A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area

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2nd Edition - May 2010
Acknowledgments
This booklet, which has been developed by the Mid West Mental Health
Alliance, has drawn on information from a number of publications developed
in recent years.
These publications and their authors are kindly acknowledged below:
• An Introduction to Victoria’s Public Clinical Mental Health Services Department of Human Services
• Information for Consumers and Carers - North West Area Mental Health
Service
• Information for Consumers and Carers - St Vincent’s Mental Health
Service
• More About Psychiatric Services - Outer East Area Mental Health Service
• Referral Guide - Information for primary care providers wanting to
access mental health services - Mid West Adult Mental Health Service
(Primary Mental Health Team)
• The Gateway - Werribee Mercy Mental Health Program
• TIPS - Mid West Area Mental Health Service
The following partner agencies of the Mid West Mental Health Alliance are
also gratefully acknowledged for their input into the development of this
resource:
The information contained in this booklet is true and correct at the time of printing,
however, agency and contact details are subject to change. Information relating to
legal advice should not be used in replacement of expert advice as social security
laws and procedures change frequently.
© NorthWestern Mental Health - 2010
Please visit: www.nwmh.mh.org.au (Partnership Projects) to download the latest version of the
guide and other useful Alliance resources.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Contents
Common Abbreviations ___________________________________ page 5
About The Mid West Mental Health Alliance __________________ page 6
Other Important Partnerships_______________________________ page 7
Purpose of this Booklet ___________________________________ page 9
The Victorian Mental Health System - An Overview ____________ page 10
Mid West Area Mental Health Service:
An Overview ___________________________________________ page 11
MWAMHS Services _____________________________________ page 12
MWAMHS Service Entry Flowchart_________________________ page 19
Other Key Roles at MWAMHS _____________________________ page 20
Rights and Responsibilities - Consumers, Carers, Staff __________ page 22
Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services (PDRSS):
An Overview ___________________________________________ page 26
MIND Australia _________________________________________ page 29
Norwood Association ____________________________________ page 37
Western Region Health Centre _____________________________ page 40
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Links to Other Specialist Care Providers:
GPs and Private Mental Health Specialists ____________________ page 51
Forensicare - Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health _______ page 52
Spectrum - The Personality Disorder Service for Victoria_________ page 54
Substance Use and Mental Illness Treatment Team (SUMITT) ____ page 57
Victorian Dual Disability Service ___________________________ page 58
Orygen Youth Health – Clinical Services _____________________ page 61
MWAMHS & PDRSS - An Alliance for Everyone’s Benefit:
Case Managers & Key Workers - Who Does What? _____________ page 65
Guidelines for Communication Between MWAMHS and PDRSS __ page 69
Other Useful Information:
Explanations of Frequently Used Terms ______________________ page 70
Important Telephone Numbers______________________________ page 73
Useful Internet Sites ______________________________________ page 76
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Common Abbreviations
Throughout this booklet names and terms have been abbreviated. These
abbreviations are used often by staff, and the following list may help you make
sense of the jargon.
AOD
AMHRU
CATT
CCT
CCU
CTO
D2DL
ECT
ED
EPPIC
GP
ISP
IPP
MO
MSTS
MWAMHS
OT
PDRSS
PHAMS
RAP
RPN
SAAPU
SW
SUMITT
WRHC
Alcohol and Other Drug Agencies
Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit
Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team
Continuing Care Team
Community Care Units
Community Treatment Order
Day to Day Living Program
Electro Convulsive Therapy
Emergency Department
Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre
General Practitioner
Individual Service Plan (used by clinical services)
Individual Program Plan (used by PDRSS services)
Medical Officer
Mobile Support and Treatment Service
(commonly called "MST")
Mid West Area Mental Health Service
Occupational Therapist
Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation Support Service
Personal Helpers & Mentors Service
Recovery Action Plan
Registered Psychiatric Nurse
Sunshine Adult Acute Psychiatric Unit
Social Worker
Substance Use Mental Illness Treatment Team
Western Region Health Centre
Later in this booklet there is a more detailed summary of commonly used terms
(see “Explanations of Frequently Used Terms” section)
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About the Mid West Mental Health Alliance
The Mid West Mental Health Alliance is part of a statewide DHS project that
aims to strengthen the organisational partnership between clinical mental health
services and Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services (PDRSS),
in order to improve recovery and rehabilitation outcomes for shared adult
consumers with mental illness and associated psychosocial disability.
The Mid West Alliance has been established by the Mid West Area Mental
Health Service (MWAMHS), in partnership with Mind, Norwood Association
and Western Region Health Centre. The Alliance, which covers the LGAs of
Brimbank and Melton and the Townships of Sunbury and Bulla, is of particular
relevance to clinical bed based and case management services, and PDRSS home
based outreach, day programs and residential rehabilitation services.
The project aims to maximise recovery, rehabilitation and continuity of care
outcomes for the target consumer group by:
1. Building better working relationships at the management and staff level,
which will improve the level of collaboration, coordination and
integration between the clinical and PDRS service sectors.
2. Supporting the implementation of practice reforms that will provide
tangible and sustainable benefit to the consumer group (e.g. information
exchange, developing shared rehabilitation plans, joint staff training, etc.)
3. Encouraging innovation in service system delivery.
4. Maximising recovery and rehabilitation by including carers and families
as part of the partnership team.
The Mid West Mental Health Alliance partners are committed to working
together, as we are all part of the mental health service system. This means that
our shared clients will be identified, well supported across the range of their
individual needs, and most importantly be at the centre of all our care planning,
intervention and review processes.
This means that we will all need to:
•
•
•
Respect, support and enhance the contribution each agency makes to the
consumer’s treatment, rehabilitation and recovery.
Improve the frequency and ways we communicate and share information.
Work collaboratively to assess consumer needs and carer/family supports to
plan and deliver services, and streamline referral pathways.
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Other Important Partnerships
A number of additional key partnerships exist between Alliance member agencies
and other local community and health service providers:
Discharge Protocols Between Western Melbourne Division of General
Practice and MWAMHS
This is a protocol that describes agreed ways of working together between
clinicians of Mid West Area Mental Health Service and GPs working in the City
of Brimbank, the Shire of Melton and the Sunbury part of Hume. Its aim is to
ensure consumers receive continuous high quality mental health care, through:
• Engaging in discharge planning as early as possible in a person’s treatment,
and in collaboration with the person, their carers, and others involved in the
person’s care and treatment.
• Providing written and verbal information in relation to treatment to the
person while engaged with AMHS.
• Providing written and verbal information about treatment to the person being
discharged to their GP and other relevant service providers.
• Coordinating the discharge process to ensure continuity of care and the
appropriate level of care to ensure a successful transition.
Mental Health Housing Inter-Agency Protocol Agreement
This is a service agreement between Sunshine Office of Housing, Salvation Army
Social Housing Service (Western Metropolitan Region), Mid West Area Mental
Health Service, Norwood Association and Western Region Health Centre. The
aim of this agreement is to develop a collaborative, early intervention approach to
service delivery to improve outcomes for public housing tenants who are mental
health clients in the City of Brimbank and Shire of Melton.
Effective coordination of an individual’s health care and housing support relies on
the sharing of personal information between the partner service providers. In
particular, early notification to partner agencies is essential in the provision of
early intervention support for clients whose tenancies may be at risk (e.g. a person
may become unwell and have difficulty making rental payments).
This protocol seeks to promote a climate of mutual cooperation, professional
respect and goodwill between the partner service providers with regard to
information sharing, while at the same time keeping the best interests of the
tenants as the primary focus.
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Families where a Parent has a Mental Illness (FaPMI) Initiative
The Families where a Parent has a Mental Illness Initiative promotes family
focused practice through workforce training, development and networking, to
ensure timely identification and referral to support services and ultimately reduce
possible negative impacts of parental mental illness on the family.
The initiative has three objectives:
1. To increase the capacity of specialist mental health services (clinical and
Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services) to provide a family
focused response to the parenting needs of their consumers and to the needs of
their children.
2. To increase the capacity of specialist mental health service network partners to
recognise and respond appropriately to parental mental illness.
3. To establish and strengthen the capacity of networks and support structures
involving mental health services and their network partners, to support the
needs of all family members through collaborative approaches to service
provision. This process also occurs in partnership with consumers and carers.
The Melton Brimbank FaPMI initiative is comprised of Mid West Area Mental
Health Service, Norwood Association, SUMMITT, the Royal Children’s Hospital
Mental Health Program and the member agencies of the Melton Brimbank Child
First and Integrated Family Services Alliance.
The Integrated Rehabilitation & Recovery Care Service West (IRRCS West)
A Department of Health initiative to develop a cohesive and collaborative clientcentered recovery and rehabilitation service framework. It brings together clinical
mental health and PDRSS to improve support for long-term residents of the
Secure Extended Care Unit (AMHRU) and the four Community Care Units in the
Western Metropolitan Area Mental Health catchments.
IRRCS West involves the coordination/collaboration of clinical and PDRSS
services (as well as other services as required) to: stabilise clients’ housing,
health, social connection and safety issues; pursue planned and consistent
therapeutic goals for each individual; and provide a platform for long term
sustainable engagement in the broader recovery and rehabilitation service system.
Key partners include: The Western Region Health Centre (lead agency); North
Western Mental Health (Mid West, North West & Inner West Area Mental Health
Services); Norwood Association; Doutta Galla Community Health Service;
Werribee Mercy Mental Health Program; Mind; Dianella Community Health; and
Moreland Community Health Service.
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Purpose of this Booklet
This booklet is designed to help workers familiarise themselves with the different
mental health services operating in the Mid West area, as well as support them in
developing collaborative working relationships to improve rehabilitation and
recovery outcomes for shared consumers and their carers.
This booklet contains:
•
Information about clinical mental health services, PDRSS and other specialist
care providers operating in the Mid West area.
•
Descriptions of worker roles and responsibilities.
•
Guidelines for communication between MWAMHS and PDRSS with respect
to the exchange of shared consumer information.
•
Explanations of commonly used terms in the mental health system.
•
Phone and website listings of other relevant health and support services.
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The Victorian Mental Health System - An Overview
Mental health systems vary from state to state. The Victorian public mental health
service system primarily consists of clinical and psychiatric disability
rehabilitation and support services. It responds to the framework of the National
Mental Health Plan 2003-2008.
•
Clinical mental health services are government funded and managed by
public hospitals. These services provide assessment, diagnosis, treatment,
rehabilitation and clinical case management to people with a serious
mental illness; and include both residential and non-residential
components. Clinical mental health services are collectively known as
Area Mental Health Services (AMHS).
•
Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services (PDRSS)
are managed by non-government organisations in the community and
receive government funding. They provide psychosocial assessment,
rehabilitation and recovery support through a range of individual and
group programs. PDRSS program types include: psychosocial
rehabilitation day programs, home-based outreach support, residential
rehabilitation, supported accommodation, planned respite services,
mutual support and self-help services, and carer support. PDRSS are
designed to complement the clinical mental health services and differ
from general community support services through the expertise necessary
for understanding and working with the effects of mental illness.
•
A number of regional and statewide specialist care providers have also
been established to focus on particular problems and disorders, such as
substance abuse issues, personality disorders, mentally ill offenders, and
people who have a mental illness and an intellectual disability. These
services are funded to develop and disseminate best practice and service
models for working with consumers who have particular needs. They
typically engage in direct care, consultation, education and training, and
research.
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Mid West Area Mental Health Service (MWAMHS)
An Overview
Mid West Area Mental Health Service (MWAMHS) is the public mental health
service for people living in the cities of Brimbank and Melton and the townships
of Sunbury and Bulla. The map below shows the region covered.
