OUTCOME BASED EDUCATION SYSTEM B

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(AUTONOMOUS)
Shamshabad-501218, Hyderabad
OUTCOME BASED EDUCATION SYSTEM
B.TECH - Electrical and Electronics Engineering
(For the Batches Admitted From 2011-2012)
CREATE
EVALUATE
HIGHER - ORDER
THINKING SKILLS (HOTS)
ANALYZE
APPLY
UNDERSTAND
LOWER - ORDER
THINKING SKILLS
REMEMBER
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY OF LEARNING OUTCOMES
DEPARTMENT VISION AND MISSION
DEPARTMENT VISION AND MISSION
VISION
The vision of the Electrical and Electronics Engineering department is
to build a research identity in all related areas of Electrical
Engineering uniquely. Through core research and education, the
students will be prepared as the best professional Engineers in the
field of Electrical Engineering to face the challenges in such
disciplines
MISSION
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department supports the
mission of the College through high quality teaching, research and
services that provide students a supportive environment. The
department will make the best effort to promote intellectual, ethical
and technological environment to the students. The department
invokes the desire and ability of life-long learning in the students for
pursuing successful career in engineering.
PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES (PEOs)
AND
PROGRAM OUTCOMES (POs)
Electrical and Electronics Engineering Departmental Advisory Council:
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department Advisory Council (EEEDAC) is composed from
a diverse group of representatives from academe, industry and importantly the alumni. The
“Program Educational Objectives” were initially drafted by a committee of EEE faculty and were
vetted and approved by a group of faculty from peer department, Electronics & Communications
Engineering. Assessment data for evaluation of effectiveness of the program and achievement of
program objectives is collected annually through “alumni surveys” and every three years through
“employer surveys”. This information is compiled by departmental committee and presented to EEE
External Advisory Board for review. The feedback and recommendation of EEE Advisory Board are
implemented for improvements year on year. The meeting of the Advisory Board is conducted
annually. Additional meetings are conducted as required, to review strategic planning and innovative
programs for their impact on programs. The Advisory Council visits the institute and holds meeting
with representatives of administration, faculty and the students. The secretary of departmental
council presents a report to the council, on improvements and amendments to the program. The
advisory council prepares a status report for action and review by the Principal.
B. Tech - Electrical and Electronics Engineering Program Educational Objectives (PEOs)
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering department at the institute is dedicated to providing
educational opportunities in Electrical and Electronics Engineering to specific undergraduate student
body of talented girls and boys. The department emphasizes close interactions between students
and the faculty dedicated to education and actively engaged in events enriching the educational
programs. The program emphasizes active learning with a strong laboratory component. The
department nurtures the intellectual, professional, and personal development of students with a
view to transform them to competent professionals and responsible members of the society.
1. EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Learning Outcomes, Assessment Criteria
The educational objectives of a module are statements of the broad intentions of the teaching
team. They indicate what the teaching team intends to cover and the learning opportunities they
intend to make available to the student. A learning outcome is a statement of what a learner
(student) is expected to know, understand and /or be able to do at the end of learning period. The
department prefers to express learning outcomes with following common prefix:
‘On completion of (the period of learning e.g. module), the student is expected to be able to…’
Generally, learning outcomes do not specify curriculum, but more general areas of learning. It is not
possible to prescribe precisely how specific a learning outcome statement should be. A balance is
struck between the degree of specificity in a learning outcome statement and that achieved by the
assessment criteria, below. On one hand too many learning outcomes, for a module, are considered
akin to assessment criteria or curricular detail (EEE intend to describe the curriculum in a range
statement) while too few learning outcomes fail to provide sufficient information on the course. As a
practice between 3 and 6 learning outcomes are considered by EEE for a course.
The Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) of the Electrical and Electronics Engineering department
are broad statements or road maps describing career and professional objectives we intend our
graduates to achieve through this program.
2.
B. TECH - ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
Program Educational Objective I
To experience success in electrical and electronics engineering areas or other diverse fields that
requires analytical and professional skills.
Program Educational Objective II
To stimulate students to contribute to their fields or professions and to excel them in professional
ethics and leadership qualities.
Program Educational Objective III
To inculcate in students, professional attitude, effective communication skills and capability to
succeed in multi-disciplinary and diverse fields.
Program Educational Objective IV
To promote students to continue to pursue professional development, including continuing or
advanced education relevant to their career growth and to create enthusiasm for life-long learning.
With a view to challenge ourselves and to nurture diverse capabilities for professional and
intellectual growth for our graduates it is important for the department to define departmental
objectives in generalized and broad format. Adherence to these objectives is proposed to be
demonstrated through actions or achievements.
I.
Following indicators are considered as demonstration of PEO-I (success in Electrical and
Electronics Engineering areas / other allied and diverse fields):
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
k.
l.
m.
II.
Acceptance and satisfactory progress by students in a graduate degree program.
Significantly contributing and delivery of desired engineering component, product or
process.
Formulating and solving, moderately complex electrical and electronics engineering
problems.
Skillful use of state-of-the-art tools for electrical and electronics engineering
processes.
Making practical recommendations that address issues related to electrical and
electronics engineering product and systems.
Producing clear written electrical and electronics engineering documentation
(papers, reports, and significant parts of proposals).
Being assigned to make reports or presentations for internal or external clients.
Publishing and reviewing papers for conferences / journals, or producing an
internally reviewed publication.
Making a significant contribution to a proposal.
Making a useful invention and drafting/ applying for a patent.
Participating in the field through; public speaking, activity in professional societies/
technical associations etc.
Addressing issues related to intellectual property rights.
Capability to handle societal, ethical, legal, business and technical issues related to a
project.
Contribute and excel in their fields or professions, develop professional ethics and
leadership qualities (PEO-II) may be demonstrated by any of the following:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Leading a project or designed team.
Promotion to managerial position.
Election or appointment to leadership position in a professional society.
Participating in one of the organization’s NSS programs.
e.
f.
g.
III.
Professional attitude, effective communication skills, capabilities to succeed in multidisciplinary or diverse fields (PEO-III) may be demonstrated by any of the following:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
IV.
Volunteering in a college, civic or other charitable organization.
Participating in team sports or coaching.
Effectively handling a situation involving ethics.
Appropriately using tools for collaboration, such as telecons, videocons etc.
Skillfully using tools for project and configuration management, like resource
planning systems, software source control systems, etc.
Working successfully on ethnically, technically and gender diverse teams.
Effectively resolving problems encountered in team work.
Communicating effectively in a group environment.
Estimating correctly the required resources (time, team, equipment etc.) for
Electrical and Electronics Engineering projects.
Making appropriate decisions on outsourcing and developing components in-house.
Seeking assistance or elevating problems when necessary.
Continue to pursue professional development including continuing or advanced education
relevant to their career growth and to create enthusiasm for sustained life-long learning
(PEO-IV) may be demonstrated by any of the following:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Successfully completing the graduate course.
Self-learning ; a new skill, tool, area system
Reading technical books, journals, conference papers, technical reports or
standards.
Attending a technical conference, symposium or workshop.
Belonging to a professional society
EEE department periodically reviews these objectives and as part of this review process, encourages
comments from all interested parties including current students, alumni, prospective students,
faculty, teaching assistants, those who hire or admit our graduates to other programs, members of
related professional organizations, and colleagues from other educational institutions.
B. TECH - ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING PROGRAM OUTCOMES:
3.
A. Ability to apply knowledge of Mathematics, Science, Computer Science, Electronics and
Electrical Engineering (Fundamental Engineering Analysis Skill).
B. Ability to design electrical and electronics circuits and conduct experiments with electrical
engineering as well as to analyze and interpret data (Information Retrieval Skills).
C. Ability to design digital and analog system pertaining to electrical systems (Creative Skills).
D. Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks. (Team Work).
E. Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. (Engineering Problem Solving
Skills).
F. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Professional Integrity).
G. Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written form (Speaking / Writing Skills).
H. Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to understand the value of life-long
learning (Continuing Education Awareness).
I.
Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society (Social Awareness).
J.
Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern engineering tools, soft wares and equipments
to analyze problems necessary for engineering practice. (Practical Engineering Analysis Skills).
K. A Knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative projects (Innovative Skills).
L. Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive examinations like
GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc. (Successful Career and Immediate Employment).
4. MAPPING OF OBJECTIVES TO OUTCOMES
The following Figure shows the correlation between the PEOs and the POs
The following Table shows the correlation between the PEOs and the POs
Program Objectives
I
Success in
electrical
engineering areas
II
Excel in
professional
ethics and
leadership
qualities
Program Outcomes
A. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, Computer Science,
electronics and electrical engineering. (Fundamental Engineering Analysis Skill).
B. Ability to design electrical and electronics circuits and conduct experiments with
electrical engineering as well as to analyze and interpret data (Information
Retrieval Skills).
C. Ability to design digital and analog system pertaining to electrical systems
(Creative Skills).
D. Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks (Team Work).
E. Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. (Engineering
Problem Solving Skills).
G. Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written form (Speaking /
Writing Skills).
H. Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to understand the value of
life-long learning (Continuing Education Awareness).
I. Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society (Social Awareness).
J. Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern engineering tools, software and
equipments to analyze problems necessary for engineering practice. (Practical
Engineering Analysis Skills).
K. A Knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative projects (Innovative
Skills).
L. Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive
examinations like GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc. (Successful Career and
Immediate Employment).
E. Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. (Engineering
Problem Solving Skills).
F. Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Professional Integrity).
I. Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society (Social Awareness).
K. A Knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative projects (Innovative
Skills).
L. Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive
examinations like GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc. (Successful Career and
Immediate Employment).
III
Succeed in multidisciplinary and
diverse fields
Continue
IV advanced
education
B. Ability to design electrical and electronics circuits and conduct experiments with
electrical engineering as well as to analyze and interpret data (Information
Retrieval Skills).
C. Ability to design digital and analog system pertaining to electrical systems
(Creative Skills).
D. Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks (Team Work).
F. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Professional Integrity).
G. Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written form (Speaking /
Writing Skills).
H. Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to understand the value of
life-long learning (Continuing Education Awareness).
I. Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society (Social Awareness).
L. Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive
examinations like GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc. (Successful Career and
Immediate Employment).
A. Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, Computer Science,
electronics and electrical engineering. (Fundamental Engineering Analysis Skill).
F. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility (Professional
Integrity).
G. Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written form (Speaking /
Writing Skills)
J. Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern engineering tools, soft wares
and equipments to analyze problems necessary for engineering practice.
(Practical Engineering Analysis Skills).
L. Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive
examinations like GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc. (Successful Career and
Immediate Employment).
5. RELATION BETWEEN THE PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES AND THE PROGRAM OUTCOMES:
Broad relationship between the program objectives and the program outcomes is given in the
following Table 1 below:
Table 1 - Relationship between program objectives and program outcomes
Program Educational Objectives
→
(I)
(II)
(III)
Excel in
Succeed in
Success
profession
multiin
al ethics disciplinary
electrical
and
and
engineeri
leadership
diverse
ng areas
qualities
fields
Program Outcomes
↓
(IV)
Continue
advanced
education
A.
Apply maths, science, and electronics and
electrical engineering
S
M
S
B.
Design electrical and electronics circuits and
conduct experiments
S
S
M
Design digital and analog systems
S
S
M
Work on multi-disciplinary tasks.
S
M
S
M
E.
Identify, formulate and solve
engineering problems.
S
S
M
M
F.
Understand professional and ethical
responsibility.
M
S
S
S
Ability to communicate effectively
S
M
S
S
H.
Ability to develop confidence for selfeducation and life-long learning.
S
M
S
M
I.
Recognize the impact of engineering on
society.
S
S
S
M
Acquire new knowledge to use modern
engineering tools, software’s and
equipments
S
M
M
S
K.
Knowledge of contemporary issues to
undertake innovative projects
S
S
M
M
L.
Ability to face and succeed in competitive
examinations.
S
S
S
S
C.
D.
G.
J.
Key: S = Strong relationship; M = Moderate relationship
6. SPECIFIC LEARNING OUTCOMES IN ENGINEERING:
Graduates from accredited program must achieve the following learning outcomes, defined by broad
areas of learning.
A.
Ability to apply knowledge of Mathematics, Science, Electronics and Electrical Engineering



