programming tasks on a PLC based control
system using any of the IEC-61131 programming languages.
• Students will be able to integrate, troubleshoot, and maintain sensors,
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•
Suggested Text:
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Course Topics:
transducers, and actuators in a system under the control of a PLC.
Students will be able to utilize ladder logic PID instructions or equivalent to
perform closed-loop process control.
The following list contains suitable texts and/or references for this course, However, the
specific content of EMET 430 will be determined primarily by the automated control
equipment available at each campus offering the EMET program. In most instances, the
appropriate texts will be manufacturers' equipment and software manuals for the
equipment used in the course.
• Petruzella, Frank D., Programmable Logic Controllers, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 007-829852-0
• Filer, Robert, Leinonen, George, Programmable Controllers Using AllenBradley SLC 500 and Control Logix, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-025603-X.
• Geller, David, Programmable Controllers using the Allen Bradley SLC-500
Family, Prentice-Hall, ISBN 0-13-096208-2
• Kissell, Thomas E., Industrial Electronics – Applications for programmable
controllers, instrumentation and process control, and electrical machines and
motor controls, Prentice Hall, ISBN 0-13-060241-8
• Stenerson, Jon, Fundamentals of PLCs, Sensors, and Communications, Prentice
Hall, ISBN 0-13-061890-X
• Hughes, Thomas, Programmable Controllers, ISA, ISBN1-55617-729-1
•
Ability to use computers to prepare written reports.
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – one hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class/lab.
1. Optional review of basic ladder logic programming (1 lecture hour). This is left
to the discretion of the instructor.
2. Optional review of field devices and discrete module wiring configurations (1
lecture hour). This is left to the discretion of the instructor.
3. Advanced PLC programming in any of the following: ladder, function block
diagram, sequential function chart, structured text, or other IEC-61131
programming languages. (6 lecture hours/6 lab hours).
4. Specialty modules and applications (2 lecture hours/2 lab hours). Note: The
depth of coverage is largely dependant on the equipment available at the campus
of instruction and is left to the discretion of the instructor.
5. Analog instrumentation, transducer, and sensor PLC interfacing (2 lecture
hours/2 lab hours).
6. PLC system communications and/or device networks in any of the following:
DH+, DH-485, DeviceNet, Ethernet IP, Sercos, Foundation Fieldbus, Profibus,
etc., (2 lecture hours/2 lab hour).
7. PLC system planning, layout, integration, and testing (2 lecture hours).
8. PLC status files and system troubleshooting (1 lecture hour/1 lab hour).
9. Proportional integral derivative (PID) instructions and applications, system
modeling, open and closed loop tuning (4 lecture hours/4 lab hours).
10. Human machine interface programming and applications (2 lecture hours/2 lab
hours).
11. Optional advanced control topics based on the needs of local industry. Suitable
examples are motion control, fuzzy control, predictive control, neural networks,
etc (4 lecture hour/4 lab hours). This is left to the discretion of the instructor
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and local IAC requirements.
12. Optional iterative final design project development and demonstrations (6 lab
hours). This is left to the discretion of the instructor.
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to prepare, test, debug, and load control
programs for all automated control equipment used in the course. Students are also
expected to use standard word processing, spreadsheet, and mathematical analysis
software to prepare course work and laboratory reports.
Lab Exercises:
Typical laboratory exercises would include the following:
1. Laboratory orientation and safety procedures.
2. Programming exercises involving the use of counter, timer, comparison, data
manipulation, & arithmetic instruction exercises.
3. Programming exercises involving the use of program control, sequencer, and bit
shift register instructions.
4. Temperature, flow, or pressure measurement, display, and control exercises.
5. Motor speed and position control exercises.
6. PID instruction usage, system modeling, sampling time, and loop tuning
exercises.
7. Real-time control of remote devices using remotely-acquired data.
8. PLC network driver and device network configuration exercises.
9. Smart field device interface exercises using control networks (such as DH+,
Device,Net, Field Bus, ProfiBus, Ethernet/IP, Sercos, etc.)
10. PLC DDE/OPC automated data acquisition and exchange.
11. PLC HMI interface and client programming exercises.
12. Design/Redesign of open ended problems containing any of the above topics.
Required Equipment
The following is the minimum equipment required to conduct this course:
• Current technology PLCs with communication links to networked personal
computers.
• A variety of PLC I/O modules.
• A variety of PLC discrete and analog field devices.
• Current technology PLC programming and networking software.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Usage:
Students should be encouraged to use library resources and industry trade journals in
the preparation of out-of-class assignments and reports.
Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving intended course outcomes listed above:
1. Traditional exams covering lecture material
2. Out of class assignments and quizzes covering lecture materials
3. Formal and informal lab reports documenting programming solutions to
assigned control problems.