The Mid West Area Mental Health Service offers:
• Treatment and care for people aged between 18-65 years, who are
experiencing a serious mental illness.
• Assistance, education and support for people who live with a mental illness/
mental health problems.
• Ongoing education and support for families/ friends in their caring role.
• Integrated care across the various hospital, residential and community-based
services.
Source: www.health.vic.gov.au/mentalhealth/services/adult/map-nw.htm
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MWAMHS Services
Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team (CATT)
Service Description:
This multidisciplinary team is made up of 4 components (Triage, CATT, ECATT,
and Consultation and Liaison Psychiatry):
The Mid West Area Triage Service is the single point of contact for people
wishing to engage with Mid West Area Mental Health Service, either in regards
to themselves or someone they are concerned about. Triage provides the initial
assessment of needs, risks and urgency, along with initiating and coordinating
service response where appropriate. Triage will provide callers with alternate
referral options and advice if there appears to be no or limited mental health
issues. Triage is a telephone referral service only - they do not see 'walk-ins', and
will not accept faxed referrals without telephone contact.
*Please note that as from August 2010, Triage will move to a centralised
service for the North and West region. After this time, the current phone
number will automatically redirect to the new service for the first 6 months.
All initial referrals to Mid West Area Mental Health Service
(with the exception of PMHT) are processed by Triage Services
Tel:
1300 859 764 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
The Mid West Area CATT Service provides a 24-hour, 7 day a week service for
people who are experiencing a psychiatric crisis. It is a short-term intensive
home-based treatment service, but does not provide an instant emergency service.
CATT treatment is the first step before admission to hospital, and it also assists in
an early discharge management program to reduce the length of hospital stays.
ECATT provides a 24-hour, 7 day a week service for all people who present to the
Emergency Department at Sunshine Hospital in a state of psychiatric crisis.
ECATT also attends to all psychiatric referrals from emergency physicians at the
hospital.
Consultation and Liaison Psychiatry services are provided at both Western and
Sunshine Hospitals, where clinicians provide psychiatric expertise within acute
general health care settings.
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Entry Criteria for CATT Services:
• Meets entry criteria for Mental Health Act 1986
• Lives in the Brimbank or Melton LGAs, or townships of Sunbury or
Bulla
• Aged between 18-65
• Presentation indicates acute mental illness or significant deterioration in
mental state (inclusive but not limited to psychotic disorders, mood
disorders and suicidality)
Referrals:
• Access to CATT is via Triage only - they will determine appropriateness
of referral. Triage can be contacted on: 1300 859 764 (24 hours a day, 7
days a week).
Sunshine Adult Acute Psychiatric Unit
Service Description:
Sunshine Adult Acute Psychiatry Unit (SAAPU) provides short-term care to
people in an acute phase of mental illness, within a multi-disciplinary framework.
Services involve assessment and treatment that focuses on individual needs and
goals developed in conjunction with the patient, such as management of an
ongoing illness, development of coping skills and relapse prevention. The unit is
located at Sunshine Hospital and has 25-beds (5 high dependency beds and 20
low dependency beds). Average length of stay is 12 days.
Entry Criteria:
• Clients in acute stage of psychiatric illness, or acute situational crisis
with associated risk of harm to self or others
• Requires a period of close observation/intensive investigation and
treatment which cannot be provided in the community
Referrals:
• Admission to the Unit is via CATT or MWAMHS Triage.
Contact SAAPU:
Sunshine Hospital (Entrance via Majorca St)
Furlong Road, St Albans, Victoria, 3021 (Melways: 26, E5)
PO Box 294, St Albans 3021
Tel:
8345 1260
Fax:
8345 1261
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Continuing Care Team (CCT)
Service Description:
The Continuing Care Team (CCT) provides assessment and treatment services
through a case management system to adults aged between 16-65 years. Case
Managers coordinate an individual's care, which may include counselling,
psychiatric review, education, assistance with recreation or employment, working
with families and other carers, and other specific therapeutic interventions. They
also provide an initial assessment for people requesting assistance where the
Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team (CATT) is not required.
Entry Criteria:
• A diagnosed severe mental illness, including schizophrenia spectrum
disorders, severe mood disorder (e.g. with psychotic features), severe
personality disorder
• Current symptoms
• A history of hospitalisation or at risk of hospitalisation
• Ongoing psychosocial disability
• Prone to relapse or non-compliance without CCT involvement
• Cognitive Impairment as a result of mental illness, i.e. judgement,
disorganisation, etc.
• Significant and ongoing risk factors or co-morbid disorders, such as
substance abuse
• Engage other health and welfare services significantly (or complex needs
requiring multiple agency involvement)
• Present difficulties for General Practitioners, private psychiatrists or
disability support services to manage
• People who are on a Community Treatment Order are automatically
accepted for treatment
Exclusion Criteria
• Clients who are stable, engaged in treatment, functioning well in their
daily activities or experiencing lower levels of disability are referred to
other service providers
• Clients with diagnosis of a high prevalence disorder such as depression
or anxiety disorders. The PMHT provides consultation, support and some
direct treatment through shared cared with primary care providers. Crisis
intervention for these disorders is provided through CATT.
• Referrals for assessment where a diagnosis of severe mental illness has
not been established. While it is possible to offer a clarifying assessment
interview to support primary care and community support services
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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•
•
through PMHT or CCT, for people in crisis where the diagnosis is not
clear, ongoing assessment is more appropriately a CATT function.
People with substance abuse problems, an intellectual disability or ABI
without a co-morbid psychiatric illness
People with forensic issues who present an unacceptable worker safety
risk for community case management
Referrals:
• Admission to the CCT is through MWAMHS Triage. They can be
contacted on: 1300 768 073 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week).
Contact CCT:
4A Devonshire Road, Sunshine 3020 (Melways: 26, H12)
Tel:
9288 7000
Fax:
9310 2556
Mobile Support and Treatment Service (MSTS)
Service Description:
The Mobile Support and Treatment Service provides intensive home-based
outreach and rehabilitation services for people with severe psychiatric disability.
The service aims to assist people who are especially prone to relapse and
hospitalisation, who require more support than what is available through clinic
based care (i.e. the Continuing Care Team). The team operates 7 days per week
and focuses on improving independent living skills and reducing time spent in
hospital.
Entry Criteria:
• Moderate to severe mental illness
• Seriously impaired ability to function independently in the community
• Requires more than one contact visit per week
Referrals:
• Entry via CCT and other internal MWAMHS programs, plus some
external mental health programs
Contact MSTS:
4A Devonshire Road, Sunshine 3020 (Melways: 26, H12)
Tel:
9288 7000
Fax:
9310 2556
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Community Care Units (CCU)
Service Description:
An 8-unit complex, accommodating 20 beds with 24-hour support from a
multidisciplinary team. CCU provides psychosocial rehabilitation for people with
long-term mental illness in a community-based residential setting. Using a
recovery framework, the aim of the community care unit is to assist individuals to
develop the daily living skills they require to live independently.
Entry Criteria:
• Moderate to severe psychiatric illness and disability
• Needs rehabilitation in a community based residential program setting
Referrals:
• Via MWAMHS MSTS
Contact CCU:
38 Evergreen Avenue, St Albans 3021 (Melways: 25, C1)
Tel:
9365 3000
Fax:
9365 3011
Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit (AMHRU)
Service Description
The Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit provides 26 secure extended care
beds that are delivered on a regional catchment basis and has active links with the
4 referring Area Mental Health Services across Melbourne.
The unit provides medium to long term in-patient treatment and recovery for
clients with unremitting and severe symptoms of mental illness. It represents the
highest level of care on the continuum of mental health services and provides
treatment, supervision and support for those whose needs cannot be met
adequately by other available programs and services.
Collaborative relationships are in place with a wide range of local providers
including PDRSS, GPs, Community Health Services and Housing providers to
meet the multiple needs of each client. We endeavour to assist clients to improve
their quality of life by achieving their desired optimum level of functioning to
facilitate community reintegration.
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Referrals:
Access to AMHRU is by referral from the Mobile Support and Treatment Team
of each AMHS.
Entry Criteria:
• Severe and enduring psychiatric illness and disability
• Unable to sustain community placement
• Needs rehabilitation in a highly supported environment
Contact Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit:
Sunshine Hospital (Entrance via Majorca St)
Furlong Road, St Albans, Victoria, 3021 (Melways: 26, E5)
Tel (BH):
8345 1220
Tel (AH):
8345 1231
Fax:
8345 1900
Primary Mental Health Team (PMHT)
Service Description
The PMHT provides primary, secondary and tertiary consultation to primary care
providers. These include GPs, Community Health Service counsellors, ISIS
CAPS & Linkages Program and Melton-Brimbank Child First and Family Service
Alliance agencies. The team also provides time-limited treatment on a shared care
basis with primary care providers for people with high prevalence disorders (i.e.
anxiety, depression) and eating disorders. The aim of the PMHT is to enhance the
capacity of primary health care service providers to assist people experiencing
high prevalence mental disorders and eating disorders, and promote greater
collaboration between primary care and mental health services.
Entry Criteria:
• The primary care provider’s service is located in the Mid West Area
Mental Health Service catchment area (Brimbank, Melton, Sunbury), or
in the case of ISIS Caps & Linkages Program and the Melton Brimbank
Child First and Family Services Alliance agencies, the client resides in
the MWAMHS catchment area.
• The primary care provider is able to work with the PMHT on site at their
service for primary consultation and treatment.
• The primary care provider is working with people with high prevalence
disorders and eating disorders. Secondary consultation is provided via
phone or on site at the primary care provider’s service.
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•
•
Primary and secondary consultation will also be provided when there is a
diagnostic dilemma.
Education and training to primary care providers is via direct negotiation
with the Team Manager.
Contact PMHT:
4A Devonshire Road, Sunshine 3020 (Melways: 26, H12)
Tel:
9288 7000
Fax:
9310 2556
Prevention and Recovery Care Centre (PARC)
Service Description:
PARC services are a new supported residential service for people experiencing a
significant mental health problem but who do not need or no longer require an
acute hospital admission. In the continuum of care, they sit between adult acute
psychiatric inpatient units and a client’s usual place of residence. PARC aims to
assist in averting acute inpatient admissions and facilitate earlier discharge from
inpatient units. They are not a substitute for an inpatient admission; rather they
provide clinical treatment and short-term residential support.
The Burnside PARC is a 20-bed facility that operates in partnership with Mercy
Mental Health, Western Region Health Centre, Norwood Association and Mid
West Area Mental Health Service. Estimated length of stay for patients would
generally not exceed 28 days.
Referrals:
• Via local AMHS Crisis and Assessment Team
Contact Burnside PARC:
54 Burnside Street Deer Park, 3023 (Melways: 25, E8)
Tel:
8390 3400
Fax:
8390 3498
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MWAMHS Service Entry Flowchart
(Source: Referral Guide - Information for primary care providers wanting to access mental
health services. Produced by the Primary Mental Health Team at Mid West AMHS)
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Other Key Roles within MWAMHS
Area Manager - oversees the operational function of the MWAMHS.
Director of Clinical Services - is a registered Consultant Psychiatrist who works
in partnership with the Area Manager to ensure the delivery of a safe and high
standard of clinical care.
Consultant Psychiatrist - is a registered, qualified senior medical practitioner
who has undertaken further extensive specialised training in the diagnosing,
treatment and management of mental illness.
Psychiatric Registrar - is a registered, qualified medical practitioner who is
training to become a psychiatrist.