B.
Knowledge and understanding of scientific principles and methodology necessary to
strengthen their education in their engineering discipline, to enable appreciation of
its scientific and engineering context and to support their understanding of
historical, current and future developments and technologies.
Knowledge and understanding of mathematical principles necessary to underpin
their education in their engineering discipline and to enable them to apply
mathematical problems.
Ability to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering
disciplines to support the study of their own engineering discipline.
Ability to design electrical and electronics circuits and conduct experiments, analyze and
interpret data.
Practical application of engineering skills through combining theory and experience. Use of
other relevant knowledge and skills in fulfilling this objective, including:












C.
Knowledge of material characteristics, equipment, processes, or products.
Workshop and laboratory skills.
Understanding of contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (example,
operations and management, technology development, etc).
Understanding use of technical literature and other sources of information.
Awareness of nature of intellectual property and contractual issues.
Understanding of appropriate codes of practice and industry standards.
Awareness of quality issues.
Ability to work with technical uncertainty.
Understanding of engineering principles and ability to apply them to analyze key
engineering processes.
Ability to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components
through the use of analytical methods and modeling techniques.
Ability to apply quantitative methods and computer software relevant to their
engineering discipline, in order to solve engineering problems.
Understanding ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems.
Ability to design digital and analog systems pertaining to electrical and electronics
engineering.
Design is the creation and development of an economically viable product, process or
system to meet a defined application. It involves significant technical and intellectual skills
that can be used, to integrate all engineering understanding, knowledge for the solution of
real problems. Graduates will therefore need the knowledge, understanding and skills to:




Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints relating to health, safety,
environmental and sustainability and assessment of risks based on these constraints.
Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as
aesthetics.
Identify and manage costs and drivers thereof.
Use creativity to establish innovative solutions.






D.
Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks.








E.
Ensure fitness of purpose, for all aspects of the problem including production,
operation, maintenance and disposal.
Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes.
Knowledge and understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering
Processes.
Knowledge of management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering
objectives within that context.
Understanding of the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable
development.
Awareness of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering
activities including personnel, health, safety and Environmental (HSE) risks.
Maturity – requiring only the achievement of goals to drive their performance
Self‐direction(take a vaguely defined problem and systematically work to resolution)
Teams are used during the classroom periods, in the hands-on labs and in the design
projects.
Some teams change for eight-week industry oriented Mini-Project, and for the
seventeen -week design project.
Instruction on effective teamwork and project management is provided along with
an appropriate textbook for reference.
Teamwork is important not only for helping the students and to know their
classmates but also in completing assignments.
Students also are responsible for evaluating each other’s performance, which is then
reflected in the final grade.
Ability to demonstrated and work with all levels of people an a team in organization
Ability to identify, formulate and solve electrical engineering problems.
Is based on the problem solving process that has been well documented in engineering
texts. The elements of the process include:







Problem or opportunity identification.
Problem formulation and abstraction.
Information and data collection.
Model translation.
Experimental design and solution development.
Implementation and documentation.
Interpretation of results.
As the most engineers eventually learn, the problem solving process is never complete.
Therefore, a final element here is feedback and improvement.
F.
An understanding of legal and ethical responsibility.



Ability to make informed ethical choices and knowledge ability to of professional
codes of ethics. Evaluates the ethical dimensions of professional practice and
demonstrates ethical behavior.
Stick on to what they believed in.
High degree of trust and integrity.
G.
Ability to communicate effectively in both written and verbal form.

Written Communication: "Students should demonstrate the ability to communicate
effectively in writing."

Clarity.

Grammar/Punctuation.

References.

Verbal Communication: "Students should demonstrate the ability to communicate
effectively orally."


H.
Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to understand the value of life-long
learning.
Inspire the students to further explore in his/her program to recognize the need for life-long
learning. Some aspects of life-long learning include:






I.


Project management professional certification.
Begin work on advanced degree.
Updating the knowledge, related to advanced electrical engineering concepts.
Personal continuing education efforts.
Ongoing learning – stays up with industry trends/ new technology.
Continued personal development.
Have learned same new significant skills.
Have taken up to 80 hours training per year.
Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern electrical engineering tools, softwares
and equipments to analyze problems necessary for electrical engineering practice.


K.
Knowledge and understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering
processes.
Knowledge of managerial techniques which may be used to achieve engineering
objectives within that context.
Understanding of the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable
development.
Awareness of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering
activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk (including environmental risk)
issues.
Personal continuing education efforts.
Understanding of the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in
engineering.
Ability to recognize the impact of electrical engineering on society .






J.
Speaking Style.
Subject Matter.
Focusing the knowledge and interpretation an socio economic, political and
environmental issues.
Obtaining in-depth knowledge on contemporary issue.
A knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative projects.

Encompasses a wide range of tools and skills needed by engineering graduates in
computer software, simulation packages, diagnostic equipment, use of technical
library resources and literature search tools.
L.
Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive examinations
like GATE, GRE, TOEFL and GMAT etc.