4. Project report documenting project development, implementation and testing
Course Coordinator:
Gregory D. Stanton, Instructor, Electrical Engineering, Penn State Berks
([email protected])
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EMET 440 – Electro-Mechanical Project Design
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Fall 2005)
Catalog Description:
EMET 440: Electro-Mechanical Project Design
(3 credits). Planning, development, and implementation of an electro-mechanical
design project which includes formal report writing, project documentation, group
presentations, and project demonstrations. Prerequisites: IET 215, MET 210W, and
EMET 410.
Goals of the Course:
Electro-Mechanical Project Design is intended to require students to demonstrate, in a
team-based environment, the ability to conceptualize and propose an original electromechanical design project in response to an open-ended problem statement. The
students will then plan and manage the design, development, implementation,
troubleshooting, and ultimate demonstration of that design using standard engineering
design practices. Acceptable projects must include mechanical, electrical, and
automated controls elements.
Relationship to EMET EMET 440 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
Program Outcomes:
• Students should be able to choose appropriate technology to solve problems.
(Outcome 7)
• Students should be able to apply the engineering design process to solve openended problems. (Outcome 8)
• Students should demonstrate the ability to work as professionals on a team and in
a project environment. (Outcome 11)
• Students should recognize the need for life-long learning, be prepared to continue
their education through formal or informal study, and be able to adapt to a
continuously changing work environment. (Outcome 12)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 7:
• Having a broad knowledge of technology related to electromechanical systems
and having skills in critical thinking, students will be able to select appropriate
technology to solve problems related to the completion of an electro-mechanical
design project. The student will be able to satisfy all functional design
specifications for this project.
OUTCOME 8:
• Having a knowledge of at least one systematic approach to the engineering design
process and having the tools and understanding for solving open-ended problems,
the student will be able to choose an electro-mechanical design project from a
variety of options with minimal constraints and submit a project proposal that
satisfies all of the constraints.
• Having a knowledge of at least one systematic approach to the engineering design
process and having the tools and understanding for solving open-ended problems,
the student will be able to solve at least one engineering design problem related
to a major component of the electro-mechanical design project. The student will
be able to document all steps in the systematic design approach in a formal report.
OUTCOME 11:
• Having a basic understanding of communication skills including those skills
specifically related to technical communication, students will be able to work in
multi-member teams during the course of a semester to complete successful
electro-mechanical design projects.
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OUTCOME 12:
• Having access to all Penn State information technology and communication
resources, students will be able to do professional technical research and adapt
design concepts and change design strategies to overcome problems arising
during project development.
Suggested Texts:
There are no specific texts recommended for this course.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this
course:
• Understanding of fundamentals of electrical power and machines, analog and
digital electronics, instrumentation, and sequential and feedback control concepts.
• Understanding of fundamentals of computer-aided drafting, statics and dynamics,
properties and strengths of engineering materials, machine design concepts, and
production principles.
• Ability to use computers to prepare written reports, perform basic data reduction,
graph and present engineering data, and perform complex engineering analyses of
electrical, electronic, and mechanical systems.
Course Topics:
•
•
•
•
•
The following activities should be required as part of any student design project.
Project conceptualization and formal design proposal
Development and maintenance of formal project schedule, including goals,
milestones, and resource commitments
Formal written reports and oral presentations documenting progress, final design
details, and final project demonstration
Completion of project through successful demonstration of compliance with
proposed design goals
Computer Use:
Students are expected to use computers to prepare design drawings using appropriate
CAD software; solve complex engineering problems that arise during design using
appropriate analysis software; develop, test, debug, and load automated control
programs used in the electro-mechanical design project; and prepare reports and
presentations using standard word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use/Research Students are required to use library technical resources and electronic data resources to
retrieve information necessary to complete a successful design.
Requirements:
Course Assessment:
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• OUTCOMES 7, 8, 11, & 12: Demonstration of a successful, working design that
complies with pre-defined criteria provides broad evidence of accomplishment of
these outcomes.
Course Coordinator:
Bruce Muller, Senior Instructor in Engineering, Penn State Altoona College,
[email protected]
October 25, 2005
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IET 105 – Economics of Industry
Standard Course Outline (Updated – Spring 2006)
Catalog Description:
IET 105: Economics of Industry
(2 credits). Internal economics of industrial enterprise, cost factors, and methods of
comparing alternate proposals.
Goals of the Course:
Economics of Industry is a required course for senior-level students in the ElectroMechanical Engineering Technology (EMET) baccalaureate degree program. The
purpose of the course is to teach students the fundamentals of the application of financial
analysis formulas to decisions regarding monetary investments in engineering machines
or processes. The course starts out by covering interest tables, cash flow diagrams, and
fundamental engineering factors and formulas. It proceeds to several classical methods
for evaluating the favorability of pursuing potential engineering investments. It then
makes use of these methods for comparing alternative investments. Breakeven and
depreciation studies complete the course material.