Program Manager - manages the day-to-day running of the individual programs.
The six programs that have a Program Manager are the Adult Inpatient Unit,
Crisis and Assessment Treatment Team, Mobile Support and Treatment Team,
Continuing Care Team, Community Care Unit and PMHT.
Triage Worker - is a mental health professional that is available by phone to
assist with any new referrals to MWAMHS.
Duty Worker - is a health professional who provides support, information and
referral to current and recent consumers within the CCT and MST services, when
the Case Manager is unavailable. This service operates during business hours.
Administration Workers - are present at reception and greet the public at all
services. They complete a wide variety of office duties, and provide clerical
support to the staff.
Consumer Consultant - is a person who has experienced being a consumer of
mental health services. The Consumer Consultant is available for consultation
across all services, and liaises with management and staff on consumer related
issues. The Consumer Consultant acts as an advocate for consumer issues within
the service to promote more consumer-focused practice.
Consumer Consultants can:
• Meet with consumers to get feedback on the service provided to them
• Facilitate consumer meetings
• Feedback concerns to management
• Become involved in service improvement projects
• Provide consumer perspective training to staff
• Promote consumer rights
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Carer Consultant - The Carer Consultants are staff members who have a family
member with a mental illness. They listen to and provide support to carers and act
as a resource to clinical, service and management staff.
Carer Consultants can:
• Meet with carers face to face and on the phone (with interpreters, as required)
• Provide information and practical support
• Assist carers to develop effective coping strategies
• Help carers communicate concerns to clinical staff
• Assist carers to recognise the early warning signs of relapse
• Administer the Carer Support Program - Brokerage Fund (applications can be
facilitated by any Mid West AMHS Manager, Clinician, Doctor or Carer
Consultant.)
• Notify carers about educational sessions within the service to help in the
caring role.
• Deliver training and education to staff and students (secondary and tertiary)
to provide the carer and family perspective on effective treatment,
rehabilitation and recovery.
• They also work with staff to improve the service’s response to carers, and
promote carer and family issues in the planning, development and evaluation
of MWAMHS.
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Rights and Responsibilities - Consumers, Carers, Staff
Guiding Principles
According to the Australian Charter of Healthcare rights, consumers and carers
are entitled to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Access - Access services to address their health care needs
Safety - Safe and high quality health services, provided with professional
care, skill and competence
Respect - The provision of care that respects individuals’ culture, beliefs,
values and personal characteristics
Communication - Open, timely and appropriate communication about health
care in a way that people can understand
Participation - Opportunities to contribute to decision making and choices
about their care and about health service planning
Privacy - Maintenance of personal privacy and proper handling of personal
health and other information
Feedback - Comment on or complain about care and have concerns dealt
with properly and promptly
Common Rights
All consumers, families/carers and staff have the right to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be and feel physically and emotionally safe.
Be treated with respect and dignity.
Be spoken to in a respectful manner.
Have an opinion, express an opinion and be listened to.
Be considerate of private time and space.
Not be discriminated against.
To have access to an interpreter as required.
Be respected with regard to the confidentiality and privacy of information
provided.
Common Responsibilities
All consumers, families/carers and staff share the following responsibilities:
•
•
•
•
To be aware of the rights of others.
To communicate openly and honestly with each other.
To discuss changes in condition and treatment plans.
To discuss and clarify diagnosis and treatment.
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•
•
•
•
To discuss and clarify side effects of treatment.
To work together to improve the effectiveness of treatment.
To ensure that people are treated in the least restrictive way possible.
To provide feedback on the service and or care in the form of suggestions,
compliments and or complaints.
Consumer Rights
Consumers have a right to:
•
•
•
•
•
Receive a copy of their rights, know their legal status, whether they are
voluntary or involuntary, and have their rights explained so that they
understand them.
Be informed about what is happening at all times and be involved in making
decisions about their treatment and care.
Receive information and ask questions so that they are able to fully
understand everything.
Know how to make suggestions, compliments and or complaints, and be
assisted to do this if it is needed.
Request an advocate to assist them.
Families and Carers Rights
Families and Carers have a right to:
•
•
•
•
Be recognised, respected and supported as partners in providing care to the
consumer.
Be involved in providing essential information to the clinician in the
assessment phase, and in the ongoing treatment and care of the consumer.
Receive training in the most effective ways to relate to consumers and
support their recovery.
Receive timely and easily understood information about the relevant mental
illness, its likely causes, treatment options and outcomes which are
reasonably required for the ongoing care of the consumer.
Staff Rights
Staff have the right to:
•
•
•
A safe and respectful workplace with freedom from discrimination and
harassment.
The opportunity for professional development.
The opportunity for supervision, training and support.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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The Mental Health Act
The Mental Health Act, 1986 requires all mental health services to work within
principles that include respect for people’s dignity and treatment in the least
restrictive environment.
The Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities
Human rights are the basic rights that belong to all of us. The Charter emphasizes
freedom, respect, equality and dignity.
Human rights are the foundation for freedom, justice, peace and respect and are
an essential part of any democratic and inclusive society that respects the rule of
law, human dignity and equality.
Everyone has the same human rights: men, women, and children, rich and poor,
and all nationalities and faiths.
Our human rights include:
• Civil and political rights
• Economic and social rights
• Environmental and cultural rights
Confidentiality and Privacy
Confidentiality is a high priority at MWAMHS. Staff are required to work under
the statutory requirements for protecting the confidentiality and privacy of
identifiable consumer information.
The following legislations govern the management of confidential and private
consumer information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Victorian Mental Health Act 1986 and Amendments
Guardianship and Administration Act 1986
Health Records Act 2001
Health Services Act 1988 (Section 141)
Information Privacy Act 2000
Freedom of Information Act 1982 and Amendments
Where two or more acts provide conflicting information, the Mental Health Act
supersedes all other acts.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Feedback
Comments about MWAMHS, both good and bad, are welcome and helpful to
staff.
If consumers/carers would like to make a compliment, complaint or a suggestion,
they can:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Speak with the Case Manager
Speak with the Program Manager
Speak with the Consumer Consultant
Speak with the Carer Consultant
Put a letter in the suggestion box
Post a completed feedback form or letter to:
Feedback Officer
4A Devonshire Road,
Sunshine VIC 3020
Every effort will be made by staff to resolve any complaints received and to
provide timely and thoughtful feedback.
There will be no negative consequences when complaints are made and all
comments are treated as confidential.
In the event of a complaint not being resolved, the following agencies may be
able to assist:
Mental Health Review Board
8601 5270
Community Visitors
9603 9500
Victoria Legal Aid
9269 0234
Mental Health Legal Centre
9629 4422
Chief Psychiatrist Office
1300 767 299
Ombudsman
9613 6222
The Public Advocate
9603 9500
Health Services Commissioner
8601 5200
This information has been adapted from the Statement of Rights and Responsibilities for Consumers,
Families/Carers and Staff brochure produced by NorthWestern Mental Health, in conjunction with VMIAC
and the Victorian Mental Health Carers Network (Jan, 2010).
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support
Services (PDRSS) in the Mid West Area
An Overview
Victoria has the largest non-government mental health sector in Australia. Known
as Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services (PDRSS), this sector
plays a vital role in supporting consumers and carers in accessing health,
accommodation support, psychosocial and vocational rehabilitation and recovery,
respite care and recreation services.
PDRSS are predominantly funded to provide support to the adult population (1664 years). The services aim to assist people to develop skills that will improve
their quality of life and independence, and provide opportunities for them to
participate in social, recreational, educational and vocational activities.
All PDRSS consumers are allocated a Key Worker. The Key Worker works with
consumers to identify specific goals and assist them in realising those goals. The
goals and the plan for achieving them are recorded in an Individual Program Plan
(IPP).
A Case Manager at the MWAMHS is the usual source of referral to a PDRSS,
however self-referral and referrals from GPs, private psychiatrists and other
services may also be accepted. People can also directly apply for PDRS services,
as these agencies have their own assessment processes to determine if people are
appropriate for their services.
Psychosocial Day Programs
Day programs provide activities and support for people experiencing the effects
of mental illness within environments that are supportive and foster recovery.
Activities and programs focus on social interaction, skill development, building
self-belief and awareness, as well as connecting people to the wider community.
Day programs offer both structured and informal ‘drop in’ services. Structured
activities may include sessional activities, such as: art and craft, women's or men's
personal development groups, educational and pre-vocational activities, and
recreational groups. Day programs generally operate five days a week, but some
also offer evening and weekend sessions. Consumers choose when and how
frequently they attend, depending on their interests and needs.
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Day programs are usually located in accessible community settings, near public
transport and shopping facilities. Many of the service activities take place in local
community facilities (e.g. neighbourhood houses, coffee shops, TAFE colleges,
gyms and community halls), and delivered in partnership with other community
services. This promotes community integration and ensures learning occurs in
everyday environments.
Home-Based Outreach Support
Home-based outreach services provide structured, time limited social and living
skills programs on an individual basis and in the person’s own home. Support
may also be provided in community settings where one-to-one support is
necessary (e.g. assistance accessing education, transport or recreation). The
service is available to all people, regardless of their type of housing or whether
they live by themselves or with others.
The PDRSS worker will assist with developing independent living skills, such as
cooking, cleaning, shopping and self-care. They may also accompany the person
in recreational and educational activities. Some home-based outreach services are
linked to public housing to provide accommodation and support packages.
Services are tailored to meet the needs of the individual and encourage
independence and self-determination.
Personal Helpers & Mentors
Personal Helpers and Mentors provide direct and personalised assistance through
outreach services, and support participants in their recovery journey by building
support relationships and providing holistic support. It supports participants to
better manage their daily activities and reconnect to their community through one
to one support, referral and linkages to appropriate health and community services
and engages with and supports family, carer and other relationships.
The program is open to people aged 16 years and over whose ability to manage
their daily activities and to live independently in the community is severely
impacted as a result of a severe mental illness. A person does not need to have a
formalised clinical diagnosis of a severe mental illness to initially access the
program.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Residential Rehabilitation
Residential rehabilitation services provide transitional accommodation and
support to assist consumers to develop independent living skills and facilitate
their transition back into the family home or into an independent living situation.
Consumers of a residential rehabilitation service will have a level of disability
that requires more intensive support than what is offered by home-based outreach
or day programs. Some residential rehabilitation services have staff who stay
overnight at the residence.
PDRSS Programs in the Mid West Area
A range of PDRSS operate in the Mid West area. Descriptions of these services
and the programs they offer will be explained in more detail in the following
pages.
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MIND Australia
MIND provides five major services to people living in Brimbank, Melton and
Sunbury, as well as to people in all other Western Metropolitan suburbs,
including Hume and Moreland. The age range for the community residential
services is 16-64 whereas the respite service is for people of all ages.
Appleby Crescent Service
A 24-hour residential and transitional support service for adults with serious
mental health issues
How Appleby Crescent Service does its work
The program at Appleby Crescent Service supports the recovery of people who
have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness. The program provides
residential support for individuals by working to foster independence and
responsibility in a supportive community. Appleby offers a recovery based mental
health program and should not be considered as an accommodation service. The
service also has a transitional worker who provides support for people entering
and leaving the service. The length of stay at Appleby Crescent Service is around
2 years. The program has staff available overnight for emergencies.
Who can live at Appleby Crescent Service?
The program is designed for adults from the Western Metropolitan Region of
Melbourne diagnosed with a serious mental illness. Program participants are
usually within the 20-50 age range, but may take adults up to 64 years. As clients
are required to share with two other residents, a level of personal independence
and competence in living skills is required.