Create a plan for success that connects their college education to future career.
Graduates ready for immediate employment.
Make a smooth transition into post graduate studies.
7. Faculty Objectives:
F1: Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness of and commitment to
their ethical and social responsibilities, both as individuals and in team environments.
F2: Enable graduates to keep on self- development throughout their careers.
F3: Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally
and fulfill the need of industry.
F4: Organize, in collaboration with stakeholders, conferences, symposia and workshops to upgrade
technical and scientific levels in Electrical and Electronic Engineering
F5: Carry out and publish academic knowledge
F6: Increase activities to promote innovation, commercialization and Entrepreneurship.
8. Program Outcomes Attained through course modules
I SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
A1001
Mathematics – I [A, E]
X
X
A1002
Engineering Physics [A, D]
X
A1003
Engineering Chemistry [A]
X
A1501
Computer Programming [A, D, E, J]
X
A1201
Basic Electrical Engineering [A, B, E, L]
X
X
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab [A, B ,I, K, L]
X
X
A1502
Computer Programming Lab [D, E, I, J, L]
X
X
X
X
X
A1601
PC Software Lab [D, E, I, J, L]
X
X
X
X
X
D
E
J
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
II SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
B
C
A1008
Technical English [G, H, I, L]
A1007
Mathematics-II [A, E]
X
X
A1005
Probability, Statistics and Computational Techniques [A, E]
X
X
A1004
Environmental Science [F, I]
A1503
Data Structures through C [A, D, E, J]
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab [D, F, G, H, I, L]
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab [B, C, D, E, I, J, L]
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab [A, D, H, I, K]
F
G
H
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
L
X
X
X
X
K
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
H
I
X
X
X
X
III SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
B
A1011
Mathematics – III [A, E]
X
A1401
Electronic Devices [A, B, C, D, I]
X
A1013
Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis [F, I]
A1404
Digital Logic Design [A, B, C, D, I]
X
X
A1203
Network Analysis [A, B, L]
X
X
A1204
DC Machines [A, E, I, L]
X
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab [A, B, C, D, E, F, L]
X
X
A1207
Electric Circuits and Simulation Lab [A, B, E, L]
X
X
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
J
K
L
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
IV SEMESTER
Code
Subject
C
D
E
X
X
A1509
Computer Architecture and Organization [A, D, E, J]
X
A1411
Electronic Circuits [A, B, C, D, I]
X
A1209
Power System Generation [A, E, H, I, L]
X
X
A1210
AC Machines – I [A, E, I, L]
X
A1211
Electro Magnetic Fields [A, E, I, L]
A1212
X
X
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Control Systems [A, E, J, L]
X
X
A1213
DC Machines Lab [A, B, I, L]
X
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab [B, C, D, K, L]
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
V SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
B
C
D
E
X
X
F
G
H
I
A1506
Object Oriented Programming through JAVA [A, D, E, J]
X
A1541
Soft Computing [A, E, I, K]
X
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications [A, B, C, D, I]
X
X
X
X
X
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform Techniques [A, B, C, D, I]
X
X
X
X
X
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution [A, E, H, J, L]
X
X
A1218
AC Machines – II [A, E, I, L]
X
X
A1219
AC Machines Lab [A, B, C, D, L]
X
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab [B, H, J, K, L]
X
K
L
X
X
X
J
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
J
K
L
X
X
VI SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
A1015
Industrial Management and Psychology [F, I]
A1423
Micro Processors and Interfacing [A, D, J]
X
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems[A, E, I, K, L]
X
A1221
Electrical Measurements [A, E]
X
A1222
Power Electronics [A, E, H, L]
X
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
X
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
INTERDEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVE – I
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab [A, D, H, J, K, L]
X
X
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab [A, B, H, K, L]
X
X
A
B
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
K
L
VII SEMESTER
Code
Subject
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
X
A1430
Embedded Systems [A, D]
X
X
A1224
Power System Switchgear and Protection [A, E, I, J, L]
X
X
X
A1225
Power System Operation and Control [A, E, I]
X
X
X
A1226
Power Semiconductor Drives [A, E, H, K]
X
X
X
X
X
INTERDEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVE – II
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – I
A1233
Electrical Measurements Lab [A, C, H, L]
X
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I [A, D, E, K, L]
X
X
X
X
X
D
E
X
X
X
K
L
X
X
VIII SEMESTER
Code
Subject
A
A1236
Utilization of Electrical Energy [A, E]
X
B
C
F
G
H
I
J
X
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – II
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – III
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II [A, D, E, K, L]
X
X
X
ELECTIVES
INTERDEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVE – I
Code
Subject
A
B
A1511
Database Management Systems [D, E, I, J, L]
A1605
Wireless and Mobile Computing [B, E, J]
A1429
VLSI Design [A, D, H, J, K, L]
A1337
Robotics [B, C, E, K]
X
A1701
Introduction to Aircraft Industry [B, J]
X
A1148
Air pollution and Control Methodologies [B, I]
X
C
D
E
X
X
X
F
G
H
I
J
X
X
X
X
L
X
X
X
X
K
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
INTERDEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVE – II
Code
Subject
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
A1016
Human Values and Ethics [D, F, H, I]
X
X
X
X
A1017
Human Resource Management [D, F, I]
X
X
X
A1018
Entrepreneurship [D, F, I]
X
X
X
A1019
Business Communication [D, F, I]
X
X
X
A1020
Intellectual Property and Patent Rights [D, F, I]
X
X
X
A1021
Project Planning and Management [D, F, I]
X
X
X
J
K
L
J
K
L
X
X
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – I
Code
Subject
A
A1227
High Voltage Engineering [A, D, K, L]
X
A1228
Energy Management [F, I, K]
A1229
Linear System Analysis [B, J]
A1230
Instrumentation [A, D, E, K, L]
X
A1231
Special Electrical Machines [A, B, E, J]
X
A1232
Power System Transients [B, E, J]
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
K
L
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – II
Code
Subject
A
B
A1237
Electrical Distribution Systems [A, D, F, I]
A1238
High Voltage DC Transmission and FACTS [B, D, L]
X
A1239
Power Quality [B, C, E, J]
X
A1240
Advanced Control Systems [A, B, I, L]
X
X
A1241
Dynamics of Electrical Machines [A, B, E, J]
X
X
A1242
Advanced Power System Protection [B, C, E, K]
C
X
D
E
X
F
G
H
X
I
J
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
B
C
X
X
X
X
PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVE – III
Code
Subject
A1243
Reliability Engineering [A, D, I, K]
A1244
Digital Control Systems [B, D, K]
A1245
Extra High Voltage AC Transmission [A, D, K]
A1246
Machine Modeling and Analysis [C, E, K]
A1247
Solar Energy and its Applications [A, B, C, H, J]
A1248
Programmable Logic Controllers [C, H, J]
A
X
E
F
G
H
X
X
X
X
X
D
X
I
J
X
K
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
L
9. The classification of outcomes of the above Electrical and Electronics Engineering
courses is grouped as follows:
Outcome (A) : Ability to apply knowledge of Mathematics, Science, Electronics and Electrical
Engineering
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1001
Mathematics – I
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution
A1002
Engineering Physics
A1218
AC Machines – II
A1003
Engineering Chemistry
A1219
AC Machines Lab
A1501
Computer Programming
A1423
Micro Processors and Interfacing
A1201
Basic Electrical Engineering
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab
A1221
Electrical Measurements
A1007
Mathematics-II
A1222
Power Electronics
A1005
Probability, Statistics and Computational Techniques
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
A1503
Data Structures through C
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab
A1430
Embedded Systems
A1011
Mathematics – III
A1224
Power System Switchgear and Protection
A1401
Electronics Devices
A1225
Power System Operation and Control
A1404
Digital Logic Design
A1226
Power Semiconductor Drives
A1203
Network Analysis
A1233
Electrical Measurements Lab
A1204
DC Machines
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1236
Utilization of Electrical Energy
A1207
Electric Circuits and Simulation Lab
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II
A1509
Computer Architecture and Organization
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1411
Electronic Circuits
A1227
High Voltage Engineering (Professional Elective I)
A1209
Power System Generation
A1230
Instrumentation (Professional Elective I)
A1210
AC Machines – I
A1231
A1211
Electro Magnetic Fields
A1237
A1212
Control Systems
A1238
High Voltage DC Transmission and FACTS
A1213
DC Machines Lab
A1240
Advanced Control Systems
(Professional Elective II)
A1506
Object Oriented Programming through JAVA
A1241
Dynamics of Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective II)
A1541
Soft Computing
A1243
Reliability Engineering
(Professional Elective III)
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications
A1245
Extra High Voltage AC Transmission
(Professional Elective III)
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform Techniques
A1247
Solar Energy and its Applications
(Professional Elective III)
Special Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective I)
Electrical Distribution Systems
(Professional Elective II)
Outcome (B) : Ability to design electrical and electronics circuits and conduct experiments with
electrical engineering as well as to analyze and interpret data
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1201
Basic Electrical Engineering
A1221
Electrical Measurements
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1605
Wireless and Mobile Computing
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1401
Electronic Devices
A1337
Robotics (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1404
Digital Logic Design
A1701
A1203
Network Analysis
A1148
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1229
Linear System Analysis (Professional Elective I)
A1207
Electric Circuits and Simulation Lab
A1231
Special Electrical Machines (Professional Elective I)
A1411
Electronic Circuits
A1232
Power System Transients (Professional Elective I)
A1213
DC Machines Lab
A1239
Power Quality (Professional Elective II)
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab
A1240
Advanced Control Systems
(Professional Elective II)
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications
A1241
Dynamics of Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective II)
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform Techniques
A1242
Advanced Power System Protection
(Professional Elective II)
A1219
AC Machines Lab
A1244
Digital Control Systems (Professional Elective III)
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab
A1247
Solar Energy and its Applications
(Professional Elective III)
Introduction to Aircraft Industry
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
Air pollution and Control Methodologies
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
Outcome (C) : Ability to design digital and analog systems pertaining to Electrical Engineering
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform and Distribution
A1401
Electronic Devices
A1233
Electrical Measurements Lab
A1404
Digital Logic Design
A1337
Robotics (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1239
Power Quality (Professional Elective II)
A1411
Electronic Circuits
A1242
Advanced Power System Protection
(Professional Elective II)
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab
A1246
A1219
AC Machines Lab
A1247
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications
A1248
Machine Modeling and Analysis
(Professional Elective III)
Solar Energy and its Applications
(Professional Elective III)
Programmable Logic Controllers
(Professional Elective III)
Outcome (D) : Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1002
Engineering Physics
A1423
Micro Processors and Interfacing
A1501
Computer Programming
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
A1502
Computer Programming Lab
A1430
Embedded Systems
A1601
PC Software Lab
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I
A1503
Data Structures through C
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab
A1511
Database Management Systems
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab
A1016
A1401
Electronic Devices
A1017
A1404
Digital Logic Design
A1018
Human Values and Ethics
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Human Resource Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Entrepreneurship (Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1019
Business Communication
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1509
Computer Architecture and Organization
A1020
Intellectual Property and Patent Rights
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1411
Electronic Circuits
A1021
Project Planning and Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab
A1230
Instrumentation (Professional Elective I)
A1506
Object Oriented Programming through JAVA
A1237
Electrical Distribution Systems
(Professional Elective II)
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications
A1243
Reliability Engineering
(Professional Elective III)
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform Techniques
A1244
Digital Control Systems
(Professional Elective III)
A1219
AC Machines Lab
A1245
Extra High Voltage AC Transmission
(Professional Elective III)
Outcome (E) : Ability to identify, formulate and solve electrical engineering problems
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1001
Mathematics – I
A1218
AC Machines - II
A1501
Computer Programming
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems
A1201
Basic Electrical Engineering
A1221
Electrical Measurements
A1502
Computer Programming Lab
A1222
Power Electronics
A1601
PC Software Lab
A1224
Power System Switchgear and Protection
A1007
Mathematics-II
A1225
Power System Operation and Control
A1005
Probability, Statistics and Computational Techniques
A1226
Power Semiconductor Drives
A1503
Data Structures through C
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1236
Utilization of Electrical Energy
A1011
Mathematics – III
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II
A1204
DC Machines
A1511
Database Management Systems
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1605
Wireless and Mobile Computing
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1207
Electric Circuits and Simulation Lab
A1337
Robotics (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1509
Computer Architecture and Organization
A1230
Instrumentation (Professional Elective I)
A1209
Power System Generation
A1231
Special Electrical Machines (Professional Elective I)
A1210
AC Machines – I
A1232
Power System Transients (Professional Elective I)
A1211
Electro Magnetic Fields
A1239
Power Quality (Professional Elective II)
A1212
Control Systems
A1241
A1506
Object Oriented Programming through JAVA
A1242
A1541
Soft Computing
A1246
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution
Dynamics of Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective II)
Advanced Power System Protection
(Professional Elective II)