Relationship to
EMET Program
Outcomes:
IET 105 contributes to the following EMET program outcomes:
• Students should recognize the social, economic, safety, quality, reliability, and
ethical issues in the work environment. (Outcome 9)
Course Outcomes:
The specific course outcomes supporting the program outcomes are:
OUTCOME 9:
• Students will be able to compute financial calculations including simple and
compound interest, equivalence, present worth, and annuities. They will do so
using the pertinent standard engineering economy equations assisted by a
calculator and/or computer program. The monetary results will be calculated to
within a few percent of the exact values.
• Students will be able to judge the attractiveness of proposed investments by
analyzing cash flow, present worth, annual worth, and return on investment.
This will be done using the pertinent engineering economy equations and a
calculator or software. The monetary results will be within a few percent of the
exact values and the alternatives chosen will be the correct ones.
• Students will be able to select among alternatives for depreciation accounting
and computing economic risk. This will be done using the pertinent
engineering economy equations and a calculator or software. The monetary
values will be calculated to within a few percent of the exact values and the
alternatives chosen will be the correct ones.
Suggested Text:
The following is a suitable text for this course:
• Blank, L. and Tarquin, A., Engineering Economy, McGraw-Hill.
Prerequisites by
Topic:
Students are expected to have the following topical knowledge upon entering this course:
• Know how to calculate numerical answers to equations using a scientific
calculator.
• Know how to use software to manipulate data to produce a desired result (e.g.
EXCEL spreadsheet program).
• Know how to linearly interpolate to get values from tabular data (e.g. the interest
tables).
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Course Topics:
Coverage times shown in parentheses are suggestions only.
Note – One hour as indicated here represents one 50-minute class.
• Introduction: Overview; simple and compound interest; rate of return; minimum
attractive rate of return; equivalence; terminology and symbols; cash flow
diagrams; using software for solutions. (2 hours)
• Compound Interest Factor Usage: Compound interest factors (F/P, P/F, P/A,
A/P, A/F, F/A) and their application; the P/G and G/P factors and their
application; interpolation in the interest tables; determination of unknown interest
rate or unknown number of years. (2 hours)
• Engineering Economics Problems: Calculations involving one or more shifted
uniform series plus randomly placed single amounts; calculations involving
shifted gradients (increasing or decreasing). (2 hours)
• Nominal and Effective Interest Rates: Calculation of effective interest rate;
payment period (PP) and compounding period (CP); problems involving PP<CP
or PP<CP. (2 hours)
• Present Worth Analysis: Comparing two or more mutually exclusive alternatives
using PW analysis (equal lives and different lives); capitalized cost comparisons;
life cycle; PW of bonds. (2 hours)
• Annual Worth Analysis: Comparison of two or more mutually exclusive
alternatives using AW analysis (equal lives and different lives); AW analysis of
permanent investments. (2 hours)
• Rate of Return (ROR) Analysis: Rate of return; calculation of the ROR of a
single project using the PW or AW approach. (2 hours)
• ROR Analysis for Two or More Alternatives: Overview; incremental cash flow
table and diagram; ROR on extra investment; calculation of incremental rate of
return using PW or AW approach. (2 hours)
• Benefit to Cost Ratio Analysis: Benefit, dis-benefits, and cost components; B/C
analysis for a single project; evaluating alternatives by using incremental B/C
analysis. (2 hours)
• Replacement and Retention Studies: Motivation for the studies; equal life and
unequal life alternatives; AW and PW approaches; opportunity cost and cash
flow options; two or more challengers; using a study period; calculating the
economic service life. (2 hours)
• Breakeven Analysis: Overview; breakeven analysis for a single project;
breakeven analysis involving two or more alternatives. (2 hours)
• Depreciation Methods: Terminology; the straight line, declining balance, and
double declining balance depreciation methods; the modified accelerated cost
recovery system (MACRS) method; depletion studies. (2 hours)
Computer Use:
The course instructor may request that the students perform Engineering Economy
analysis using an appropriate software package (e.g. EXCEL) as well as by setup on
paper followed by computations using a calculator.
Course Grading:
Course grading policies are left to the discretion of the individual instructor.
Library Use
The course instructor may assign the students one or more research papers related to
safety, reliability, and ethical issues within the engineering profession. This will require
the use of the internet or Library technical data bases.
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Course Assessment
The following may be useful methods for assessing the success of this course in
achieving the intended outcomes listed above:
• In-class examinations.
• Research papers involving specific topics.
• Homework problems exercising engineering economics approaches to
investment decisions.
Interim* Course
Coordinator:
Donald E. Coho, Instructor of Engineering, York ([email protected])
*A replacement for this course in the 4EMET curriculum with an EMET 3XX course
number is under development.
October 31, 2004
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