Location and setting
The property at Appleby Crescent Service, situated in a residential part of West
Brunswick, consists of five, three bedroom, two-story townhouses with a shared
outside common area and a separate staff townhouse on the same property. The
service is located close to shops and public transport. Fees for service are set at
25% of income and a $40 a fortnight asset replacement charge.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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What the program aims to do
Appleby Crescent Service provides opportunities to its residents for skill
development, enhanced social relationships and community access. Each resident
is allocated a key-worker who provides support to achieve agreed recovery goals.
The program encourages accessing structured group activities in the community
and requires mandatory attendance at key-worker one-on-one appointments,
community and house meetings while residing in the Service.
Eligibility Criteria
Perspective clients must have the following criteria:
1. A serious mental health diagnosis
2. 18 - 64 years of age
3. Reside within the Western Metropolitan Region of Mind (Formerly The
Richmond Fellowship Victoria and South Australia)
Other eligibility considerations:
1. Current client profile within the Service
2. Desire to engage in recovery and/or rehabilitation
3. Ability to live in a shared environment
4. Out of region applications will be considered
Referral Procedure
Referrals can be made to the program by a mental health service, self-referral,
family member, friend or worker.
1. Initial Contact Form will be completed over the phone
2. A visit to the program arranged to provide further information
3. Referral forms are provided if the prospective applicant wishes to
continue with the intake process.
4. Completed referral forms received at Appleby Crescent Service
5. Decision by program to offer an interview or suggest more appropriate
referral options
6. After interview: offer of place in the program or reasons provided for
why a place has not been offered and alternative referral options
suggested
7. If no vacancies exist at the time of initial contact a place on the Service’s
waiting list will be offered
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Further information
Please contact Appleby Crescent Service:
Address: 21 Jolley St West Brunswick 3055 (Melways: 29, D5)
Hours: 9.00 am - 5.00 pm Monday to Friday
Phone: 03 9386 4055 Fax: 03 9386 4200
Email: [email protected]
Electra Street Community
A residential service for adults with mental health issues
What Electra Street Community does
The program at Electra Street Community supports the recovery of people who
have been diagnosed with a serious mental illness. The program provides
individual support as well as working to foster a supportive community. The
length of stay at Electra Street Community is for up to 3 years.
Who can live at Electra Street Community
The program is designed for adults from the Western Metropolitan Region of
Melbourne. Program participants are usually within the 20-35 age range, but may
take adults up to 64 years. As staff are not available overnight, a level of personal
independence and competence in living skills is required. The program is staffed
for limited hours on weekends.
Where
The property at Electra Street Community is situated in a residential part of
Williamstown and consists of separate men and women’s buildings, each housing
5 residents, and a separate staff office on the same property. Electra Street
Community is close to shops and public transport.
What the program aims to do
The program provides opportunities to its residents for skill development,
enhanced social relationships and community access. Each resident is allocated a
key-worker and they work together to achieve agreed recovery goals. There is
also a structured program at Electra Street Community, where residents are
expected to attend a number of meetings each week.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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How to access the program
Referrals can be made to the program by a mental health service, by self-referral,
or by a family member, friend or worker. As part of the selection process, there is
a visit to the program to provide information and to meet staff and residents.
Referral forms are provided if the prospective applicant wishes to continue with
the selection process. Prospective applicants are required to attend an assessment
interview before being offered a place at Electra Street Community.
Further information
Please contact Electra Street Community:
Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday.
Address: 47 Electra Street Williamstown 3016 (Melways: 56, C8)
Phone: 03 9397 1028
Fax:
03 9397 3399
Email: [email protected]
McPherson Community Dual Disability Service
A 24-Hour residential service for adults with intellectual disability and mental
health issues
What McPherson Community does
McPherson Community is the only Mind program that is funded by Disability
Services, and is one of only two residential programs in Victoria specifically for
people with co-existing intellectual and psychiatric disabilities. It is a 24-hour
service that includes a sleepover worker for emergencies.
Who can live at McPherson Community
Eligibility criteria include being registered with Disability Services as eligible for
service in the North-West Metropolitan Region of Melbourne, having an
intellectual disability, mental health issues, and being an adult. Program
participants are usually within the 30-60 age range.
Where
The property at McPherson Community supports six residents and has an office in
the house. McPherson Community is in Sunshine North and is in walking
distance from local shops and public transport.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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What the program aims to do
The program provides opportunities to its residents for skill development,
enhanced social relationships and community access. Each resident is allocated a
key-worker and they work together to achieve agreed recovery goals. Goals may
include budgeting, employment, independent living skills, accessing community
activities, and social and emotional well being.
The program also provides many opportunities for fun and rest. Recent examples
include interstate holidays, attending balls and dances, picnics and country drives.
How to access the program
Vacancies for McPherson Community come from DHS Disability Services
Register in the North- West region. Referrals for McPherson Community should
be directed to DHS Client Services Intake on 9412 2741.
Further information
Please contact McPherson Community:
Address: 19 Bangerang Sunshine 3020 (Melways: 26, F6)
Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday
Phone: 03 9310 2626
Fax:
03 9310 1240
Email: [email protected]
Victoria Street Program
A 24 hour residential service for adults with mental health issues
What Victoria Street Program does
The program at Victoria Street supports the recovery of people who have been
diagnosed with a serious mental illness. The program provides individual support
as well as working to foster a supportive community. The length of stay at
Victoria Street Program is for up to 3 years. The program has staff available
overnight for emergencies.
Who can live at Victoria Street Program
The program is designed for adults who have a serious mental illness from the
Western Metropolitan Region of Melbourne. Program participants are usually
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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within the 20-45 age range, but may take people up to 64 years. A level of
personal independence and competence in living skills is required. Participants
are expected to clean their own room, with the assistance of staff if needed. Staff
support participants to be involved in a roster to prepare and clean up after meals.
Where
The Victoria Street Program consists of a block of 17 flats, with staff offices on
site and a 3-bedroom house close by. Victoria Street Program is located in
Brunswick, situated minutes from Sydney Road and is close to shops and public
transport.
What the program aims to do
The program provides opportunities to its residents for skill development,
enhanced social relationships and community access. Each resident is allocated a
key-worker who provides support to achieve agreed recovery goals. Residents are
expected to meet with their Key Worker at least once a week and attend the
weekly community meeting.
How to access the program
Referrals can be made to the program by a mental health service, by self-referral,
by a family member, friend or worker. As part of the selection process there is a
visit to the program to meet staff and residents and to gain further information.
Referral forms are provided if the prospective applicant wishes to continue with
the selection process. Prospective applicants are required to attend an assessment
interview when a vacancy occurs in the program.
Further information
Please contact Victoria Street Program:
Address: 253 Victoria St Brunswick 3053 (Melways: 29, H7)
Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday
Phone: 03 9387 2133
Fax:
03 9388 2491
Email: [email protected]
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Western Respite Services
A planned Respite Service for people in the Western Metropolitan Region who
experience serious mental health issues, and their carers
What Western Respite Services does
The program at Western Respite Services supports the relationship between
people with a mental illness and their carers. We do this by offering planned
respite activities that can be an enjoyable and enriching experience for our
participants.
These include:
• Group holidays to various locations around Victoria;
• Day trips and activities;
• Family holidays for the client, carer and other family members;
• Individual respite sessions where a respite worker assists the client with
outings and access to community activities.
Western Respite clients
Clients of all ages who have a diagnosed mental illness that live in the Western
Metropolitan region including the local government areas of Brimbank, Hobson’s
Bay, Hume, Maribyrnong, City of Melbourne, Melton, Moonee Valley, Moreland
and Wyndham. The client must have an unpaid carer who is closely involved in
caring for and supporting them and would benefit from a respite break. A carer
maybe a parent, spouse, other family member, close friend or housemate.
Where
Generally the pre-holiday meeting venue and holiday pick-up and drop-off point
is our office at 14 Hall Street, Newport, 3015. Staff generally meet clients at their
homes and then go out, for individual respite sessions.
What the program aims to achieve
Western Respite Services aims to provide opportunities for clients on their road to
recovery by enhancing social relationships, providing new and exciting
experiences and at the same time giving carers a respite break.
How to access the program
Referrals can be made by medical practitioners, mental health services, clinics,
workers, carers or clients. After the referrals are received, an assessment
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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interview is arranged to ascertain the most appropriate service that meets the
needs of the client and their carer.
Further information
Please contact Western Respite Services:
Address: 14 Hall St, Newport 3015 (Melways: 55, K2)
Post:
P.O Box 1024, Newport, 3015
Hours: 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday
Phone: 9391 0144
Fax:
9391 0433
Email: [email protected]
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Norwood Association
Norwood provides rehabilitation and support services to adults (16-65 years of
age) who live with mental health issues and resulting disabilities, and who
reside within the communities of Brimbank, Melton and Sunbury. The services
provided to clients are via qualified Rehabilitation and Recovery Practitioners.
Norwood currently provides four programs:
Norwood Intensive Outreach Support Program
This is a home-based rehabilitation program that provides medium term (12-24
months) planned intensive rehabilitation.
The Norwood Intensive Outreach Support Program is available to people who:
• Experience severe, enduring psychiatric disabilities
• Are motivated to participate in structured support (4-6 hours per week)
• Are focused on relearning skills that will enable them to achieve greater
personal independence in the community
Norwood offers this support through an Individual Support Plan (ISP). The ISP
outlines personal goals and sets out strategies for skill development in the areas
of: independent living and household management; social and community access;
personal development; and leisure and recreational pursuits.
Home-Based Outreach Support Program
This program provides outreach support to people who desire to live
independently in the community with minimal support.
Planned support (up to 1-2 hours per week) is provided to individuals within their
own home and/or community environment. The emphasis of this support is
around consolidating and reinforcing an individual's strengths, abilities and
potential.
A key focus of this program is the linking of people with appropriate community
supports and developing and/or maintaining skills and abilities around:
• Independent living and home management
• Problem solving and motivation
• Personal and emotional support
• Social relationships
• Recreation and leisure
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This support program also includes the facilitation of educational, vocational and
personal development activities and pursuits.
Support is individualised to meet each person's needs and is provided through an
individual support plan and Rehabilitation and Recovery Practitioner.
Pathways Program
This is a voluntary and short-term intensive program that aims to create pathways
for people living with mental health issues, complex needs, and primary and
secondary homelessness.
The Pathways Program is available to individuals who:
• Have a diagnosed mental health condition and associated psychiatric
disability
• Are receptive to and motivated towards participating in structured
support arrangements which are aimed at rehabilitation and skill
enhancement
• Are currently experiencing homelessness or are at risk of homelessness
• Have been referred by a bed-based clinical service.
Brimbank Carers Group
The Brimbank Carers Group was formed in 2002 by MWAMHS and Norwood
Association in response to the needs of carers of people experiencing mental
health issues, who reside the City of Brimbank and other nearby localities. The
group meets monthly to attend a rotating program of activities comprised of
facilitated discussions and support, social activities (e.g. restaurant dinners) and
educational sessions (e.g. presentations by guest speakers). The aims of the group
are to provide family members and partners of people with a mental illness with
support, information, understanding and training to cope with and manage mental
illness and its effects.
Enquiries and Referrals:
Ph:
9365 9500
Hours: Monday to Friday, 10.00am - 4.00pm
Self-referral or referral from a family member or agency professional can only be
undertaken with the permission of the person being referred.
To make a referral please visit: www.connectingcare.com.au
Norwood Association does not provide clinical support treatment services,
however it works in collaboration with mental health professionals.