Machine Modeling and Analysis
(Professional Elective III)
Outcome (F) : An understanding of legal an ethical responsibility
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1004
Environmental Science
A1018
Entrepreneurship (interdepartmental Elective II)
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab
A1019
Business Communication
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Intellectual Property and Patent Rights
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Project Planning and Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1013
Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis
A1020
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1021
A1015
Industrial Management and Psychology
A1228
Energy Management (Professional Elective I)
A1016
Human Values and Ethics
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1237
Electrical Distribution Systems
(Professional Elective II)
A1017
Human Resource Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Outcome (G) : Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written form
Code
A1008
Subject
Technical English
Code
A1009
Subject
English Language Communication Skills Lab
Outcome (H): Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to understand the value of life-long
learning.
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1008
Technical English
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab
A1226
Power Semiconductor Drives
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab
A1233
Electrical Measurements Lab
A1209
Power System Generation
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution
A1016
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab
A1247
A1222
Power Electronics
A1248
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
Human Values and Ethics
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Solar Energy and its Applications
(Professional Elective III)
Programmable Logic Controllers
(Professional Elective III)
Outcome (I): Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society.
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab
A1419
Signal Analysis and Transform Techniques
A1502
Computer Programming Lab
A1218
AC Machines - II
A1601
PC Software Lab
A1015
Industrial Management and Psychology
A1008
Technical English
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems
A1004
Environmental Science
A1224
Power system Switchgear and Protection
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab
A1225
Power System Operation and Control
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1511
Database Management Systems
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab
A1148
A1401
Electronic Devices
A1016
A1013
Managerial Economics and Financial Analysis
A1017
A1404
Digital Logic Design
A1018
A1204
DC Machines
A1019
A1411
Electronic Circuits
A1020
A1209
Power System Generation
A1021
Air pollution and Control Methodologies
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
Human Values and Ethics
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Human Resource Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Entrepreneurship (Interdepartmental Elective II)
Business Communication
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Intellectual Property and Patent Rights
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
Project Planning and Management
(Interdepartmental Elective II)
A1210
AC Machines – I
A1228
Energy Management (Professional Elective I)
A1211
Electro Magnetic Fields
A1237
Electrical Distribution Systems
(Professional Elective II)
A1213
DC Machines Lab
A1240
Advanced Control Systems (Professional Elective II)
A1541
Soft Computing
A1243
Reliability Engineering (Professional Elective III)
A1415
Integrated Circuits Applications
Outcome (J): Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern electrical engineering tools, software
and equipments to analyze problems necessary for electrical engineering practice.
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1501
Computer Programming
A1224
Power Switchgear and Protection
A1502
Computer Programming Lab
A1511
A1601
PC Software Lab
A1605
A1503
Data Structures through C
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1701
Introduction to Aircraft Industry
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1509
Computer Architecture and Organization
A1229
Linear System Analysis (Professional Elective I)
A1212
Control Systems
A1231
Special Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective I)
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab
A1232
Power System Transients (Professional Elective I)
A1506
Object Oriented Programming through JAVA
A1239
Power Quality (Professional Elective II)
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution
A1241
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab
A1247
A1423
Micro Processors and Interfacing
A1248
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
Database Management Systems
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
Wireless and Mobile Computing
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
Dynamics of Electrical Machines
(Professional Elective II)
Solar Energy and its Applications
(Professional Elective III)
Programmable Logic Controllers
(Professional Elective III)
Outcome (K): A knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative projects.
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1305
Computer Aided Engineering Drawing Lab
A1337
Robotics (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1541
Soft Computing
A1228
Energy Management (Professional Elective I)
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab
A1230
Instrumentation (Professional elective I)
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems
A1242
Advanced Power System Protection
(Professional Elective II)
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
A1243
Reliability Engineering (Professional Elective III)
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab
A1244
Digital Control Systems
(Professional Elective III)
A1226
Power Semiconductor Drives
A1245
Extra High Voltage AC Transmission
(Professional Elective III)
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I
A1246
Machine Modeling and Analysis
(Professional Elective III)
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II
Outcome (L) : Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in competitive examinations
like GATE, TOEFL, GRE, GMAT etc.
Code
Subject
Code
Subject
A1201
Basic Electrical Engineering
A1217
Power System Transmission and Distribution
A1010
Engineering Physics and Engineering Chemistry Lab
A1218
AC Machines – II
A1502
Computer Programming Lab
A1219
AC Machines Lab
A1601
PC Software Lab
A1422
Electronic Circuits & Integrated Circuits Lab
A1008
Technical English
A1220
Computer Methods in Power Systems
A1009
English Language Communication Skills Lab
A1221
Electrical Measurements
A1504
Data Structures through C Lab
A1222
Power Electronics
A1203
Network Analysis
A1427
Micro Processors and Interfacing Lab
A1204
DC Machines
A1223
Power Electronics and Simulation Lab
A1406
Electronic Devices Lab
A1224
Power System Switchgear and Protection
A1207
Electric Circuits and Simulation Lab
A1233
Electrical Measurements Lab
A1209
Power System Generation
A1234
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – I
A1210
AC Machines – I
A1249
Power Systems and Simulation Lab – II
A1211
Electro Magnetic Fields
A1511
Database Management Systems
(Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1212
Control Systems
A1429
VLSI Design (Interdepartmental Elective I)
A1213
DC Machines Lab
A1230
Instrumentation (Professional Elective I)
A1214
Control Systems and Simulation Lab
A1240
Advanced Control Systems
(Professional Elective II)
10. METHODS OF MEASURING LEARNING OUTCOMES AND VALUE ADDED
Various methodologies that are used to measure “student learning” each have their own limitations
and biases and no method can be relied upon completely. For this reason “triangulating the data” is
considered as the best practice in educational research. Using data from several different sources
increases the probability that, the findings present an accurate picture. The following formal
assessment procedures are employed:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
6)
7)
8)
9)
10)
11)
University end-of-semester course evaluations
Departmental mid-semester course evaluations
Departmental course objective surveys
Course portfolio evaluations
Exit Interviews
Alumni feedback
Employer surveys
Department academic council meetings
Faculty meetings
Project work
Placements and
12) Professional societies.
Each is described in more detail below:
(1)
University end-of-semester course evaluations:
Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University (JNTU) conducts end-of-semester examination for
all courses. Summary results for each course are distributed to the appropriate instructor
and the HOD, summarizing the course-specific results and comparing them to the average
across the university. Students are encouraged to write specific comments about the
positive and negative aspects of the course. The statistical summary and student comments
are presented and also submitted to the principal and department academic council for
review.
(2)
Departmental mid-semester course evaluations:
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering department conducts mid-semester reviews for all
courses. Students are encouraged to participate in a feedback survey on the state of the
courses they have currently chosen. The survey provides student an opportunity for a
written comment as well. Faculty are strongly encouraged to review these evaluations and
draft a brief response on how they will react to correct any deficiencies noted by the
students. The results are reviewed by department faculty (all faculty have permission to read
results for all courses).
(3)
Departmental course objective surveys and evaluations:
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering department conducts end-of-semester course
objective surveys for all of our courses. Students are encouraged to fill out a feed back form
for the courses they are currently studying. Faculties are strongly encouraged to review
these evaluations and draft a brief response on how to improve upon observations by the
students. The results are reviewed by departmental committee (all faculty have permission
to read results for all courses). The results of how program satisfy course objectives are
discussed. Based on this feedback for certain courses, alterations / changes to the course
objectives are recommended for implementation.
(4)
Course portfolio evaluations:
Department collects course portfolios from the instructor of each course offered in a given
semester. They are documented and are available for entire EEE faculty to study. These
portfolios help the course coordinator monitor how the course is being taught, and helps
new faculty to understand how more experienced colleagues teach the given course. With
respect to assessment, each portfolio contains two surveys to be submitted by the instructor
of the course. The beginning-of-semester survey encourages faculty members to think
about what they can do to improve the teaching and administration of their course,
compared with the last time they taught it. The end-of-semester survey encourages faculty
to record what did and did not work well during this course offering and what improvements
should be made for the future.
(5)
Exit Interviews:
Inputs from final year students are solicited annually through “Exit Survey”. The results are
disseminated to the faculty and department advisory council for analysis and action. The
questionnaire is designed to survey program outcomes, solicit information on program
experiences, career choices as well as suggestions and comments. This instrument seeks to
assess how students view the department's program in retrospect.
(6)
Alumni feedback:
The “alumni survey” is a medium where our alumni’s perception on effectiveness of our
PEOs is captured. Through this written questionnaire we seek input on the Program
Objectives and Learning Outcomes from alumni based on their job experience (after
graduation and after they have spent few years with their employer). Alumni are excellent
resources with perspective on the values and advantages of their education. They also
provide opportunities for current students for networking and potential employment. The
data is analyzed and used for continuous improvement in PEOs.
(7)
Employer surveys:
The employer survey is a feedback tool and a survey participated by “Employers and
Advisors” of alumni (with two or more years in employment). We review the effectiveness of
our curriculum through this feedback and assess how well the student performed in real
world and issues related to Electrical and Electronics Engineering. We seek information on
several categories of preparation, and for each category, employer’s perception about our
graduates is captured. This survey assists us in determining effectiveness and overall
performance level of our Program Educational Objectives.
(8)
Department Academic Committee meetings:
The Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department Advisory Committee (EEEDAC)
includes a diverse group of experts from academe, industry and the alumni. The Advisory
Council visits the institute and holds meeting with representatives of administration, faculty
and the students. The head of department presents a report on improvements and
amendments to the program to the council. The advisory council prepares a status report for
action and review by the Principal.
(9)
Faculty meetings:
The state of undergraduate program is the focal point of monthly faculty meetings and thus
is a common agenda point for such meetings. The faculty devotes substantial time, in formal
and informal discussions, assessing state of the program and searching for improvements.
(10)
Project work:
The final project reports, must demonstrate that students produced solutions to
research/industry problems involving contemporary issues. There is no scale for this tool as
the reports provide qualitative data.
(11)
Placements:
Data from the Placement and Training Centre pertaining to placement of graduates reflects
how successful our graduates are in securing a job in a related field.
(12)
Professional societies:
The role of professional societies in introducing our students to technical, entrepreneurial
and societal aspects of the field and in providing outstanding opportunities for lifelong
learning makes them important constituents. Department of Electrical and Electronics
Engineering support student chapters of the IEEE Power Engineering Society (PES) and
Power Electronics Society (PELS). The initiative encourages student participation and
provides means and interface for service, enhancing the profession, networking and
leadership skills.
WRITING AND ASSESSING COURSE
LEVEL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning Outcomes
Learning Outcomes are the formal statements of what students are expected to learn in a course.
Synonyms for “learning outcome” include expected learning outcome, learning outcome statement,
and student learning outcome. Course level student learning outcomes provide information on
exactly what expected learning outcomes are and what methods can be used to assess them. This is
designed to assist faculty with the process of developing expected learning outcomes and methods
for assessing those outcomes in their courses. This provides basic information related to course
purpose, expected learning outcomes, methods for assessing expected learning outcomes, criteria
for grade determination and a course outline. After reading and completing this, individuals will be
able to:







Prepare a description of the course as well as a written statement regarding the course’s
purpose;
Construct/develop expected learning outcomes for the course;
Create an assessment plan that outlines the specific methods that will be used to assess the
expected student learning outcomes for a course;
Describe how grades will be determined in a process that is separate and distinct from
assessing the expected learning outcomes;
Identify the common components of a course outline
Revise their course syllabi to incorporate a course purpose, expected learning outcomes,
methods to assess those outcomes, the criteria for grade determination, and a course outline.
This process uses some terminology related to expected learning outcomes and assessment. A
brief glossary of terms has been provided below for reference purposes.
Assessment of expected learning outcomes: The process of investigating (1) what students are
learning and (2) how well they are learning it in relation to the stated expected learning outcomes
for the course.
Assessment plan: The proposed methods and timeline for assessment-related activities in a given
course (e.g., when are you going to check what/how well the students are learning and how are you
going to do that?).
Classroom Assessment Technique (CAT): Angelo and Cross (1993) developed a variety of
techniques/activities than can be used to assess students’ learning. These CATs are often done
anonymously and are not graded. These activities check on the class’ learning while students are still
engaged in the learning process. An example of a CAT is a non-graded quiz given a few weeks before
the first exam.
Course description: A formal description of the material to be covered in the course.
Course purpose: The course purpose describes the intent of the course and how it contributes to the
programme. The course purpose goes beyond the course description.
Evaluation: Making a judgment about the quality of student’s learning/work and assigning marks
based on that judgment. Evaluation activities (such as exams, papers, etc.) are often seen as formal
ways to assess the expected learning outcomes for a course.
Methods for assessing student learning outcomes: This term refers to any technique or activity that
is used to identify what students are learning or how well they are learning. Formal methods for
evaluating student learning outcomes include Continuous Assessment Tests, Mid Semester Test,
Tutorials, End Semester Examination etc. The assessment methods are used to identify how the well
students have acquired the learning outcomes for the course.
1.
COURSE PURPOSE
One of the first steps in identifying the expected learning outcomes for a course is identifying the
purpose of teaching in the course. By clarifying the purpose of the course, faculty can help discover
the main topics or themes related to students’ learning. These themes help to outline the expected
learning outcomes for the course.
The course purpose involves the following:
1. What role does this course play within the programme?
2. How is the course unique or different from other courses?
3. Why should/do students take this course? What essential knowledge or skills should they gain
from this experience?
4. What knowledge or skills from this course will students need to have mastered to perform well
in future classes or jobs?
5. Why is this course important for students to take?
The “Course Description” provides general information regarding the topics and content addressed
in the course, the “Course Purpose” goes beyond that to describe how this course fits in to the
students’ educational experience in the programme.
2.
EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES
An expected learning outcome is a formal statement of what students are expected to learn in a
course. Expected learning outcome statements refer to specific knowledge, practical skills, areas of
professional development, attitudes, higher-order thinking skills, etc. that faculty members expect
students to develop, learn, or master during a course (Suskie, 2004). Expected learning outcomes are
also often referred to as “learning outcomes”, “student learning outcomes”, or “learning outcome
statements”.
Simply stated, expected learning outcome statements describe:
1. What faculty members want students to know at the end of the course and
2. What faculty members want students to be able to do at the end of the course.
Learning outcomes have three major characteristics
1. They specify an action by the students/learners that is observable
2. They specify an action by the students/learners that is measurable
3. They specify an action that is done by the students/learners (rather than the faculty members)
Effectively developed expected learning outcome statements should possess all three of these
characteristics. When this is done, the expected learning outcomes for a course are designed so that
they can be assessed (Suskie, 2004).
3.
WRITING EFFECTIVE LEARNING OUTCOME STATEMENTS
When writing expected learning outcomes, it is important to use verbs that describe exactly what
the learner(s) will be able to do upon completion of the course.
Examples of good action words to include in expected learning outcome statements:
Compile, identify, create, plan, revise, analyze, design, select, utilize, apply, demonstrate, prepare,
use, compute, discuss, explain, predict, assess, compare, rate, critique, outline, or evaluate
There are some verbs that are unclear in the context of an expected learning outcome statement
(e.g., know, be aware of, appreciate, learn, understand, comprehend, become familiar with). These
words are often vague, have multiple interpretations, or are simply difficult to observe or measure
(American Association of Law Libraries, 2005). As such, it is best to avoid using these terms when
creating expected learning outcome statements.
For example, please look at the following learning outcomes statements:


The students will understand Electrical Distribution Systems.
The students will appreciate knowledge discovery from Distribution Automation Techniques.
Both of these learning outcomes are stated in a manner that will make them difficult to assess.
Consider the following:


How do you observe someone “understanding” a theory or “appreciating” Distribution
Automation Techniques?
How easy will it be to measure “understanding” or “appreciation”?
These expected learning outcomes are more effectively stated the following way:


The students will be able to identify and describe what techniques are used in Distribution
Automation systems.
The students will be able to identify the characteristics of Classification techniques from other
Distribution Automation Techniques.
Incorporating Critical Thinking Skills into Expected Learning Outcomes Statements
Many faculty members choose to incorporate words that reflect critical or higher-order thinking into
their learning outcome statements. Bloom (1956) developed a taxonomy outlining the different
types of thinking skills people use in the learning process. Bloom argued that people use different
levels of thinking skills to process different types of information and situations. Some of these are
basic cognitive skills (such as memorization) while others are complex skills (such as creating new
ways to apply information). These skills are often referred to as critical thinking skills or higher-order
thinking skills.
Bloom proposed the following taxonomy of thinking skills. All levels of Bloom’s taxonomy of thinking
skills can be incorporated into expected learning outcome statements. Recently, Anderson and
Krathwohl (2001) adapted Bloom's model to include language that is oriented towards the language
used in expected learning outcome statements. A summary of Anderson and Krathwohl’s revised
version of Bloom’s taxonomy of critical thinking is provided below.
Definitions of the different levels of thinking skills in Bloom’s taxonomy
1. Remember – recalling relevant terminology, specific facts, or different procedures related to
information and/or course topics. At this level, a student can remember something, but may
not really understand it.
2. Understand – the ability to grasp the meaning of information (facts, definitions, concepts,
etc.) that has been presented.
3. Apply – being able to use previously learned information in different situations or in
problem solving.
4. Analyze – the ability to break information down into its component parts. Analysis also
refers to the process of examining information in order to make conclusions regarding cause
and effect, interpreting motives, making inferences, or finding evidence to support
statements/arguments.
5. Evaluate – being able to judge the value of information and/or sources of information based
on personal values or opinions.
6. Create – the ability to creatively or uniquely apply prior knowledge and/or skills to produce
new and original thoughts, ideas, processes, etc. At this level, students are involved in
creating their own thoughts and ideas.
List of Action Words Related to Critical Thinking Skills
Here is a list of action words that can be used when creating the expected student learning
outcomes related to critical thinking skills in a course. These terms are organized according to the
different levels of higher-order thinking skills contained in Anderson and Krathwohl’s (2001) revised
version of Bloom’s taxonomy.
REMEMBER
Count
Define
Describe
Draw
Identify
Label
List
Match
Name
Outline
Point
Quote
Read
Recall
Recite
Recognize
Record
Repeat
Reproduce
Select
State Write
4.
UNDERSTAND
Associate
Compute
Convert
Defend
Discuss
Distinguish
Estimate
Explain
Extend
Extrapolate
Generalize
Give
examples
Infer
Paraphrase
Predict
Rewrite
Summarize
APPLY
ANALYZE
Add
Apply
Calculate
Change
Classify
Complete
Compute
Demonstrate
Discover
Divide
Examine
Graph
Interpolate
Manipulate
Modify
Operate
Prepare
Produce
Show
Solve
Subtract
Translate
Use
Analyze
Arrange
Breakdown
Combine
Design
Detect
Develop
Diagram
Differentiate
Discriminate
Illustrate
Infer
Outline
Point out
Relate
Select
Separate
Subdivide
Utilize
EVALUATE
Appraise
Assess
Compare
Conclude
Contrast
Criticize
Critique
Determine
Grade
Interpret
Judge
Justify
Measure
Rank
Rate
Support
Test
CREATE
Categorize
Combine
Compile
Compose
Create
Drive
Design
Devise
Explain
Generate
Group
Integrate
Modify
Order
Organize
Plan
Prescribe
Propose
Rearrange
Reconstruct
Related
Reorganize
Revise
Rewrite
Summarize
Transform
Specify
TIPS FOR DEVELOPING COURSE LEVEL EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES STATEMENTS
Limit the course-level expected learning outcomes to 5 - 10 statements for the entire course (more
detailed outcomes can be developed for individual units, assignments, chapters, etc.).
Focus on overarching or general knowledge and/or skills (rather than small or trivial details).
Focus on knowledge and skills that are central to the course topic and/or discipline.
Create statements that are student-centered rather than faculty-centered (e.g., “upon completion of
this course students will be able to list the names of all Distribution Automation Techniques versus
“one objective of this course is to teach the names of all Distribution Automation Techniques. )
Focus on the learning that results from the course rather than describing activities or lessons in the
course.
Incorporate or reflect the institutional and departmental missions.
Incorporate various ways for students to show success (outlining, describing, modeling, depicting,
etc.) rather than using a single statement such as “at the end of the course, students will know
_______ “ as the stem for each expected outcome statement.
5.
SAMPLE EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES STATEMENTS
The following depict some sample expected learning outcome statements from selected courses.
Basic Electrical Engineering:
At the end of the course, the student should be able to:
 Define basic electrical concepts, including electric charge, current, electrical potential,
electrical Power and energy.
 Distinguish the relationship of voltage and current in resistors, capacitors, inductors, and
mutual Inductors.
 Differentiate circuits with ideal, independent, and controlled voltage and current sources
and able to apply Kirchhoff’s voltage and current laws to the analysis of electric circuits.
 Illustrate to apply concepts of electric network topology, nodes, branches, and loops to solve
circuit problems, including the use of computer simulation.
 Emphasize on basic laws and techniques to develop a working knowledge of the methods of
analysis used.
 Interpret to solve series and parallel magnetic circuits
 Design various two port network parameters and relations between them.
AC Machines - I:
Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:
 Capable to analyze the principle, Construction and operation of a single phase transformer
 Proficient with the transformer about the No Load and Load Conditions.
 Development of basic skills in design and analysis of the Equivalent Circuit of a Transformer.
 Acquaint with the star-star, delta –delta, star-delta, delta-star connections of a polyphase
transformer.
 Discriminate the principle, construction and operation of a three phase Induction Motor.
 Interpret the different techniques for the speed control of an Induction Motor
 Interpolate the performance and torque –slip characteristics of an Induction motor
Power System Generation:
Upon completion of this course, students will acquire knowledge about:

Analyze the power system structure and interconnected grid system

Compare the applications and significance of both conventional and non-conventional
sources

Proficient in comparison of different types of generating stations.

Categorize the different types of substations & its layouts.

Analyze and perform the tasks of correcting the power factor & voltage control.

Analyze the power generation economic aspects such as load curves & factor governing the
power system performance.

Evaluate the tariff methods & calculations
Power System Operation and Control:
After completing this course the student must demonstrate the knowledge and ability to:

Associate and apply the concept and principle of unit commitment and optimal operation of
power plants.

Estimate the interconnection of power systems networks with two or more streams.

Assess various methods to obtain the economic operation.

Proficient in load frequency control of single area and two area networks,

Identify the steady state and dynamic performance of I area LFC and II area LFC.

Analyze and perform the tasks of modeling the generator, turbine, and speed governor.

Compute reactive power control in transmission lines and compensation of reactive power.
6.
AN OVERVIEW OF ASSESSMENT
According to Palomba and Banta (1999) assessment involves the systematic collection, review, and
use of evidence or information related to student learning. Assessment helps faculty understand
how well their students understand course topics/lessons. Assessment exercises are often
anonymous. This anonymity allows students to respond freely, rather than trying to get the “right”
answer or look good. Assessment exercises attempt to gauge students’ understanding in order to
see what areas need to be re-addressed in order to increase the students’ learning.
In other words, assessment is the process of investigating (1) what students are learning and (2) how
well they are learning it in relation to the stated expected learning outcomes for the course. This
process also involves providing feedback to the students about their learning and providing new
learning opportunities/strategies to increase student learning.
For example, Dr. JVR initiates a class discussion on material from Chapter One and determines that
most students are confused about Topic X. This class discussion served as a method for assessing
student learning and helped determine the fact that student learning related to Topic X is somewhat
lacking. Dr. JVR now has the opportunity to (1) inform the students that there is some confusion and
(2) make adjustments to address this confusion (e.g., ask student to re-read Chapter One, re-lecture
over Topic X, etc.). This assessment process helps increase students’ learning.
Difference between “evaluation” and “assessment”
Evaluation focuses on making a judgment about student work to be used in assigning marks that
express the level of student performance. Evaluation is usually used in the process of determining
marks. Evaluation typically occurs after student learning is assumed to have taken place (e.g., a final
exam). Evaluation is part of the assessment process. Course assignments that are evaluated/graded
(e.g., exams, papers, tutorials, etc.) are often seen as formal assessment techniques.
While evaluation is an important component of most classrooms, it does have some limitations. For
example, if the class average on an exam is a 45%, is seems pretty clear that something went wrong
along the way. When one has only evaluated the final learning product, it can be challenging to go
back and discover what happened. It can also be difficult to address the situation or provide
opportunities for students to learn from their mistakes. Yes, a curve on an exam can help address a
low class average, but does it help the students learn? Engaging in informal assessment activities
throughout the course can help avoid this situation.
Assessment process
1. Establishing expected learning outcomes for the course;
2. Systematically gathering, analyzing, and interpreting evidence (through formal assessment
activities such as exams or papers and informal assessment activities such as in-class discussions
exercises) to determine how well the students’ learning matches:
 faculty expectations for what students will learn and
 the stated expected learning outcomes for the course
3. Faculty members should use this evidence/assessment of student learning to:
 provide questionery to students about their learning (or lack thereof) and
 adjust their teaching methods and/or students’ learning behaviors to ensure greater
student learning (Maki, 2004).
The Best Practice in a Classroom Assessment and is an example of a method that can be used to
assess learning outcomes. At the end of a class period or major topic, faculty ask students to
anonymously write down what point(s) were the most unclear to them. After class, faculty members
review these responses and then re-teach or re-address any confusing topics, thus increasing
student learning (Angelo & Cross, 1993).
7.
WRITING A COURSE PURPOSE
Determining the PURPOSE of teaching the course
When planning a course and determining the Learning Outcomes for that course, it is important to
examine the course’s purpose within the context of the college, and/or the department/program.
This process will assist faculty in determining the intent of the course as well as how the course fits
into the curriculum. This will help identify the essential knowledge, skills, etc. that should be
incorporated into the course and the stated expected learning outcomes for the course. The course
purpose section should clarify the course’s standing within the programme (e.g., is the course
required or an elective?, does this class have a pre-requisite?, etc.). It should also describe the
course’s role in the departmental/programmatic curriculum by addressing the intent (importance,
main contribution, intrinsic value, etc.) of the class.
STEP ONE: Determine if the course is part of the IEEE / ACM / AICTE Model Curriculum
The earliest curriculum was published in 1968 for computer science (CS) by the Association for
Computing Machinery (ACM), and in 1977 the Computer Society of the Institute for Electrical and
Electronic Engineers (IEEE-CS) provided its first curriculum recommendations. In the late 1980’s the
ACM and the IEEE-CS together formed a task force to create curricula for computer science and
computer engineering. The core curriculum covers classes in computer science curriculum, and
subsequently separate curricula reports were issued for information systems, software engineering
and computer engineering
STEP TWO: Determine how the course fits into the departmental curriculum
Here are some questions to ask to help determine how a course fits in the departmental curriculum:
What role does the course play in the departmental/programmatic curriculum?
 Is this course required?
 Is this course an elective?
 Is this course required for some students and an elective for others?
 Does this class have a pre-requisite?
 Is this class a pre-requisite for another class in the department?
 Is this course part of IEEE / ACM / AICTE Model Curriculum?
How advanced is this course?
 Is this course an undergraduate or graduate course?
 Where does this course fall in students’ degree plan - as an introductory course or an
advanced course?