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Contact Norwood Association:
Norwood Centre
1 Andrea Street
St Albans Vic 3021 (Melways: 25, K2)
Ph:
9365 9500
Fax:
9310 7255
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.norwoodservices.org.au
Norwood
Association
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Western Region Health Centre
Western Region Health Centre (WRHC) delivers accessible, high quality, timely
and responsive psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery services to the Cities of
Brimbank and Melton, and Bacchus Marsh and Sunbury Communities.
Services include: structured group programs, youth residential rehabilitation,
outreach and carer support groups.*
Programs are organised across 4 main service teams:
• Brimbank Community Mental Health Team- incorporates Horizons Day
Program and the Mid West Day-to-Day Living Group Program.
• Melton and Bacchus Marsh Community Mental Health Teamincorporates Outlooks and Outbacc Day Programs and the Mid West
Day-to-Day Living Group Program.
• Hume Community Mental Health Team- incorporates Stepping Stones
Day Program in Sunbury and the Hume Outreach Support Program
(Personal Helpers and Mentors Program), which provides outreach to the
communities of Sunbury and Bulla in the Mid West catchment.
• ROCKET- Young Persons (16-24 yrs) Residential Rehabilitation
Program.
Consumer Participation
Consumer participation is highly valued, promoted and practiced. We view
consumer participation as a fundamental right, and understand that in order for
participation to occur in a meaningful way, we need to actively support it through:
• Ensuring that all staff enthusiastically encourage all consumers to
participate in a manner that is appropriate, relevant and meaningful
• Ensuring there are structures, policies and processes that enable
consumers to participate in a number of different ways.
• Involving consumers in decision-making processes, which allow them to
contribute to Individual Service Plans and in developing activity
Programs.
• Participant meetings and forums involving consumers in the evaluation
of our programs and activities.
• Running peer support and consumer facilitated activities.
*NB: WRHC also offers a range of mental health services for consumers residing outside the Mid West
catchment. For more information about these services, please visit the website: www.wrhc.com.au/
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Structured Group Programs
WRHC’s group programs include:
• Day Programs: Horizons, Outlooks, Outbacc and Stepping Stones
• Mid West Day to Day Living (D2DL) Group Programs: D2DL is a
Federal Government initiative for individuals with severe and persistent
mental illness. The program aims to improve health outcomes for people
who experience social isolation through the provision of structured and
socially-based recreational and educational activities in the community.
Overall Aims
To provide quality psychosocial group programs that:
• Enhance quality of life and independence
• Assist participants to meet self-determined goals, including areas of
social and living skill development
• Assist participants to develop more adaptive coping skills
• Facilitate participation in educational, recreational, personal and skill
development programs
• Maximise social, family and peer support networks, and community
connectedness.
Program Structure
Staff are committed to deliver an inclusive and welcoming service, building
trusting and supportive relationships that are based on mutual respect and the
following principles:
• Voluntary engagement
• Respect for choice, diversity and individual lifestyles
• Integrated and coordinated services
• Empowerment and participation
• Interpersonal relationships and community connectedness
• Family and cultural sensitive practice.
Participants attend a variety of time-limited education, recreational and social
groups, programs and activities of their choice. These activities and programs
focus on social interaction, skill development, building self-belief and awareness,
and connecting people to the wider community.
Through the use of the individual support plans (ISP), consumers are encouraged
to set their own rehabilitation goals, and access health and other relevant services
in the community.
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Examples of day program activities include:
• Drop in (social support, health and wellbeing information)
• Creative expression (art, craft and music)
• Personal development (interpersonal, communication and coping skills)
• Life skills coaching (budgeting, cooking and healthy eating, community
access, etc.)
• Social supports (peer support, mentoring and self-help)
• Vocational (pre-vocational courses, volunteering, return to work or
study)
• Specialist engagement (young persons group, Vietnamese group, African
youth street soccer)
Eligibility and Referral
WRHC group programs are generally available to people who:
• Are 16 years and over
• Experience mental health difficulties
• Have an inability or find it difficult to engage in one or more daily living
activities
• Have a willingness to participate in the program
• Live in designated catchment areas (Maribyrnong, Hobson’s Bay,
Melton, Brimbank, Hume or Wyndham)
Note: Specific eligibility and referral requirements may vary according to the
service type, catchment area and funding body. Please contact the relevant site
Duty Worker for specific details:
Hours of Operation
Office hours for all teams are from 9-5pm, Monday to Friday.
Contacts for WRHC group programs:
(Addresses and location maps are presented on following pages)
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Contact Brimbank Community Mental Health Team
Programs:
Horizons Day Program and Day-to-Day Living
Catchment:
Brimbank
Address:
2 Erica Avenue, St Albans, 3021 (Melways: 26, A1)
Ph:
9364 1455
Fax:
9364 5144
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Contact Melton and Bacchus Marsh Community Mental Health Team
Programs:
Outlooks and Outbacc Day Programs and D2DL (Melton only)
Catchment:
Melton and Bacchus Marsh
Address:
48 Unitt Street, Melton, 3337 (Melways: 337, A8)
Ph:
9747 6337
Fax:
9747 6339
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Contact Hume Community Mental Health Team
Program:
Stepping Stones Day Program
Catchment:
Hume
Address:
Suite 5, 33-35 Macedon Street, Sunbury 3429
(Melways: 382, F4)
Ph:
9971 6200
Fax:
9971 6299
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Youth Residential Rehabilitation (ROCKET)
ROCKET is a psychosocial residential rehabilitation service for people aged 1624 who are experiencing serious mental health issues. The service aims to help
people to develop the skills needed to live independently. Participants can be in
the program for up to two years and are supported in their steps towards
independent living and, where possible, helped to continue with their school or
work.
The service can accommodate up to 9 young people (three females and six
males). Key workers support participants in helping them to identify their goals
and strengths, develop skills and knowledge and access community resources.
ROCKET offers participants a range of individual and group based activities that
focus on:
Living skills:
• Communication and social skills
• Decision making and problem solving skills
• Recreation
• Reducing harm associated with substance use
Participants will also receive support to access:
• Local health and counselling services
• Education, training and employment services
• Local Council services
• Mental health services
• Housing services
• Drug and alcohol services
The program promotes diversity, choice, independence and participation for
young people.
Eligibility and Referrals
Services are generally available to young people who:
• Experience serious mental health difficulties
• Are 16 -24 years of age
• Require support to develop /enhance living and social skills to live
independently
• Have a willingness to participate in the program
• Live in or have strong links with the Western Metropolitan Region
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Any organisation, individual or family can make referrals.
Referral forms can be obtained by phoning the Community Mental Health
workers on-site on: 9310 9100
Following receipt of a referral, staff will make contact to arrange a meeting with
the applicant. During this meeting a structured assessment interview will be held
to determine the applicant's support needs and provide further information about
the program.
Orientation
Prior to taking up residence at ROCKET, successful applicants are required to
complete a six-week orientation. During this time the applicant will be invited to
participate in individual and group activities. They will also be asked to do a few
overnight sleepovers. The orientation ensures that potential participants are
familiar with the program before committing to move in.
Hours of Operation
ROCKET operates 24 hrs /day, seven days a week.
Staffing
Rocket is staffed 8.00am to 8.00pm weekdays, 11.00am to 7.00pm on Saturday
and Sunday. There are no staff overnight, however an on-call system is in place
for emergencies.
Costs incurred for participating in the program
Participants pay a service fee, which covers accommodation, food and utilities.
Contact ROCKET
(Address and location map are presented on following page)
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Contact ROCKET:
ROCKET YOUTH RESIDENTIAL REHABILITATION
Address:
5 Bent Street, St. Albans, 3021 (Melways: 26, A5)
Phone:
9310 9100
Fax:
9310 9200
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Hume Outreach Support Program (Personal Helpers and Mentor
Program)
Program Description
Provides time limited outreach services to people living (16 years+) with an
enduring mental illness.
Services are tailored to meet the needs of the individual and encourage
independence and self-determination. Assistance may include: advocacy and
liaison, problem solving skills/strategies, independent living skills, social and
emotional support, information and referral, access to health and other services,
and time-limited educational, recreational and social groups.
The emphasis is on recovery through community support and social connection,
and to support participants to better manage their daily activities and reconnect
with their community.
Referral
Any organisation, individual or family can make a referral.
Referral forms can be obtained by ringing the Duty worker at the Hume
Community Mental Health Team on: 9971 6200
Eligibility
Individuals aged 16+ years who:
• Reside within or has significant links within the City of Hume or the
Townships of Sunbury and Bulla.
• Whose ability to manage their daily activities and to live independently
in the community is severely impacted as a result of a severe mental
illness
• Note: A person does not need to have a formalised clinical diagnosis of a
severe mental illness to initially access the program
Hours of Operation
Office hours are from 9-5pm, Monday to Friday
Contact Details
Hume Community Mental Health Team
Address:
Suite 5, 33-35 Macedon Street, Sunbury 3429
(Melways: 382, F4) - See map on page 45 for further directions
Ph:
9971 6200
Fax:
9971 6299
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Melton Carer Support Groups
WRHC - Mid West Mental Health Program facilitates two carer support groups in
the Melton Community:
• Melton Mental Health Carer Support Group
• Melton Young Carer Support Group
Carer Support Groups offer families, friends and other relatives the opportunity to
learn more about mental illness: to talk with others in similar situations, to share
ideas on coping, and learn about support services available. The groups are
affiliated with Outlooks and receive support and funding from Carers Victoria.
Anticipated Benefits
Psychosocial programs at Outer Western provide some of the following benefits:
• Improvement in confidence and self-esteem
• Development of social networks
• Improved general health and fitness
• Development of living skills
• Opportunities to engage in study or return to work
Enquiries and Referral
Melton and Bacchus Marsh Community Mental Health Team Leader
Catchment:
Melton and Bacchus Marsh
Address:
48 Unitt Street, Melton, 3337 (Melways: 337, A8)
Ph:
9747 6337
Fax:
9747 6339
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GPs and Private Mental Health Specialists
MWAMHS and PDRSS have links with many other care providers, creating a
broad support network for consumers and carers. These include private GPs
and psychiatrists, community health services and local government.
General Practitioners (GPs)
GPs are usually the first point of contact for people and their carers experiencing
a mental illness. They can offer continuous care throughout the person’s recovery.
They are able to access information and additional supports for the consumer and
their carers.
Private Psychiatrists
An appointment with a private psychiatrist is via GP referral. Having a referral
means the Medicare rebate can be claimed. Psychiatrists’ fees will vary, and some
psychiatrists bulk bill. Information on fees and billing arrangements can be
obtained through the referring doctor or directly from psychiatrists’ rooms.
Private psychiatrists mainly provide outpatient services from their consulting
rooms or inpatient services to private hospitals. They often specialise in particular
illnesses, age groups and may speak languages other than English.
Harvester Private Consulting Suites
Harvester Consulting Suites are located on the first floor of 4A Devonshire Road,
Sunshine. Currently, this private practice offers services from Consultant
Psychiatrists and Psychologists. The service works with MWAMHS, other local
AMHS and Medical Practices in and around the area, with the aim to improve the
working relations between the public and private sectors.
*Note: All people wishing to use this service need a referral from their General
Practitioner. Current clients of MWAMHS need to discuss the referral with their
treating team.
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Forensicare - The Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental
Health
The Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health, known as Forensicare, is
the statutory authority responsible for the provision of adult forensic mental
health services in Victoria.
The Community Forensic Mental Health Services provides three distinct
programs:
1. Mental Health Program
2. Problem Behaviour Program
3. Court Services Program
1. Mental Health Program
The Mental Health Program is comprised of 3 sub-programs:
•
•
•
Community Integration Program - Forensicare (CIP)
Non-custodial Supervision Order Program (NCSO)
Mental Health Court Liaison Program (MHCLS)
Community Integration Program - Forensicare (CIP)
Clinicians within this program assist clients with a serious mental illness to
transition from prison and Thomas Embling Hospital into the community and
facilitate engagement with AMHS. CIP - Forensicare clinicians undertake an
outreach support role with clients and provide intensive work with clients postrelease from prison and more intensive short-term work with forensic patients and
clients referred from AMHS.
Referrals can be made via the CFMHS Intake Worker on 9947 2500.
Non-custodial Supervision Order Program (NCSO)
The NCSO program provides liaison, education and clinical consultation to
AMHSs that are responsible for the management of clients on an NCSO.
Contact the NCSO Coordinator at the CFMHS on 9947 2500.
Mental Health Court Liaison Program (MHCLS)
Senior mental health clinicians located within the Magistrates’ Courts provide
mental health assessment and advice to the courts regarding mentally ill persons
presenting at court. The MHCLS will also facilitate relevant linkages with
community based mental health services, AOD services, and other communityA guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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based services, or prison based mental health services for those remaining in
custody. MHCLS clinicians are located at the Melbourne, Broadmeadows,
Sunshine, Ringwood, Heidelberg, Dandenong, and Frankston Magistrates’ courts.
Referrals are made directly to the MHCLS at the relevant Magistrates’ Court.
2. Problem Behaviour Program
This program provides psychiatric and psychological consultation and treatment
for people with a range of ‘problem’ behaviours associated with criminal
offending, and for whom services are not available elsewhere.
Problem behaviours include, but are not limited to:
• Serious physical violence
• Threats to kill or harm
• Stalking
• Deviant sexual behaviours
• Fire setting
Referrals can me made via the CFMHS Intake Worker on 9947 2500.
3. Court reports and Adult Parole Board Reports
This service provides psychiatric and psychological pre-sentence reports at the
request of Magistrates and Judges where mental disorder may be relevant in
sentencing. This service also provides reports to the Adult Parole Board to assist
the board in determining parole decisions involving prisoners with a serious
mental illness or problem behaviour.
Requests for reports must be directed through the CFMHS Administration
Coordinator on 9947 2500.
Eligibility for CFMHS services:
• Clients 18 years and over
• Clients who present with significant mental health issues and high risk
behaviours
• Clients with a significant forensic history
• Clients who have exhibited one or more problem behaviours, and/or have
spoken about fantasies about committing them.
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Spectrum - The Personality Disorder Service for Victoria
Spectrum is a state funded service for people with severe borderline personality
disorders who are at risk of serious self-harm
Spectrum programs are designed primarily to assist mental health clinicians
within Victorian area mental health services to better meet the needs of their
clients with severe or borderline personality disorder. These clients typically have
severe interpersonal difficulties, a long history of self-harm and/or suicide
attempts and particularly complex needs.
Spectrum is funded to provide services for people with borderline personality
disorder who:
• Have current involvement from a Clinical Area Mental Health Service in
Victoria
• Are aged between 16 and 64 years
• Live in the state of Victoria.
If an individual with severe or borderline personality disorder is involved in a
Spectrum program, the area mental health service needs to continue their work
with the client throughout the period of Spectrum's involvement.
Spectrum Programs
Spectrum provides a range of programs including:
1. Assessment Services for Clients of Clinical Area Mental Health Services in
Victoria
Spectrum provides a specialist clinical assessment service to clients for whom a
Spectrum treatment service is being considered, or where a mental health
clinician has requested an assessment for a particular purpose.
2. Secondary Consultation Services for Clients of Clinical Area Mental
Health Services in Victoria
A secondary consultation can assist clinicians from area mental health services in
their work with clients who have severe or borderline personality disorder. A
secondary consultation may involve any treating team within the area mental
health service (AHMS) or child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS).
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3. Direct Treatment for Clients of Clinical Area Mental Health Services in
Victoria
Spectrum works in partnership with Victorian Area Mental Health services to
provide direct treatment to people with personality disorders. Treatment is based
on a full assessment and designed with the client and their team. A Spectrum
clinician works closely with the client and the Area Mental Health Service case
manager throughout the period of treatment.
3. Care Co-ordination and Treatment for Clients with High & Complex
Needs
The Chief Psychiatrist in Victoria may refer sometimes clients with particularly
complex needs. Sometimes a Spectrum assessment may identify an exceptionally
severe and chronic presentation. In these instances, Spectrum can provide clinical
leadership and direct work in some instances.
4. Professional Development
Spectrum offers a range of professional development workshops in a central
location. These workshops are designed to assist mental health clinicians to better
meet the needs of their clients with severe or borderline personality disorder.
5. Spectrum is also involved with:
• Research
• Advocacy
Making a Referral to Spectrum
Information for Clinical Mental Health Service Clinicians (AMHS &
CAMHS)
• Spectrum accepts referrals for Assessments & Secondary
Consultations from any AMHS or CAMHS clinician in Victoria (such as
Continuing Care Team, Mobile Support Team, Inpatient Unit or CAT
team clinicians).
• Spectrum accepts referrals for Direct Treatment from AMHS and
CAMHS Case Managers and Therapists in Victoria who work in
Continuing Care Teams, Mobile Support Teams and Community Care
Units.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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•
Other statewide specialist mental health services in Victoria such as
Forensicare, Victorian Aboriginal Health Service (Mental Health
Program) and Victorian Dual Disability Service may refer to Spectrum
for Assessments & Secondary Consultations.
When to make a referral
A client would typically have severe interpersonal difficulties and a long history
of self-harm and/or suicide attempts, and particularly complex needs.
Spectrum clinicians can provide assistance with:
• Clarifying diagnostic issues
• Assessment of a client
• Treatment planning in the client's locality
• Organising a wider treatment plan that may include statewide
interventions
• Accessing Spectrum's direct treatment programs (outpatient or
residential)
• Collaborative treatment review when there has been considerable clinical
input but little progress
A referral can be made at any time; however it will assist Spectrum if the
following has occurred prior to making contact:
•
•
•
•
Client is actively working with a Clinical Mental Health Service (AMHS
or CAMHS)
An initial assessment of the client has been made
An initial formulation has been completed (detailing your understanding
of the client's presentation)
You and/or your team have questions relating to the client's care and
treatment
How to make a referral
All referrals, requests for professional development and enquiries can be made by
contacting Spectrum's Intake Clinician on (03) 9871 3900.
Please also visit Spectrum’s website for latest service updates:
www.spectrumbpd.com.au
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Substance Use and Mental Illness Treatment Team
(SUMITT)
What is the aim of SUMITT?
The Substance Use and Mental Illness Treatment Team (SUMITT) is an initiative
of the Department of Human Services to build the capacity of services and staff to
respond to the needs of consumers with co-occurring mental illness and substance
misuse.
The aim of SUMITT is to provide high quality services to individuals who have
co-occurring mental health and substance-related disorders and build the capacity
of the mental health and alcohol and other drug services to provide evidence
based accessible and integrated treatment and care to these consumers and their
carers.
A SUMITT senior clinician is co-located at each NorthWestern Mental Health
AMHS and at local alcohol and other drug services in the North-Western region.
What services are provided by SUMITT?
Primary consultation to consumers with a dual diagnosis in consultation with their
respective mental health or alcohol and other drug worker.
Secondary consultation to mental health or drug and alcohol workers involved
with clients with a serious mental illness and co-existing substance misuse.
Tertiary consultation to organisations providing assistance with addressing
commonly encountered barriers to treatment in clients with a dual diagnosis, i.e.
mental health/ substance abuse.
Education and training to mental health and drug and alcohol workers and
interested others. (See annual training calendar/individual training programs to
organisations as appropriate.)
How can referrals be made to SUMITT?
Case Managers from the AMHS can make referrals to SUMITT.
Secondary and tertiary consultation may be accessed via telephone Monday to
Friday, 9am-5pm on 8387 2202.
Requests for consultations may be faxed on 8387 2202.
GPs and other primary care providers cannot refer clients directly to SUMITT.
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Victorian Dual Disability Service
Specialist service for people with a mental illness and an intellectual disability
The Victorian Dual Disability Service (VDDS) is a state-wide mental health
service for people with an intellectual disability. It is founded on the belief that
people with a dual disability should have access to the best possible mental health
care. To achieve this VDDS works with specialist mental health services in
Victoria to assess, treat and manage people with a dual disability.
VDDS activities include:
• Clinical support (phone based advice and second opinions)
• Training (lectures, workshops)
• Academic units
• Publications and projects
1. Clinical
Phone based advice
VDDS provides advice to anyone about the mental health of people with an
intellectual disability in relation to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Presentation of mental disorders
Mental health assessment
Assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Treatment for a mental disorder
Management of mental and behavioural disorders
Services available in Victoria and how to access these services
The VDDS hours of operation are Monday to Friday 8.30am-5.00pm. If no one
can take your call or if you call out of office hours you may leave a message and
your call will be returned within 1 working day.
Assessment
a. Who can request an assessment?
• Clinicians from Area Mental Health Services can request an assessment
by phoning VDDS on 9288 2950.
• Employees of Disability Services North and West Metropolitan Region
can request an assessment by referring to the Behaviour Intervention and
Support Team.
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•
If you are a person with a disability, a carer, a family member, a private
psychiatrist, or a GP you are welcome to phone VDDS for advice on how
to request an assessment.
b. What does the assessment provide?
• VDDS understanding of the problem
• Diagnostic opinion
• Recommendations about treatment and management
• Recommendations on what services should be involved
2. Training
In 2010 VDDS will deliver workshops locally via the mental health training and
professional development clusters. These workshops are specifically designed for
clinicians from Area Mental Health Services in Victoria, and key workers from
Psychiatric Disability Rehabilitation and Support Services.
Topics will include:
• Assessment
• Challenging Behaviour
• Autism Spectrum Disorders
• Management
3. Academic
VDDS delivers a range of lectures, tutorials, workshops and information sessions.
Currently, the service makes a contribution to the following courses:
•
•
Monash University - Graduate Diploma Community Mental Health: Dual
Disability module
RMIT University - Disability - Bachelor of Applied Science
4. Service Development
• Works with 22 Victorian AMHS in developing networks and
partnerships to enhance policies and procedures for innovative services
of care.
• Facilitates the development of systems for partnerships and collaborative
treatment planning, through consultation and liaison.
• Publications and Projects
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Contact the Victorian Dual Disability Service:
Address:
St Vincent's Hospital Campus
PO Box 2900, Fitzroy 3068
Tel:
9288 2950
Fax:
9288 2953
[email protected]
Email:
Web:
www.vdds.org.au
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Orygen Youth Health Clinical Program
An Overview:
The Orygen YH Clinical Program provides specialist mental health services for
adolescents and young adults aged between 15 and 24 years of age who reside in
the Western and North Western regions of Melbourne (which includes the Mid
West catchment). Clinical services are provided to young people within their
families and communities, with the provision of inpatient care for severe episodes
of mental disorder.
Clinical services are provided for up to two years and currently 750 young people
each year access the service. They are young people experiencing a wide range of
mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorders,
and psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A substantial
proportion of these young people have a comorbid drug and/or alcohol use
disorder, which also requires intervention.