Can I expect the students taking this course to know anything about the course topic?
Are other faculty members counting on students who have taken this course to have
mastered certain knowledge or skills?
When students leave this course, what do they need to know or be able to do?
 Is there specific knowledge that the students will need to know in the future?
 Are there certain practical or professional skills that students will need to apply in the
future?
 Five years from now, what do you hope students will remember from this course?
What is it about this course that makes it unique or special?
 Why does the program or department offer this course?
 Why can’t this course be “covered” as a sub-section of another course?
 What unique contributions to students’ learning experience does this course make?
 What is the value of taking this course? How exactly does it enrich the program or
department?
8.
WRITING EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES FOR A COURSE
The following pages should be of assistance in developing several broad, effectively stated expected
learning outcomes for a course. When beginning to construct expected learning outcome
statements, it is always good to think about the learners.
Please take a moment to think about the student learners in the course. Please consider the
following questions:
 What are the most essential things the students need to know or be able to do at the end of
this course?
 What knowledge and skills will they bring with them?
 What knowledge and skills should they learn from the course?
When you begin thinking about the expected learning outcomes for a course, it is a good idea to
think broadly. Course-level expected learning outcomes do not need to focus on small details;
rather, they address entire classes of theories, skill sets, topics, etc.
The “Course Description” contains the following contents:
 Course Overview
 Prerequisite(s)
 Marks Distribution
 Evaluation Scheme
 Course Objectives
 Course Outcomes
 How Course Outcomes are assessed
 Syllabus
 List of Text Books / References / Websites / Journals / Others
 Course Plan
 Mapping course objectives leading to the achievement of the programme outcomes
 Mapping course outcomes leading to the achievement of the programme outcomes
9.
REFERENCES
1. American Association of Law Libraries (2005). Writing learning outcomes. Retrieved May
31, 2005 from http://www.aallnet.org/prodev/outcomes. asp .
2. Anderson, L.W., and Krathwohl, D.R. (Eds.) (2001). Taxonomy of learning, teaching, and
assessment: A revision of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives. New York:
Longman.
3. Angelo, T.A. & Cross, K.P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for
college teachers (2nd Ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Ball State University, (1999).
4. Bloom’s Classification of Cognitive Skills. Retrieved, June 10, 2005 from
http://web.bsu.edu/IRAA/AA/WB/chapter2.htm.
5. Bloom, B.S., (1956) Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational
goals: Handbook I, cognitive domain. Longmans, Green: New York, NY.
6. Hales, L.W. & Marshall, J.C. (2004). Developing effective assessments to improve
teaching and learning. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers, Inc.
7. Huba, M.E., (2005). Formulating intended learning outcomes. Retrieved June 16, 2005
from
http://www.viterbo.edu/academic/titleiii/events/files/Jun04/Intended%20Learning%20
Outcomes.ppt#256,1, Formulating Intended Learning Outcomes.
8. Kansas State University, (2004). Assessment of student learning plan. Retrieved May 15,
2005 from http://www.k-state.edu/assessment/Library/templatew.doc.
9. Kansas State University, (2004). Form for identifying strategies and processes for the
assessment of student learning outcome(s). Retrieved May 15, 2005 from http://www.kstate.edu/assessment/Library/strategies.pdf.
10. Kansas State University, (2005). How to write student learning outcomes: Action verb
List – suggested verbs to use in each level of thinking skills. Retrieved May 15, 2005 from
http://www.k-state.edu/assessment/Learning/action.htm.
11. Krumme, G (2001). Major categories in the taxonomy of educational objectives (Bloom
1956). Retrieved June 6, 2005 from http://faculty.washington.edu/krumme/guides/
bloom1Html.
12. Maki, P.L. (2004). Assessing for learning: Building a sustainable commitment across the
institution. Stylus: Sterling, VA.
13. Palomba, C.A. & Banta, T.W. Eds. (2001). Assessing student competence in accredited
disciplines: Pioneering approaches to assessment in higher education. Stylus: Sterling,
VA.
14. Siebold, R. & Beal, M. (May 2005). Online course development guide: The workbook.
Presented at The Teaching Professor Conference in Shaumburg, IL.
15. Suskie, L. (ed) (2001). Assessment to promote deep learning: Insight from AAHE’s 2000
and 1999 Assessment Conferences.
16. Suskie, L. (2004). Assessing student learning: A common sense guide. Anker Publishing
Company: Bolton, MA.
17. St. Edward's University Center for Teaching Excellence (2004). Task Oriented Question
Construction Wheel Based on Bloom's Taxonomy. Retrieved on May 17, 2005 from
http://www.stedwards.edu/cte/resources/bwheel.htm.
18. Texas Tech University (2005). Texas Tech University 2005-06 Undergraduate and
Graduate Catalog Volume LXXXII. Published by the Office of Official Publications:
Lubbock.
19. TX. Texas Tech University Office of the Ombudsman, (2005). Syllabus Guide for Faculty:
Tips for creating a conflict free syllabus. Retrieved June 9, 2005 from http://
www.depts.ttu.edu/ombudsman/publications/SyllabusGuideforFaculty.doc.
SAMPLE COURSE DESCRIPTION
(Autonomous)
Shamshabad, Hyderabad – 501 218
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING
VCE – R 11 A Regulations
IV Semester
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Course Code
:
AEE11T08
Course Title
Course Structure
:
:
AC Machines-I
Lectures Tutorials
4
1
Course Coordinator
:
Ms. D. Shobha Rani, Professor Dept of EEE
Team of Instructors
:
Md Asif, Associate Professor
Practicals
-
Credits
4
I.
Course Overview:
This course focuses on basic principle, construction & operation of single phase transformers, poly
phase transformers and three phase Induction Motors. The detailed study about the operation of
transformer under load and no load conditions will be concentrated. The design aspects about the
equivalent circuit of transformer will be elucidated and also the various poly phase connections will
be enlightened. The basic principle involved in the production of rotating magnetic field in an three
phase induction motor will be discussed also the Speed control and starting methods of three phase
Induction motors are emphasized.
II.
Prerequisite(s):
Level
UG
III.
Credits
Periods / Week
Prerequisites
4
5
DC Machines
Marks Distribution:
Sessional Marks
University
End Exam
Marks
Total
Marks
Continuous Assessment Tests
There will be two Continuous Assessment Tests in theory courses having
a weight age of 10 marks to be answered in two hours duration each.
The first Continuous Assessment Test will be held in the 7th week with
the announced schedule in the first two units of syllabus. The second
Continuous Assessment Test will be held at the end of the semester
with the announced schedule in the fourth and fifth units of syllabus.
Marks shall be awarded considering the average of two Continuous
Assessment Tests in each course. In case a student does not appear in
the Continuous Assessment Tests due to any reason whatsoever, will
get zero marks(s).
Mid Semester Test
There will be one Mid Semester Test in theory courses for a maximum
of 15 marks to be answered in two hours duration. The Mid Semester
Test will be held in the 10th week with the announced schedule in the
first three units of syllabus. In case a student does not appear in the Mid
Semester Test due to any reason whatsoever, will get zero marks(s).
75
100
IV. Evaluation Scheme:
Continuous Assessment Test
10 marks
Mid Semester Test
15 marks
End Semester Examination
75 marks
V.
Course Educational Objectives:
I. Introduce students to the basic fundamentals related to the principle, construction and operation
of a Practical Transformer.
II. Understand the different types of transformers and the different operating conditions of a
transformer.
III. To measure the performance of a transformer by conducting transformer tests and to calculate the
parameters of a transformer
IV. Use important concepts related to connections of a polyphase transformer.
V. Introduce students to the basic fundamentals related to the principle, construction and operation
of an Induction Motor.
VI. To measure the performance and characteristics of an Induction motor by conducting Circle
diagram
VII. To perform different techniques for the speed control of an Induction Motor
VI.
Course Outcomes:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
VII.
Capable to analyze the principle, Construction and operation of a single phase transformer
Proficient with the transformer about the No Load and Load Conditions.
Development of basic skills in design and analysis of the Equivalent Circuit of a Transformer.
Acquaint with the star-star, delta-delta, star-delta, delta-star connections of a polyphase
transformer.
Discriminate the principle, construction and operation of a three phase Induction Motor.
Interpret the different techniques for the speed control of an Induction Motor
Interpolate the performance and torque –slip characteristics of an Induction motor
How Program Outcomes are assessed:
Program Outcomes
Level
Proficiency
assessed by
Assignments,
Exercises
D
Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science electronics