The clinical program provides a broad range of services including initial triage
and assessment services, one-to-one therapy, case management and specialist
psychiatric treatment including psychotropic medications, family education and
support services, group-based recovery programs, consumer support services,
home-based treatment and intensive outreach programs for difficult to engage
clients, as well as inpatient services.
Orygen YH also has a large and very active consumer participation program (the
Platform Team) and a family peer support program that provide strategic advice
to the program on service delivery issues and hands-on information, advice and
peer support to other consumers and carers of the service.
Youth Access Team (YAT):
The YAT program is a mobile mental health crisis assessment and treatment team
for young people.
The YAT Triage service is the first point of contact for people being referred to
Orygen YH. Any young person who has a serious mental health problem and
lives in the catchment area can be referred or refer themselves, to OYH. Triage
staff will discuss the young person's difficulties with the referrer and make an
initial decision about whether the person requires a specialist mental health
assessment, considering the level of risk, and the urgency of the situation. The
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young person will also be involved in the process and where appropriate family,
school staff and GPs may also be involved.
Triage is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. People are encouraged to
make non-urgent referrals during business hours on 8345 7400.
For urgent referrals after hours contact 1800 888 320, or call the paging service on
03 9483 4556, ask for the Triage staff and leave your contact details. All pager
messages will be responded to quickly.
YAT Acute services:
The acute team completes crisis assessments for young people newly referred to
the service and unable to wait for a routine appointment. They also provide crisis
response to current clients outside of business hours.
Community treatment is also offered to current clients who require more intensive
treatment than can be offered by the case managers alone.
Orygen Youth Health Inpatient Unit: (IPU)
The IPU has 16 beds and the average length of stay is 10-12 days.
The IPU is located at 35 Mavis St, Footscray, on the Western Hospital site.
Admission to the IPU is via YAT.
Continuing Care Teams:
When a young person is offered treatment at Orygen YH, they are allocated a
Case Manager and often a doctor. It is expected that the young person will attend
appointments at Orygen YH in Parkville or at community sites, but sometimes the
Case Manager will visit the young person at home. Treatment is provided for up
to two years. This is not always provided in one block but may be offered over
several shorter periods of care.
CCT Services:
Early Psychosis Prevention & Intervention Centre (EPPIC):
EPPIC is a comprehensive service addressing the needs of young people with
psychotic disorders. These disorders can cause acute distress and confusion in a
young person, as well as for family, friends and professionals. EPPIC aims to
facilitate early identification and treatment of psychosis and therefore reduce the
disruption to the young person’s functioning and psychosocial development.
EPPIC also promotes wellbeing among family members and assists in reducing
the burden for carers.
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The EPPIC PACE team works with young people who might be at risk of
developing psychosis. By identifying people who are at risk and providing them
with appropriate treatment, it is hoped that early symptoms will be reduced, while
also delaying or perhaps averting further problems.
Youthscope:
Youthscope provides treatment to young people who are experiencing illnesses
such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. The treatment may include
individual, group and/or family work, and much of the intervention is focused on
developing skills to understand and manage the illness, while also identifying
personal goals to work towards and achieve. Episodes of care are brief, usually
between four and six months, with a total of two years of treatment available.
Psychosocial Services:
The Psychosocial services available include recovery group programs, vocational
services, a youth participation and peer support program, and a family peer
support program.
Group programs:
Group programs are an integral component of the clinical treatment and are
offered to all clients. They encompass a diverse range of approaches and
therapeutic activities. In addition, group program clinicians work in close
collaboration with teachers from Travancore School, a Department of Education
school facility that offers a range of educational and vocational programs, for
both individuals and groups. Case Managers can refer clients at any time.
OTHER ORYGEN ACTIVITIES
OYH - Research Centre
The Research Centre aims to understand the biological, psychological and social
factors that influence onset, remission and relapse of mental illnesses in order to
find better ways to prevent and/or reduce the impact of mental disorders. OYH Research Centre is regarded as one of the pre-eminent psychiatric and research
institutes in Australia and an international leader in the effective management of
youth mental illness. A not-for- profit group, the Research Centre conducts
studies into all aspects of mental illnesses that effect young people and presents
cutting-edge research that translates into more effective treatments.
OYH - Training and Communication
The Training and Communication department at Orygen endeavours to share
knowledge gained through clinical and research expertise to enhance the service
system that supports young people with mental illness. It therefore works to
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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strengthen the integration of the youth health service system, including public,
community and private health services at local, national and international levels.
OYH - Training and Communication activities are also designed to influence
political agendas and increase community understanding about mental illness in
young people.
Contact Orygen Youth Health Clinical Program:
Address:
35 Poplar Road
Parkville 3052
Tel:
8345 7400 (Triage)
8345 7550 (Inpatient Unit)
9342 2800 (Outpatients and Research Centre)
Further information is available at www.oyh.org.au and www.eppic.org.au
A referral guide – How it Works – How to Refer to Orygen Youth Health can be
found on the site’s Information and Resources page:
http://tc.oyh.org.au/InformationResources
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Case Managers & Key Workers - Who Does What?
The work of the clinical and PDRS service sectors can sometimes be very similar
or even overlap. Two roles that share particularly similar duties are the Case
Managers from clinical services and the Key Workers from PDRSS.
Often it is necessary for staff in these two roles to work together to plan and
coordinate the ways they assist consumers, particularly if consumers are linked
into both these services at the same time.
The following information describes the general roles and responsibilities of Case
Managers (clinical services) and the Key Workers (PDRSS). It also provides
some guidelines for how these workers can best work together to provide a
coordinated system of care to support shared consumers.
Case Managers
Case Managers are based in the Area Mental Health Services. They are qualified
health professionals that work alongside the consumer to provide specialised
medical and allied health support to help them achieve their goals. The Case
Manager liaises with families and carers and is responsible for co-ordinating and
ensuring all activities related to the consumer’s wellbeing are met. Case Managers
working in clinical services are also required to work under the provisions of the
Victorian Mental Health Act, 1986.
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The Case Manager may be one of the following health professionals:
•
Social Worker - is a mental health professional who works closely with
a consumer to provide individual counselling and advocacy, including
negotiating access to social and community supports. These workers are
also trained to work with families, particularly in the areas of mediation
and intervention.
•
Psychologist - is a mental health professional who has specialist training
in the assessment of behaviour and cognitive functioning. The
psychologist assists consumers to positively change how they think, feel
and act towards themselves and others.
•
Consultant Psychiatrist - is a registered, qualified senior medical
practitioner who has undertaken extensive specialised training in the
diagnosing, treatment and management of mental illness. These
professionals typically provide support and advice to Case Managers,
rather than work in a case management role per se.
•
Occupational Therapist - is a mental health professional that has
specialist training in the assessment of function related to all aspects of
self-care and daily living.
•
Psychiatric Nurse - is a registered nurse who specialises in the nursing
care and treatment of consumers with a mental illness.
The key roles of mental health Case Managers are to:
•
Assess, plan and provide individualised treatment and care in
collaboration with the consumer, carers and relevant others (e.g. PDRSS
and other community support workers)
• Coordinate services for the consumer in a timely and efficient manner
• Be a point of contact and accountability
• Guide the consumer and carers through the system
• Provide intensive support and intervention
• Monitor and review risk and the intensity of case management need
• Access multidisciplinary input as needed
• Link the consumer and carers to other community supports and agencies
• Ensure effective discharge planning
(Information adapted from Introduction to Victoria’s public clinical mental
health services, DHS, 2006)
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Key Workers
Key Workers are the primary contact person for the consumer in PDRSS
programs. They often carry the same professional qualifications as Case
Managers and can be Psychologists, Social Workers, Occupational Therapists,
Nurses, etc.
Key Workers primarily focus on the day-to-day rehabilitation of consumers,
responding to individual concerns as they arise (e.g. financial matters, social
connection, interpersonal relationships, emotional stability, etc.) They also
facilitate individual and group based activity programs that aim to enhance
physical health and wellbeing, self-esteem and awareness, independent living
skills and creativity.
Due to the extensive time spent with clients, Key Workers can be a great support
and source of information for Case Managers (who see clients less frequently and
are often time restricted). This information is invaluable to developing and
modifying joint care plans to enable effective rehabilitation of shared consumers.
Key Workers are also responsible for:
• Collaborating with the consumer in the development of an Individual
Program Plan (IPP, sometimes known as an Individual Recovery Plan or
IRP), which reflects the consumer’s recovery and support needs.
• Coordinating the implementation of the consumer’s IPP.
• Ensuring that the consumer receives the services and supports necessary
to regain the skills and confidence required in activities of daily living,
independence, decision-making, and maintaining social relationships.
• Facilitating the consumer’s access to and participation in, a range of
general community support programs and activities. These include
programs and activities relating to accommodation, education and
training, income security, employment, recreation and leisure.
• Facilitating contact and developing a cooperative relationship with
clinical mental health services, particularly with a consumer’s Case
Manager, private psychiatrist and/or general practitioner.
• Developing, with the informed consent of the consumer, a cooperative
relationship with any other carers involved with the consumer.
• On the request of the consumer, acting as an advocate for the consumer,
especially in dealing with discriminatory attitudes and behaviour and in
facilitating access to services.
(Information adapted from PDRSS Guidelines for Service Delivery, DHS,
2003)
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 67
Working Together
Because a proportion of PDRSS consumers also receive case management
services from the clinical mental health services, Case Managers and Key
Workers represent a key partnership in providing a coordinated system of care for
these shared consumers and their carers.
Staff can work together to support shared consumers by:
•
•
•
•
•
Keeping up to date with the latest programs and services in their area.
Getting to know workers from other services (i.e. putting ‘faces to
names’, learning more about one another’s jobs).
Using each other’s strengths to develop balanced plans, tailored to
consumer needs.
Letting each other know about significant developments that may affect
their work with shared consumers (see Guidelines for communication
between MWAMHS & PDRSS on following pages for more info).
Making sure that consumers and carers are involved in important
decision-making, and kept up to date about changes to support plans.
Some of the benefits from working together include:
•
•
•
Developing collaborative working relationships, which ensure that
consumers are provided with “the right service at the right time”.
Developing complimentary treatment and support goals and strategies for
shared consumers, which help avoid duplication of services.
Integrated and coordinated continuity of care plans.
BY WORKING TOGETHER, BETTER OUTCOMES CAN BE
GAINED FOR EVERYONE!!!
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 68
Knowing or not knowing about important changes in consumers’ circumstances can have a big impact on our work.
Therefore it’s crucial that we inform other workers who are also involved with our consumers when the following issues
occur:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Change in consumer contact details
Change in case manager details:
a. Are you going on leave?
b. Has another worker been assigned to support the consumer while you’re away?
c. Has there been a change in the level of clinical support (e.g. consumer has been referred to another
internal program)?
Referral to an external agency
Hospital admission/ discharge
Significant change in medication/ likely side effects
Changes in legal status (e.g. treatment orders, administrator/ guardianship order, power of attorney, etc.)
Changes in consumer management plan (i.e. ISP/RAP/IPP/IRP):
a. Goals, strategies, roles, outcomes, etc.
b. Contingency plan, relapse prevention plan
c. Critical incidents (i.e. nature of incident, management strategy, outcome)
Discharge/ transitional planning
Significant changes in personal circumstances:
a. Mental state (e.g. signs of risk or relapse)
b. Physical health
c. Employment status
d. Housing issues (e.g. evictions, arrears, etc.)
e. Carer/ children/ other relationship issues
Lastly, don’t forget to report your correspondence with other services in your case notes/ monthly contacts. If it’s not
documented then it didn’t happen!
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 69
Explanations of Frequently Used Terms
Area Mental Health Services (AMHS) - The network of public specialist mental
health services that operates in defined geographical areas.
Carer - The term ‘carer’ includes those who, while not related to the client by
biology or marriage, are nevertheless actively involved in their care. This may
include intimates, friends, housemates and professional carers. The term ‘primary
carer’ is defined in the Mental Health Act (1986) as “any person who is primarily
responsible for providing support or care to a person other than wholly or
substantially on a commercial basis.”
Community Treatment Order (CTO) - is provided for by the Mental Health
Act 1986. It permits involuntary treatment in the community for some consumers
with a mental illness who are subject to an involuntary treatment order. As such,
they offer a less restrictive, community-based environment for involuntary
treatment, than an in-patient setting.
Consumer - Consistent with prevailing views, the term consumer generally refers
to the users of public mental health services. Organisations that represent users of
mental health services have embraced the term ‘consumer’ because they feel that
it acknowledges people with mental illness as individuals with legitimate rights,
preferences and responsibilities. It covers children, young people, adults and older
people.
Continuity of Care - Provision of mental health services to a consumer in a way
that ensures care is continued when there is a change of service or Case Manager.
An example is when a person leaves a psychiatric inpatient service and their care
is transferred to the community mental health centre or where the consumer
moves to a new area.
Dual Diagnosis - The occurrence of a serious mental illness and a substance
abuse disorder concurrently in the same individual.
Dual Disability - The occurrence of a serious mental illness and an intellectual
disability at the same time in the same individual.
Duty Worker - A mental health professional at a community mental health
service who is the first contact for people requesting services within an area
mental health service. The duty worker undertakes an initial screening and may
then arrange an intake assessment of the consumer’s current problem/s and guide
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 70
the consumer to other community services. The term ‘triage’ may be used instead
of ‘duty’.
Individual Service Plan (ISP) - is a working plan put together by the consumer
and Case Manager from MWAMHS. It is a summary of goals and activities the
consumer is working towards, with ways of how to get there. The plan is
regularly reviewed and amended according to the progress the consumer is
making throughout their recovery. Carers may help in this process.
Individual Program Plan (IPP) - is a working plan to identify and support the
recovery needs of consumers within PDRSS programs. This plan is very similar
in structure and purpose to the Individual Service Plan (ISP) used by clinical
services (i.e. MWAMHS); however the focus in this case is on psychosocial
rehabilitation goals, than managing symptoms of illness through medical
treatment. Individual Program Plans (IPP) outline and guide this process. The IPP
is developed by consumers, with the support of their Key Worker. The plan
guides a dynamic rehabilitation process, including identification of current
environmental issues, goal setting, strategies for success, and regular reviews.
Informed Consent - is consent obtained freely, without threats or improper
inducements, after questions by the consumer have been answered on all aspects
of the treatment being offered. This will involve an explanation of what the
treatment involves, the benefits, the risks and the alternatives available. It will
also include an explanation of consumer rights.
Mental Health Act 1986 - The Victorian Mental Health Act 1986 provides a
legislative framework for the care, treatment and protection of people with a
mental illness in Victoria. The key features of the Act are its emphasis on rights
and the requirement that treatment should be provided in the least restrictive
environment, with dignity and respect for the person with the mental illness.
Mental Health Review Board - is an independent tribunal that hears appeals
from involuntary patients, hospital order patients and security patients who want
to be discharged from their involuntary treatment status. The Board also
automatically reviews these individual cases.
Prevention and Recovery Care Units (PARC) - These are sub-acute clinical
units that provide a short term acute supported residential option, in partnership
with the PDRSS sector, for people experiencing a significant mental health
problem requiring intensive support but who do not need a hospital admission.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
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Psychosocial Rehabilitation - focuses on the promotion of personal recovery,
giving people the opportunity to work, live and enjoy a social life in the
community.
Recovery - a personal and unique way of changing one’s attitudes, values and
goals to live a hopeful and meaningful life beyond the effects of mental illness.
Recovery Action Plan - A working plan that is similar in structure and purpose
to ISPs/IPPs, which is primarily used by the Community Care Unit.
Triage - Mental health triage is provided for all potential consumers (or people
seeking assistance on behalf of a person thought to have a mental illness) at the
first point of contact with mental health services. Triage may also be used for
assessment of current and former consumers who make unplanned contact with
the mental health service.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 72
Important Telephone Numbers
Mid West Area Mental Health Service
MWAMHS Triage Service
Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team
Sunshine Adult Acute Psychiatric Unit (SAAPU)
Adult Mental Health Rehabilitation Unit (AMHRU)
St Albans Community Care Units (CCU)
Continuing Care Team
Mobile Support and Treatment Team
Primary Mental Health Team
Consumer Consultants
Carer Consultants
PDRSS in the Mid West Area
Norwood Association
Mind Australia- Appleby Crescent Service
Mind Australia- Electra Street Community
Mind Australia- McPherson Community
Mind Australia- Victoria Street Program
Mind Australia- Western Respite Services
Western Region Health Centre- Horizons
Western Region Health Centre- Outlooks
Western Region Health Centre- ROCKET
In the case of an emergency: fire, police, ambulance
(when you need an immediate response)
Local Hospitals
Sunshine Hospital
Western Hospital
The Royal Melbourne Hospital
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
1300 859 764
1300 859 764
8345 1260
8345 1220
9365 3000
9288 7000
9288 7000
9288 7000
9288 7000
9288 7000
9365 9500
9386 4055
9397 1028
9310 2626
9387 2133
9391 0144
9364 1455
9747 6337
9310 9200
000
8345 1333
8345 6666
9342 7000
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Local Police
Sunshine Police
Melton Police
Sunbury Police
9313 3333
9747 7999
9744 8111
Crisis Services
Lifeline (24 Hours) Generalist
Kids Helpline (24 hours)
Parentline (8am-12am weekdays, 10am-10pm weekends)
Grief Line (12pm-3am)
Direct Line (24 hours) Alcohol and Drug Counselling
Womens’ Domestic Violence Crisis Line (24 hours)
Western Region Centre Against Sexual Assault
(24 hours)
Mensline Australia (24 hours)
Suicide Helpline (24 hours)
Gamblers Helpline (24 hours)
Family Drug Helpline (24 hours)
Maternal & Child Health Line (24 hours)
Child Abuse/ Prevention (24 hours)
13 11 14
1800 551 800
13 22 89
9596 7799
1800 888 236
1800 015 188
9687 5811
1300 789 978
1300 651 251
1800 858 858
1300 660 068
13 22 29
1800 688 009
Mental Health Advice Line
The Mental Health Advice Line is a state-wide telephone
information service available to all Victorians seeking mental
health information, advice and referral for themselves or another
person.
The service is for Victorians of all ages and from all
backgrounds. You can call about yourself, a friend or a family
member and you may remain anonymous if you wish.
The service is staffed by mental health professionals who
provide expert mental health advice 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week, including public holidays.
In an emergency or life threatening situation, you should still
call 000.
Interpreters for non-English speakers are also available.
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
1300 280 737
Page 74
Other Consumer Information/Support Services
SANE Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Mental Illness Fellowship Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Arafemi Support Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Victorian Mental Illness Awareness Council (VMIAC)
Building 1, 22 Aintree St. East Brunswick 3057
1800 187 263
8486 4222
1300 550 265
9380 3900
A peak consumer body in Victoria, offering peer support.
- Consumer support group, Wednesday: 11am - 2 pm
- VMIAC The Art Shed - Wednesday art activities and conversation
Victorian Transcultural Psychiatry Unit
The Mental Health Legal Centre Inc.
520 Collins Street, Melbourne 3000
9288 3300
9629 4422
Legal information, advice, referral & advocacy to assist consumers. Free legal
advice available Monday and Thursday: 3 - 5pm & Friday: 2 - 4pm.
Carer Information
SANE Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Mental Illness Fellowship Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Carers Victoria Advisory Line
Respite Connections (formerly Carers Links West)
ARAFEMI Carer Support Helpline (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm)
Victorian Transcultural Psychiatry Unit
1800 187 263
8486 4222
1800 242 636
9396 1077
1300 550 265
9288 3300
Carer Support Groups
Respite Connections (formerly Carers Links West)
9396 1077
Melton Carers Group C/o WRHC - Outlooks Day program
9747 6337
ADEC- Action on Disability Within Ethnic Communities
9480 1666
Al-Anon and Alateen
9642 3330
Groups for relatives and friends of people with alcohol problems
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 75
Useful Internet Sites
National and Victorian Peak Organisations
Mental Health Council
of Australia
Victorian Mental Illness
Awareness Council
Carers’ Network
www.mhca.org.au
Sane Australia
www.sane.org
Beyond Blue
www.beyondblue.org.au
Victoria’s Mental Health
Services
Department of Health &
Ageing Federal Government
Mental Health Foundation of
Australia (Victoria)
VICSERV - Psychiatric
Disability Services of Victoria
www.health.vic.gov.au/mentalhealth
Consumer and Carer Links
Association of Relatives and
Friends of the Mentally Ill
Carers Victoria
Consumer, Carer and
Community Participation and
information, Victorian
Government
Mental Health Legal Centre
Victoria Legal Aid
www.vmiac.com.au
www.carersnetwork.org
www.health.gov.au
www.mentalhealthvic.org.au
http://vicserv.org.au
www.arafemi.org.au/index.asp
www.carersaustralia.com.au/
www.health.vic.gov.au/consumer/
www.communitylaw.org.au/mentalhealth/
www.legalaid.vic.gov.au/Index.cfm
Searching for Interstate Health Services
Australian Health Map, to find
health services across Australia
www.abc.net.au/health/healthmap/default.
htm
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 76
General Health Information
HealthInsite Federal Government
health information
Better Health Channel
Victorian Government
Auseinet The Australian Network
for Promotion, Prevention and
Early Intervention for Mental
Health
www.healthinsite.gov.au
www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au
www.auseinet.com/stateinfo/refer/index.php
General Mental Health Information and Support
Anxiety Recovery Centre
Victoria
Counselling Online for drug and
alcohol related concerns
Depression Net
www.arcvic.com.au/
Mental Health Research Institute
- Voices Clinic
Royal Australian & NZ College
of Psychiatrists
www.mhri.edu.au/voices.htm
www.counsellingonline.org.au
www.depressionet.com.au
www.ranzcp.org/
Local Health Services
ISIS Primary Care
Djerriwarrh Melton Community Health
Centre
Sunbury Community Health Service
Women’s Health in the North
Directory
www.isispc.com.au/index.php
9296 1200
www.djhs.com.au/
8746 1100
www.sunburychc.org.au/
9744 4455
www.whin.org.au/intro.html
9484 1666
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 77
Multicultural Services
ADEC Action on Disability within
Ethnic Communities
VTPU - translated mental health
information
www.adec.org.au
www.vtpu.org.au/resources/translatedm
h.php
Youth
ORYGEN Youth Health
EPPIC Early Psychosis Prevention
and Intervention Centre
PATS Paying Attention to Self support for young people who have a
parent with mental Illness.
COPMI - Children of Parents with a
Mental Illness
www.orygen.org.au
www.eppic.org.au/
www.rch.org.au/pats/index.cfm?doc_id
=7074
www.copmi.net.au/
A guide to working with mental health services in the Mid West area (May 2010)
Page 78
Melbourne Health Values
Respect
for the dignity, beliefs and abilities of every individual
Caring
and compassion
Integrity
by being open, honest and fair
Unity
as a team and in embracing our communities
Discovery
through passion for innovation
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