and electrical engineering.
Ability to design electrical, electronics circuits and conduct
experiments with electrical engineering as well as to analyze and
interpret data.
Ability to design digital and analog systems pertaining to electrical
systems.
Ability to visualize and work on multi-disciplinary tasks.
E
Ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
H
Design Exercises
F
An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
N
--
N
--
N
--
N
--
A
B
C
Ability to communicate effectively in both verbal and written
form.
Ability to develop confidence for self-education and to
understand the value of life-long learning.
G
H
I
Ability to recognize the impact of engineering on society.
H
S
Hands on Practice
Sessions
N
--
N
--
Ability to acquire new knowledge to use modern engineering
tools, software and equipments to analyze problems necessary
for engineering practice.
S
K
Knowledge of contemporary issues to undertake innovative
projects.
H
L
Ability to use the techniques and skills to face and succeed in
competitive examinations like GATE, GRE, TOEFL, GMAT etc.
H
J
N= None
S = Supportive
H = Highly Related
Design Exercises,
Seminars, Paper
Presentations
Design Exercises,
Development of
Prototypes, Mini
Projects
Exams, Discussions
VIII.
SYLLABUS
UNIT-I
CONSTRUCTION, OPERATION & PERFORMANCE OF SINGLE PHASE TRANSFORMERS :
Single phase transformers-types - constructional details-minimization of hysteresis and eddy current
losses-emf equation - operation on no load and on load - phasor diagrams. Equivalent circuit - losses
and efficiency-regulation. All day efficiency - effect of variations of frequency & supply voltage on iron
losses.
UNIT-II
TESTING OF SINGLE PHASE TRANSFORMER AND AUTO TRANSFORMER :
OC and SC tests - Sumpner’s test - predetermination of efficiency and regulation-separation of losses
test-parallel operation with equal and unequal voltage ratios - auto transformers-equivalent circuit comparison with two winding transformers.
UNIT-III
POLYPHASE TRANSFORMERS :
Polyphase transformers - Polyphase connections - Y/Y, Y/, /Y, / and open , Third harmonics in
phase voltages-three winding transformers-tertiary windings-determination of Zp, Zs and Zt transients
in switching - off load and on load tap changing; Scott connection.
UNIT-IV
CONSTRUCTION, PRINCIPLE, THEORY &CHARACTERISTICS OF POLYPHASE INDUCTION MOTORS :
Polyphase induction motors-construction details of cage and wound rotor machines-production of a
rotating magnetic field - principle of operation - rotor emf and rotor frequency - rotor reactance, rotor
current and pf at standstill and during operation.
Rotor power input, rotor copper loss and mechanical power developed and their inter relation-torque
equation-deduction from torque equation - expressions for maximum torque and starting torque torque slip characteristic - double cage and deep bar rotors - equivalent circuit - phasor diagram crawling and cogging
UNIT-V
CIRCLE DIAGRAM & SPEED CONTROL METHODS OF INDUCTION MOTORS :
Circle diagram-no load and blocked rotor tests-predetermination of performance-methods of starting
and starting current and torque calculations. Speed control-change of frequency; change of poles and
methods of consequent poles; cascade connection. Injection of an emf into rotor circuit (qualitative
treatment only)-induction generator-principle of operation.
IX.
List of Text Books / References / Websites / Journals / Others
TEXT BOOKS :
1. Theraja B L , Theraja A K , (2000) “Electrical Technology”, New Delhi: S. Chand Publishers,
2. Bimbra P S , (2008) “Electrical Machines”. New Delhi: Khanna Publishers,
th
3. Gupta J B, (2006) “Electrical Machines”, 14 edition, New Delhi: S K Publishers,
REFERENCE BOOKS
nd
1. Ashfaq Hussain , (2005), “Electric Machines”, 2 Edition , New Delhi: Dhanpat Rai Publications
th
2. Clayton & Hancock, “Performance and Design of D.C Machines”, 4 Edition , New Delhi: BPB
Publishers,
3. Nagrath I J & Kothari D P , (2004) “Electric Machines”, 3rd Edition, New Delhi: Tata Mc Graw - Hill
Publishers ,
4. Fritzgerald A E, Kingsley C and Umans S, “Electric Machinery”, 5th Edition, New Delhi: Mc Graw-Hill
Companies,
X.
Course Plan:
The course plan is meant as a guideline. There may probably be changes.
Lecture
No.
Course Learning Outcomes
17,18
Extrapolate the basics of Single Phase
transformers
Discriminate Principle of Single Phase
transformers, Emf equation
Ability to Paraphrase the Construction
details of Single Phase Transformers
Able to differentiate the types of single
phase transformers
Compute the Operation of single phase
transformer on no load and load
conditions
Discriminate the Phasor diagrams of
transformers
Compute Equivalent Resistance and
Leakage reactance of single phase
transformer
Design Equivalent circuit of single phase
transformer
Paraphrase
about
Losses
in
Transformers, Efficiency of a transformer.
Compute the all day efficiency, problems
Interpret the effect of varying frequency
on core losses
Conduct the Open circuit and Short
circuit test on Single phase T/F
19,20
Conduct Sumpner’s test on 1-phase T/F
1
2
3,4,5
6
7
8,9
10
11,12
13
14,15
16
21,22
23,24
25
26
27,28
29
30,31,3
2
33,34
35
36
37,38
Estimate Separation of core losses in a 1phase T/F
Interpolate Parallel operation of T/Fs,
equal voltage Ratios , unequal voltage
ratios
Analyze about Auto transformers,
comparison with two winding
transformers
Categorize Poly phase connection of
transformers
Design Y-∆, ∆-Y, Y-Y, ∆-∆, connections in
3 ph transformers
Design V-V connections, Tap changing
Transformer
Interpolate Three winding Transformers,
Scott connection of Transformers
Extrapolate a Polyphase Induction
Motors principle of operation,
production of rotating magnetic field for
2 ph & 3 ph
Generalize the Constructional details of
Induction Motors & Types of rotors
Interpret Rotor emf , frequency,
reactance, current and pf at standstill
and during operation
Determine the value of slip in an
induction motor
Topics to be covered
Introduction to Single Phase transformers
Principle of Single Phase transformers, Emf
equation
Construction details of Single Phase
Transformers
Types of single phase transformers,
problems
Operation of single phase transformer on
no load and load conditions,
Phasor diagrams of transformers, Problems
Equivalent Resistance and Leakage
reactance of single phase transformer
Equivalent circuit of single phase
transformer, Problems
Losses in Transformers, Efficiency of a
transformer, problems
Calculation of all day efficiency, problems
Regulation of Transformer, effect of varying
frequency on core losses, Problems
Open circuit and Short circuit test on Single
phase T/F,
Predetermine the efficiency & regulation
Sumpner’s test on 1-phase T/F, Problems
Separation of core losses in a 1-phase T/F,
problems
Parallel operation of T/Fs, equal voltage
Ratios , unequal voltage ratios
Problems
Auto transformers, comparison with two
winding transformers , Problems
Poly phase connection of transformers
Y-∆, ∆-Y, Y-Y, ∆-∆, connections in 3 ph
transformers
V-V connections, Tap changing Transformer
Three winding Transformers, Scott
connection of Transformers,
Problems,
Polyphase Induction Motors principle of
operation, production of rotating magnetic
field for 2 ph & 3 ph
Constructional details of Induction Motors
& Types of rotors
Calculation Rotor emf , frequency,
reactance, current and pf at standstill and
during operation
Problems on slip
Reference
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
39,40
41
42
43,44
45,46
47-50
51,52
53,54
55
56,57
58-60
XI.
Interpret the Rotor power input, rotor
copper loss & Mechanical power
developed and their relations
Compute the Torque equation and
discuss the torque slip characteristics
Obtain the relations between Maximum,
starting and full load torques
Paraphrase about Double cage and deep
bar rotors, Crawling and cogging
Determine the value of torque in an
induction motor
Interpret the performance of Induction
Motor by using Circle diagram
Discriminate the Methods of starting
Induction Motor
Design of circle diagram in an induction
motor
Generalize the Speed Control methods
for Induction Motors- change of
frequency method
Paraphrase Change of poles, cascade
connection
Interpret injection of an emf into rotor
circuit method of speed control,
Induction Generator-principle of
Operation
Calculation of Rotor power input, rotor
copper loss & Mechanical power developed
and their relations
Torque equation ,torque slip characteristics
T1,T2
Relations between Maximum, starting and
full load torques
Double cage and deep bar rotors, Crawling
and cogging
Problems on torque
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
Predetermination of performance of
Induction Motor by using Circle diagram
Methods of starting Induction Motor
T1,T2
T1,T2
Problems on circle diagrams
T1,T2
Speed Control methods for Induction
Motors- change of frequency method,
problems
Change of poles, cascade connection,
problems
injection of an emf into rotor circuit method
of speed control,
Induction Generator-principle of Operation
T1,T2
T1,T2
T1,T2
Mapping course objectives leading to the achievement of the program outcomes:
Course
Objectives
Program Outcomes
A
I
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
S
J
K
S
S
III
H
S
H
S
S
IV
H
S
H
S
H
S
S
S
S
VI
H
VII
H
L
S
II
V
S
H
H
H
H
H
S
H
H
Mapping course outcomes leading to the achievement of the program outcomes:
Program Outcomes
Course
Outcomes
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
S
H
S = Supportive
XII.
T1,T2
H = Highly Related
1
S
2
H
3
H
S
H
S
S
4
H
S
H
S
H
5
S
S
H
H
S
6
H
7
S
S
H
S
H
S
S
S = Supportive
H = Highly Related
H
H
S
H
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